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Can Type 2 Diabetes Drink Coffee?

Who And Ada Promote 5 Cups Of Coffee To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes???

Who And Ada Promote 5 Cups Of Coffee To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes???

5 Cups of Coffee a Day for Type 2 Diabetes? By Steve McDermott on January 10th, 2017 (Steve McDermott is a person with type 2 diabetes who wrote this article for Diabetes Daily). “Coffee is one thing that we all love but can’t really decide if it’s good for us or not. Research in the past has shown that coffee and diabetes don’t go well together. 5 cups is good? If WHO says so, there might be something to it. Right? However, new research, funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), indicates that coffee is good for: • Cardiovascular diseases(myocardial infarction, high cholesterol…) • Cancer (prostate, breast…) • Parkinsons disease • …And type 2 diabetes! According to the research conducted by Marilyn Cornelis, PhD, from NFU School of Medicine: (Of all the foods we consume) coffee has the most potential to prevent type 2 diabetes. (Source: Diabetes Forecast) What is more, WHO has released guidelines for dietary recommendation for Americans for 2015-2020, in which they state that 3-5 cups of coffee is associated with health benefits (including for type 2 diabetes). Seems like both the latest research and even WHO is pro-coffee. I know I’m pro-coffee myself, being an avid coffee drinker and I think it’s great I’m doing something good for myself by having a cup of coffee a day! Let alone 5 cups! You can download the WHO statement here, I’ve copied the section about coffee for you here (be aware what is says about how much sugar and milk you should add to coffee): Coffee and Diabetes – An Age Old Question When talking about coffee and diabetes, we’ve been talking a lot about caffeine and diabetes – which is not the same as ‘coffee and diabetes.’ Why? Because coffee is not just caffeine. Who doesn’t love a cup of coffee? The lates Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Navigating what you can and cannot eat and drink when you have type 2 diabetes can be tricky. Of course, there’s the obvious stuff you know is good to cut out or limit in your diet, like processed sweets and other refined carbohydrates, which can cause blood sugar levels to soar when eaten in excess. But what about those murkier diet staples, which seem to straddle the line between healthy and indulgent, but are ingrained in so many of our everyday rituals? For millions of people in various cultures around the world, caffeinated drinks are likely the sort of thing that comes to mind when we talk about food or drinks in a healthy diabetes diet that aren’t so cut-and-dried. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for a while and are seeking better blood sugar control, the subject of caffeine in a diabetes diet is a fair concern. Caffeinated Drinks for Diabetes: Are They Safe? “For people already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, studies have shown caffeine consumption decreases insulin sensitivity and raises blood sugar levels,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, who is based in Hilton Head, South Carolina. According to a review published in April 2017 in Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews, five out of seven trials studied found that caffeine increases blood glucose and keeps levels higher longer. That doesn’t sound good, but if you’re accustomed to having your morning java, don’t skip out on the drink just yet. Some studies suggest that other components of caffeinated coffee may offer some benefits for people with diabetes. In a study published in March 2016 in the International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, researchers looked at coffee consumption in adults with and w Continue reading >>

Can A Type 2 Diabetic Drink Coffee?

Can A Type 2 Diabetic Drink Coffee?

The American Diabetes Association identifies coffee as an acceptable beverage for people with diabetes. However, coffee's impact on blood sugars can vary. According to a review published in the February 2014 issue of "Diabetes Care," the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) decreases with coffee consumption. However coffee and the additives in coffee drinks can influence blood sugar control in those who already have diabetes. Testing blood sugars may be the best way to learn the body's response to these beverages. Video of the Day A small study published in the May 2011 issue of "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" reviewed the blood glucose effects of coffee when consumed with a meal, and found that caffeinated coffee caused more insulin resistance and higher post-meal blood sugars compared to decaffeinated coffee. An individual with insulin resistance will require more insulin to lower blood sugar compared to someone whose body uses insulin efficiently. Duke University research published in the February 2008 issue of "Diabetes Care" studied habitual coffee drinkers who had T2DM, testing their glucose levels after ingestion of caffeine supplements equivalent to four cups of coffee. Compared to a placebo, the caffeine supplements caused higher post-meal blood sugars. While the mechanism was unclear, the researchers suggested caffeine may worsen insulin resistance or affect glucose by increasing the production of stress hormones. Decaffeinated coffee may also have an impact on blood sugar levels. Researchers who studied these effects on a small group of healthy young men published their findings in the February 2010 issue of "Diabetes Care." Within 60 minutes of consumption, decaffeinated coffee raised blood glucose more than a placebo, but less than caffeinated Continue reading >>

