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Can Type 2 Diabetics Eat Donuts

8 Foods That Are Off-limits For Type 2 Diabetes

8 Foods That Are Off-limits For Type 2 Diabetes

Foods That Don't Belong in Your Diabetes Diet One of the most essential steps to avoiding complications from type 2 diabetes is managing your diet, says William Sullivan, MD, a senior physician at Joslin Diabetes Center and an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. People with type 2 diabetes can control their blood sugar by eating foods that are low in sugar and carbohydrates. A healthy diet is even more important if you're overweight. "Weight loss has a dramatic effect on controlling diabetes," Dr. Sullivan says. He advises small portions and healthy foods — especially those low in sugar. So what shouldn't be on your plate? Avoid — or at least limit — these eight foods to help manage type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Can I Ever Have A Donut Or A Malt

Can I Ever Have A Donut Or A Malt

I would really love to have a chocolate malt or a couple of dunkin donuts.Is there anyway I can have this without spiking my sugar? My glucose readings are in the normal range with help from my meds your sugars will spike no matter what you eat, the test is if they come back down in 2 hours to a normal range. I have a dunkin donut once in a while, it is included in my daily carb totals, also when I have it I am doing some sort of activity which provides a form of exercise which helps....but a couple of donuts I would not do, and if I had a chocolate malt I would make it a small Hey proverb, |I know that it sucks but why not try to find a replacement for those things. I know that when I get a donut craving I add it into my meal plan to substitute something like a donut hole. I have also looked around for other things that I could substitute for the donuts, some maybe smaller bites of something similar. I find that I can have one of the two bite brownies if I am really going through a sugar withdrawal but more and more lately, I tend to go more for the greek yogourt and mixing in some fresh fruit and nuts. I like the mouth feel of the greek yogourt and adding some fresh fruit to it really makes it yummy. Also, my friends who come over, I ask them not to bring over big honking desserts or chocolate bars because I find that too difficult. It is amazing how much they understand. Every once in a while, you will fall off the wagon, I think we all have, you just have to remember that your actions have repercussions. Just make falling off the wagon the exception rather than the rule. I used to love having a dessert after my dinners, now, I rarely have any dessert. DLife has some wonderful recipes for snacks and diabetic safe desserts and their library of recipes is quite extens Continue reading >>

My Type 1 Diabetes: I Have Diabetes And I Can Eat A Donut

My Type 1 Diabetes: I Have Diabetes And I Can Eat A Donut

Over the years, many people have said things to me like, "Oh- you have diabetes? So you can't have sugar, right?" Or they'll walk into a party with some delicious looking dessert but then look at me and say, "Oh sorry, I know you can't eat this because of your DIABEETUS." Out of frustration, I've occasionally answered their statement by saying, "Well, if I really wanted to, I could eat that plus a whole bag of sugar. I'd just need to take more insulin to cover it." But of course, I wouldn't eat an entire bag of sugar. But a donut? Yes. I can and I sometimes will eat a donut. But if we're being honest, no one really should eat them. Not someone like me who's a Type 1. And not a Type 2. And not even a non-diabetic person! So I generally stay away from them, only eating them on a rare but delicious morning. But it's not my Type 1 that stops me from eating sugar. It's my overall desire for good health. But I confess. Today I indulged. I ate a donut. And of course it wasn't a healthy choice. But, oh my gee, was it delicious! I took my typical morning shot of insulin- although not a donut dose- thinking I could get away with it by running an extra couple miles during my morning run. Sometimes that works for me. I notice that when I do a more intense aerobic exercise, even if it only lasts about 20 minutes, it often drops my blood sugar more than walking for an hour does. I think of it like my blood is moving that insulin into my body that much faster. Like I said, sometimes that works. (And I'd rather err on the side of not quite enough insulin prior to a workout, than too much. That's not advice, that's just how I like do it.) It didn't work for me today though. After a 20 minute run, followed by a 1 hour and 15 minute walk, my blood sugar was still higher than I wanted it Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating with Diabetes: Desserts and Sweets By Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator 11/22/2010 Id be willing to bet that most everyone has been toldand therefore believesthat people with diabetes cannot have any sugar and are resigned to living without dessert for the rest of their lives. Well, as a Certified Diabetes Educator, I'm here to tell you that this is a myth. People with diabetes can eat sugar, desserts, and almost any food that contains caloric sweeteners (molasses, honey, maple syrup, and more). Why? Because people with diabetes can eat foods that contain carbohydrates, whether those carbohydrates come from starchy foods like potatoes or sugary foods such as candy. Its best to save sweets and desserts for special occasions so you dont miss out on the more nutritious foods your body needs. However, when you do decide to include a sweet treat, make sure you keep portions small and use your carbohydrate counting plan . The idea that people with diabetes should avoid sugar is decades old. Logically, it makes sense. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar. Sugary foods cause blood sugar levels to increase. Therefore people with diabetes should avoid sugary foods in order to prevent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and keep their diabetes under control. However, simply avoiding sugary foods does not go very far in terms of controlling blood sugar. Here's why. After you eat, your blood sugar level (aka postprandial blood glucose level) is largely determined by the total amount of carbohydrate you ate, not the source of the carbohydrates eaten. There are two types of carbohydrates that elevate your blood sugar levels: sugar and starch. Both will elevate your blood glucose to roughly the same level (assuming you ate the same a Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Candy Not only do high-sugar foods like candy, cookies, syrup, and soda lack nutritional value, but these low-quality carbohydrates also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications. Learn to satisfy your sweet tooth by snacking on high-quality carbohydrates such as fresh fruit. Apples, berries, pears, grapes, and oranges all have sweet, juicy flavors and are packed with fiber to help slow the absorption of glucose, making them a much better choice for blood sugar control. When snacking on fruit, pair it with a protein food, such as a string cheese, nonfat yogurt, or handful of nuts, to further reduce the impact on your blood sugar. (For more sweet ideas, see my list of 20 Low-Sugar Snack ideas). Continue reading >>

