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Can We Eat Pomegranate In Diabetes?

Pomegranate And Type 2 Diabetes.

Pomegranate And Type 2 Diabetes.

Abstract Over the last decade, various studies have linked pomegranate (Punica granatum Linn), a fruit native to the Middle East, with type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment. This review focuses on current laboratory and clinical research related to the effects of pomegranate fractions (peels, flowers, and seeds) and some of their active components on biochemical and metabolic variables associated with the pathologic markers of type 2 diabetes. This review systematically presents findings from cell culture and animal studies as well as clinical human research. One key mechanism by which pomegranate fractions affect the type 2 diabetic condition is by reducing oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. This reduction may occur by directly neutralizing the generated reactive oxygen species, increasing certain antioxidant enzyme activities, inducing metal chelation activity, reducing resistin formation, and inhibiting or activating certain transcriptional factors, such as nuclear factor κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. Fasting blood glucose levels were decreased significantly by punicic acid, methanolic seed extract, and pomegranate peel extract. Known compounds in pomegranate, such as punicalagin and ellagic, gallic, oleanolic, ursolic, and uallic acids, have been identified as having anti-diabetic actions. Furthermore, the juice sugar fraction was found to have unique antioxidant polyphenols (tannins and anthocyanins), which could be beneficial to control conditions in type 2 diabetes. These findings provide evidence for the anti-diabetic activity of pomegranate fruit; however, before pomegranate or any of its extracts can be medically recommended for the management of type 2 diabetes, controlled, clinical studies, are needed. Continue reading >>

Pomegranates And Blood Sugar

Pomegranates And Blood Sugar

The seed and flower of the pomegranate fruit may possess properties capable of lowering blood sugar, potentially benefiting patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes. Doctors from India to Africa are studying pomegranate seeds, flowers and their extracts and compounds for hypoglycemic, or blood sugar lowering, properties, and to identify their mechanisms. For example, a 2007 "Journal of Medicinal Food" report acknowledges the hypoglycemic activity of pomegranate seeds, flowers and juice and identifies three antioxidant acids as among their potentially anti-diabetic constituents. If you have concerns about your blood sugar, consult with your doctor and only use pomegranate-based therapies with her approval. Video of the Day According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, the pomegranate fruit grows on the Punica granatum tree native to Iran and now cultivated in parts of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Mediterranean. Used for millennia in folk medicine, it has since demonstrated antioxidant, antibacterial and antiviral properties in laboratory tests, although human trials have been neither as abundant nor conclusive. There is no standard dosage of pomegranate for medical purposes, although UMM's Steven D. Ehrlich, N.M.D., reports that drinking 8-12 ounces per day is considered safe. Ehrlich warns, however, that people with diabetes should not drink pomegranate juice or any fruit juice without their doctor's prior approval. A 2007 study in the "African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines" on the blood sugar-lowering effects in diabetic rats of several herbal compounds, including pomegranate seeds, found no significant difference in the fasting blood-glucose levels of the subjects fed pomegranate seeds from the control group. Study author Gh Continue reading >>

Fruit List For Diabetics

Fruit List For Diabetics

Often people suffering from diabetes avoid fruits out of fear that the sugar present in fruits could push up their blood sugar level. However, this is a false conception. Most fruits, specifically fruits rich in fibers, are beneficial for reducing the blood sugar level. Sugar present in fruits is usually in the form of fructose. Unlike other forms of sugar, such as sucrose, fructose has low glucemic index. Minimal insulin is needed for the metabolism of fructose. Intake of this fruit sugar is not associated with sudden surge of the blood sugar level. Studies have shown that by reducing cholesterol and triglyceride production, fructose could protect us from diseases such as arteriosclerosis, which leads to heart diseases and stroke. Diabetes bad food includes those that have high glycemic indexes for glucose- which includes those foods that are high in saturated fats and uncontrollably high amounts of sugar in any of its forms- especially sugar from milk. Which brings us back to our main concern- what kinds of fruits can a diabetic eat? Fruits for diabetics are usually those fruits that have high fiber content and have low sugar content. If we take these criteria and apply it, the first fruit that would come to mind would be the high and mighty avocado. But beware; the large avocados have a lot of calories in it- so if you buy the large avocado from florida, make sure you regulate your calorie intake for the rest of the day. Diabetics should NOT eat cooked fruit. Always eat raw fruits in order to reap the benefits. Here's a list of fruits that are beneficial for Diabetics. Any type of wild or organic berry - Seasons: Range All Year Blueberries, Elderberries, Blackberries, Gooseberries, Strawberries etc. There are loads to choose from. You can find their respective season Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

