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Can Type 2 Diabetes Turn Into Type 1

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

The Discovery Of Type 1 Diabetes

The Discovery Of Type 1 Diabetes

The etiological heterogeneity of idiopathic diabetes has been recognized for 25 years, and subdivision into type 1 and type 2 diabetes is fundamental to the way we think about the disease. Review of the literature suggests that the concept of type 1 diabetes as an immunemediated disease emerged rapidly over the period from 1974 to 1976 and showed many of the features of a classic paradigm shift. A few key observations triggered recognition and acceptance of the new paradigm, but the necessary context was provided by scientific developments in areas mainly unrelated to diabetes. The disease paradigm established by 1976 is still widely accepted, and its essential features have been modified only in detail by the revolution in molecular biology that has occurred over the intervening period. Notwithstanding, some of the underlying assumptions remain imprecise, unchallenged, or unconfirmed. Appreciation of the historical origin and subsequent evolution of these fundamental concepts could stimulate critical analysis and help prepare the way for a new paradigm. “The history of modern knowledge is concerned in no small degree with man's attempt to escape from his previous concepts.” The word “paradigm” has the root meaning “to show side by side” and is used when an ideal or theoretical model is held up against reality. The historian Thomas Kuhn has pointed out that groups of scientists working within an area form loosely interwoven communities with a common working map, or paradigm (1a). As he put it, “A paradigm is what the members of a scientific community share, and, conversely, a scientific community consists of men who share a paradigm.” Scientific communities can be surprisingly resistant to new ideas or data that do not fit the accepted model, and change, Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes – The Basics

Type 1 Diabetes – The Basics

Type 1 diabetes used to be called insulin dependent diabetes or juvenile diabetes. Over the years this has become confusing as many people with type 2 diabetes eventually need insulin to manage their diabetes and as well, adults can also get type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes never turns into type 1 diabetes – they are very different diseases. In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas cannot produce insulin because the cells that actually make the insulin have been destroyed by the body’s own immune system. The Islets of Langerhans is the area in which the endocrine,( hormone-producing) cells of the pancreas are grouped. Discovered in 1869 by the famous German pathological anatomist Paul Langerhans, the islets of Langerhans constitute approximately 1 to 2% of the mass of the pancreas. There are about one million islets in a healthy adult human pancreas, which are distributed evenly throughout the organ; their combined mass is 1 to 1.5 grams. Insulin acts as a key to open the blood cells and release the glucose into the body where it is needed. This insulin must be replaced. People with Type 1 diabetes must have insulin every day to live. At this stage that means insulin injection via an insulin syringe or pen, or an insulin pump. Read more here at Diabetes Australia What age is it diagnosed? While Type 1 diabetes can and does occur at any age, it usually starts in childhood, the teen years and in young adults, with the peak age being 11 years old. It is most common under 40 years of age. People diagnosed as adults can find it tough going as it can be assumed they have type 2 diabetes due to their age. There is an adult onset autoimmune diabetes (LADA) which is basically type 1 diabetes in adults – it has a slow onset, not quick like the usual type 1 diabetes and is also ofte Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Type 1, Type 2, And Gestational – Includes A Free Patient Information Pdf!

Diabetes: Type 1, Type 2, And Gestational – Includes A Free Patient Information Pdf!

Download the free patient handout PDF near the end of this article! People with Diabetes have high blood sugar because their body doesn’t make insulin or their body doesn’t respond to the insulin they do make. Insulin is a hormone that controls how the body turns sugar from food into energy. There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2, and Gestational. If diabetes is not treated it can cause serious health problems with the heart, nerves, eyes, and kidneys. Type 1 Diabetes Type I Diabetes is found mostly in children and young adults. People with Type I Diabetes do not make enough insulin in their bodies and must have insulin shots every day to make sure they have enough insulin so that the food they eat can turn into energy. Symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes Someone may have Type 1 Diabetes if they have any of these symptoms and are a child or young adult: Urinate often Very thirsty or very hungry loss of weight Very tired or weak Blurred vision Trouble sleeping Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes is found mostly in people over 45, but is showing up in younger patients because of unhealthy diets and lack of regular exercise. People with Type 2 Diabetes either cannot make enough insulin or cannot use the insulin they do make very well. You are at risk for Type 2 Diabetes if you: Are older than 45 years of age Are overweight and/or do not exercise regularly Are related to someone with diabetes, such as a parent, brother or sister Gave birth to a baby that weighed 9 pounds or more or had gestational diabetes while pregnant Are African American, Hispanic/Latino, Native American, Asian American or Pacific Islander Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes Any of the symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes (listed above) Dry mouth Cuts or bruises that heal slowly Tingling or numbness in hands or Continue reading >>

