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Can You Be A Cop If You Have Diabetes?

Diabetes And Law Enforcement?

Diabetes And Law Enforcement?

I'm looking to make a career switch and become a cop. My best man in my wedding is a cop and his entire family. I asked my friend if haveing Diabetes would be an automatic no for joinging the force. He didn't know. Does anyone out there have an answer? I am a controlled diabetic for the last 11 years, I'm 26 years old with a clean record and a phchology degree. Thanks for your help! As you well know, there are many degrees to which the adverse effects of diabetes can be controlled. There mere fact of the disease shouldn't be a bar. You would have to be medically certfied to perform, as are all applicants. It's unreasonable to allow someone who has, dispite their efforts, periods in which their mentation is affected. This becomes the key issue. This may give you an idea of how ADA is applied: Bombrys v. City of Toledo, 849 F. Supp. 1210, 3 AD Cases (BNA) 651 (N.D. Ohio 1993). City rejected applicant for police officer position who had insulin-dependent diabetes. Held: In permanently enjoining defendant "from imposing a blanket exclusion of person with insulin-dependent diabetes from employment as police officers...[,]" the court first examined the plaintiff's condition, finding that, except for his diabetes, he had passed all physical examinations. Court found that he was able to control his diabetes by taking insulin. Court then examined the police officer position in the City of Toledo, finding that police officers did not have to work up to 12 hours on a regular basis; that nothing in nature of job prevented on-duty police officers from taking glucose tablet to control low blood sugar; that it was possible for on-duty police officers to safely inject insulin in a matter of seconds while fully clothed; and that persons with insulin-dependent diabetes were in fact serv Continue reading >>

Getting A Job: American Diabetes Association

Getting A Job: American Diabetes Association

If you are in the market for a new job, you may be concerned that your diabetes will stand in the way of getting the job you want. A common question is whether you have to tell potential employers about your diabetesor if you do tell them, how much do you share? You are not usually required to tell employers that you have diabetes. In some professions, there are specific legal rules regarding certification and physical qualification, and you must disclose your diabetes in order to meet the job standards. But for the most part, there is no legal requirement to disclose a disability and the decision whether to tell an employer or potential employer is up to the individual. Keep in mind, however, that anti-discrimination laws only provide protection from discrimination if the employer knows about the disability. Unless your employer has notice of your diabetes, you will not be able to prove that any discriminatory action was because of your disability. Blanket banslaws, regulations or policies that restrict a person from employment simply because of a disabilityare illegal and medically inappropriate because they do not take into consideration the individual's qualifications and abilities. Thanks to advances in law and medicine, there are no longer many jobs that are off-limits to people with diabetes. Commercial drivers who treat their diabetes with insulin are now able to obtain Department of Transportation medical certification through a diabetes exemption program. Fire fighters , police officers, and other law enforcement personnel now have the benefit of guidelines developed by diabetes health care professionals that assess whether the person is able to do the job, rather than automatically disqualify the person on the basis of a diabetes diagnosis. In addition to th Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Law Enforcement

Diabetes And Law Enforcement

Have you ever wondered how diabetes could affect your job as a police officer or other type of law enforcement professional? I hadnt either until I came across an interesting article that started me thinking and I wanted to share it with you. The Mayo Clinic defines Diabetes as a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because its an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. Its also your brains main source of fuel. The article I found was posted on TheDiabetesCouncil.com asked Can You Join The Police Force If You Have Diabetes? so I read further and found it very interesting. Here is an except with some interesting thoughts from our friends at TheDiabetesCouncil.com Do diabetes and law enforcement mix, or does having diabetes disqualify one from working in law enforcement? Although having diabetes should not disqualify you from working as a law enforcement officer, the nature of the occupation would require some form of assessment of each individuals medical history, and evaluation of each persons ability to serve as a law enforcement officer on a case-by-case basis. Still, discussion forums I researched are filled with stories of law enforcement officers who have lost their job due to poorly managing their diabetes, are not promoted because of it, or who are discriminated against in one way or another while on duty. Conversely, there are many stories of law enforcement officers who have managed well on the job, either on insulin, a pump and/or a CGM (Continuous Glucose Monitor). With time in the field, law enforcement officers learn ways to deal with skipped meals, stress, increased activity and more. Excerpted from Can You Join The Police Force If You Have Diabetes? Continue reading >>

Can U Become A Cop If U Have Diabetes?