Fruit For A Diabetes Diet: What To Know Before You Snack

Fruit For A Diabetes Diet: What To Know Before You Snack

People with type 2 diabetes know that they need to pay attention to their carbohydrate intake. Of the three main macronutrients in food — protein, fat, and carbohydrates — it's the carbohydrates that directly affect blood sugar levels, and this includes the carbohydrates in fruit. But a study published in August 2013 in the British Medical Journal looked at the association between fruit and type 2 diabetes and found that fruit can still be a crucial part of a good diabetes diet. The study, which followed nearly 190,000 people over a number of years, found that eating whole fruits — especially blueberries, grapes, and apples — significantly reduces the risk for type 2 diabetes. On the flip side, drinking more fruit juices actually increases the risk for diabetes. “If you have type 2 diabetes, you do need to watch your sugar," says Katie Barbera, RD, CDE, of Northwell Health Systems in New Hyde Park, New York. She explains that while both whole fruit and fruit juice have carbohydrates, a small piece of whole fruit is equal to about 4 ounces (oz) of fruit juice. So if you drink 12 oz of fruit juice, you could be getting more than you need. “And whole fruits have a lot of other advantages for a diabetes diet," Barbera adds. Understanding the Carbohydrates in Fruit Like vegetables and grains, fruits contain carbs. You need the fruits for a healthy diet, but with type 2 diabetes you also need to keep track of the carbs. Still, figuring out which fruits are best for diabetes is about more than counting carbs — it's also important to take into account the beneficial nutrients certain fruits provide. “Whole fruits are an excellent source of antioxidants," Barbera says. "They have a lot of fiber, so they make you feel fuller and satisfy your hunger. They also add Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Pomegranate Extract Benefits For Diabetes

Pomegranate Extract Benefits For Diabetes

Pomegranate, probably cultivated earliest in Persia (modern day Iran) and the western Himalayas. Later migrated along the Silk Route and is today grown extensively in Korea, Japan and Latin America, where it was introduced by settlers and traders. Throughout history and in many religions and cultures, the pomegranate fruit has been revered as a symbol of strength and vitality, prosperity and fertility. Pomegranate is a rich source of highly active phytochemicals. One of the major benefits of pomegranate juice is in the protection of arteries from fatty deposits (atherosclerosis). It also improves blood flow to the heart and protects from coronary heart disease. Research also exists to show its effect on: High blood pressure Metabolic syndrome Muscle strength Obesity Dental plaque Muscle soreness Hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol) Gum disease Prostate cancer Inflamed and sore mouth Trichomoniasis Intestinal worm infestations Diarrhea Dysentery Sore throat Hemorrhoids and Menopausal symptoms, among others. What Does Research Have to Say? In one of the most important authoritative studies till date relating pomegranate and type 2 diabetes, researchers from the Jordan University of Science and Technology measured the direct effect of fresh pomegranate juice on the levels of fasting blood glucose as well as on insulin and melatonin in individuals with impaired fasting glucose. They found noticeably lower levels of fasting blood sugar as well as lower insulin resistance after three hours of administering pomegranate juice. In patients with impaired fasting glucose, pomegranate juice caused a decrease in the level of serum melatonin within an hour of consumption. How Does it Act? A key mechanism by which pomegranate extract benefits type 2 diabetes patients is through reduction Continue reading >>

3 Reasons To Eat Pomegranates If You Have Diabetes

3 Reasons To Eat Pomegranates If You Have Diabetes

Everyone loves the seeds of the pomegranate they are great for salads, smoothies and are an excellent healthy snack . But people with diabetes are often advised to avoid consuming fruit juices and fruits . However, should they avoid pomegranates? Yes, typically people with diabetes are said to avoid fruits in high quantities since they can lead to spikes in the blood glucose. However, recently a few studies have come to the discovery that people with diabetes should not avoid pomegranates. Do you love pomegranates? Then, read on to find out more. Are Pomegranates Beneficial for People with Diabetes? Recent studies show that there is actually more to pomegranates that we are aware of. They are beneficial for people with diabetes in many ways. They can do the following: According to one study fresh juice of pomegranate actually increases the functions of the beta cells. These are the cells which make insulin. Also, this juice lowers insulin resistance and stimulates the cells to make insulin. Therefore, the sugar is used up well. It is actually more pronounced in people who have low fasting blood sugar levels and in younger patients. According to one research consuming pomegranate juice might help individuals with diabetes reduce the risk of heart disease. In this particular study individuals with diabetes consumed pomegranate juice for 3 months. They had a reduced risk of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is the hardening of the arteries. Also, this juice has shown to slow down the absorption of LDL cholesterol by the immune cells. As a matter of fact, individuals with diabetes have elevated risk for atherosclerosis, and that might lead to heart attacks, strokes, heart disease, etc. According to this study antioxidants in pomegranate juice might be beneficial in lowering Continue reading >>

