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Can Type 2 Diabetes Drink Coffee?

Prediabetes? The Coffee-health Connection

Prediabetes? The Coffee-health Connection

New research has shown—yet again—that drinking coffee can reduce your type 2 diabetes risk. The study, in nearly 1,500 Greek adults followed for a decade, found that people who downed the equivalent of 2.5 to 3 cups of brewed coffee daily had half the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. And people who drank about 1.5 cups of joe a day cut their risk by about 30%. “Apparently healthy individuals with no history of cardiovascular disease may benefit from daily consumption of this amount of coffee,” one of the study’s authors, Efi Koloverou, MmedSci, a clinical dietitian and doctoral candidate at Harokopio University in Athens, told DiabeticLifestyle in an e-mail interview. The findings were published July 1, 2015 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. There were too few decaf drinkers in the new study to draw conclusions about whether caffeine-free brew would have the same benefits. But there’s strong evidence from other research that decaf has similar protective effects, according to Mary Ann Johnson, PhD, the Flatt Professor in Foods and Nutrition at the University of Georgia in Athens and a national spokesperson for the American Society for Nutrition. Researchers suspect that a substance in the coffee bean itself is what helps to lower inflammation in the body. This in turn can reduce overall risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Johnson points to a 2014 meta-analysis (a study in which the results of several smaller studies are pooled and analyzed together) which included 28 studies and 1.1 million people and found both coffee and decaf coffee drinkers had a reduced likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. And the more a person drank, the lower their risk. Java drinkers got more good news earlier this year, when the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

The average U.S. adult consumes about two 8-ounce cups (474 milliliters) of coffee a day, which can contain around 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young, healthy adults, caffeine doesn't appear to noticeably affect blood sugar (glucose) levels, and consumption up to 400 milligrams a day appears to be safe. Some studies suggest that drinking coffee, caffeinated and decaffeinated, may actually reduce your risk of developing diabetes. If you already have diabetes, however, the impact of caffeine on insulin action may be associated with higher or lower blood sugar levels. For some people with diabetes, about 200 milligrams of caffeine — or the equivalent of one to two 8-ounce cups (237 to 474 milliliters) of plain, brewed coffee — may cause this effect. Caffeine affects every person differently. If you have diabetes or you're struggling to control your blood sugar levels, limiting the amount of caffeine in your diet may provide a benefit. Continue reading >>

Coffee And Diabetes

Coffee And Diabetes

Tweet The effect of coffee on diabetes, when presented in the media can often be confusing. News stories can in the same week tout the benefits coffee can have on diabetes and shoot down coffee as being unhelpful for blood sugar levels. This doesn’t mean the articles are contradictory though. Put slightly more simply, coffee contains different chemicals, some of which have beneficial effects whereas others can have a less beneficial effect, such as caffeine which can impair insulin in the short term. Caffeine and blood sugar levels Regular high caffeine consumption, over a 4 week period, has been shown to impair insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes. [20] Whilst the researchers found a relationship between higher coffee consumption and lower sensitivity to insulin, they recognised that the rapid transition to having more coffee may have produced an atypical or emphasised response by the body. Benefits of coffee Coffee has been shown to lower risks of the following conditions: Coffee contains polyphenols, which are a molecule that anti-oxidant properties which are widely believed to help prevent inflammatory illnesses, such as type 2 diabetes, and anticarcinogenic (anti-cancer) properties. As well as polyphenols, coffee contains the mineral magnesium and chromium. Greater magnesium intake has been linked with lower rates of type 2 diabetes. The blend of these nutrients can be helpful for improving insulin sensitivity, which may help to offset the opposite effects of caffeine. Coffee and prevention of diabetes Coffee and its effect on risks of developing type 2 diabetes have been studied a number of times and has indicated a notably lower risk of type 2 diabetes being associated with coffee drinkers. A 2009 study of 40,000 participants noted that consumptio Continue reading >>

Coffee Consumption And Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee Consumption And Type 2 Diabetes