Type Diabetes Do And Donts | Diabetic Connect

Type Diabetes Do And Donts | Diabetic Connect

Thank you Joyce for the great advice. I take my meter with me now. This morning out of bed my reading was at 120 which was way better then 203 last Friday. Before lunch my reading was at 102. I'm happy to see good results and knowing that I can eat what everyone eats but in portion and moderately.. Mahalo for all your help to each and everyone who responded!! God bless!!! Joria, if you don't have one, get another meter to carry with you at all times. I never leave home without one. Okay I am moving past the nasty too sweet Krispy Creme donut. I could go for one right now but way too much sugar than I am willing to eat. As a T2, I pretty much eat what I want but stay within portion size. I think you should check your blood sugar before you go to work. This will tell you what you need to do. Even if you are high, you still have to eat something. Like Nick said, you had a liver dump. Try eating your egg snack just before bed. That way the liver will have something to do over night. If you want a donut go for the small plain cake ones. When I was working, on the mornings I had to catch the bus to work, I would stop at 7-11 to get one to go with the boiled egg and baked sausage I had with breakfast and this kept me going until my mid morning snack. You can enjoy foods most people eat provided you eat it in moderation and learning what will and what won't cause your blood sugar to spike. You cannot not eat if you are diabetic. I learned that lesson very early. There are times when you may not feel hungry and when I feel that way, I have a half of an apple, a cup of yogurt or some cheese and crackers. Diabetes and eating properly is always a learning process so don't feel bad if you have a high or a low. Once you get in the swing of things, you learn what will and will not wo Continue reading >>

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

There are many misconceptions that people with diabetes must follow a strict diet, when in reality they can eat anything a person without diabetes eats. Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a "Diabetic Diet," debunks some common food myths for people with diabetes. 1. People with diabetes have to eat different foods from the rest of the family. People with diabetes can eat the same foods as the rest of their family. Current nutrition guidelines for diabetes are very flexible and offer many choices, allowing people with diabetes to fit in favorite or special-occasion foods. Everyone, whether they have diabetes or not, should eat a healthful diet that consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein foods, and heart-healthy fats. So, if you have diabetes, there's no need to cook separately from your family. 2. People with diabetes should never give in to food cravings. Almost everyone has food cravings at some point, and people with diabetes are no exception. It's not uncommon for people with diabetes to cut out all sweets or even cut way back on food portions in order to lose weight. In turn, your body often responds to these drastic changes by creating cravings. Nine times out of ten, your food choices in these situations tend to be high in fat and/or sugar, too. The best way to deal with food cravings is to try to prevent them by following a healthy eating plan that lets you occasionally fit sweets into your diabetes meal plan. If a craving does occur, let yourself have a small taste of whatever it is you want. By doing so, you can enjoy the flavor and avoid overeating later on. 3. People with diabetes shouldn't eat too many starchy foods, even if they contain fiber, because starch raises your blo Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. French Fries Overdoing it on greasy, fried foods can lead to weight gain and wreak havoc on your blood sugar. French fries, potato chips, and doughnuts are particularly bad choices for diabetics because they’re made with carb-heavy, starchy ingredients, which can cause blood glucose levels to shoot up. Fried foods soak up tons of oil, leading to lots of extra calories — and some, like fried chicken and many fried appetizers, are coated in breading which increases the calorie count even more. Many fried foods are also laden with unhealthy trans fats because they’ve been deep-fried in hydrogenated oils, which will raise your bad cholesterol and increase your risk of heart disease. Whether you already have diabetes or are working to prevent it, no amount of trans fats can be safely incorporated into your diet, so it’s best to check labels and keep hydrogenated oils far from your plate. Previous Next More Photos White Bread Pancakes and Syrup Continue reading >>

