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Can We Eat Apple For Diabetes?

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Many people think that diabetics have to avoid many foods, including different fruits. However, there are super healthy fruits for diabetics because they provide important minerals, vitamins, phytochemicals and fiber. Some low-carb fruits are also good for diabetics. People who have this disease should care about the ratings of the glycemic index to measure the carbohydrates which are converted to the blood Gl. Scientifically, the suitable glycemic index for diabetics is below 50. The following are the top 19 good fruits for diabetics and high blood pressure. Let’s check out these fruits to control your blood sugar and cure diabetes naturally. 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure Revealed! 1. Apples (Gl: 38, Gl/a fresh apple: 150g:7) Apples are very high in vitamin C, antioxidants and fiber. Apple pulp and peel contain pectin which helps to detoxify your body and remove harmful waste from the body. Pectin also is high in galacturonic acid that can help diabetics lower their insulin requirements up to 30%. You can eat a fresh apple or toss some slices of apples into a cup of tea and enjoy your breakfast. A medium apple contains about 12 g of carbohydrates and 54 calories. You can eat fresh apples without peeling them because apple peel includes a good source of anti-oxidants that good for digestion. Furthermore, apples are available throughout any seasons of the year. For containing a large amount of the soluble fiber, apples are fruit good for diabetics. Apples help diabetes patients reduce cholesterol, normalize their blood sugar level and improve their bowel function. Apple is also good at eliminating inflammation in the body and help diabetics beat infections effectively. Besides, apple is rich in anti-oxidants that help boost immunity. Apple also h Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetes Patient Eat Fruit?

Can A Diabetes Patient Eat Fruit?

You can eat fruit but you need to watch the portion size and the frequency. Fruits contain carbs which can raise blood sugar. When eating fruit, the amount of fruit you eat will determine how much sugar or carb grams you are ingesting. One serving of fruit has about 10 grams of carbs. One serving equals a small apple, 20 cherries, 2 T. raisins, or 4 oz. of apple juice. Pairing fruit with a protein or fat helps slow down the digestion of the sugar. Apples with cheese or peanut butter or fruit in a protein shake work great. Fruit is a great option for healthy living. As a diabetic you must add fruit into your carbohydrate count. Whether you are using the exchange list or carb counting, be sure to use the proper serving size. For example, 1 small apple is 15 grams of carbohydrate. Be sure to combing the fruit with a protein, such as peanut butter to avoid a high spike in blood sugars. Meet with a Registered Dietitian to ensure how to add fruit to your diabetic diet. If you are diabetic or on an aggressive weight-loss plan, eat more fruits that are lower in sugar such as berries, green or Granny Smith apples, melons, oranges, kiwis and papaya and less of the higher calorie fruits such as mangos, grapes, bananas, pineapple and peaches. Those with diabetes do not need to avoid fruit as long as they limit it to two fresh fruits with breakfast and one with lunch and dinner. They should exclude fruit juice and eat only limited amounts of dried fruit. Frozen fruit can be a convenient substitute when fresh fruit isn't available. The nutritional value of frozen fruit is comparable to that of fresh fruit. Avoid the canned varieties because they are not as nutritious. They often have sweeteners added and they have lost most of their water-soluble nutrients. Eat for Health: Lose Weigh Continue reading >>

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

Tweet Fruit juice has, until recently, been considered a great way to get your five a day. people with diabetes need to moderate their fruit juice intake as larger glasses of juice can substantially raise blood sugar levels. The key is to In addition, more recently, regular consumption of fruit juice has been linked with an increase in type 2 diabetes risk. What's in fruit juice? Aside from vitamin C and calcium, fruit juice contains: Calories - 250ml glass of unsweetened orange juice typically contains around 100 calories, compared to the 60 calories in an actual orange Fructose (a form of sugar) - half a pint of fruit juice contains more sugar than the World Health Organisation recommends ideally having in a day (30g of sugar for men, 24g for women) A lack of fibre - juice always contains less fibre than whole fruit and highly processed juices may not contain any fibre How does this affect my diabetes? Badly, is the short answer. Sugar levels in fruit juice can cause a significant spike in blood sugar levels, increasing the risk of hyperglycemia. The glycemic index, which is used to reflect the impact on blood sugar levels of individual foods, places orange juice between 66 and 76 on a scale of 100. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice doesn't offer much fibre. (it's stripped away in the juicing process). Fibre is a kind of carbohydrate that, because the body doesn't break it down, is calorie-free, so it doesn't affect your blood sugar, making it important for people with diabetes. Soluble fibre can help lower your cholesterol levels and improve blood glucose control if eaten in large amounts. Apples, oranges, and pears all contain soluble fibre, but not when juiced. Is fruit juice all bad for people with diabetes? Fruit juice has some benefits for people wi Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes: 6 Fruits To Help Control Your Blood Sugar