Print this page Coffee and risk of type 2 diabetes Epidemiological studies suggest that drinking 3-4 cups of coffee per day is associated with an approximate 25% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared to consuming none or less than 2 cups per day1,2. Research also suggests a dose response relationship15-17. A systematic review with a meta-analysis of 457,922 individuals and 21,897 newly-diagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes from eight different countries showed a statistically significant negative association between coffee consumption and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes2. The dose response analysis concluded that every additional cup of coffee, up to 6-8 cups per day, was associated with a 5-10% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Drinking 3-4 cups of coffee per day was associated with an approximate 25% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared to consuming none or less than 2 cups per day. Additional epidemiological studies and reviews from different countries have also confirmed the inverse association with coffee consumption3-13. Furthermore, a 10 year follow-up study from Greece highlighted the significance of long-term habitual coffee drinking against diabetes onset14. Further dose response studies have also been reported. A 2014 study concluded that participants who increased coffee intake by more than one cup per day over a 4 year period had an 11% lower risk of type 2 diabetes, whilst those who decreased coffee consumption by one cup per day had a 17% greater risk of type 2 diabetes15. A meta-analysis of prospective studies suggested a 12% reduction in risk of type 2 diabetes for every additional two cups of coffee per day, and a 14% reduction for every 200mg increment of caffeine per day. This review also suggested that the effect w Continue reading >>

Wait, What’s The Deal With Coffee And Diabetes?

Wait, What’s The Deal With Coffee And Diabetes?

Confused about coffee and diabetes? Not sure if your morning coffee is giving you diabetes or preventing it? I’m not surprised. Historically coffee has been deplored as an unhealthy vice. But recently there’ve been some big claims the other side of the spectrum… So should you believe the hype? Can coffee actually play a role in preventing diabetes? In the last ten or so years, there have been many studies (like this and this) looking into the relationship between coffee and diabetes. Most have found the same link: coffee drinking is associated with lower incidence of diabetes! A recent review, which was conducted in 2013, looked at 28 studies, with over one million people – and found strong support for this link. The evidence appears to be consistent across various ethnicities and showed a dose-response relationship, that is, the more coffee people drank, the lower their relative risk of developing diabetes. One study even showed those who decreased their coffee consumption increased their risk of diabetes, while those who increased consumption, decreased their risk! Even though this is a lot of people and many studies, it’s important to note, these were epidemiological studies. So it’s just observational evidence. Epidemi.. What? Epidemiological evidence means that people have conducted studies of large populations of people and found a pattern – or association – between people and a disease. The pattern seen in diabetes is that those who drink coffee seem to have less diabetes. “One Triple Shot Latte to go”? Before you go out and over-caffeinate yourself, let’s break this down. Firstly, what these studies show is just an association, not a cause. That is, not drinking coffee will not cause you to get diabetes, and drinking coffee will not prevent Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Green And Roasted Coffee On Type 2 Diabetes

The Effect Of Green And Roasted Coffee On Type 2 Diabetes

An estimated 100 million of Americans drink coffee on a daily basis, pouring themselves an average of three cups! And while the energy surge is already anticipated, brewing evidence regarding coffee's effect on type 2 diabetes may be a benefit coffee-lovers did not see coming! Coffee is much more than a complimenting breakfast beverage, as people gather together to enjoy that notorious cup of joe quite frequently. In fact, an estimated 100 million of Americans drink coffee on a daily basis, pouring themselves an average of three cups! And while the energy surge is already anticipated, brewing evidence regarding coffee's effect on type 2 diabetes may be a benefit coffee-lovers did not see coming! Coffee and Diabetes In a recent study published in Food Research International, the link between coffee consumption and diabetes reduction became much bolder. Over a two-month span, researchers analyzed 52 healthy men and women who consumed three servings of coffee. More specifically, a 35:56 blend of green and roasted coffee significantly reduced fasting blood glucose and increased insulin sensitivity. Further supporting evidence suggests, despite its caffeine content (or lack thereof), coffee can promote tighter glucose control and reduce diabetes risk, especially in women. Additionally, coffee has shown to contribute to weight loss, specifically the reduction of fat mass. And with overweight and obesity being risk factors for diabetes, its consumption can lower the possibility of its development. But along with its worthy role in weight and diabetes management, additional coffee benefits include... ...brain defense. That morning cup of joe is already touted to enhance morning energy and stimulate the mind. But the effects of coffee are not only initial, but may lead to signif Continue reading >>

Is Coffee Good For Diabetes?

Is Coffee Good For Diabetes?