Can U Become A Cop If U Have Diabetes?

Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: It depends...some will let you and some will not, and it also depends on if you are dependent on insulin. They are concerned about the lows that insulin users may experience. I know that our local police department will not allow it, but the next town over does. I'm not sure about our state police or the sheriffs department. (I have a diabetic friend that tried to join our local police department. They denied him, but was accepted in the next town, took the training and is now a member of their police force) Source(s): Secrets To Reverse Diabetes : That is questionable. There are many diabetic police officers, but most were diagnosed after they were on the job. It may be a disqualifying physical condition for some agencies. I do know of some diabetics who have sued and won the suits to get hired, but I tend to see it more as a case by case basis. Don't forget that working undercover can involve long hours and irregular meal schedules and an inability to take medication on time that could pose some serious problems for a diabetic. Whether you are legally able to is a different matter than whether it is a good job for you. If you need very tight control, i,e, very regular meals, then an unpredictable job like SWAT really wouldn't be good for you, or your health. Your best bet is to speak to someone in the police, and be realistic about what you need, and what you can do. Personally, I couldn't be in anything unpredictable, because I have quite a short window of time between warning signs and unconsciousness hypo. That would mean I was a danger to other people in that position. It depends on you, just like anyone without insulin. There are some things we can't do, but they are few and far between. Upload failed. Pl Continue reading >>

Any Diabetic Officers? : Protectandserve

Any Diabetic Officers? : Protectandserve

This subreddit is a place where the law enforcement professionals of Reddit can communicate with each other and the general public in a controlled setting. This is a great place for those who are already in the field, people who are aspiring cops, and anyone else interested in the world of law enforcement. Everyone is welcome here. If you imply that you are a sworn law enforcement officer, verify your account by following these instructions . Refusing to do so, while implying you are a LEO, WILL result in a ban. Remember, impersonating a law enforcement officer, even online, is a crime. The security protocols that are in place do not allow the system to be accessed via a cell phone, and it works best using Chrome. Be respectful. Refrain from insults when disagreeing with another user. Practice OPSEC. Any pictures of CADs must have all information minus the specific text you're showing redacted. No personal information (i.e., addresses, phone numbers, etc.) shall be readable. Remember, this forum can be seen by anyone. No racism, antisemitism, sexism, victim blaming, etc. is allowed. Any racist or derogatory terms will result in an immediate ban. "Dindu nuffin," and its derivatives, is strictly prohibited. Do not post material that paints law enforcement in a negative light without a discussion starter (at least a paragraph) within the post or comments. Do not post links leading to BCND or /r/news. When linking to another subreddit, you must use the NP domain (explanation here ). Only post memes, image macros, reaction gifs, rage comics, etc. on Mondays. "[MEME]" at the beginning of the post's title, or it will be removed. This rule does not apply to comment sections. Only post hiring questions in the Weekly Hiring Questions Thread. Follow Reddit's User Agreement at all Continue reading >>

Diabetic Woman Settles Suit After Being Shot With Stun Gun By Police, Hopes For Reforms

Diabetic Woman Settles Suit After Being Shot With Stun Gun By Police, Hopes For Reforms

Diabetic woman settles suit after being shot with stun gun by police, hopes for reforms View full size Ross William Hamilton/The OregonianMichelle Schreiner, who has diabetes, was shot with a stun gun by a Gresham police officer who mistook her as consciously defiant. Schreiner said she always carries insulin, glucose tablets and a glucose reader, but sometimes her blood sugar still plummets and she becomes angry, emotional or unable to control her body. Michelle Schreiner's blood sugar was dangerously low when a friend called 9-1-1 and Gresham police and paramedics arrived to find her holding a syringe full of insulin. The officer ordered Schreiner -- who was dropping in and out of consciousness and was having trouble speaking or moving -- to drop the syringe. He shot Schreiner with a stun gun before handcuffing her and allowing paramedics to treat her. Not only was the incident life-threatening, Schreiner said, the stun gun was excruciating, and she was left humiliated, with saliva and mucus running from her mouth and nose. Schreiner sued in U.S. District Court over the December 2005 incident. Last month, the city and Schreiner's attorney, Beth Creighton, reached a settlement: Schreiner received $37,500 and a promise that Gresham will train its officers by the end of summer in how to better recognize and care for people in medical distress, including those with diabetes. Schreiner says the training just might make Oregon's fourth-largest city -- population 101,000 -- safer for diabetics. The 37-year-old says she's conscientious about avoiding low blood sugar, but occasionally it happens. "The first question I've always been asked is: 'Have (you) been drinking?'" Schreiner said. That's a common perception, said Sally Spaid Norby, executive director of the American Dia Continue reading >>