Type Ii Diabetes: 6 Fruits To Help Control Your Blood Sugar

Type II Diabetes: 6 Fruits to Help Control Your Blood Sugar Controlling your diabetes could be as easy as losing weight. There are many things that you can do to control you blood sugar and increasing your intake of certain fruits is one of them. Natural sugar is easier to break down than processed or man-made sugar. This is why adding fruit, a great source for natural sugar, to your diet in moderation could prevent your body from building an insulin intolerance. Here are our favorite fruits to add to your diet if you are looking to naturally control your blood sugar, or decrease the amount of insulin that you use each day. 1. Avocado Avocado is thought by many to be a vegetable. On the contrary, it is actually a fruit. This fruit is high in monounsaturated fats which are one of the healthy fats that you should ingest on a regular basis. These fruits also improve heart health. They have a very low percentage of low-quality carbohydrates and can improve the sensitivity you have to your insulin. This means that simply snacking on avocado, eating guacamole, or adding it to a sandwich could decrease the amount of insulin that you have to take. 2. Grapefruits Grapefruits are a great source of chromium. Recent studies have shown chromium to significantly lower blood sugar levels. A grapefruit with breakfast can help break down the dietary sugars that are in your cereal as well. It also contains a very low amount of carbohydrates but most of these carbohydrates are considered healthy fiber so they won’t cause a serious increase in blood sugar. 3. Pineapples Pineapple does not prevent blood sugar spikes. However, it has a low glycemic index, which means that it raises your blood sugar slower and does not cause rapid spikes. This means that when your blood sugar starts low, it Continue reading >>

Fruit List For Diabetics

Fruit List For Diabetics

Often people suffering from diabetes avoid fruits out of fear that the sugar present in fruits could push up their blood sugar level. However, this is a false conception. Most fruits, specifically fruits rich in fibers, are beneficial for reducing the blood sugar level. Sugar present in fruits is usually in the form of fructose. Unlike other forms of sugar, such as sucrose, fructose has low glucemic index. Minimal insulin is needed for the metabolism of fructose. Intake of this fruit sugar is not associated with sudden surge of the blood sugar level. Studies have shown that by reducing cholesterol and triglyceride production, fructose could protect us from diseases such as arteriosclerosis, which leads to heart diseases and stroke. Diabetes bad food includes those that have high glycemic indexes for glucose- which includes those foods that are high in saturated fats and uncontrollably high amounts of sugar in any of its forms- especially sugar from milk. Which brings us back to our main concern- what kinds of fruits can a diabetic eat? Fruits for diabetics are usually those fruits that have high fiber content and have low sugar content. If we take these criteria and apply it, the first fruit that would come to mind would be the high and mighty avocado. But beware; the large avocados have a lot of calories in it- so if you buy the large avocado from florida, make sure you regulate your calorie intake for the rest of the day. Diabetics should NOT eat cooked fruit. Always eat raw fruits in order to reap the benefits. Here's a list of fruits that are beneficial for Diabetics. Any type of wild or organic berry - Seasons: Range All Year Blueberries, Elderberries, Blackberries, Gooseberries, Strawberries etc. There are loads to choose from. You can find their respective season Continue reading >>

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

There’s compelling evidence supporting the notion that high-fructose diets are responsible for most chronic disease; insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and obesity in particular Many fruits are very high in fructose, up to 50X the sugar that most of the fruits our ancestors were exposed to due to consistent hybridization over the past century for sweetness Therefore most fruits are best limited or avoided if you have insulin/leptin resistance as determined by struggling with your weight, or, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease or cancer According to a new study, certain kinds of whole fruits—particularly blueberries, grapes, prunes and apples—may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes Consumption of fruit juices, on the other hand, was found to have greater risk. Those who drank one or more servings of fruit juice each day had a 21 percent higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to the others I believe most will benefit from restricting their fructose to 25 grams a day; and as little as 15 grams a day if you’re diabetic or have chronic health issues. This includes fructose from whole fruits By Dr. Mercola You're probably well-familiarized with my controversial stance on fructose. Compelling evidence shows that fructose is, by far, more harmful to your health than other sugars—especially when it's removed from whole fruits and highly processed and genetically modified, such as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in most processed foods. I've also, as a general rule, warned you of eating too much fruit, as many fruits can be quite high in fructose. This has caused some confusion and consternation among many readers, as fruit has long been promoted as an important part of a healthy diet. That said, there are considerations to take into account when it comes to Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