And Diabetes

And Diabetes

Diabetes is a common, life-long condition that occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin it does produce doesn’t work properly. Insulin is a hormone that transfers glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body cannot make proper use of this glucose so it builds up in the blood instead of moving into your cells. The chances of developing diabetes may depend on a mix of your genes and your lifestyle. Drinking to excess, for example, can contribute to individuals becoming diabetic. Diabetes is a manageable condition. But when it’s not well managed, it is associated with serious health complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and amputations2. There are two main types of diabetes3 Type 1 diabetes develops if the body can’t produce enough insulin, because insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed. It can happen: Because of genetic factors When a virus or infection triggers an autoimmune response (where the body starts attacking itself). People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed before they’re 40 and there’s currently no way to prevent it. It’s the least common type of diabetes – only 10% of all cases are type 14. Type 2 diabetes. Develops when the body can still make some insulin, but not enough, or when the body becomes resistant to insulin. It can happen: When people are overweight and inactive. People who are an ‘apple-shape’ (with lots of fat around the abdomen) have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes Because of genetic factors. People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed when they’re over 40, and it’s more common in men. However, more overweight children and Continue reading >>

Articles Ontype 2 Diabetes

Articles Ontype 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a life-long disease that affects the way your body handles glucose, a kind of sugar, in your blood. Most people with the condition have type 2. There are about 27 million people in the U.S. with it. Another 86 million have prediabetes: Their blood glucose is not normal, but not high enough to be diabetes yet. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. It's what lets your cells turn glucose from the food you eat into energy. People with type 2 diabetes make insulin, but their cells don't use it as well as they should. Doctors call this insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to try to get glucose into the cells. But eventually it can't keep up, and the sugar builds up in your blood instead. Usually a combination of things cause type 2 diabetes, including: Genes. Scientists have found different bits of DNA that affect how your body makes insulin. Extra weight. Being overweight or obese can cause insulin resistance, especially if you carry your extra pounds around the middle. Now type 2 diabetes affects kids and teens as well as adults, mainly because of childhood obesity. Metabolic syndrome. People with insulin resistance often have a group of conditions including high blood glucose, extra fat around the waist, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol and triglycerides. Too much glucose from your liver. When your blood sugar is low, your liver makes and sends out glucose. After you eat, your blood sugar goes up, and usually the liver will slow down and store its glucose for later. But some people's livers don't. They keep cranking out sugar. Bad communication between cells. Sometimes cells send the wrong signals or don't pick up messages correctly. When these problems affect how your cells make and use insulin or glucose, a chain reac Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: What Is The Condition Affecting Diane Abbott? How It Treated?

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms: What Is The Condition Affecting Diane Abbott? How It Treated?

Diane Abbott, MP for Hackney North and Stoke Newington and was previously Shadow Home Secretary revealed yesterday she has type 2 diabetes. Ms Abbott said the condition was ‘out of control’ during the campaign. Kathryn Kirchner, clinical advisor, for Diabetes UK said: “Diabetes occurs when the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood is too high because your body can’t use it properly for energy. “This happens because the pancreas either doesn’t produce any insulin, enough insulin, or the insulin it does produce doesn’t work properly. “There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2. They’re different conditions, caused by different things, but they are both serious and need to be treated and managed properly. “Diabetes is the fastest growing health threat today. “We know that 3.6 million people have been diagnosed with diabetes and around 11.9 million adults are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes but don’t even know it. “Its impact and complications can be devastating, causing blindness, amputations, even early death.” About 10 per cent of people with diabetes have Type 1, which means that their body doesn’t produce any insulin. Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin either via injections or a pump. Type 1 is not related to lifestyle factors and it’s not preventable. People with Type 2 diabetes don’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin they produce doesn’t work properly. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Type 2 diabetes is treated with a healthy diet and increased physical activity. Medication and/or insulin is often required too. One of the Continue reading >>

Can A Type 2 Diabetic Become Type 1?

Can A Type 2 Diabetic Become Type 1?

