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Can Vodka Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Tips For Managing Glucose Levels

Tips For Managing Glucose Levels

Upswing: Caffeine There are many different ways blood sugar (glucose levels in the blood) can be affected and cause problems with sugar control in people with diabetes. Each person reacts differently to various items that influence blood sugars. There are some compounds individuals with diabetes may want to examine to see how they influence their own blood sugar levels. For example, blood sugar levels can rise after drinking coffee, black tea, and some energy drinks due to the presence of caffeine. There are other compounds that may alter blood glucose levels and methods people with diabetes can use to see what compounds and actions influence their own blood sugar levels. Upswing: Sugar-Free Foods A number of foods claim to be "sugar-free," but these foods raise blood sugar levels because many of them contain carbohydrates in starches, fats, and even fiber. Sugar alcohols such as sorbitol and xylitol add sweetness to foods but still may have enough associated carbohydrates to raise blood sugar levels. Foods with high levels of carbohydrates are likely to raise blood sugar levels very high, and eventually may cause organ damage over time in people with diabetes. Upswing: Chinese Food Foods high in fat can cause blood sugar to stay higher for longer periods of time. Pizza, French fries, and most fried foods are high in carbohydrates and fat. It's a good idea to check your blood sugar about two hours after you eat such foods to see how your blood sugar levels are affected. Upswing: A Bad Cold Dehydration can elevate your blood sugar so it is wise to stay well hydrated. If you are sick, diarrhea and vomiting for more than two hours, or illness longer than a few days may alter your blood sugar. Moreover, blood sugar rises as your body tries to fight any type of illness. Medi Continue reading >>

100 Percent Fruit Juice Is Safe, Doesn't Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels, Says Study

100 Percent Fruit Juice Is Safe, Doesn't Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels, Says Study

100 Percent Fruit Juice Is Safe, Doesn't Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels, Says Study According to a latest study published in the Journal of Nutritional Science, drinking 100 per cent fruit juice does not raise blood sugar levels. Food | NDTV Food Desk | Updated: January 20, 2018 14:49 IST For the longest time, there has been a long standing debate surrounding fruit juices. Some experts have dismissed the idea of consuming fruit juices altogether, especially for diabetics a sit may result in sugar spikes. Diabetes is a group of disease, characterized by too much sugar in the blood (high blood glucose) and is said to have serious implications. According to a latest study published in the Journal of Nutritional Science, drinking 100 per cent fruit juice does not raise blood sugar levels, and diabetics can heave a sigh of relief. The findings revealed that 100 percent fruit juice had no significant link with the risk of Type 2 Diabetes and support a growing body of evidence that 100% fruit juice has no significant effect on glycemic control. For the study the researchers examined a comprehensive data analysis and quantitatively assessed the relationship between drinking 100% juice and blood glucose control. The systematic review included 18 randomized controlled trials (RCT) to evaluate the impact of 100% juice from fruits, such as apple, berry, citrus, grape, and pomegranate. For the meta-analysis, fasting blood glucose and fasting blood insulin levels were used as biomarkers for diabetes risk. Continue reading >>

Is It Okay For Diabetics To Consume Alcohol?

Is It Okay For Diabetics To Consume Alcohol?

Most believe that alcohol is not safe for diabetics. Seen as a high-sugar indulgence, alcohol is believed to spike blood sugar levels, leading to a subsequent crash. But how true is this belief that alcohol is entirely bad for diabetics? Dr. Shalini Jaggi, Senior Consultant with Action Diabetic Centre of Sri Balaji Action Medical Institute, New Delhi, gives us the answers. Dr. Shalini is frank about alcohol consumption: “People with diabetes can consume alcohol in moderation if they are aware of how it might affect their blood sugars. As one of the important lifestyle factors, alcohol consumption has shown a U-shaped association with the risk of diabetes, with the least risk being observed in people consuming moderate amounts of alcohol compared to non-drinkers as well as heavy drinkers. However, different findings have been seen in different studies which may not essentially conform to this fact.” How does alcohol spike blood sugar level? “What we need to understand is that alcohol also contains carbohydrates, which raise your blood sugar levels. So you may observe a slight peaking in your blood glucose levels initially depending on the amount of alcohol consumed.” She also explains how alcohol can drop your blood sugar level: “Another very important fact that we need to know is that in diabetics alcohol can also lower your blood sugars and precipitate hypoglycaemia as well. This occurs because alcohol is metabolized in the liver which is also the main organ responsible for storing your blood glucose and releasing it when needed. Alcohol interferes with liver’s release of glucose because once liver detects alcohol, it gives preference to first clearing the alcohol, putting glucose production and release on hold. Hence this lack of glucose release from liver Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol

Diabetes And Alcohol

If you have diabetes, everything you eat and drink takes on extra importance. You have to ask yourself whether that bowl of pasta will boost your blood sugar, and naturally you wonder if you can get away with having a little dessert. You may also wonder if it's OK to drink alcohol. You probably won't find beer or wine on any official "diabetic menu," but if your diabetes is well-controlled, a drink with dinner is not likely to do you harm. As reported in the Annals of Internal Medicine, light drinking might actually help you control your blood sugar -- at least in the short term -- while possibly lowering your risk for heart disease. The key word is "moderate." While light drinking usually isn't dangerous, too much alcohol can make your disease harder to control and put your health at risk. If you don't drink now, it's best not to start. If you're already a drinker, knowing when to say "when" can be a crucial step toward managing your diabetes and staying well. The American Diabetes Association recommends a limit of two drinks per day for men, and one drink per day for women. But even if you stick to these modest levels, you'll need to use a little caution and common sense to make sure alcohol won't turn against you. If you have diabetes, drinking is certainly a good topic to discuss with your doctor. Immediate impact If you do drink socially, you're already aware of alcohol's impact. Within minutes of your first sip, alcohol can start making its presence felt all over the body. The heart beats a little faster, the skin feels a little warmer, and the brain gets a small buzz. People with diabetes should know about other, lesser-known effects of alcohol. For one thing, alcohol keeps the liver from releasing sugar (glucose) to the bloodstream. As reported in the Annals of Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol — Smart Tips To Avoid Blood Sugar Swings

Diabetes And Alcohol — Smart Tips To Avoid Blood Sugar Swings

People with diabetes are usually very aware of how different foods affect their blood sugar, but still have questions about alcohol. When it comes to whether or not it’s safe to drink a cocktail or two when you have diabetes, the answer is “it depends.” When you have diabetes (type 1 or type 2), you learn how different foods affect your blood sugar. You might have noticed, for example, that a handful of Gummi Bears causes glucose to soar while an apple with peanut butter causes it to level out. Alcohol, like all things we put in our bodies, affects blood sugar levels, so it’s important to understand how it works, when it’s safe and when it might be better to skip. When you drink alcohol, it quickly moves from the stomach into the bloodstream and is metabolized (or broken down) by the liver. One alcoholic beverage—which is 5 ounces of wine or champagne, 12 ounces of beer or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor—is metabolized by the liver in approximately two hours. When you drink alcohol faster than your liver is able to break it down [more than one drink per two hours], the excess moves to other parts of the body, including the brain; the result: you begin to feel tipsy. People with diabetes have to be concerned with more than just catching a buzz. The liver plays a role in blood sugar regulation; if you are on a diabetes medication, such as sulfonylureas (glipizide, glyburide) or insulin, drinking alcohol can divert the liver’s efforts to regulate blood sugar, causing it to drop dangerously. To determine whether it is safe to drink alcohol, the American Diabetes Association suggests asking three basic questions: Is your diabetes under control? In other words, are your blood sugar levels typically in the normal range throughout most of the day? Do you have any Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Beer Lower Blood Glucose Level?

Can Drinking Beer Lower Blood Glucose Level?

Using beer monotherapy to control blood sugar has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. :-) Drinking beer can lower your blood sugar, especially if you drink a lot of it, but not in the way you want it too. If you really tie one on, not that I’m recommending it, your blood sugar will definitely drop. The problem is that it will drop 6-10 hours downstream when you are sleeping it off. Depending on what other meds you are on for your diabetes, it might even drop you low enough to kill you. In the mean time, before your blood sugar drops so low that you die, your sugar will actually go up because beer has quite a few carbohydrates. Let’s face it, a can of beer is just a fermented bowl of oatmeal, after all. But assuming you don’t drink enough to kill yourself, drinking a lot of beer can actually make your diabetes worse because beer has a lot of calories, which can make you fat, which can make your insulin resistance worse, which will make your blood sugars higher, which will kill you very slowly instead. Don’t get me wrong. Sorry wives of beer drinkers: your newly diabetic husband can still have his beer. But like anything else with diabetes, moderation is the key. So don’t overdo it. Remember that too much alcohol is a recipe for too low blood sugar. Enjoy all that life has to offer, just enjoy it in moderation. Continue reading >>