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

5 Cups Of Coffee A Day For Type 2 Diabetes?

Coffee is one thing that we all love but can’t really decide if it’s good for us or not. Research in the past has shown that coffee and diabetes don’t go well together. However, a new research, funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), indicates that coffee is good for: Cardiovascular diseases(myocardial infarction, high cholesterol…) Cancer (prostate, breast…) Parkinsons disease According to the research conducted by Marilyn Cornelis, PhD, from NFU School of Medicine: (Of all the foods we consume) coffee has the most potential to prevent type 2 diabetes. (Source: Diabetes Forecast) What is more, WHO has released guidelines for dietary recommendation for Americans for 2015-2020, in which they state that 3-5 cups of coffee is associated with health benefits (including for type 2 diabetes). Seems like both the latest research and even WHO is pro-coffee. I know I’m pro-coffee myself, being an avid coffee drinker and I think it’s great I’m doing something good for myself by having a cup of coffee a day! Let alone 5 cups! You can download the WHO statement here, I’ve copied the section about coffee for you here (be aware what is says about how much sugar and milk you should add to coffee): Let me pour myself another cup of coffee right now (and according to the coffee and diabetes research, you should grab a coffee yourself) because we’re going to see: Why is coffee good for us? What does other research about coffee and diabetes suggest How much sugar and milk I personally add to my coffee? I’ll reveal my own easy recipe for diabetes-friendly coffee – I’m drinking one right now! In short, do coffee and diabetes go hand in hand together? Let’s find out: Coffee and Diabetes – An Age Old Question I don’t really know anybody that wouldn’t l Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Coffee

Diabetes And Coffee

Should people with type 2 diabetes avoid that cup o’ joe, or is it safe to drink? Q: Is it safe for people with diabetes to drink coffee? A: Many studies have linked moderate coffee drinking with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A large review published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that people who drank four to six cups of coffee per day were 28 percent less likely to develop diabetes than individuals who drank zero to two cups. Caffeinated or decaffeinated, filtered or instant, all types seem to be protective. However, for people who already have diabetes, the picture gets a bit cloudier. That’s because some studies show that the caffeine in coffee reduces insulin sensitivity, which means insulin and blood sugar levels may in fact increase. If you have diabetes and you’re having a tough time keeping your blood sugar down, I recommend switching to decaf for a week or two to see if your blood sugar readings improve. If they do, decaf is clearly the way to go. Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

The average U.S. adult consumes about two 8-ounce cups (474 milliliters) of coffee a day, which can contain around 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young, healthy adults, caffeine doesn't appear to noticeably affect blood sugar (glucose) levels, and consumption up to 400 milligrams a day appears to be safe. Some studies suggest that drinking coffee, caffeinated and decaffeinated, may actually reduce your risk of developing diabetes. If you already have diabetes, however, the impact of caffeine on insulin action may be associated with higher or lower blood sugar levels. For some people with diabetes, about 200 milligrams of caffeine — or the equivalent of one to two 8-ounce cups (237 to 474 milliliters) of plain, brewed coffee — may cause this effect. Caffeine affects every person differently. If you have diabetes or you're struggling to control your blood sugar levels, limiting the amount of caffeine in your diet may provide a benefit. Continue reading >>

Caffeine Risks May Rattle Diabetic People

Caffeine Risks May Rattle Diabetic People

type 2 diabetes -- but it isn't caffeine. Caffeine makes it hard for people with diabetes to control their blood sugar, new studies suggest. In the latest of these studies, Duke University researcher James D. Lane, PhD, and colleagues put continuous blood-sugar monitors on 10 people with type 2 diabetes. All were regular coffee drinkers averaging four cups a day, but they stopped drinking coffee during the experiment. On one day, each patient took a 250 mg caffeine capsule at breakfast and another 250 mg caffeine capsule at lunch. That's roughly the same as having them drink two cups of coffee at each meal. On another day, the same people got placebo pills with no caffeine in them. The result: On the days the patients took caffeine, their blood-sugar levels were 8% higher. And after every meal -- including dinner -- their blood sugar spiked higher than it did on the day they had no caffeine. "These are clinically significant blood-sugar elevations due to caffeine," Lane tells WebMD. "Caffeine increases blood glucose by as much as oral diabetes medications decrease it. ... It seems the detrimental effects of caffeine are as bad as the beneficial effects of oral diabetes drugs are good." Lane warns against reading too much into this small, 10-patient study. But he says it does show that caffeine has real effects on the everyday lives of people with diabetes. "For people with diabetes, drinking coffee or consuming caffeine in other beverages may make it harder for them to control their glucose," he says. (If you have diabetes, how much caffeine do you consume on a regular basis? Talk with others on WebMD's Type 2 Diabetes Support Group message board.) Several studies have found that coffee drinkers -- especially those who drink a lot of coffee -- have a lower risk of diabe Continue reading >>