The Health Benefits Of Apples

The Health Benefits Of Apples

We’re right in the middle of October. Here in New England, the leaves are changing, the weather is crisper, and it’s prime time for apples! In fact, October just happens to be National Apple Month, and rightly so. With so many luscious varieties available, it would be a shame not to indulge and reap the health benefits of apples. Apple fun facts Curious about apples? Here are a few fun facts to digest: • About 2,500 varieties of apples are grown in the U.S., and 100 varieties are grown commercially. • Apples are grown in all 50 states. • Apples were the favorite fruit of the ancient Greeks and Romans. • The size of apples ranges from roughly the size of a cherry to the size of a grapefruit. • The top 10 apple varieties sold in the United States are Gala, Red Delicious, Fuji, Granny Smith, Honeycrisp, Golden Delicious, McIntosh, Cripp’s Pink Lady, Braeburn, and Jazz. • One of the oldest varieties of apples in existence is the Lady apple. • A food-grade wax is applied to many varieties of apples after harvesting. • Apples ripen 6–10 times faster at room temperature than in the refrigerator. I could go on about apples! Who knew that there was so much to know about them? Apple nutrition Despite all of the apple lore, you might be wondering if apples fit into a diabetes eating plan. The answer, plain and simple, is absolutely yes! First, here’s a breakdown of the nutritional value of an “average” apple (the nutrition numbers will vary somewhat from apple to apple, and, of course, based on the size of the apple). One small, 6-ounce apple contains the following: • 80 calories • 21 grams of carbohydrate • 4 grams of fiber • 0 grams of protein • 0 grams of fat • 2 milligrams of sodium • 164 milligrams of potassium In addition, apples c Continue reading >>

How To Eat To Manage Diabetes - Top 10 Tips

How To Eat To Manage Diabetes - Top 10 Tips

Moderation is key when it comes to managing diabetes. Douglas Twenefour, clinical advisor at Diabetes UK, explains what to eat when and shares his top 10 tips for managing your diabetes... There is not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ eating pattern for people with diabetes, but Douglas Twenefour suggests tips that can be incorporated into individual healthy eating goals for people who have the condition... 1. Eat regular meals Spacing meals evenly throughout the day will help control your appetite and blood glucose levels – especially if you are on twice-daily insulin. 2. Opt for slowly absorbed carbohydrates All carbohydrates (carbs) affect blood glucose levels, so be conscious of how much you eat and opt for carbs that are more gradually absorbed. Try wholewheat pasta, basmati rice; granary, pumpernickel or rye bread; new potatoes in their skins, sweet potatoes and yams; oat-based cereals, such as porridge or natural (unsweetened) muesli. For more information, take a look at our Spotlight on... low-GI foods. 3. Cut the fat Eat less fat – particularly saturated fat. Try unsaturated fats and oils, especially monounsaturated fats like extra virgin olive oil and rapeseed oil, as these types of fat are better for your heart. Use lower fat dairy products including skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. Grill, steam or bake foods rather than frying. Remember that all fats contribute similar amounts of calories, so limit your overall intake if you are aiming to lose weight. 4. Five a day Aim for at least five portions of fruit and vegetables every day to give your body the vitamins, minerals and fibre it needs. A portion is: 1 medium-sized piece of fruit, like a banana or apple, 1 handful of grapes, 1 tablespoon (30g) dried fruit, 1 small glass (150ml) of unsweetened 100% fruit juice or Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas

Even diabetics should eat at least two servings of fruit per day, and bananas are one healthful way of filling that requirement. One extra-small banana contains 8 percent of the daily value for potassium, a mineral that can help you control your blood pressure. It also provides you with 2 grams of fiber and 12 percent of the daily value for vitamin C. As long as you're careful to eat them with meals, and account for their carbohydrate content in your daily meal plan, they can remain a part of your diet. Carbohydrate Counting The recommended serving size for bananas for diabetics is one extra-small banana, which is a banana that is no more than 6 inches long. A banana of this size contains 19 grams of carbohydrates, which is about a third of the 45 grams to 60 grams of carbohydrates most diabetics can consume in each meal. Glycemic Index Foods that are low on the glycemic index cause less of a rise in blood sugar levels than foods that are higher on the glycemic index. A banana that is a bit green is lower on the glycemic index than a riper banana. If you eat a banana, which is a medium glycemic index food, eat it along with foods that are low on the glycemic index or with foods that contain little or no carbohydrate, as this will help keep your blood sugar from spiking. Foods low on the glycemic index include nuts, non-starchy vegetables and beans. Meat, fish, poultry, cheese and eggs are examples of foods that contain very little carbohydrate. Fruits that have a lower glycemic index include raw apples, cherries and grapefruit, and those that have a higher glycemic index include dried dates and watermelon. Create Your Plate The American Diabetes Association's Create Your Plate method allows you to control your blood sugar without worrying about counting carbohydrates. Y Continue reading >>

Top 20 Fruits For Diabetics

Top 20 Fruits For Diabetics

Some serious health conditions need extra precaution when it comes to our eating habits. One such disease, diabetes, restricts us from eating certain types of food. From watching our sugar intake to controlling the consumption of refined carbohydrates, precautions could help in reducing the risk factor of diabetes, which could even lead to some types of cancer. Quite many people believe that diabetics cannot eat certain fruits. According to the guidelines by nutritionists and medical institutions, it is important for everyone to have at least 4 to 5 fruits servings in a day. Considering the fact that a person who is suffering from diabetes, should have controlled sugar level, there is no need for them to avoid fruits to keep their blood sugar level controlled. They just need to be extra careful when eating certain kind of fruits such as bananas, litchis, custard apples and mud apples. Eat them but in limited quantity. Here we have listed top 20 fruits that can be eaten by diabetics... Pears Rich in vitamins and fibre, this delicious food is one of the healthier snacking options for diabetics. Papaya Another 'super-food' for diabetics is papaya. Papaya contains essentials minerals and vitamins, hence, can be eaten by people suffering from diabetes. Starfruit Somewhat similar to jamuns, starfruit is another option for diabetics. It controls your blood sugar level but in case a person has diabetes nephropathy, starfruit should be avoided. Guava Guava is good for controlling blood sugar and also prevents constipation. Loaded with vitamin A and C, they also contain high dietary fibre. Kiwi fruit You could include kiwi in your diet. Many researchers have proved that eating kiwis could actually help you in lowering your blood sugar levels. Black Jamun This fruit is one of the Continue reading >>

Apples Could Reduce Risk Of Diabetes: Eating Fruit Twice A Week Could Cut Chance Of Developing Type 2 By 23%

Apples Could Reduce Risk Of Diabetes: Eating Fruit Twice A Week Could Cut Chance Of Developing Type 2 By 23%

Drinking more fruit juice was linked to an increased risk of developing the condition Study is the first to look at the effects of different types of fruit on diabetes risk Previous studies have linked anthocyanins found in berries and grapes to lowered heart attack risk An apple a day could keep diabetes away, according to a new report. Research showed that eating whole fruits - particularly blueberries, grapes and apples - was ‘significantly associated’ with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. However, drinking more fruit juice was linked to an increased risk of developing the condition, reports the British Medical Journal. The study is the first to look at the effects of different types of fruit on diabetes risk. Professor Qi Sun, of Brigham Women’s Hospital in the United States, said: “While fruits are recommended as a measure for diabetes prevention, previous studies have found mixed results for total fruit consumption. “Our findings provide novel evidence suggesting that certain fruits may be especially beneficial for lowering diabetes risk.” Researchers looked at data from more than 187,000 people, gathered between 1984 and 2008. More than 12,000 of these developed diabetes during the study period. The researchers looked at overall fruit consumption, as well as consumption of individual fruits. These were grapes or raisins, peaches, plums, apricots, prunes, bananas, cantaloupe melon, apples or pears, oranges, grapefruit, strawberries and blueberries. They also looked at consumption of apple, orange, grapefruit, and “other” fruit juices. People who ate at least two servings each week of certain whole fruits - particularly blueberries, grapes, and apples - reduced their risk for type 2 diabetes by as much as 23% in comparison to those who ate less than Continue reading >>

