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Can Type 2 Diabetes Cause Dental Problems?

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Did you know that trouble keeping your blood sugars in control could lead to an infection? That infection could be in your gums. That’s right. People with diabetes have a higher incidence of gum disease or periodontal disease than people without diabetes. In this article, we will look at the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. We will look at what it is, what are the prevention and treatment options available, some other oral problems that are also linked to diabetes, and more. Just like high blood glucose makes it easier for you to get an infection in other places in your body, high blood glucose levels also make it easier to get a gum infection, or other infection in your mouth. Decaying teeth and poor oral habits contribute to periodontal disease, as does smoking. We will take a look at all of that here. First, let’s see why Martin contacted TheDiabetesCouncil. Martin was interested in learning more about his high blood sugars and their effects on his teeth. He had been trying to get his blood sugar levels down, but nothing he seemed to do with diet, exercise, or medications helped in aiming his target range for blood sugars or in an A1C range that he was comfortable with. He was due to pay a visit to his dentist since his last visit was over a year ago. Martin’s dentist told him that he was at the start of a periodontal disease, and in addition, he had a gum infection. He wondered if the infection in his gums may be a reason for why he was unable to keep his blood glucose in a good range. An infection anywhere in your body could be a reason for unruly blood glucose. Let’s see if we can answer Martin’s question in depth. What is periodontal disease? Periodontal disease is an infection that develops of the gum, and underlying bone, that holds the Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

I just wrote an answer to this question about 5 minutes ago and will answer it again because it is so very important for you and for millions of other people. The answer to your question is yes. From my personal experience Type 2 Diabetes can be reversed. In March of 2017 I was diagnosed with Type II Diabetes. It really scared me. My father was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes at 60 and I watched him have to inject insulin 2 times a day. His body still deteriorated due to the diabetes. I did not want to end up like that. I was a chocoholic and ate huge portions. I was too heavy for my height and did not get enough exercise. I immediately got on the internet and started researching for cures for Type II Diabetes. I read all the information at the American Diabetes Association website and was thoroughly depressed. I was being told that I had a progressive disease with no cure that would last the rest of my life and finally cause my death. I learned that I would have to take progressively stronger medications to control my diabetes and BG, (Blood glucose levels). I decided that this path was not for me. I knew there had to be a cure for this terrible disease even if all these doctors and pharmaceutical companies were saying that there is no cure. I read everything I could find on T2 Diabetes. Causes, treatments, reversal and cure. I decided that changing my diet drastically to a low carb high fat diet, LCHF, was the way to go. I found a great deal of good information at Diet Doctor - Making low carb simple. So I did it. I absolutely changed my diet completely from that day. It was very difficult. My body was craving carbohydrates, especially sweets. I had physical flu symptoms from the body adjusting to this new diet. I used meditation and mindful eating to get through those Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Dental Care: 8 Problems And 9 Preventative Solutions

Type 2 Diabetes And Dental Care: 8 Problems And 9 Preventative Solutions

People with type 2 diabetes are more likely to suffer oral health complications. In fact, your risk is increased 2-3 fold compared with the rest of the population. This makes it especially important for you to understand what the issues can be, along with dental care practices you can use to prevent the complications. The most important thing to realize is that both your teeth and gums are affected by glucose levels in the blood. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more risk there is for developing all types of complications. Don't ignore your dental health because if untreated, over time, all areas of the mouth and even bone structure can be compromised. Here we talk about 8 possible dental problems, along with 9 preventative solutions. 8 Diabetes Dental Problems #1: Gingivitis Gingivitis is inflammation of the gums, the earliest stage of gum disease. Symptoms are irritated, swollen, red gums. If treated early, gingivitis may not progress to one of the following, more serious conditions. #2: Periodontitis This is a gum infection resulting in teeth pulling away from the gums. Pockets between teeth and gums can fill with germs or pus and become deeper. Eventually gum surgery may be needed. As the infection worsens, bone is destroyed and teeth may become loose and need to be pulled. #3: Dental Caries These are also known as cavities. They occur due to bacteria breaking down the hard tissue of the tooth, resulting in tooth decay. Cavities need to be filled with a composite material to avoid further erosion. #4: Tooth Loss If the teeth are unable to be saved, they may need to be pulled. This can cause distortion in remaining teeth and jaw/bone structure. If many or all teeth are pulled, eventually dentures will be needed to masticate food. Keep in mind that dentures are Continue reading >>