Some Words About Alcohol

Some Words About Alcohol

SOME WORDS ABOUT ALCOHOL Alcohol can provide calories, or energy, without directly raising blood sugar, but if you’re an insulin-dependent diabetic, you need to be cautious about drinking. Ethyl alcohol, which is the active ingredient in hard liquor, beer, and wine, has no direct effect on blood sugar because the body does not convert it into glucose. In the case of distilled spirits and very dry wine, the alcohol generally isn’t accompanied by enough carbohydrate to affect your blood sugar very much. For example, 100 proof gin has 83 calories per ounce. These extra calories can increase your weight slightly, but not your blood sugar. Different beers—ales, stouts, and lagers—can have varying amounts of carbohydrate, which is slow enough in its action that if you figure it into your meal plan, it may not raise your blood sugar. Mixed drinks and dessert wines can be loaded with sugar, so they’re best avoided. Exceptions would be a dry martini or mixed drinks that can be made with a sugar-free mixer, such as sugar-free tonic water. Ethyl alcohol, however, can indirectly lower the blood sugars of some diabetics if consumed at the time of a meal. It does this by partially paralyzing the liver and thereby inhibiting gluconeogenesis so that it can’t convert all the protein of the meal into glucose. For the average adult, this appears to be a significant effect with doses greater than 1.5 ounces of distilled spirits, or one standard shot glass. If you have two 1.5-ounce servings of gin with a meal, your liver’s ability to convert protein into glucose may be impaired. If you’re insulin- dependent and your calculation of how much insulin you’ll require to cover your meal is based on, say, two hot dogs, and those hot dogs don’t get 7.5 percent converted to gluc Continue reading >>

Drinking, Drugs And Diabetes* Do You Know?

Drinking, Drugs And Diabetes* Do You Know?

Page 1 While we don’t recommend that you drink, smoke, or take drugs, we know that adoles- cence is a period where people often try new things, even risky ones. If you choose to experiment, we want you to know how to be safer as these substances relate to your health as a person with diabetes. ALCOHOL AND DIABETES As a person with T1D, your body handles alcohol differently than someone else’s, which can be dangerous if you are not prepared, paying attention, and know what to look out for. What happens in your body when you drink alcohol? - Your body considers it a toxin and wants to get rid of it, so your liver starts working to break down the alcohol. - Your liver stores sugar. So if you drink a moderate amount, your blood glucose can rise. But if you drink a lot, you have a much higher risk of having a severe low blood sugar because your liver is too busy breaking down the alcohol and can’t raise your blood sugar for you. - This risk of low blood sugars can continue for 24 hours after drinking—until your liver clears all the alcohol out of your body. What’s your risk? You are at risk of severe lows if you are taking insulin or certain diabetes pills. If you make the decision to drink alcohol, here are some tips to keep you safe: • Wear your medical ID. • Use the buddy system – you don’t have to tell everyone at the party you have diabetes, but make sure you drink with a friend who can look out for you, keep you safe, and knows what to do if you get low. • NEVER drink on an empty stomach. Eating a meal first will take the pressure off your liver. • Check your blood sugar frequently, including before your first drink. • Drink slowly (sips, not gulps!) and in moderation. • Keep track of Continue reading >>

You May Want To Skip The Splenda

You May Want To Skip The Splenda

Before you sweeten your coffee with the contents of a little yellow packet, read this. A popular artificial sweetener known as sucralose and marketed as Splenda can adversely affect how some people metabolize sugar, according to a new study from researchers at Washington University in St. Louis. The study compared overweight people with normal sugar metabolism to see how they reacted when they were given either water or sucralose—about as much as is in one can of diet soda—to drink before a glucose challenge test, which involves drinking a glucose mixture and then having blood taken at multiple intervals. Researchers found a kind of insulin-and-blood-sugar roller-coaster scenario. People’s blood sugar levels peaked higher if they got sucralose, rather than water, before the glucose challenge test. Insulin levels also climbed higher. And, a few hours into the test, at the lowest blood sugar point, sucralose consumption led to lower blood sugar levels than did water, which can set the stage for carb cravings. “Everyone got the same amount of glucose, both times, but their bodies secreted much more insulin when they got sucralose first,” says M. Yanina Pepino, PhD, the study’s main researcher. Insulin is needed for the body to use sugar for energy, but too much is harmful, Dr. Pepino says. High blood levels of insulin keep fat from being broken down for energy, making it hard to lose weight. And chronically high insulin levels can lead to insulin resistance, a precursor to type-2 diabetes. Does that mean that people who drink diet soda all the time are setting themselves up for type-2 diabetes? No one knows, Dr. Pepino says. However, in two large population studies, consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners (think all of those pastel packets at your local coffee Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Yes, alcohol and tobacco use may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Alcohol Although studies show that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol may actually lower the risk of diabetes, the opposite is true for people who drink greater amounts of alcohol. Moderate alcohol use is defined as one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. Too much alcohol may cause chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which can impair its ability to secrete insulin and potentially lead to diabetes. Tobacco Tobacco use can increase blood sugar levels and lead to insulin resistance. The more you smoke, the greater your risk of diabetes. People who smoke heavily — more than 20 cigarettes a day — have almost double the risk of developing diabetes compared with people who don’t smoke. Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol & Blood Glucose Level