Diabetes Myths Just Keep Coming

Diabetes Myths Just Keep Coming

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. 05/12/2010 05:12 am ETUpdatedNov 17, 2011 This morning as I read the amazing "Doughnuts for Diabetes" story by Jessica Apple over on A Sweet Life , I would have dropped my own donut, had I been eating one. However, having diabetes, I keep my daily sugar and fat consumption low and spread my treats out over the week. What was amazing about this story was its bedfellows, Krispy Kreme and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). Krispy Kreme was sponsoring a run to raise money for the premiere search-for-a-cure type 1 diabetes organization. O.K., I'm sorta with you so far. But then comes the part that amazes: Participants ran a measly mile, then ate a dozen doughnuts and ran the mile back to their starting point. Apple posts the nutrients in a single glazed Krispy Kreme doughnut, 12 of which amounts to 2,400 calories, 264 grams of carb and 144 grams of fat. If you were a man in the Krispy Kreme Challenge you consumed 2,400 calories and burned about 210! The organizer of the run, Annette Peery, said in her defense while being interviewed by a local news station, that while a diabetes event centered around doughnuts might seem ironic, that's a misconception because "Type 1 diabetes is not related to obesity and physical inactivity (as opposed to type 2 diabetes). Type 1 is an autoimmune disorder and people have to live on insulin as their life support and we want to find a cure so they no longer have to live on that life support." Wow, so eating a dozen donuts is O.K. 'cause I have to take insulin and I'm not obese. Hmm... As Apple points out, eating high-sugar, high-fat foods are not just plain unhealthy, it makes it more difficult to manage blood sugar, whether you have type 1 or type Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

The Donuts And Diabetes Myth

The Donuts And Diabetes Myth

2 Amy Scheer November 26, 2012 at 9:57 am Youre rightit is a mythbut I have to agree with her. Were already bombarded regularly with candy given as rewards in school, donuts as birthday treats, that if someone could break the chain every once in a while, then those occasional treats can go back to being occasional. I have nothing against sweets, but I, too, was amazed when attending a JDRF open house and being offered chocolate cake, chocolate candies, and pop. Im not diabeticmy son isbut I rarely eat that stuff myself! And when I asked half-jokingly for a carb count, the JDRF worker said to me, HA! Good luck with that. I like your blog but I have to agree with that lady. I am always mortified when I see the crap food but out at a T1 event. Just because T1s CAN have foods loaded with sugar, doesnt mean they should. There are so many healthier choices to put out on a table! I have a 5 year old T1 who eats very healthy and we have amazing results because of it. When talking to other parents of T1s that eat nothing but junk and they cant seem to figure out why their numbers and A1Cs are completely out of wack.duh? Foods affect your body! The donuts & diabetes myth is not untrue just for T1. You can live on a steady diet of donuts & you will most likely eventually become overweight, but unless you have the genes for T2, you wont develop it. If you truly want to raise awareness about diabetes, you should provide correct info about ALL types. I have to agree with the others as far as teaching our kids to eat healthy. Theres nothing wrong with an occasional treat, carefully bolused for, however the constant diet of over-processed, chemical-laden, high fat & high carb diet so common in this country is not good for any child, let alone a child with diabetes. We can argue the di Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Donuts: Time To Stop The Stereotypes