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

What is type 1 diabetes? It's a disease in which the pancreas is unable to produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that controls the amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and adolescents and is a lifelong (chronic) disease. In type 1 diabetes, there is no insulin to let glucose get into the cells, so sugar builds up in the bloodstream where it can cause life-threatening complications. Diabetes lowers the body's ability to fight infection and slows healing. People with type 1 diabetes must take insulin injections every day. In type 2 diabetes, the body may not be producing enough insulin or the insulin is not working adequately (insulin resistance). The pancreas initially makes extra insulin to compensate, but with time fails to produce enough to regulate blood glucose levels. This type of diabetes usually develops in adulthood and is more common. According to the American Diabetes Association, only 5 percent of people with diabetes have the type 1 form of the disease. People who suffer from diabetes are at high risk for tooth decay and other oral health problems. Symptoms Exhibited by Children with Diabetes According to JDRF, children with diabetes may exhibit the following symptoms: Thirst. Fatigue. Weight loss. Frequent urination. Vision changes. Fruity, sweet-smelling breath. Good blood sugar control requires a balance of food, exercise and medication. A diet rich in calcium and vitamin D helps to ensure strong bones and teeth. Proper blood sugar control is key to controlling and preventing oral health problems. Diabetes can contribute to bacteria growth in the mouth, plaque buildup and gum disease while also weakening the body's ability to fight back. Other Oral Complications According to the American Dental Associati Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Poorly controlled diabetic patients are at risk for numerous oral complications such as periodontal disease, salivary gland dysfunction, infection, neuropathy, and poor healing. Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is a common chronic disease of abnormal carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism that affects an estimated 20 million people in the United States, of whom about one third are undiagnosed. There are two major forms recognized, type-1 and type-2. Both are characterized by inappropriately high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). In type-1 diabetes the patient can not produce the hormone insulin, while in type-2 diabetes the patient produces insulin, but it is not used properly. An estimated 90% of diabetic patients suffer from type-2 disease. The causes of diabetes are multiple and both genetic and environmental factors contribute to its development. The genetic predisposition for type-2 diabetes is very strong and numerous environmental factors such as diet, lack of exercise, and being overweight are known to also increase one’s risk for diabetes. Diabetes is a dangerous disease which affects the entire body and diabetic patients are at increased risk for heart disease, hypertension, stroke, kidney failure, blindness, neuropathy, and infection when compared to nondiabetic patients. Diabetic patients also have impaired healing when compared to healthy individuals. This is in part due to the dysfunction of certain white blood cells that fight infection. The most common test used to diagnose diabetes is the fasting blood glucose. This test measures the glucose levels at a specific moment in time (normal is 80-110 mg/dl). In managing diabetes, the goal is to normalize blood glucose levels. It is generally accepted that by maintaining normalized blood glucose levels, one Continue reading >>

Does Periodontal Disease Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Does Periodontal Disease Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes has long been a risk factor for periodontal disease; new research may point to reverse causation. Diabetes has long been believed to be a risk factor for periodontal disease. Results of a new study show that the reverse might also be true, according to researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Ryan T. Demmer, PhD, MPH, associate research scientist in the department of epidemiology, said that these findings add a “new twist” to the association, suggesting that periodontal disease may lead to diabetes. “It has been generally accepted that periodontal disease is a consequence of diabetes despite the fact that this association has not been studied with the same methodological rigor applied to coronary and stroke outcomes,” he told Endocrine Today. “We found that over two decades of follow-up, individuals who had periodontal disease were more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life when compared to individuals without periodontal disease.” The researchers studied over 9,000 participants without diabetes from a nationally representative sample of the U.S. population, with more than 800 eventually developing diabetes. They then compared the risk of developing diabetes over the next 20 years between people with varying degrees of periodontal disease and found that individuals with elevated levels of periodontal disease were nearly twice as likely to become diabetic in that 20-year timeframe. Demmer said to keep an open mind about the results, however. “They certainly are thought-provoking, biologically plausible and supported by longstanding research regarding periodontal disease and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. While there are no immediate clinical implications that stem from these findings, they do suggest a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Care