Coffee And Diabetes: Your Need To Know Facts

Coffee And Diabetes: Your Need To Know Facts

Whether you’re a coffee drinker or not, you’re surely aware of this very popular beverage enjoyed by millions of people around the globe. Produced by brewing coffee beans, this caffeinated beverage traces it’s roots back to at least the 15th century in Arabia. At present, it is one of the top traded and highly valued agricultural commodities. Here we're going to explore coffee and diabetes – if it's good for you to drink or not… What is Coffee? Coffee is produced by roasting beans, grinding them into a powder, and brewing the grounds through a filter via hot water. There are various ways of doing this including drip, percolated, and french press. The way you choose to brew it is really your preference as there is little difference in nutrition benefits regardless of the method brewed. While generally served hot, it is increasingly being served cold (referred to as “iced”) often with cream and/or sugar added – or in your case as a diabetic, a suitable sugar alternative. Instant coffee consists of dried soluble grounds, which can be dissolved in hot water mimicking the taste of fresh brewed coffee. Coffee Nutrition Facts Calories in coffee are trace – meaning, you won't be consuming many calories at all, that is, if you drink it black. Keep in mind anything you ADD to coffee might contain more calories – cream and sugar, for example. It terms of vitamins and minerals, coffee contains (per cup): 11% Recommended Daily Value (RDA) vitamin B12 and riboflavin 6% RDA vitamin B6 3% RDA manganese and potassium 2% RDA magnesium and vitamin B3 …which isn’t too bad for a zero calorie drink! One cup of coffee from standard grounds, using tap water, will contain about 40 mg caffeine but there is considerable variation depending on the bean, the brew and the con Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Coffee? Is It Good Or Bad For Diabetic Patient

Can Diabetics Drink Coffee? Is It Good Or Bad For Diabetic Patient

Coffee has been known as a harmful drink which has been responsible for causing a number of health issues. Doctors have always advised avoiding the drink. However, recent studies have only proved that drinking a moderate amount of coffee may not be too bad for health. It, in fact, gives a number of health benefits. In the article that follows, we will find out, although surprisingly, that drinking coffee may actually reduce the risk of contracting type 2 diabetes in the long run. What is Diabetes and What Are Its Types? To understand the effects of coffee on the blood sugar level and diabetes, it is first necessary to understand the very meaning of the disease and how is it caused: Diabetes is a disease which is caused either due to the lack of proper production or due to the improper use of insulin in the human body. This gives rise to the blood sugar level or the glucose level in the body. There are the following main types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes It is the condition where the Pancreas are unable to produce enough insulin in the body. Type 2 Diabetes It is the condition which occurs when the body is not able to process the level of sugar or glucose present in the blood properly When we talk about the effect of drinking coffee on the level of blood sugar in the body and consequently its effect on diabetes, we are essentially speaking of type 2 diabetes. The reason being, the effects of caffeine, the main ingredient in the coffee, has been seen more on this type than any other type. Effect of Coffee on blood sugar level if you are not Diabetic Let us begin by first understanding the effect of coffee on people who are not suffering from diabetes already. The following are the effects: Coffee reduces the risk of contracting type 2 diabetes if you consume a moderate a Continue reading >>

