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Can Type 2 Diabetes Cause Heart Disease?

Drug That Lowers Blood Sugar To Combat Type 2 Diabetes ‘also Helps Fight Obesity And Heart Disease’

Drug That Lowers Blood Sugar To Combat Type 2 Diabetes ‘also Helps Fight Obesity And Heart Disease’

A DRUG used to treat diabetes has been hailed a game changer after experts found it not only slashes blood sugar levels but can also protect against heart and kidney disease. The drug, taken once a day, lowers blood pressure and combats obesity, one of the main causes of type 2 diabetes, a new study shows. Canagliflozin, sold under trade name Invokana, reduces the overall risk of heart disease by 14 per cent and slashed the risk of hospitalisation for heart failure by 33 per cent. And researchers from The George Institute for Global Health, found it also had a "significant impact" on the progression of kidney disease. Professor Bruce Neal described the findings as "exciting", adding they offer real hope to people with type 2 diabetes. He said: "Coronary heart disease is the biggest killer by far for people with type 2 diabetes. "Our findings suggest that not only does canagliflozin significantly reduce the risk of heart disease, it also has many other benefits too. "We found it also reduced blood pressure and led to weight loss. "Type 2 diabetes is growing rapidly all over the world and we need drugs that not only deal with glucose levels, but that also protect the many millions of people from the very real risks of stroke and heart attack." Getty Images Invokana is known as a SGLT2 inhibitor and is a relatively new drug, that works to block the body's reabsorption of sugar or glucose. It is already available to patients in the UK, prescribed by doctors to help manage type 2 diabetes. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) stated in 2014 canagliflozin is recommended for use alongside other diabetes medication including metformin and insulin. There are more than four million people in the UK living with diabetes, 90 per cent of whom have type 2. The Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Cardiovascular (cv) Disease Go Hand In Hand.

Type 2 Diabetes And Cardiovascular (cv) Disease Go Hand In Hand.

JARDIANCE is a prescription medicine used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes, and also to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death in adults with type 2 diabetes who have known cardiovascular disease. JARDIANCE is not for people with type 1 diabetes or for people with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). Dehydration. JARDIANCE can cause some people to have dehydration (the loss of body water and salt). Dehydration may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, light-headed, or weak, especially when you stand up. You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you: have low blood pressure, take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics), are on a low salt diet, have kidney problems, are 65 years of age or older. Ketoacidosis (increased ketones in your blood or urine). Ketoacidosis is a serious condition and may need to be treated in the hospital. Ketoacidosis may lead to death. Ketoacidosis occurs in people with type 1 diabetes and can also occur in people with type 2 diabetes taking JARDIANCE, even if blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL. Stop taking JARDIANCE and call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, and if possible, check for ketones in your urine: nausea, vomiting, stomach-area (abdominal) pain, tiredness, or trouble breathing. Serious urinary tract infections. Serious urinary tract infections can occur in people taking JARDIANCE and may lead to hospitalization. Tell your doctor if you have symptoms of a urinary tract infection such as a burning feeling when passing urine, a need to urinate often or right away, pain in the lower part of your stomach or pelvis, or blood in the urine. Sometimes people also may have a fever, back pain, nausea or vomit Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Increase The Risk Of Heart Disease?

How Can Diabetes Increase The Risk Of Heart Disease?