Hello Anonymous, Welcome to EmpowHER. No. Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells to produce energy. Different factors, including genetics and some viruses, may contribute to type 1 diabetes. Although type 1 diabetes usually appears during childhood or adolescence, it can develop in adults. By Mayo Clinic Staff Print Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. Regards, Maryann Continue reading >>

12 Things You Might Not Know About Diabetes

12 Things You Might Not Know About Diabetes

Jupiterimages via Getty Images Diabetes is at epidemic proportions across the globe and most people know someone living with this condition. The serious physical and mental health complications associated with all types of diabetes however, are less widely known. Here are 12 things you might not know about diabetes. 1. The personal and social costs of diabetes are enormous If you live with diabetes you will know that it is not just about sugar. Most people associate diabetes with the sweet stuff, but it is far more complicated than that. Many people experience significant impact on their social and emotional wellbeing. 2. There are a number of types of diabetes, and while they have similar impacts on your body, they are very different diseases There are three basic types - type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (pregnancy diabetes). They have similar problems in relation to lack of insulin, but have different causes and management regimes. Type 2 diabetes never turns into type 1 diabetes, but many people with type 2 diabetes will eventually need some insulin injections to manage due to the progressive nature of the condition. 3. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease and nothing to do with lifestyle or eating too much sugar In type 1 diabetes the pancreas does not make insulin at all because the cells that produce insulin have been destroyed by the body’s own immune system. While we are getting closer, we still don’t understand why this happens, but some kind of trigger sets of an autoimmune attack. It is usually diagnosed in people under 40, but can occur at any age. Insulin acts as a key to open the blood cells and release glucose from your food into your brain, muscles and organs, where it is needed to live. For people with type 1 diabetes in Continue reading >>

How Our Bodies Turn Food Into Energy

How Our Bodies Turn Food Into Energy

All parts of the body (muscles, brain, heart, and liver) need energy to work. This energy comes from the food we eat. Our bodies digest the food we eat by mixing it with fluids (acids and enzymes) in the stomach. When the stomach digests food, the carbohydrate (sugars and starches) in the food breaks down into another type of sugar, called glucose. The stomach and small intestines absorb the glucose and then release it into the bloodstream. Once in the bloodstream, glucose can be used immediately for energy or stored in our bodies, to be used later. However, our bodies need insulin in order to use or store glucose for energy. Without insulin, glucose stays in the bloodstream, keeping blood sugar levels high. How the Body Makes Insulin Insulin is a hormone made by beta cells in the pancreas. Beta cells are very sensitive to the amount of glucose in the bloodstream. Normally beta cells check the blood's glucose level every few seconds and sense when they need to speed up or slow down the amount of insulin they're making and releasing. When someone eats something high in carbohydrates, like a piece of bread, the glucose level in the blood rises and the beta cells trigger the pancreas to release more insulin into the bloodstream. See Illustration: How Insulin Works Insulin Opens Cell Doors When insulin is released from the pancreas, it travels through the bloodstream to the body's cells and tells the cell doors to open up to let the glucose in. Once inside, the cells convert glucose into energy to use right then or store it to use later. As glucose moves from the bloodstream into the cells, blood sugar levels start to drop. The beta cells in the pancreas can tell this is happening, so they slow down the amount of insulin they're making. At the same time, the pancreas slows Continue reading >>

Can Type 1 Diabetes Turn Into Type 2 ? | Best Health – How Do You Develop Diabetes

Can Type 1 Diabetes Turn Into Type 2 ? | Best Health – How Do You Develop Diabetes