Police Training On Diabetes: Dwindling, If Anything

Police Training On Diabetes: Dwindling, If Anything

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Topics touching diabetes never go away, but many of them seem to get sidelined at times. We often ask ourselves, "Whatever happened to...?" In this case, training police to better deal with people with diabetes (PWDs) who might be acting irrationally due to a blood sugar low? Today, fellow D-blogger and journalist Mike Hoskins joins us to report on the state of affairs (spoiler alert: it's frustrating!). We've all seen the headlines about police conduct toward those with diabetes, in those regrettable driving-while-low situations. For example, one story recently came out of Henderson, NV. , where police mistook a man's "diabetic shock" for drunken driving back in October 2010 and beat him pretty severely. Video captured it all, and now in February the city and state have agreed to pay $292,500 in damages to the man and his wife as a result. I cringe every time I hear about these situations, not only because of the generalized fear that this could happen to any of us PWDs, but more specifically because I personally have been behind the wheel and had a low. Luckily, I've not faced any police or first responders who mistook my medical emergency for criminal behavior. But I know it happens, and that scares the heck out of me. With all the stories about these situations, we wondered what's changed in recent years in how police receive training to recognize and deal with diabetes. What can our community expect these days compared to how things "used to be?" The answer from some of those who monitor this: not nearly enough. "Unfortunately, it's a hodgepodge of progress and it's all over the place," said the American Diabetes A Continue reading >>

Jobs Diabetics Can Not Have

Jobs Diabetics Can Not Have

My question is, who has the right to say an insulin dependent diabetic will have poor control of their diabetes? Question is because I have recently found out my Type 1 diabetic son will not be able to join the military, become an astronaut, drive a tractor trailer, fly an airplane or become a police officer. My son may have 60 plus years of great control. He may have 60 years of poor control. But no one will know this until it happens. In every single job I listed above, you have drug addicts working in them positions. But they are disciplined when they have a positive drug test. So why can't the same be done with an insulin dependent diabetic. Who is to say they may have a low while on duty or while driving or flying? How can that be an assumption? Do these people truly believe every single insulin diabetic will have one or many lows in their diabetic lifetime while working? I can totally understand their reasoning, but who is to say they will have a low while on duty? I am not a physician, but a volunteer and a mom of a type 1 diabetic and the daughter of a type 2.I feel the same way you do, but my husband and I tell our daughter that she can be anything she wants to be.Who knows they might change the rules or better yet FIND A CURE!! You have to realize that if a person has a severe low in the military, as a pilot or in a big rig, it is not just there life at stake; they are risking the life of others.I do know that in the state I live before a diabetic teenager gets there drivers permit and license the doctor has to sign a statement that the person has been in good control for at least 6 months.I know several teens that have not been able to get there permits yet. I have also read about and, met diabetics that have had such severe lows that the local EMTs know her Continue reading >>

Any Diabetics Who Have Been Through An Academy?

Any Diabetics Who Have Been Through An Academy?

Any diabetics who have been through an academy? Any diabetics who have been through an academy? I am a type 1 diabetic, and I have been cleared medically. I will most likely be attending an academy in January and would like some tips and advice for things I can do during the academy to help. Most specifically during PT (I wear an Insulin pump, i workout frequently now doing cross-fit and during then i just take my pump off). I am a type 1 diabetic, and I have been cleared medically. I will most likely be attending an academy in January and would like some tips and advice for things I can do during the academy to help. Most specifically during PT (I wear an Insulin pump, i workout frequently now doing cross-fit and during then i just take my pump off). contact member tanksolider --------------I know he is a diabetic Since some people need to be told by notes in crayon .......Don't PM me with without prior permission. If you can't discuss the situation in the open forum ----it must not be that important My new word for the day is FOCUS, when someone irritates you tell them to FOCUS I know a few diabetics in the dept. They don't seem to have problems. Though be warned, some depts. will find a reason not to hire you. Judge me by the enemies I have made----Unknown I know a few diabetics in the dept. They don't seem to have problems. Though be warned, some depts. will find a reason not to hire you. Well I already know that i will be hired, I will be starting the Academy in January. You are right though, some depts will give a problem. I'm just looking for some pointers/tips throughout the academy. I've already worked as a peace-officer/ other quasi-law enforcement jobs with no problems at wll, but anything can be of help!! Last edited by Patriot91 ; 12-19-2014, 11:52 AM. Jus Continue reading >>