Diabetes And Donuts: Time To Stop The Stereotypes

Piotr Adamowicz via Getty Images Earlier this week, President Obama playfully skewered his Republican opponents calling them “cray” for dismissing the overwhelming scientific consensus on climate change. He then joked: “If you go to 100 doctors, and 99 of them tell you you have diabetes, you wouldn’t say, ‘Ah, that’s a conspiracy. All 99 doctors got together with Obama to keep me from having bacon and donuts.’” As the mother of a 6-year-old son with type 1 diabetes, I was surprised that the president, whom I greatly admire and respect, made this joke just a couple of days after he declared November 2015 as National Diabetes Month, stating supportively: “We recognize the impact diabetes has on people’s lives, and we rededicate our talents, skills, and knowledge to preventing, treating, and curing it.” And, apparently, joking about it. I am certain neither the president, nor his staff gave the seemingly inoffensive joke a second thought. And I realize that it was not a joke about diabetes, rather it paired diabetes and donuts to make a humorous analogy. Therein lies the issue for me: the offhanded way so many people use inaccurate, dated, and sometimes offensive and stigmatizing stereotypes about diabetes, for a laugh. Diabetes isn’t funny. It’s serious. And in my son’s case deadly serious. Type 1 diabetes (T1D), the most acute form of diabetes, is an autoimmune disease, in which the body’s immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas — and without insulin my son will die. Even though he takes insulin everyday (via an insulin pump) he still could die from this disease, and that fear is with me, every minute, of every day. There is nothing he, I, or anyone could have done to prevent him from getting type 1. It is a dail Continue reading >>

4 Foods To Steer Clear Of, And What To Have Instead

4 Foods To Steer Clear Of, And What To Have Instead

When you have diabetes, the list of foods to avoid can seem endless. Before you throw your hands up in despair, here are some healthy alternatives to foods you really should avoid when trying to manage blood glucose levels. 1. Coffee Drinks Flavored coffee drinks may seem harmless, but they can be loaded with hidden sugars. A large Frozen Coffee Coolatta®from Dunkin Donuts made with skim milk contains 410 calories and 101 grams of carbohydrates (98 grams coming from sugar!) And that’s the variety made with skim milk! If you reach for the large Frozen Coffee Coolatta made with cream, you will almost double the calorie content to 800 calories and the carbs to 97 grams per serving. These drinks provide the equivalent of 23 teaspoons of sugar. All of that added sugar spikes blood glucose levels, which is the last thing you want when you're dealing with diabetes. So what should you do if you are craving some flavor in your coffee, but don’t want all of the added calories and sugar? The smarter substitution: Try a coffee that has already been infused with flavor, such as hazelnut or French vanilla coffee with a splash of milk. A large French vanilla coffee from Dunkin Donuts (without any added cream or sugar) contains only 10 calories and 1 gram of carbohydrate. That’s a savings of 96 grams of carbohydrate or more! If you prefer to make your own, try sprinkling your coffee beans with a pinch of cinnamon, which not only helps to sweeten it up, but may help improve blood glucose regulation as well. 2. Prepackaged Fruit Smoothies Sure, they sound healthy. A smoothie blended with fresh fruit and vegetables—how could that ever be a bad thing? But pre-bottled smoothies, or ones you order from a local coffee bar or deli, often contain excessive amounts of added sugars. For Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes “eat Anything”?

Can People With Diabetes “eat Anything”?

If you’ve lived with diabetes for at least, say, 30 seconds, you’ve probably been told by your doctor, a magazine, or a family member what you aren’t allowed to eat as a diabetic. None of this, and none of that. This, that, and all of those are “bad for people with diabetes.” By the time you’ve heard and read it all, it almost feels like all you’re left with are vegetables, sugar-free cough drops, and water. “I have diabetes, what can I eat?” In Jane Dickinson‘s new book, “People with Diabetes Can Eat Anything,” she wants you to know you’ve got far more options than today’s media and healthcare system would lead you to believe. As a Certified Diabetes Educator and Registered Nurse who has lived with type 1 diabetes since 1975 (when she was just a kiddo), she knows what the pressure to eat like a perfect diabetes robot feels like, and she knows life around food doesn’t have to feel so strict and restrictive. In my own life with diabetes, I’m a big fan of choosing my carbs wisely, and focusing my meals and snacks around lean protein, healthy fats, veggies, and occasional delicious treats. In this interview, Jane shares how her perspective on food has evolved over the years and how to get started if you currently feel bombarded with the “you can’t eat that” lecture. Ginger: Has your relationship and perspective on food evolved tremendously since your diagnosis? Jane: My relationship and perspective on food have most certainly evolved and I would definitely say that they are still evolving!! Food is so central to our lives, and when you add diabetes into the mix, it takes staying positive and realistic to achieve and maintain a healthy relationship with food. On top of that, we are learning more about food every day. It makes my head sp Continue reading >>

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