How Do You Develop Diabetes Symptoms and diseases of type 1 diabetes pre and type of patient conditions. Type 2 diabetes can not develop into type 1 diabetes, since the two conditions have different causes. It is possible that he has been misdiagnosed type 2 and always really 1, but it does not become 1. The cells use it since this causes high levels of blood sugar, which can lead to them being often subtle, but they become severe. Now he is 58 years old and not type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the system is produced when the pancreas produces insulin. 2 becomes a problematic question that diabetics often ask, since they are afraid of that. Prediabetes how to prevent type 2 diabetes 21 webmd offers an introduction. You have problems with insulin, a hormone that helps convert sugar from the food you eat into energy. Type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, but usually occurs before type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin that moves glucose out of the blood and into cells to be used probably within 10 years; Ability to change the life of the ability to inhibit insulin, are called lead. Eventually, however, you can no longer produce enough insulin to take, it does not mean you have type 1 diabetes, 12 so if your beta cells have already gone away as a result of diabetes, they can not die again because 2. You can write 2 Does diabetes become 1 diabetes? Drugs Can type 2 diabetes become 1? Lada healthline Can Healthline 1 url? Q webcache. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Over time, the body stops producing enough insulin and can do so. Learning insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, helps glucose from food enter your cells to be used as energy. If this persists, you will lose fluid in the body (dehydrated) and it is likely to Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 definition and facts Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Insulin produced by the pancreas lowers blood glucose. Absence or insufficient production of insulin, or an inability of the body to properly use insulin causes diabetes. The two types of diabetes are referred to as type 1 and type 2. Former names for these conditions were insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes, or juvenile onset and adult onset diabetes. Symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes include increased urine output, excessive thirst, weight loss, hunger, fatigue, skin problems slow healing wounds, yeast infections, and tingling or numbness in the feet or toes. Some of the risk factors for getting diabetes include being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle, a family history of diabetes, hypertension (high blood pressure), and low levels of the "good" cholesterol (HDL) and elevated levels of triglycerides in the blood. If you think you may have prediabetes or diabetes contact a health-care professional. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that result from defects in insulin secretion, or its action, or both. Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes (as it will be in this article) was first identified as a disease associated with "sweet urine," and excessive muscle loss in the ancient world. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine, hence the term sweet urine. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers the blood glucose level. When the blood glucose elevates (for example, after eating food Continue reading >>

Can Type 2 Diabetes Turn Into Type 1?

Can Type 2 Diabetes Turn Into Type 1?

Jewels Doskicz is a registered nurse, freelance writer, patient advocate, health coach, and long-distance cyclist. Jewels is the moderator of Diabetic Connect’s weekly #DCDE Twitter chat, and she and her daughter both live healthfully with type 1 diabetes. In a twist of events, a small-scale study in Japan found that type 2 diabetes may possibly turn into type 1. Yes—you heard me right. At a time when type 2 diabetes, one of the world’s most prolific diseases, is being redefined as an “autoimmune disease” rather than “a purely metabolic disease,” anything may be possible. If your mind works anything like mine, you may be thinking that perhaps these individuals actually had type 1.5 diabetes to begin with rather than type 2. What is type 1.5? Type 1.5 isn’t type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes—it falls somewhere in between and begs for the wrong diagnosis from the get-go (without a thorough healthcare provider in the swivel stool). Also known as Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (or LADA for short), type 1.5 diabetes actually accounts for 10 percent of people living with diabetes, according to Diabetes Forecast. It’s not always easy to diagnose because of its inherently tricky gray-zone features: • Slow onset over the course of months to years • An oral medication may work initially, but typically after six years, insulin is needed • Positive antibodies • Age of onset is usually adulthood • Those affected show signs of insulin resistance Interestingly enough, this subgrouping was discovered when the ability to test for antibodies became available in the 1970s. People with type 1 diabetes were found to have positive antibodies that launched an attack on their immune system; people with type 2 diabetes did not—except for a small fraction wh Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

Type 1 Vs. Type 2 Diabetes

Type 1 Vs. Type 2 Diabetes

In the normal digestive process, your body breaks down much of the food you eat into glucose, a simple sugar that's stored in your body and used for energy. The hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, regulates the amount of glucose in your blood by helping liver, muscle, and fat cells absorb the sugar. Diabetes is a disease that develops when your pancreas doesn't make enough insulin, or your body doesn't use insulin properly — resulting in high blood glucose levels, which can cause a range of health issues. There are several types of diabetes: Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are the most common. Type 1 diabetes develops when the body produces little to no insulin. It’s considered an autoimmune disorder, meaning that the immune system erroneously attacks and destroys the pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin. Type 1 — previously known as insulin-dependent diabetes, or juvenile-onset diabetes (because it often develops at a young age) — accounts for about 5 percent of all diabetes diagnoses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Type 2 diabetes develops when liver, muscle, and fat cells don't respond properly to insulin and become "insulin resistant." Glucose doesn't enter the cells as efficiently as before, and instead builds up in the bloodstream. In type 2, the pancreas responds to these increased blood glucose levels by producing more insulin. Eventually, however, it can no longer make enough insulin to handle spikes in glucose levels — such as what happens after meals. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, according to the CDC. Type 1 Diabetes Prevalence In 2012, an estimated 29.1 million people in the United States — 9.3 percent of the population — had diabetes, according to Continue reading >>

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