Pomegranate Helps Diabetic Hearts

Pomegranate Helps Diabetic Hearts

Aug. 29, 2006 -- Drinking pomegranate juice may help people with diabetesdiabetes reduce their risk of heart diseaseheart disease. A preliminary new study shows that people with diabetes who drank pomegranate juice for three months had a lower risk of atherosclerosis -- or hardening of the arteries. In addition, the pomegranate juice appeared to slow the absorption of unhealthy LDL cholesterolLDL cholesterol by immune cells. People with diabetes have increased risk for atherosclerosis, which contributes to coronary heart disease, heart attacks, strokes, and other circulation problems. These results suggest that the antioxidants found in pomegranate juice may be especially beneficial in reducing these heart-related risks associated with diabetes. "In most juices, sugars are present in free -- and harmful -- forms," says researcher Michael Aviram, of the Technion Faculty of Medicine in Haifa, Israel, in a news release. "In pomegranate juice, however, the sugars are attached to unique antioxidants, which actually make these sugars protective against atherosclerosis." People with diabetes aren't able to process sugars normally and are advised to monitor their intake of food and beverages high in natural or processed sugars, including fruit juice. Pomegranate Juice Reduces Diabetes RisksIn the small study, published in the journal Atherosclerosis, researchers examined the effects of drinking a specially prepared concentrated pomegranate juice that is the equivalent to about a 6-ounce glass of "single strength pomegranate juice, just as it is when you squeeze the pomegranate and get the juice," Aviram tells WebMD by email, every day for three months in 10 healthy adults and 10 adults with type 2 diabetes (who were not dependent on insulin therapy). Drinking pomegranate juice Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

Why Are Pomegranates Good For Diabetics? 4 Reasons

Why Are Pomegranates Good For Diabetics? 4 Reasons

The glistening seeds of the pomegranate are an irresistible treat for many of us, and that includes diabetics. Typically, diabetics are advised to avoid consuming fruits and juices in high quantities as they can cause a spike in blood sugar. But several studies now show that diabetics certainly shouldn’t have to resist pomegranates. The pomegranate (both its seeds and juice) has been shown to greatly reduce blood sugar, an especially vital function for those with type 2 diabetes. Ayurvedic and Unani practitioners have long been using pomegranates to treat diabetes, and they’re now finding support from breakthrough scientific research. So why are pomegranates good for diabetics? 1. Lower Blood Glucose Levels Though pomegranates contain sugar, the sugars are attached to antioxidants that lower the blood glucose levels and fight cell damage. One particular study tested participants 3 hours after they consumed 1.5 ml pomegranate juice per kg of their body weight. These participants exhibited a significant drop in fasting blood glucose levels.1 Unlike many other fruits that contain sugars in free form, pomegranates consist of sugars that are attached to antioxidants. Of these, about 4 antioxidant compounds belonging to the ellagitannin class are believed to help reduce blood sugar. Commercially available pomegranate juices that are extracted from the whole fruit and not just the seeds have 3 times as much antioxidants as red wine and green tea.[ref]Gil, Maria I., Francisco A. Tomás-Barberán, Betty Hess-Pierce, Deirdre M. Holcroft, and Adel A. Kader. “Antioxidant activity of pomegranate juice and its relationship with phenolic composition and processing.” Journal of Agricultural and Food chemistry 48, no. 10 (2000): 4581-4589.[/ref] Pomegranate antioxidants help you Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