Diabetes is a disease that affects blood vessels. While we hear about the blood vessels in the eyes or the feet more commonly in diabetes, all blood vessels are affected. Usually we see the effect on the small vessels, but we also see an effect on the large vessels of the heart. People with diabetes, independent of other problems, have more heart attacks. An adult diagnosed with diabetes has the same high cardiac risk as someone who has already had a heart attack. At least 65% of people with diabetes will die from some type of cardiovascular disease -- a death rate that is two to four times that of the general population. Diabetes can also cause chronic kidney disease, which, in turn, can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease even more. The relationship between diabetes and heart disease is clear, but the causes are complex. Over time, too much glucose in the blood damages nerves and blood vessels. This in turn can cause heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases. Damage to the arteries leading to the brain can result in stroke. In addition, damage to the blood vessels in the legs can result in poor circulation and increase the risk of foot ulcers and amputations, while damage to the blood vessels that supply blood to the kidneys can cause kidney failure. Damage to the small blood vessels in the eye can eventually cause blindness. High blood glucose levels do not fully explain the relationship between diabetes and cardiovascular disease. People with diabetes also tend to have low-level inflammation of the lining of the arteries, which can interfere with the proper function of the blood vessels and make them more susceptible to developing atherosclerotic plaque - buildup of a fatty substance that narrows the artery. In addition, with diabetes there is a greate Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Heart — Make The Connection

Type 2 Diabetes And Your Heart — Make The Connection

If you have type 2 diabetes, you’re more likely to develop heart disease than those without diabetes. You’re also at greater risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Learn more below. Continue reading >>

Why Is Type 2 Diabetes Dangerous?

Why Is Type 2 Diabetes Dangerous?

What Are The Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes? Fatigue, thirst, blurred vision, dry mouth, excessive urination, weight loss, hunger, etc are some of the common symptoms of type 2 diabetes. How Type 2 Diabetes Is Different From Type 1 Diabetes? The cells of our body that release insulin, gets destroyed by the body's immune system in type 1 diabetes. It reduces the insulin production from the body. In type 2 diabetes, our body still makes insulin but the cells don't use insulin in a right way and this condition is known as insulin resistance. What Is The Normal Range Of Blood Glucose Levels? Normal blood glucose levels for a diabetic person should be 70-130 mg/dL before meals and under 180 mg/dL is recommended, 2 hours after meals. Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes High blood sugar may affect our eyes, feet, skin, Heart and blood vessels. Even common infections may become serious if you are suffering from diabetes. Diabetic patients experience a rapid fall in weight, as like the other cells of the body, the fat cells are also not able to utilize the sugar available in blood for their maintenance. Dehydration is another feature which affects the body cells. The patient feels thirsty and anxious all the time. Painful and frequent urination which is accompanied by urinary tract infections. Nausea and vomiting LONG TERM COMPLICATIONS OF DIABETES Long term complications of Diabetes include stroke, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, urinary infections and coronary artery disease. Continue reading >>

The Best (and Worst) Diabetes Drugs—for Your Heart

The Best (and Worst) Diabetes Drugs—for Your Heart

Heart disease is the number-one killer of people with type 2 diabetes, so you would think drugs that help control diabetes would be good for the heart. But the opposite is sometimes true—some commonly prescribed diabetes drugs actually increase your risk for heart disease. There are many ways this can happen, explains Debabrata Mukherjee, MD, chief of cardiovascular medicine at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso. “Sometimes they can cause hypoglycemia—low blood sugar—which can reduce the amount of nutrients going to the heart. Sometimes they raise bad lipids and lower good cholesterol, or increase water retention [which raises blood pressure]or reduce the ability of the coronary arteries to dilate properly. And some, we don’t understand why they raise the risk for heart disease.” How could these drugs be developed by the pharmaceutical industry and be approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) yet make people with diabetes more likely to develop heart disease? Read on to find out how we got into this mess—and learn which diabetes drugs actually protect your heart. RESEARCHING DRUGS…WITH BLINDERS ON Until 2008, clinical studies needed to get diabetes drugs approved by the FDA didn’t have to even look at cardiovascular effects. They just had to show that the drugs lowered blood sugar (glucose). That’s a crucial omission, since the risk for stroke, heart disease and death from heart disease in patients with diabetes is at least twice that of patients without diabetes. So that year, the FDA made it clear to drug manufacturers that it wanted to see new drugs for type 2 diabetes undergo clinical trials to demonstrate cardiovascular safety—in addition to blood glucose effects. Now we’re seeing the results of these studies. One Continue reading >>