8 Worst Drinks For Diabetics

8 Worst Drinks For Diabetics

8 Worst Drinks for Diabetics Diabetics should be mindful before consuming these drinks Choosing diabetic-friendly drinks isn’t always easy. For many of us, a soda is the first thing we reach for to quench our thirst, but it’s certainly not the healthiest drink choice, especially for diabetics who have to think twice about what they consume. For those who have diabetes, it’s crucial that they watch what they drink in order to maintain a healthy weight and blood sugar level, because beverages high in carbohydrates, calories, and sugar can be seriously harmful. But being mindful of drinks with high levels of sugar and carbs can be tough when so many drinks out there are loaded with them. Drinks such as soda, alcohol, and energy drinks are generally known as unhealthier options. But some seemingly healthy drinks, including fruit juice, coffee, and whole milk, can also be dangerous for diabetics. Take a look at which drinks diabetics should stay away from. Fruit Juice Fruit juices are packed with sugar and carbohydrates. One 8-ounce glass of fruit juice can contain as much as 30 grams of carbohydrates, 20 grams of sugar, and 100 calories. For healthier options, choose fruit juices that are 100 percent juice with no added sugar. Flavored Coffee Coffee is a tricky one, as it has been shown to affect each person with diabetes differently. For some, it has little to no effect on blood sugar levels, but for others, even drinking coffee black can raise sugar levels. And adding cream and sugar only makes matters worse, as they not only raise blood sugar but can also cause you to gain weight. Chocolate Drinks If not consumed in moderation, chocolate drinks like packaged hot chocolate can raise blood pressure and pack on pounds, as they are loaded with sugar. Whole Milk The hig Continue reading >>

Drinking More Coffee Reduces Risk For Diabetes

Drinking More Coffee Reduces Risk For Diabetes

When it comes to your morning cup of java, drinking a second or third cup may be good for your health. There is evidence that shows coffee drinkers have a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, Parkinson’s disease and type 2 diabetes. And it seems for diabetes prevention the more coffee you drink, the better. Coffee contains several powerful antioxidants including chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid. Research shows that chlorogenic acid improves glucose metabolism and enhances insulin sensitivity while caffeic acid increases glucose uptake by the muscles. These antioxidants are why studies involving over one million adults show heavy coffee drinkers have a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Individuals in the studies who drank three or more cups of coffee a day reduced their risk of type 2 diabetes by 21% compared to those who never or rarely drink coffee. Moreover, decaffeinated coffee drinkers experienced a 6% lower risk for each cup. That is excellent news. So, even if you are sensitive to caffeine, you can still lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. Choose Your Coffee Wisely Although coffee is relatively low in calories, the pitfalls can be in the variety of added ingredients such as sweeteners and creamers. Sugar and cream add calories, fat, and carbohydrate and can easily offset the health benefits of coffee. This is especially true with coffee concoctions available in your local fast food restaurant or coffee shop. To minimize the number of calories from added sugars and high-fat creamers you should choose your coffee wisely. Check out these swaps for some of your favorites: Instead of: Dunkin Donut’s Frozen Caramel Coffee Coolatta with cream, 16 oz. For: 490 calories, 23 g fat, 71 g carbs, 65 g sugar Choose: Iced Coffee with Cream and Splenda, 20 oz. For: 6 Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Coffee: Can I Still Drink It?

Diabetes And Coffee: Can I Still Drink It?

Can I Still Drink Coffee With Type 2 Diabetes? When I see a patient newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, they are scared. Some people walk into the room crying. Others start firing questions, rapid-fire. Others will have an organized list of questions that they neatly check off as we cover information, then ask whatever is left at the end of the appointment. I hear lots of different things: “Do I really need to exercise?” “Do I need to give up donuts with my grandkids?” However, the question that I hear most often is “Can diabetics still drink coffee?” I can understand. If I was receiving a new medical diagnosis and I was questioning every habit, I’d be worried too. And if I was considering my daily caffeine fix, I’d be in tears with the best of them. To answer your question about diabetes and coffee, I have good news for you. You don’t have to give up coffee. Though, you may have to change how you drink it. The Research Between Diabetes and Coffee As we all know, the reported benefits of coffee ebb and flow. Tonight, coffee may be a health food but tomorrow, a new study may report that it is bad for us. Diabetes and coffee got a bad reputation in regards in the last decade. WebMD, a research study performed by Duke University researcher James D. Lane, Ph.D. found that caffeine made controlling blood sugars difficult. The study found that blood sugar levels were 8% higher on the days that caffeine was ingested. However, new research from 2016, discussed by Diabetes Self-Management, states that coffee-drinking participants without diabetes had an average fasting glucose level of 76 mg/dl compared with 79 mg/dl for nondrinkers. While coffee-drinking participants with diabetes had an average glucose level of 105 mg/dl compared with 128 mg/dl for nondrink Continue reading >>

Another Reason To Drink Coffee? Four Cups Of The Hot Beverage Each Day Slashes The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes By 25% (and Even Decaf Lovers Can Reap The Benefits)