Diabetes And Dental Care

Diabetes Puts Teeth and Gums More at Risk Probably the greatest impact of diabetes on dental health is that it can leave people more prone to gum disease. Most people in the population will experience or encounter some degree of gum disease (to a greater or lesser extent) throughout life. Gum disease is caused by oral bacteria. Poor glycaemic control as a complication of diabetes can make gum disease worse because it changes the immune response to these bacteria. This is especially so if someone has exposure to high glucose levels before diagnosis or starting treatment for their diabetes. Gum disease may just affect your teeth and gums, but can also be more widespread affecting your overall general health and glycaemic control. In its earliest form (gingivitis), it causes the gums to be inflamed so that they bleed on brushing and flossing. In its more progressive and advanced form (periodontitis), it causes bone and tooth loss by destroying the tissues that support and hold your teeth in place. Gum disease may also be associated with an increased risk of other diabetes complications such as cardiovascular (heart disease), cerebrovas cular (blood vessels supplying the brain) or peripheral vascular (obstruction of arteries outside the heart and brain) problems. A new Dental Cover Scheme for you and your Family DeCare Dental and ERM bring you a new dental insurance scheme that could help you not only save money on your dental bills but also to be more proactive about your dental health. Find out more at the end of this page. ERM Financial Services from DeCare Dental Insurance Ireland on Vimeo. How do I know if I have gum disease? You may not notice any symptoms of gum disease as it is usually silent and progressive. You may have gum disease if you have ever noticed or have Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Side Effect You've Never Heard Of

The Diabetes Side Effect You've Never Heard Of

Something to chew on: The 8.3% of Americans suffering from diabetes are also at greater risk for tooth loss—especially those over age 50, finds a new study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association. A team of New York-based researchers analyzed national data on more than 2,500 people age 50 and up. Here’s what they discovered: Diabetics—including those with type 1 and type 2 diabetes—were missing an average of nearly 10 teeth at the time of oral examination compared to non-diabetics, who were short fewer than seven teeth. And that’s not all: Diabetics were also twice as likely to suffer from edentulism, a complete absence of teeth; twenty-eight percent of diabetes sufferers were toothless, compared to just 14% of those without diabetes. The study authors say there may be several ways to explain the connection between diabetes and tooth loss. One theory is that hyperglycemia—or high blood sugar—disrupts the delivery of nutrients and removal of waste products from the tissue in the gums. Over time, that leads to periodontal disease and, eventually, to tooth loss. While those who have poorly controlled diabetes are most likely to experience tooth decay, even well-managed diabetics are more likely to suffer from periodontal disease. What should diabetics do to protect themselves? Apart from brushing twice a day and flossing regularly, some diabetics may need to visit their dentist four times a year for a professional tooth and gum cleaning, says study co-author Jayanth Kumar, DDS, MPH, of the New York State Department of Health’s bureau of dental health. Gum disease starts when bacteria on your teeth harden into tartar, and only your dentist can clear that tartar away. Avoid sugary snacks, which are well-known tooth decayers, and reach for Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Complications

Diabetes And Dental Complications

It has long been known that having diabetes increases the risk of severe periodontal disease. For example, people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop periodontal disease than those with well-controlled diabetes. Studies have found that poorly controlled diabetes respond differently to bacterial plaque at the gum line than do people with well-controlled diabetes and people without the disease. Also, people with poorly controlled diabetes have more harmful proteins (cytokines) in their gingival tissue, causing destructive inflammation of the gums. In turn, beneficial proteins (growth factors) are reduced, interfering with the healing response to infection. Lastly, people with diabetes tend to lose collagen, a protein that supports gums, skin, tendon cartilage, and bone, in their gum tissue, thus hastening periodontal destruction. Vascular disorders (caused by diabetes), such as reduced circulation in tiny blood vessels in the gums, interfere with nutrition and healing in the gum tissues. Young people with type 1 diabetes, especially those with poor control, are very vulnerable to early-onset periodontal disease as they reach puberty. Studies on Diabetes and Dental Problems A study published in the September 2002 issue of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice looked at 102 patients, average age 65 with type 2 diabetes. In this Swedish study, the researchers conducted a comprehensive dental examination and then compared these results with the same battery of tests given to a control group without diabetes but otherwise the same in terms of age and gender. The results indicate that subjects with diabetes had more pockets between teeth, which indicate moderate to advanced gum disease. They also had deeper pockets. The group with diabetes had mo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Problems