Drinking Alcohol & Blood Glucose Level

Blood glucose levels, also known as blood sugar levels, can be influenced by alcohol consumption. Interestingly enough, though, different amounts of alcohol can have opposite effects on blood sugar. While moderate amounts of alcohol can create a rise in blood sugar, excessive alcohol consumption can cause blood sugar levels to drop to dangerously low levels. These effects, however, are mostly associated with diabetics. Blood glucose can come from three sources: diet, stored glucose and glucose made by the body from other nutrients. The two key hormones that are necessary in regulating blood glucose levels are insulin and glucagon. When blood sugar drops, the body reacts by producing more, and when blood sugar rises, the body releases insulin to maintain balance. Alcohol can affect the amount of blood sugar and the amount of insulin in the body, particularly when drunk in high amounts. Alcohol Consumption When you consume an alcoholic drink, the alcohol moves directly into the bloodstream without being metabolized in the stomach. It only takes five minutes for alcohol to become detectable in the bloodstream, where it then travels to the liver to be metabolized. For most people it takes about two hours for the liver to metabolize a single drink. If you continue to drink alcohol faster than your liver can metabolize it, the excess alcohol is carried by the bloodstream to the brain and other areas of the body. For those taking insulin -- a hormone that regulates glucose in the blood -- this can lead to low blood sugar because the liver is busy removing alcohol from the bloodstream rather than regulating blood sugar levels. High Blood Sugar and Hypoglycemia In frequent drinkers, the body can become less sensitive to insulin, which can result in high blood sugar levels. Accor Continue reading >>

Does Coffee Raise Blood Sugar? Conclusion.

Does Coffee Raise Blood Sugar? Conclusion.

Last month, I started an experiment to better understand how different foods and lifestyle decisions impact blood sugar, using a constant-glucose-monitoring device. For the last few weeks, I’ve been testing whether or not drinking coffee raises my blood-sugar levels. The answer may seem obvious as coffee contains no sugar, but some people believe coffee can have an effect, and our first coffee experiment indicated just that. Since then, I’ve repeated the experiment twice. Here’s what I found. Planning the coffee experiment I designed the following experiment: I would drink a cup of coffee and measure my blood-sugar levels two hours prior to and after drinking it. Then I would analyze the data to see if drinking coffee seemed to raise my blood-sugar levels. To increase the reliability of the experiment, I made sure of four things: 1. I would drink the coffee black – nothing would be added to it. 2. I wouldn’t eat or drink anything else, feel stressed, nor do any form of exercise, 2 hours prior to and after drinking the coffee. 3. I would eat ketogenic. 4. I would go to bed and wake up around the same time as I normally do. It was coffee time. Drinking coffee The house was quiet, but I was up, feeling excited about doing another experiment. Everything was ready – beans, scale, grinder, and coffeemaker. The glucose sensor was safely installed in my body – constantly monitoring any change in blood-sugar levels. Using the above food scale, I put 0.63 ounces (18 grams) of coffee beans into the grinder (about the same amount as for a double espresso). I turned it on. “Grrrrooooooooooooooooouhhh”, it sounded like an elephant had been let loose in the kitchen! After 20 seconds, the noise finally stopped. I picked up the coffee-bean container, held it to my nose Continue reading >>

Really? The Claim: Drinking Water Can Help Lower The Risk Of Diabetes.

Really? The Claim: Drinking Water Can Help Lower The Risk Of Diabetes.