Another Reason To Drink Coffee? Four Cups Of The Hot Beverage Each Day Slashes The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes By 25% (and Even Decaf Lovers Can Reap The Benefits)

Good news for coffee lovers across the world. Another study has found a cuppa to be beneficial for your health. Four cups of the hot beverage each day can slash your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 25 per cent, research suggests. But the rule only applies to those who drink decaffeinated coffee, espressos and cafetieres - not lovers of trendier filter versions. The beneficial effects all stem from cafestol, a compound abundant in coffee, but in varying levels across different varieties. The findings, made by Danish scientists, add to a plethora of evidence which shows coffee to be beneficial for the body. In trials on mice at Aarhus University Hospital, those given cafestol were found to have lower blood sugar and higher insulin sensitivity. Type 2 diabetes is caused by having too much glucose in the blood because the body's way of turning it into energy is not working properly. This makes the body less sensitive to insulin. Lead researcher Dr Fredrik Brustad Mellbye said: 'Daily consumption of cafestol can delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in these mice.' 'The present study adds further knowledge about mechanisms of action of bioactive substances in coffee.' He added that it is a 'good candidate' for drug development to treat or prevent the condition, which can be fatal, in humans. The findings, published in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Natural Products, dispell the myth that the positive effects are solely from caffeine. The results also keep in line with official guidelines that recommend adults should consume no more than 400mg of caffeine each day. Drinking four cups of coffee a day is enough to prevent deadly liver disease, Dutch research implied in June. Protection against the destruction of the vital organ may also be found in just one cup o Continue reading >>

Coffee Consumption And Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee Consumption And Type 2 Diabetes

Print this page Coffee and risk of type 2 diabetes Epidemiological studies suggest that drinking 3-4 cups of coffee per day is associated with an approximate 25% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared to consuming none or less than 2 cups per day1,2. Research also suggests a dose response relationship15-17. A systematic review with a meta-analysis of 457,922 individuals and 21,897 newly-diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes from eight different countries showed a statistically significant negative association between coffee consumption and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes2. The dose response analysis concluded that every additional cup of coffee, up to 6-8 cups per day, was associated with a 5-10% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Drinking 3-4 cups of coffee per day was associated with an approximate 25% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared to consuming none or less than 2 cups per day. Additional epidemiological studies and reviews from different countries have also confirmed the inverse association with coffee consumption3-13. Furthermore, a 10 year follow-up study from Greece highlighted the significance of long-term habitual coffee drinking against diabetes onset14. Further dose response studies have also been reported. A 2014 study concluded that participants who increased coffee intake by more than one cup per day over a 4 year period had an 11% lower risk of type 2 diabetes, whilst those who decreased coffee consumption by one cup per day had a 17% greater risk of type 2 diabetes15. A meta-analysis of prospective studies suggested a 12% reduction in risk of type 2 diabetes for every additional two cups of coffee per day, and a 14% reduction for every 200mg increment of caffeine per day. This review also suggested that the effect w Continue reading >>

Can Coffee Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Coffee Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

A growing body of evidence shows that coffee prevents type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a massive health problem that’s about to get worse. A recent study concluded that 40% of Americans alive today are expected to get the disease. Left untreated, the soaring blood sugar caused by type 2 diabetes creates serious health problems throughout the body, including heart disease, stroke, loss of limbs, kidney failure, blindness, and double the risk of death. Research has shown that drinking coffee is a way to prevent type 2 diabetes. Research On Coffee And Diabetes Dozens of observational research studies have documented the many health benefits of coffee. The studies reached various conclusions, some concluded that coffee prevents diabetes by a great deal, others not all. The wide range of results reported confused the public. To end the confusion, two major systematic reviews analyzed coffee’s link with type 2 diabetes. The Huxley study came out in 2009, followed by the Ding study in 2014. The authors of these two systematic reviews averaged the data from all the published studies that had up until that time examined the link between coffee drinking and type 2 diabetes. Huxley Finds Coffee Prevents Type 2 Diabetes The Huxley study showed that the more coffee you drink, the lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. In 2009, Rachel Huxley and colleagues published a massive systematic review to analyze the health benefits of coffee. The team collected data from 18 published studies that had a combined total of nearly 458,000 participants. When compared to people who drank very little coffee, Huxley found that each additional cup of coffee was linked to a 7% reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. People obtained the maximum health benefit of coffee by drinking 6 cups daily. Continue reading >>

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