Should people with diabetes drink coffee? If you do, should it be decaf or regular? The health effects of coffee have been well studied, but we still have no definite answer. I have to admit — I don’t drink coffee and never have. The closest I get is coffee ice cream. But some of this data has me thinking I should start. • Coffee reduces risk of death. In a study of over 700,000 people done by the University of Southern California, people who drank coffee were 18% less likely to die in the next 10–16 years. The study group included people of various races and ethnic groups. • Coffee is linked with lower risk of stroke. Since stroke is a major complication of diabetes, lowering your risk seems like a good idea. • Studies indicate that coffee lowers risk ofliver and mouth cancer, improves memory, and protects against Type 2 diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. • A recent study from India found that coffee drinkers have lower fasting blood sugars. Other studies have found that coffee improves insulin function. It may lower insulin resistance. • Some nutritionists say coffee is a major source of antioxidants, molecules that slow aging and tissue breakdown. Downside of coffee Coffee has some undesirable side effects. The Mayo Clinic states that consuming more than 500–600 milligrams of caffeine a day may lead to “insomnia, nervousness, restlessness, irritability, an upset stomach, a fast heartbeat, and even muscle tremors.” It’s worth noting that 500–600 milligrams a day is a lot (about six cups of coffee or nine ounces of espresso), but some research has linked even moderate amounts of caffeine to bad health effects, according to Medical News Today. Coffee drinking in pregnancy may increase the risk of low-birth-weight babies. Drinking coffee with a Continue reading >>

Why Coffee May Reduce Diabetes Risk

Why Coffee May Reduce Diabetes Risk

Coffee drinking has been linked with a reduced risk of diabetes, and now Chinese researchers think they may know why. Three compounds found in coffee seem to block the toxic accumulation of a protein linked with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. ''We found three major coffee compounds can reverse this toxic process and may explain why coffee drinking is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes," says researcher Kun Huang, PhD, a professor of biological pharmacy at the Huazhong University of Science & Technology. Previous studies have found that people who drink four or more cups of coffee a day have a 50% lower risk of getting type 2 diabetes. The new study is published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Coffee and Diabetes Risk: Explaining Why It May Work Type 2 diabetes is the most common type. In those who have it, the body does not have enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. The hormone insulin, made by the pancreas, is crucial to move glucose to the cells for energy. Other researchers have linked the ''misfolding'' of a protein called hIAPP (human islet amyloid polypeptide) with an increased risk of diabetes. HIAPP is similar to the amyloid protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease, Huang says. When these HIAPP deposits accumulate, they can lead to the death of cells in the pancreas, Huang tells WebMD. The Chinese researchers looked at three major active compounds in coffee and their effect on stopping the toxic accumulation of the protein: "We exposed hIAPP to coffee extracts, and found caffeine, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid all inhibited the formation of toxic hIAPP amyloid and protected the pancreatic cells," Huang tells WebMD. All three had an effect. However, caffeic acid was best. Caffeine was the least good of the th Continue reading >>

Coffee, Caffeine, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Coffee, Caffeine, And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

A prospective cohort study in younger and middle-aged U.S. women Abstract OBJECTIVE—High habitual coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, but data on lower levels of consumption and on different types of coffee are sparse. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This is a prospective cohort study including 88,259 U.S. women of the Nurses’ Health Study II aged 26–46 years without history of diabetes at baseline. Consumption of coffee and other caffeine-containing foods and drinks was assessed in 1991, 1995, and 1999. We documented 1,263 incident cases of confirmed type 2 diabetes between 1991 and 2001. RESULTS—After adjustment for potential confounders, the relative risk of type 2 diabetes was 0.87 (95% CI 0.73–1.03) for one cup per day, 0.58 (0.49–0.68) for two to three cups per day, and 0.53 (0.41–0.68) for four or more cups per day compared with nondrinkers (P for trend <0.0001). Associations were similar for caffeinated (0.87 [0.83–0.91] for a one-cup increment per day) and decaffeinated (0.81 [0.73–0.90]) coffee and for filtered (0.86 [0.82–0.90]) and instant (0.83 [0.74–0.93]) coffee. Tea consumption was not substantially associated with risk of type 2 diabetes (0.88 [0.64–1.23] for four or more versus no cups per day; P for trend = 0.81). CONCLUSIONS—These results suggest that moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may lower risk of type 2 diabetes in younger and middle-aged women. Coffee constituents other than caffeine may affect the development of type 2 diabetes. High coffee consumption has been associated with better glucose tolerance and a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes in diverse populations in Europe, the U.S., and Japan (1–3). However, it remains unclear what co Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Coffee Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Drinking Coffee Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