Primary Prevention Could Reduce Heart Disease Among Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Primary Prevention Could Reduce Heart Disease Among Type 2 Diabetes Patients

In a Journal of the American College of Cardiology state of the art review published today, researchers from the division of cardiology and the Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease at the New York University Medical Center in New York City, examine evidence and guidelines for the prevention of heart disease in Type 2 Diabetes patients. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is one of the leading risk factors for heart disease and the most common cause of death in patients with Type 2 Diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 1 in 3 U.S. individuals may have Type 2 Diabetes by 2050. These patients will comprise an increasingly large portion of the heart disease population. However, less than 50 percent of U.S. adults with Type 2 Diabetes meet recommended guidelines for heart disease prevention. The researchers wrote, "cardiovascular risk reduction is critically important for the care of patients with diabetes, with or without known CVD and CV risk factors." They state the use of proven medical therapies, such as statins, aspirin and glucose lowering therapies, should be considered along with lifestyle management including exercise, nutrition and weight management, for all Type 2 Diabetes patients. This has the potential to significantly reduce the burden of heart disease among these patients. More information: Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2017). DOI: 10.1016/j.jacc.2017.07.001 Continue reading >>

What Are The Risks Associated With T2d And Cvd?

What Are The Risks Associated With T2d And Cvd?

When you treat patients with type 2 diabetes, you monitor their A1C and CV risk factors closely. However, in patients with diabetes, approximately two-thirds of deaths are attributable to CVD.1 Multiple mechanisms drive accumulated risks for CV morbidity over time in patients with diabetes. Mechanisms that have been implicated as of late include: Atherosclerotic plaques in patients with diabetes tend to be more unstable, leading to greater risk for plaque rupture and thrombosis5 Progression of CVD over time6,7 (see chart below) Worsening age-related changes in CV function increase morbidity8 In 2011, heart disease or stroke was reported in 28.3% of people with diabetes aged 35 to 64 vs 43.1% aged 65 to 74 and 55.1% aged 75 or older9 For every 1% increase in A1C, the risk of stroke, CHD, and death is increased 10% to 30%10 The Framingham heart study showed that for each decade with diabetes, the 10-year risk of CHD death can be up to 86% greater11 CV risk also increases with age, additional comorbidities, and diabetes progression8 CV=cardiovascular; CVD=cardiovascular disease; T2D=type 2 diabetes; CAD=coronary artery disease; PAD=peripheral artery disease; CHD=coronary heart disease References: Low Wang CC, Hess CN, Hiatt WR, Goldfine AB. Clinical update: cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and heart failure in type 2 diabetes mellitus–mechanisms, management, and clinical considerations. Circulation. 2016;133:2459-2502. Fitch KV, Blumen HE, Engel T. Cardiovascular event incidence and cost in type 2 diabetes: a commercial and Medicare claim based actuarial analysis. 2016; Published November 2016. Accessed February 1, 2017. Fihn SD, Gardin JM, Abrams J, et al. 2012 ACCF/AHA/ACP/AATS/PCNA/SCAI/STS Guideline for the diagnosis Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Jardiance Reduces Heart Disease Death