Diabetes And Dental Problems

by Katriena Knights If you have diabetes, blood sugar shouldn't be your only concern. The foods you eat can also affect the health of your gums and teeth. Diligent oral hygiene and regular dentist visits can keep these problems from developing, so it's important to know what the main causes and issues are. Let's take a look at some key connections between diabetes and dental problems. How Does Diabetes Cause Dental Problems? The main characteristic of diabetes is the body's inability to properly process sugars. This leads to a wide range of side effects, many of which require close attention. According to the National Institutes of Health, diabetics are at a greater risk for developing gum disease and tooth decay because high glucose levels in saliva can contribute to the build-up of plaque. For a diabetic, gum disease can be more common and severe, and often take longer to heal. And gum disease can even make your glucose levels harder to control. Be mindful of tooth decay and gum disease; both of these can lead to tooth loss if left untreated. Dental Problems Facing Diabetics According to the American Diabetes Association, there are other dental issues that are much more common among diabetics. Common ailments include: Periodontal disease Dry mouth Bad breath Diabetes can increase the likelihood of dry mouth, making you a prime candidate for bad breath. Dry mouth can cause ulcers and infections in your mouth, as well as cavities in your teeth. Diabetics are also more susceptible to gum disease such as gingivitis because of a decreased ability to fight off bacteria in the mouth. And the American Diabetes Association states that serious gum disease can actually affect the ability of diabetics to control blood glucose levels, which makes managing the disease difficult. Se Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

Diabetes And Dental Care: Guide To A Healthy Mouth

What do brushing and flossing have to do with diabetes? Plenty. If you have diabetes, here's why dental care matters — and how to take care of your teeth and gums. When you have diabetes, high blood sugar can take a toll on your entire body — including your teeth and gums. The good news? Prevention is in your hands. Learn what you're up against, and then take charge of your dental health. Cavities and gum disease Whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, managing your blood sugar level is key. The higher your blood sugar level, the higher your risk of: Tooth decay (cavities). Your mouth naturally contains many types of bacteria. When starches and sugars in food and beverages interact with these bacteria, a sticky film known as plaque forms on your teeth. The acids in plaque attack the surfaces of your teeth (enamel and dentin). This can lead to cavities. The higher your blood sugar level, the greater the supply of sugars and starches — and the more acid wearing away at your teeth. Early gum disease (gingivitis). Diabetes reduces your ability to fight bacteria. If you don't remove plaque with regular brushing and flossing, it'll harden under your gumline into a substance called tartar (calculus). The longer plaque and tartar remain on your teeth, the more they irritate the gingiva — the part of your gums around the base of your teeth. In time, your gums become swollen and bleed easily. This is gingivitis. Advanced gum disease (periodontitis). Left untreated, gingivitis can lead to a more serious infection called periodontitis, which destroys the soft tissue and bone that support your teeth. Eventually, periodontitis causes your gums and jawbone to pull away from your teeth, which in turn causes your teeth to loosen and possibly fall out. Periodontitis Continue reading >>