8 Fruits You Should Be Eating And 8 You Shouldn't

8 Fruits You Should Be Eating And 8 You Shouldn't

Who doesn't love fruit? It's delicious, sweet, and good for you. That's what I call a win/win. But not all fruits are created equally. While they all have health benefits, some are healthier than others. You should be looking for fruit high in fiber and vitamins, and low in calories and sugar. If you're thinking about which fruits to use as staples in your diet and which to indulge in only occasionally, it's important to know the facts so you can make the best and healthiest choices for your body. Do eat: Pineapple If you're looking for a tropical fruit packed with excellent health benefits, look no further than the pineapple, rich in vitamin C and manganese. The best reason to eat pineapple, however, is an enzyme called bromelain, which you can only get by eating this tasty fruit. Bromelain helps you absorb antibiotics, stops diarrhea, and may even fight diabetes, heart disease and cancer, according to a study by Biotechnology Research International. It also shortens the healing time after surgery and is used for treating inflammation and sports injuries. If you're looking for ways to incorporate more pineapple into your diet, I suggest putting it on your pizza, cutting up a pineapple and eating it as a snack, or adding it to your smoothies. You can also put in on your oatmeal, add it to beef tacos, or chop it up into some salsa. I love the way Tonia of The Gunny Sack also used a pineapple as the serving dish in her pineapple salsa recipe! Do eat: Blueberries All berries have incredible health benefits, but blueberries take it to another level. One cup of blueberries contains 4 grams of fiber and only 15 grams of carbohydrates. In that cup, you'll also get 24 percent of your daily recommended vitamin C and 36 percent of the recommended dose of vitamin K. Due to their h Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

Diabetes mellitus (DM) commonly referred to as Diabetes, is a chronic disorder. It occurs when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or when the cells of the body become resistant to insulin. In either case, the blood sugar cannot get into the cells for storage, which then leads to serious complications. Diabetes, perhaps more than any other disease, is strongly associated with the western diet, as it was uncommon in cultures consuming a 'primitive diet'. However as cultures switch from their native diets, to the foods of commerce; their rate of diabetes increases eventually reaching the proportions seen in the western societies. However, what's alarming is the fact that India Is home to 62 million diabetics and the number is estimated to be 100 million by 2030. Obesity is seen as one of the major contributing factors to the development of insulin resistance in approximately 90% of the individuals with type-2 diabetes. In most cases, achieving ideal body weight is associated with the restoration of normal blood sugar levels. Hence dietary modifications and treatment are fundamental to the successful treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. There are some specific foods that have been shown to produce positive effects on blood sugar control. These foods have a low glycemic index and glycemic load and are high in fiber. When it comes to diabetics eating fruits, there is a lot of confusion and information is very misleading. Just remember that moderation is the key here. TIPS TO ENJOY FRUITS IF YOU ARE DIABETIC: - Always eat fruits that are fresh, local and in season. - Eat fruits that have a low glycemic index. - Fruits should not be eaten with your main meals, its best to have fruits in between meals and as a snack. - Fruits with high glycemic index should be Continue reading >>

A Healthy Diet For Prediabetes

A Healthy Diet For Prediabetes

Source: Web exclusive, September 2011 Prediabetes: What does it mean? A diagnosis of prediabetes is a warning sign about your health, but it’s not a life sentence. Prediabetes means having blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not yet in the territory of diabetes ‘ and you can easily make changes that will improve your health and lower your risk of developing diabetes and its related complications. ‘Diet, in combination with activity, can have a considerable impact on the development of Type 2 diabetes,’ says New Brunswick-based registered dietitian Michelle Corcoran, who works with clients who have prediabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes. And according to the Canadian Diabetes Association, two large studies have shown that by cutting calories, reducing fat intake and exercising at least 150 minutes a week, the number of participants who progressed from prediabetes to diabetes was lowered by 58 percent. That said, prediabetes is a diagnosis that should be taken seriously. While not everyone diagnosed with prediabetes will develop Type 2 diabetes, many will’and people with prediabetes are at higher risk for heart disease and stroke. Losing weight will make a difference, if you need to’a drop of even five to 10 percent can lower your risk, Corcoran says. Follow these healthy diet guidelines to improve the health of everyone in the family, no matter what their current situation. Whole grains for a healthy diet Consuming whole grains has been shown to lower your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, says Corcoran: ‘People who consume three servings a day are almost one-third less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those who consume three servings a week.’ Boost your intake by choosing whole-grain products rather than refined wherever p Continue reading >>

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