Living His Dream Of Law Enforcement: Lt. Jose Lopez

Living His Dream Of Law Enforcement: Lt. Jose Lopez

Living His Dream of Law Enforcement: Lt. Jose Lopez On July 2, 2010, when Lt. Jose Lopez took the podium at the recent Children With Diabetes Friends for Life Annual International Conference in Orlando to speak to the parents of children with diabetes, his goal was to use his own story to reassure them about their childrens future. What I most wanted to convey to them was that people with diabetes, especially children, can do normal stuff and live their dreams. I am not a super hero and I did it. When Jose Lopez was first diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in October of 1983, he was afraid that it meant the end of his lifelong dream to become a police officer. He was only 22 years old and still in his first year a critical probation year with the Miami-Dade Police Department. Jose had experienced major changes to his health before he went to see his general practitioner. He had noticed that the incisions from minor skin surgery were not healing and that he had lost weight without trying. When tests results came back, the diagnosis was type 1 diabetes. No one in his family had diabetes, and the only thing he really knew about it was that it was described as sugar in the blood. At that time, jobs like that of police officer, firefighter, and even commercial driver were considered off limits to people with diabetes. Determined to prove that he could serve successfully and concerned that he would be fired because of his diabetes Jose told no one on the force about his condition for a few years. He worked extremely hard to keep healthy and tried to be a standout officer on the force. During that first year, his diabetes was managed by trial and error. While his general practitioner constantly warned him of the dire consequences that would result if he didnt take his insulin los Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Jobs Can We Have As Type 1's?

What Kind Of Jobs Can We Have As Type 1's?

What kind of jobs can we have as Type 1's? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. What kind of jobs can we have as Type 1's? I know you cannot be a police officer, fire fighter, air controller, etc. I'm curious as to what kind of jobs you all have, or jobs you've been knocked back for? I personally wish that one day I can be a paramedic, but i'm worried that it will have restrictions as per the air force, military, police, fire, etc. I'm currently a qualified child care worker. I'm a Registered Nurse Have been nursing for 29 years now been diabetic for nearly 28 years. I have managed in all areas and have worked all shifts as well as double shifts etc. I've been in the ER twice in 24hrs and I feel for the nurses who had to tell with some increasingly "problematic" people who entered the ER @ 2am. I'm a Registered Nurse Have been nursing for 29 years now been diabetic for nearly 28 years. I have managed in all areas and have worked all shifts as well as double shifts etc. I know you cannot be a police officer, fire fighter, air controller, etc. I know we all hear about these things, I heard years ago it was fighter/commercial pilot and scuba diving that were barred, but I think we need to be really careful about assuming we are right about these things we have been told, often casually or from people who might have known a year ago but don't know now! I would take the line "innocent until proven guilty"... don't assume you are barred for any job until you get an answer in black and white from the relevant authority. Cassandra, I see nothing mentioned in the queensland ambo info about diabetes or conditions being a general problem. Continue reading >>

Barred From Joining The Police Because Of Type 1 Diabetes

Barred From Joining The Police Because Of Type 1 Diabetes

Above: Craig Roth (center) with his father, Saul (left), who also was a police officer. For much of his life, Craig Roth wanted to be a police officer. He dreamed of following in his fathers footsteps in joining the Nassau County Police Department and patrolling the Long Island community where his parents still live. Roth did become a police officer, and has served with distinction, but not for Nassau County; the countys civil service commission refused to hire him because of his Type 1 diabetes. The bitterness of the rejection has caused him to move away from the community where he thought he would spend his life. He said it would upset him too much to see the blue-and-yellow-and-red emblem of the countys police force every day and know he couldnt be a part of the force. I wouldnt want to live in a place that blatantly violates my civil rights, Roth said in an interview. Roth has worked in public safety his entire adult life, including with the New York City Police Department, but Nassau County officials determined his Type 1 diabetes would be too much of a liability. Instead of serving his community, Roth has been fighting its government, alleging, first in a civil complaint and now in a federal lawsuit, that the Nassau County Civil Service Commission was guilty of discrimination under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act and New Yorks Human Rights Law. Roths case highlights how little consensus exists in hiring guidelines for people with Type 1 diabetes in the field of public safety. Even those who have been working in the field for years may be barred from employment in a neighboring municipality. When Roth began the process to join the Nassau County police force in 2015, he was no stranger to the lengthy hiring process to become an officer. He had already w Continue reading >>