Diabetes Drug Jardiance Reduces Heart Disease Death

With commentary by senior study author Silvio Inzucchi, MD, professor of medicine and director of the Yale University Diabetes Center A new glucose-lowering drug, empagliflozin (Jardiance), can not only help treat diabetes, but can protect against cardiovascular-related deaths, new research suggests. That is important, since those with type 2 diabetes are at much higher risk of cardiovascular disease. About two of every three people with type 2 diabetes die of heart disease or stroke, the American Diabetes Association says. In the new study, Jardiance helped prevent one in three cardiovascular-related deaths in patients with diabetes who had established heart disease, the researchers found. "We found that the risk for cardiovascular death was reduced by 38%, overall death [from any cause] by 32%, and hospitalization for heart failure by 35%,'' says Silvio Inzucchi, MD, professor of medicine and director of the Yale University Diabetes Center. He presented the findings at the meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Stockholm on September 17. The findings were also published Sept. 17 in the The New England Journal of Medicine. "This is the first time that a diabetes drug has shown such a benefit in high-risk patients," Dr. Inzucchi says. "There were also no major safety signals [side effects] except for the known side effect of this class of increasing the risk of genital infections…'' Empagliflozin, or Jardiance, is in a class known as a SGLT-2, a sodium glucose cotransporter-2. It was FDA-approved in 2014. It can be given as a solo treatment or in combination with other diabetes drugs. Other drugs in the SGLT-2 class include Invokana (canagliflozin) and Farxiga (dapagliflozin), sometimes combined with other drugs. The SGLT-2 drugs lower Continue reading >>

Playing The Odds With Statins: Heart Disease Or Diabetes?

Playing The Odds With Statins: Heart Disease Or Diabetes?

Last year my cholesterol shot up despite living nowhere near a decent barbeque joint. I was totally stressed. I wasn't overweight. But I was pretty sedentary. My doctor prescribed a high dose of Lipitor, a powerful statin. For women of a certain age, statins are supposedly the best thing since Lycra for keeping wayward bodies in check. Statins interfere with the synthesis of low-density lipoprotein, the "bad" cholesterol. LDL is a prime suspect in heart disease, the top killer of women. The statin cut my cholesterol like buttah. But statins can also increase the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, muscle and/or liver damage. Heart trouble and diabetes run in my family. Was I trading a heart attack for diabetes? "We give statins to people with diabetes," was all my doc said. That didn't answer my question. I knew from an unrelated test that I did not currently have coronary artery disease, so I decided to investigate the statin situation. In 2012 the Food and Drug Administration slapped a black box warning on statins, saying that they could raise blood glucose levels in people at high risk of Type 2 diabetes. That meant an increase of anywhere from 9 to 27 percent in relative risk – in absolute terms about 0.3 excess cases of diabetes for every 100 people who are treated for a year with high-intensity statins (which lower cholesterol by 50 percent or more) and 0.1 excess cases of diabetes for every 100 people treated with moderate-intensity statins (which lower cholesterol by 30 to 50 percent.) Because doctors disagree on who should get statins, in 2013 the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association issued guidelines advising doctors not to treat to a cholesterol target, but to prescribe statins if patients fit into one of four risk categories an Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

Heart Disease (cardiovascular Disease, Cvd)

Heart Disease (cardiovascular Disease, Cvd)

Heart (cardiovascular) disease definition and facts Heart disease refers to various types of conditions that can affect heart function. These types include: Valvular heart disease that affects how the valves function to regulate blood flow in and out of the heart Heart rhythm disturbances (arrhythmias) that affect the electrical conduction Heart infections where the heart has structural problems that develop before birth Coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle and coronary artery disease occurs when there is a buildup of cholesterol plaque inside the artery walls. Over time, this buildup of plaque may partially block the artery and decrease blood flow through it. A heart attack occurs when a plaque ruptures and forms a clot in the artery causing a complete blockage. That part of the heart muscle that is denied blood supply starts to die. Classic signs and symptoms of coronary heart disease may include: Chest pain (angina) - This pain may radiate or move to the arm, neck or back. Irregular heartbeat Not all people with coronary artery disease have chest pain as a symptom. Some may have signs and symptoms of indigestion, or exercise intolerance where they cannot perform activities that they normally once could. Coronary heart disease is initially diagnosed by patient history and physical examination. EKG blood tests, and tests to image the arteries and heart muscle confirm the diagnosis. Treatment for coronary heart disease depends upon its severity. Many times lifestyle changes such as eating a heart healthy diet, exercising regularly, stopping smoking and controlling high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes may limit the artery narrowing. In some people, surgery or other procedures might be needed. Heart Disease: Symptoms, Signs, and Causes Women ex Continue reading >>