If you begin your day with a steaming cup of joe, you could be protecting your health along with jump-starting your morning. That's because research shows coffee may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. But how much do you need to drink to reap the potential benefits? What the Research Says Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health and Brigham and Women’s Hospital conducted one of the biggest long-term studies on the relationship between coffee and type 2 diabetes in 2004. They found that the more coffee people drank, the greater the protection against diabetes. The study followed 41,934 men for 12 years and 84,276 women for 18 years. At the beginning of the study, the participants did not have type 2 diabetes. They were asked to answer questions about their coffee-drinking habits (regular and decaffeinated) every two to four years. During that time, 1,333 new cases of type 2 diabetes were reported among the men and 4,085 cases were reported among the women. Men who reported drinking more than six cups of regular, caffeinated coffee per day cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half when compared to nondrinkers of coffee. Women who reported drinking that much cut their risk by about 30 percent. Decaffeinated coffee also showed benefits, but the results were weaker. Another study suggested that the more coffee you drink, the better. In the same year as the Harvard study, researchers in Finland, the country with the highest per capita coffee consumption in the world, found that the risk of developing diabetes appeared significantly lower in people who drank at least 10 cups a day. People who drank fewer cups of coffee had the same risk as nondrinkers. Coffee consumption may also help people who are already living with type 2 diabetes, according to the Continue reading >>

Delay Type 2 Diabetes: Substance In This Common Drink Could Prevent Disease

Delay Type 2 Diabetes: Substance In This Common Drink Could Prevent Disease

Substances found in the popular drink have been linked to delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes - but few studies have tested the hypothesis. Now, scientists from Denmark have found one of the previously untested substances could improve the function of cells and importantly - improve insulin sensitivity in laboratory mice. Experts believe the finding could help to treat or even prevent the disease. Pervious studies have considered drinking coffee could reduce the risk of developing diabetes. After discounting caffeine as the reason for this - experts found a substance in coffee called cafestol could boost insulin secretion in pancreatic cells when they were exposed to glucose. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. Experts found the substance Cafestol also increased the uptake of sugar in the blood - glucose in muscle cells. They found this was as effective as an anti diabetic drug. Scientists have conducted a new study which has investigated how cafestol would help delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. They tested the substance on mice. Researchers found one group of mice - prone to type 2 diabetes - and fed cafestol had lower blood glucose levels. They also found they had improved ability to produce insulin, compared to groups of mice which were not fed cafestol. The study concluded: “Our results show that cafestol possesses antidiabetic properties in KKAy [diabetic] mice. “Consequently, cafestol may contribute to the reduce Continue reading >>

Caffeine Risks May Rattle Diabetic People

Caffeine Risks May Rattle Diabetic People

type 2 diabetes -- but it isn't caffeine. Caffeine makes it hard for people with diabetes to control their blood sugar, new studies suggest. In the latest of these studies, Duke University researcher James D. Lane, PhD, and colleagues put continuous blood-sugar monitors on 10 people with type 2 diabetes. All were regular coffee drinkers averaging four cups a day, but they stopped drinking coffee during the experiment. On one day, each patient took a 250 mg caffeine capsule at breakfast and another 250 mg caffeine capsule at lunch. That's roughly the same as having them drink two cups of coffee at each meal. On another day, the same people got placebo pills with no caffeine in them. The result: On the days the patients took caffeine, their blood-sugar levels were 8% higher. And after every meal -- including dinner -- their blood sugar spiked higher than it did on the day they had no caffeine. "These are clinically significant blood-sugar elevations due to caffeine," Lane tells WebMD. "Caffeine increases blood glucose by as much as oral diabetes medications decrease it. ... It seems the detrimental effects of caffeine are as bad as the beneficial effects of oral diabetes drugs are good." Lane warns against reading too much into this small, 10-patient study. But he says it does show that caffeine has real effects on the everyday lives of people with diabetes. "For people with diabetes, drinking coffee or consuming caffeine in other beverages may make it harder for them to control their glucose," he says. (If you have diabetes, how much caffeine do you consume on a regular basis? Talk with others on WebMD's Type 2 Diabetes Support Group message board.) Several studies have found that coffee drinkers -- especially those who drink a lot of coffee -- have a lower risk of diabe Continue reading >>