Law Enforcement Officers And Diabetes Discrimination

Law Enforcement Officers And Diabetes Discrimination

Law Enforcement Officers and Diabetes Discrimination Throughout the country, men and women with diabetes like Jeff Kapche are helping to keep our communities safe by working as law enforcement officers. The American Diabetes Association worked with the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) to create a National Consensus Guideline for the Medical Evaluation of Law Enforcement Officers for individuals with diabetes who wish to work as law enforcement officers (LEOs). Diabetes should not be considered an automatic disqualifying condition, but rather, each LEO with diabetes must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The Consensus Guideline states that current published data suggest that persons with diabetes who can safely and effectively function as LEOs can be readily identified through careful individualized assessment. Thus blanket bans of all people with diabetes, in addition to being illegal, are not consistent with current medical knowledge. The diabetes standard is located at Section 4.3 of the Consensus Guideline and includes: Appendix B Physician Evaluation form for Law Enforcement Officers with Diabetes For additional information or to speak with a Legal Advocate about employment discrimination, call 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383). Continue reading >>

Adam Roth: Law-enforcement Officer

Adam Roth: Law-enforcement Officer

Adam Roth is no stranger to law enforcement. In his 11-year career, he's been a small-town police officer, an officer with the U.S. Pentagon Police, a member of security details for dignitaries, including the secretaries of state and commerce, and a special agent with the Department of Commerce, his current job. When Roth decided on a law enforcement career, he knew his type 1 diabetes would play a role in the application process. "There were places 10 years ago that wouldn't hire type 1 diabetics," says Roth, now 35. "I remember there were some [police] departments that I looked at that had blanket bans on people with diabetes." Applying for his first job, as a cop in a New Jersey beach town, Roth was cautious about revealing his diabetes. "I really tried to downplay it," he says. "I did tell them, but only when I had to. I figured, why give them a chance to find something wrong?" Roth was hired without issue, but he still worried when applying for a police position with the Pentagon. The Department of Defense, which would employ him, conducted medical evaluations using the same medical team as the military. "I was pretty concerned about that because the military excludes diabetics," he says. The job required physicals twice yearly and his doctor's sign-off, but aside from that, he wasn't held to different standards than other officers. But Roth ran into trouble when he pursued a reservist job with the Coast Guard while working for the Pentagon Police. He'd done combat and medical training through the military, so it wasn't a stretch to believe he'd be accepted. Yet Roth was refused because of his diabetes. "I can be a special agent with the Department of Homeland Security, but I can't be a special agent with the Coast Guard, [which is] under the Department of Homelan Continue reading >>

Can't Be A Cop W/diabetes???

Can't Be A Cop W/diabetes???

Hello..My husband has been disqualified from the New York Police Department due to his Type 1 diabetes. When he went for his medical examination, he volunteered that he was a diabetic, he was told not to worry and to provide them w/medical clearance from his doctor. He complied. He recieved a letter in the mail yesterday that states clearly..he is being disqualified due to diabetes. Tommorow we will contact the EEOC, this may seem like a silly question but Can they do this? I know that he can't be discriminated against in most situations, but I also know there are a few things he absolutely cannot do. Join military, fly airplane, ect. Is law enforcement one of them. Any information or case law examples would be much appreciated. Thank you. One more thing that might be of some help..my husband has spoken with an NYPD police officer who is also an insulin dependent diabetic, they hired him knowing this information. He hasn't had it as long as my husband, but I can't see how that would matter. Even if they have laws prohibiting him from doing this kind of work....would their laws be overturned by past precedence?? Thank you for your response. Wow..I was hoping to be able to ease his mind over this. I'm not arguing your response, I'm just a little confused as to why he wouldn't be covered under the American w/Disabilities Act? Is there anywhere I can look for further information? I've checked out the EEOC's website as well as the American Diabetic Association..all saying he's covered. Nothing really pertaining specifically to law enforcement though. We spent alot of money on college for him to obtain the credits needed to be eligible. This is really bothering me because he asked from day 1 of the exam if he was wasting his time & he was told no, as long as he was cleared b Continue reading >>

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