Heart Disease: The Diabetes Connection

Heart Disease: The Diabetes Connection

Most people living with diabetes are aware that they have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. But the statistics can be truly staggering: Nearly two-thirds of people with diabetes have high blood pressure, and, according to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die of heart disease or have a stroke than people who don't have the condition. The good news: Learning more about the link between heart disease and diabetes can help you take steps to help protect your heart and manage your diabetes. How Diabetes and Heart Disease Are Related The connection between diabetes and heart disease starts with high blood sugar levels. Over time, the high glucose in the bloodstream can damage the arteries, causing them to become stiff and hard. Fatty material that builds up on the inside of these blood vessels, a condition known as atherosclerosis. This can eventually block blood flow to the heart or brain, leading to heart attack or stroke. Your risk of heart disease with diabetes is further elevated if you also have a family history of cardiovascular disease or stroke. Other heart facts to consider: People with diabetes develop cardiovascular disease at a much earlier age than others. Heart disease that leads to heart attack or stroke is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes. A person who has diabetes has the same risk of heart attack as someone who is not diabetic, but already had a heart attack. Protecting Your Heart When You Have Diabetes If you believe you are at a higher risk for heart disease, don’t despair. There are several small lifestyle changes you can make to not only help prevent heart disease, but also manage your diabetes more effectively. Be active. The American Heart Association recomme Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes And Heart Disease

The link between diabetes and heart disease Heart and vascular disease often go hand-in-hand with diabetes. People with diabetes are at a much greater risk for heart attack, stroke, and high blood pressure. Other vascular problems due to diabetes include poor circulation to the legs and feet. Unfortunately, many cardiovascular problems can go undetected and start early in life. Silent heart disease in young people with diabetes Serious cardiovascular disease can begin before age of 30 in people with diabetes. The two most common types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes (also called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus) is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, resulting in no or a low amount of insulin. Type 2 diabetes (also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus) is the result of the body's inability to make enough, or to properly use insulin. According to the American Diabetes Association, damage to the coronary arteries is two to four times more likely in people with no symptoms who have type 1 diabetes than in the general population. Because symptoms may be absent at first, the American Diabetes Association recommends early diagnosis and treatment, as well as management, of risk factors. Many studies demonstrate people with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for heart disease. In fact, one study found that people with type 2 diabetes, without apparent heart problems, ran the same risk for heart disease as people without diabetes who had already suffered one heart attack. What causes heart disease in persons with diabetes? People with diabetes often experience changes in the blood vessels that can lead to cardiovascular disease. In people with diabetes, the linings of b Continue reading >>

Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease Scrutinized

Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease Scrutinized

The link between diabetes and heart disease is well-known -- diabetics are two to four times more likely to have cardiovascular disease than nondiabetics, and two-thirds will die of an early heart attack or stroke. But the link itself is poorly understood. "A person with diabetes and no cardiovascular history has the same risk of having a heart attack as a person who has had a prior heart attack," said Dr. Ruchi Mathur, an endocrinologist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Now researchers are attempting to figure out both the precise connection and what it means for treatment. "We need to understand why there is this risk because it has profound implications for therapy," said Dr. Jorge Plutzky, director of the vascular disease prevention program at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. "You should conceivably treat every patient with diabetes as aggressively as a heart attack survivor." That means going beyond the traditional focus on dramatically lowering blood sugar levels. Patients should also minimize a cluster of other risk factors that are common to both diabetes and cardiovascular disease: obesity, hypertension, unhealthy cholesterol profiles and, recent research indicates, inflammation. It also means that doctors should screen patients with heart disease for diabetes, and visa versa. By learning more about the mechanisms through which diabetes damages the heart, scientists may be able to interrupt or forestall the injury, extending patients' life span and improving their quality of life along the way. "People always think of diabetes as a sugar problem because it is diagnosed based on the amount of glucose in the blood," said Dr. Richard Nesto, chairman of the cardiology department at the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Mass. "However, we now recogniz Continue reading >>

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