12 Proven Foods Essential For Every Type 2 Diabetes Diet

12 Proven Foods Essential For Every Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Cut out bread. No sugar in your coffee. Only one potato at dinner. If you’ve got blood sugar problems then you’ve heard those instructions over and over. The focus is always on what you should remove from your diet, and it’s incredibly frustrating. What about what you can eat? What about the foods you should be adding to a diet for type 2 diabetes… the foods that can actually improve blood sugar control? Research shows there are many natural foods that can help. Either by reducing sugar absorption into the bloodstream, or by improving insulin resistance. It’s certainly worth your while to learn what those foods are, rather than just what to avoid. I’ve done some of the research here and strongly recommend you start with the following. 1. Almonds improve glucose metabolism Tree nuts – not peanuts, which grow in the ground – are linked with many metabolic health benefits. But almonds really standout when it comes to managing blood sugar. They are very low in carbohydrates, but that’s not why. The reason is Magnesium. Magnesium is an essential mineral involved in over 300 bodily processes, including blood pressure regulation and blood sugar control (1, 2). Alongside spinach, almonds and cashews are among the best sources of magnesium in the human diet. Several handfuls provides over 20% of the daily recommended intake (2). While the mechanism is unclear, having low magnesium levels is strongly associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It appears to impact on insulin secretion, which may be the reason that 25-38% of type 2 diabetics have low magnesium (4). Clinical trials have shown that restoring low magnesium significantly improves insulin response and reduces blood sugar levels (4, 5). Especially if you’re magnesium deficient and insulin resist Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Coffee? Is It Good Or Bad For Diabetic Patient

Can Diabetics Drink Coffee? Is It Good Or Bad For Diabetic Patient

Coffee has been known as a harmful drink which has been responsible for causing a number of health issues. Doctors have always advised avoiding the drink. However, recent studies have only proved that drinking a moderate amount of coffee may not be too bad for health. It, in fact, gives a number of health benefits. In the article that follows, we will find out, although surprisingly, that drinking coffee may actually reduce the risk of contracting type 2 diabetes in the long run. What is Diabetes and What Are Its Types? To understand the effects of coffee on the blood sugar level and diabetes, it is first necessary to understand the very meaning of the disease and how is it caused: Diabetes is a disease which is caused either due to the lack of proper production or due to the improper use of insulin in the human body. This gives rise to the blood sugar level or the glucose level in the body. There are the following main types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes It is the condition where the Pancreas are unable to produce enough insulin in the body. Type 2 Diabetes It is the condition which occurs when the body is not able to process the level of sugar or glucose present in the blood properly When we talk about the effect of drinking coffee on the level of blood sugar in the body and consequently its effect on diabetes, we are essentially speaking of type 2 diabetes. The reason being, the effects of caffeine, the main ingredient in the coffee, has been seen more on this type than any other type. Effect of Coffee on blood sugar level if you are not Diabetic Let us begin by first understanding the effect of coffee on people who are not suffering from diabetes already. The following are the effects: Coffee reduces the risk of contracting type 2 diabetes if you consume a moderate a Continue reading >>

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Part 1 of 8 Highlights For people without diabetes, coffee may help reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Caffeine has been shown in the short term to increase both glucose and insulin levels. Because of this, people with diabetes should be cautious when consuming coffee. Once sweetener is added to coffee, it removes the benefits of diabetes prevention. It can actually increase your risk of developing diabetes. Coffee was once condemned as being bad for your health. However, there’s growing evidence that it may protect against certain kinds of cancers, liver disease, depression, and Parkinson’s disease. There’s also compelling research that increasing your coffee intake may actually lower your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. This is good news for those of us who can’t face the day until we get in our cup of java. However, for those who already have type 2 diabetes, coffee could have adverse effects. Whether you’re trying to lower your risk, you have diabetes, or you just can’t go without your cup of joe, learn about coffee’s effects on diabetes. Part 2 of 8 According to the Mayo Clinic, diabetes is a disease (or group of diseases) that affects how your body processes blood glucose (sugar). Blood glucose is important because it is what fuels your brain and gives energy to your muscles and tissues. If you have diabetes, that means that you have too much blood glucose circulating in your body and it can cause serious health concerns. There are a number of different factors that can cause diabetes. Chronic diabetes types are type 1 and type 2. Other types include gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but tends to go away after birth. Another is prediabetes, which means your blood glucose levels are higher than usual but not as high as woul Continue reading >>

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