THE FACTS There are many reasons to stay properly hydrated, but only recently have scientists begun to consider diabetes prevention one of them. The amount of water you drink can play a role in how your body regulates blood sugar, researchers have found. The reason: a hormone called vasopressin, which helps regulate water retention. When the body is dehydrated, vasopressin levels rise, prompting the kidneys to hold onto water. At the same time, the hormone pushes the liver to produce blood sugar, which over time may strain the ability to produce or respond to insulin. One of the largest studies to look at the consequences was published last year in Diabetes Care, a publication of the American Diabetes Association. French scientists tracked more than 3,000 healthy men and women ages 30 to 65 for nearly a decade. All had normal blood sugar levels at the start of the research. After nine years, about 800 had developed Type 2 diabetes or high blood sugar. But those who consumed the most water, 17 to 34 ounces a day, had a risk roughly 30 percent lower than that of those who drank the least. The researchers controlled for the subjects’ intake of other liquids that could have affected the results, mainly sugary and alcoholic drinks, as well as exercise, weight and other factors affecting health. The researchers did not look at eating habits, something future studies may take into account. THE BOTTOM LINE There is some evidence that proper hydration can help protect against high blood sugar, though more research is needed. Continue reading >>

The Facts: Alcohol And Diabetes

The Facts: Alcohol And Diabetes

When it comes to alcohol and diabetes, there is some confusion as to whether it can be consumed or not. There is a large body of information that states that moderate drinking has cardio (heart) protective effects, but it can also cause havoc with your blood sugar levels. The question is, are you drinking the correct amounts and can you answer the following questions? Is your blood sugar controlled? Do you know how alcohol can affect you? Are you sticking to the recommended amount? If not, this article will give you insights and tips on how to make sure you are managing your blood sugar levels, while drinking alcohol. HOW DOES ALCOHOL AFFECT YOUR BODY? First let’s find out about what alcohol does in your body. When we drink alcohol, it moves into our bloodstream without first being metabolized in your stomach. Within five minutes of your first drink, your bloodstream contains enough alcohol to measure.1 Alcohol is metabolized by the liver, and for the average person it takes about two hours to metabolize one drink.1 If you drink faster than your body can metabolize it, it moves through your bloodstream to other parts of the body especially your brain, causing the ‘buzz sensation’.1,2 Alcohol can have different impacts on your blood sugar levels. This is often determined by how much, as well as what we drink. Drinking moderate amounts of alcohol may cause blood sugar to rise, while excessive alcohol can cause hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar levels). This hypoglycaemia can occur shortly after and for up to 24 hours after drinking.1,2,3 As your liver is processing alcohol it cannot make new glucose, preventing your body’s normal protective mechanism from kicking in if your blood glucose level falls too low during or after drinking.3 For those who are taking insulin Continue reading >>

Top 11 Alcoholic Drinks For Diabetics

Top 11 Alcoholic Drinks For Diabetics

1 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 2 3 Foods to Throw Away Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 … nucific.com Alcohol contains carbohydrates and result in an increase of blood sugars. It is important to factor in the carbohydrates you drink from alcohol when planning your insulin requirements. Drinking excessive alcohol can result in blood sugar spikes and drops if you are not prepared. If you are drinking moderately you will have better blood sugar balance than if you drink excessively. If you have diabetes you should make sure to only drink when you have food and can monitor your blood glucose levels. Never choose to omit food because you are drinking extra carbohydrates, instead make sure and eat some protein to balance out your alcohol. Include your alcohol as a carbohydrate in your meal and snack planning. When mixing your favorite alcoholic drink make sure to use calorie free soda. You could also use club soda, sparkling water, tonic water, or ginger ale. These substitutes for sugary sodas will give a delicious base to add any of your favorite alcohol flavors to. Some of these typical drinks include vodka tonic, rum and coke, scotch and soda. 1. Vodka Tonic 2. Rum and Diet Coke 3. Sugar Free Margarita 4. Light Beers 5. Wine Spritzers 6. Dry Wines 7. Vodka Cranberry 8. Scotch and Soda 9. Screwdriver 10. Mojito 11. Gin and Tonic When getting your drink from the bar, make sure to ask about substitutes for high sugar simple syrups that are often included in mixed drinks. Ask about splenda based products if the bar has them or sugar free options for your simple syrup. There are some brands that specialize in low calorie and low carbohydrate drinks which you can ask for spe Continue reading >>

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