Diabetes mellitus (DM) commonly referred to as Diabetes, is a chronic disorder. It occurs when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or when the cells of the body become resistant to insulin. In either case, the blood sugar cannot get into the cells for storage, which then leads to serious complications. Diabetes, perhaps more than any other disease, is strongly associated with the western diet, as it was uncommon in cultures consuming a 'primitive diet'. However as cultures switch from their native diets, to the foods of commerce; their rate of diabetes increases eventually reaching the proportions seen in the western societies. However, what's alarming is the fact that India Is home to 62 million diabetics and the number is estimated to be 100 million by 2030. Obesity is seen as one of the major contributing factors to the development of insulin resistance in approximately 90% of the individuals with type-2 diabetes. In most cases, achieving ideal body weight is associated with the restoration of normal blood sugar levels. Hence dietary modifications and treatment are fundamental to the successful treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. There are some specific foods that have been shown to produce positive effects on blood sugar control. These foods have a low glycemic index and glycemic load and are high in fiber. When it comes to diabetics eating fruits, there is a lot of confusion and information is very misleading. Just remember that moderation is the key here. TIPS TO ENJOY FRUITS IF YOU ARE DIABETIC: - Always eat fruits that are fresh, local and in season. - Eat fruits that have a low glycemic index. - Fruits should not be eaten with your main meals, its best to have fruits in between meals and as a snack. - Fruits with high glycemic index should be Continue reading >>

Super Fruits: Can One A Day Keep The Doctor Away?

Super Fruits: Can One A Day Keep The Doctor Away?

You know that fruit is good for you. It’s full of vitamins and fiber, low in calories, and sweet and refreshing. And, probably, when you think of fruit, what comes to mind is the average, garden-variety assortment: apples, oranges, blueberries, bananas, etc. Now there’s a whole new category of fruits called "super fruits." Super fruits are lesser-known, more exotic fruits that have a high antioxidant content—higher than “regular” fruits—and, therefore, supposedly offer greater health benefits. Many of these fruits and their juices are touted as being able to fight cancer and treat diabetes. We’ll take a look at some of these over the next two weeks. Pomegranate: This fruit has really taken the food industry by storm. Everywhere you look, you’ll see products that contain pomegranate—even pomegranate martinis! Pomegranates are large, red fruits that, when cut open, yield many small, juicy seeds. If you eat a pomegranate, you eat the seeds, not the flesh of the fruit. This fruit truly does contain a large number of antioxidants, including polyphenols. Pomegranates actually contain more antioxidants than green tea and red wine. Health benefits attributed to pomegranates include prevention of heart disease (by reducing plaque build-up on artery walls). In fact, a study published last year in the journal Atherosclerosis looked at 20 adults—10 with Type 2 diabetes and 10 without diabetes. These folks drank six ounces of concentrated pomegranate juice every day for three months. After three months, the researchers found less hardening of the arteries and a smaller uptake of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol into cells in both groups. Surprisingly, even though pomegranate juice contains carbohydrate, overall blood glucose levels did not increase in the diabetes gro Continue reading >>

Top 10 Great Reasons To Love The Pomegranate

Top 10 Great Reasons To Love The Pomegranate

Pomegranate season is underway. Markets are teeming with this glorious red fruit, supermarket shelves are packed with pomegranate juices, and cosmetic stores are promoting pomegranate oil-infused creams. The fruit-with-a-crown is one of the ritual foods for the Rosh Hashana holiday. It is understood to be the fruit that grew in the Garden of Eden and which biblical scouts brought to Moses to show the fertility of the promised land. It is also said to have 613 seeds – corresponding to the 613 mitzvot (commandments) in the Torah. The pomegranate is a fun-to-eat but messy treat packing a tart and sweet taste. And this beautiful fruit is celebrated for its medicinal powers. ISRAEL21c gives you 10 great reasons to add pomegranates to your shopping list: 1. Pomegranates are good for you The pomegranate is known as a superfood. Its jewel-like seeds (arils) have been used for medicinal purposes for millennia. Packed with powerful antioxidants and vitamins, this ruby-red fruit has been shown to be a cure-all for just about any ailment. It helps stomach upsets, menopausal hot flashes, hemorrhoids, conjunctivitis, osteoarthritis, lowers blood pressure, stimulates the immune system, wards off the flu, reduces inflammation, reduces risk of heart disease and lowers cholesterol. “The peel is good for the heart and blood vessels; the white membrane is good for stopping diarrhea and good for wounds and ulcers of the mouth and throat. The fruit also strengthens the brain, cleanses the body and blood from toxins, and is very good at expelling worms from the intestines,” Merav Altman-Adler, who practices classic Chinese medicine, tells ISRAEL21c. 2. Pomegranate juice is heart-healthy “The most important new issue is the cardiovascular protection of pomegranate,” says Prof. Michae Continue reading >>

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