Why Dental Problems Make It Hard To Control Blood Glucose

Why Dental Problems Make It Hard To Control Blood Glucose

The nearly 30 million people living with type 2 diabetes may be surprised to learn about another unintended difficulty: dental problems, namely gum disease. People with diabetes are at an increased risk for serious gum disease, or what's known as periodontitis, because they are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection, and have a decreased ability to fight bacteria that invade the gums. On the flip side, serious gum disease may have the potential to affect blood-glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes. Too much glucose or sugar in your blood from the diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your teeth and gums because it helps allow harmful bacteria to grow in your saliva. These bacteria combine with food to form plaque, a soft, sticky film that causes tooth decay or cavities. If you have uncontrolled blood sugar, you're more likely to develop gum disease than someone who doesn't have diabetes. Other dental complications related to uncontrolled diabetes include thrush, an oral fungus, and dry mouth, which can cause sores and ulcers. If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, the better you control your blood glucose, the lower your risk is for periodontitis. 5 Simple Ways to Prevent Diabetes-Related Gum Disease To help prevent dental problems: Brush your teeth at least twice daily. Floss once a day, pressing the floss against your teeth and not your gums. Check for areas where your gums are red or painful. See your dentist right away if you think you have a problem. If you are having dental work, be sure to remind the hygienist and dentist that you have diabetes. Many dental treatments can affect your blood sugar. Your dentist may decide to delay some procedures — including dental surgery — if your blood-glucose levels ar Continue reading >>

Can Binge And Starve Diets Cause Or Increase The Risk Of Developing Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Binge And Starve Diets Cause Or Increase The Risk Of Developing Type 2 Diabetes?

Fast food diet, an ‘indoorsy’ lifestyle, limited exercise and an appetite for staying up late night, all this and more has tremendous impact on our health. Ignorance surrounding serious health risks and a general lax attitude in addressing symptoms is quite common amidst us. While some can make quick tweaks in routine and get on with a healthy life, some may suffer long term impact of ignorance in taking care of themselves. In this regard, one of the most common ailments seen these days, amongst people of all ages, is Diabetes. While this ailment may not seem severe at first, if not taken care, it could have devastating results. Having said that, diagnosed at the right time and cared for appropriately, this ailment could also be completely manageable. If you have diabetes or know somebody who is diabetic or if you are looking to steer clear of it altogether, we recommend having a look at these five free apps for diabetes risk assessment and care: 1) Diabetes App Lite - Blood Sugar Control, Glucose Tracker and Carb Counter A tracker, database and communication platform rolled into one, this app allows users to track carbohydrates consumed, helps review it against a vast database of food items (which is even available offline) and facilitates communication of daily food intake reports to care provider or doctor. This app even helps track and manage aspects like water consumption and exercise. 2) Diabetes Pedometer with Glucose & Food Diary, Weight Tracker, Blood Pressure Log and Medication Reminder by Pacer As the title suggests, this app is detailed in its approach towards diabetes management. It is primarily three pronged, in the sense that it helps manage food consumption, record test results and reminds user to take medication in predefined intervals. It is ideal Continue reading >>

7 Signs Of Disease Your Teeth Can Reveal

7 Signs Of Disease Your Teeth Can Reveal

You may have type 2 diabetes istock/FangXiaNuo Red, swollen gums that may bleed are the hallmarks of periodontal disease—an incredibly common condition that affects more than 47 percent of Americans 30 and older and more than 70 percent of adults 65 and older, according to the CDC. Periodontal disease is brought on by bacteria in the mouth that infect the tissues and create plaque. "Diabetes makes periodontal disease worse," says Paulo Camargo, DDS, professor of periodontics and associate dean for clinical dental sciences at UCLA School of Dentistry. "Periodontal disease can also make the blood sugar more difficult to control." Research shows that diabetes is a major risk factor for periodontitis, a more serious form of periodontal disease that can damage soft tissues and destroy the bone that supports teeth. In fact, people with diabetes are three times more susceptible to developing periodontitis than those who aren't diabetic. "If gums bleed a lot and are swollen or the patient is having frequent abscesses or infections, the dentist might start to question if you have a family history of diabetes," says Sally Cram, DDS, a periodontist in Washington, DC, and a spokesperson for the American Dental Association. Diabetes isn't the only health problem associated with periodontal disease: The disease, which triggers a harmful, inflammatory response, is also linked to a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. These are other type 2 diabetes symptoms you shouldn’t ignore. istock/stevanovicigor Eating garlic knots and forgetting to brush your tongue aren't the only causes of bad breath. In some cases, especially if you already have a solid brushing and flossing regimen in place, a lingering case of halitosis can signal a health problem, such as gastroesophageal reflux dis Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Smile

Diabetes And Your Smile

Did you know that 29.1 million people living in the United States have diabetes? That’s 9.3% of the population. Approximately 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year—and 8.1 million people living with diabetes don’t even know they have it. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to process sugar. All food you eat is turned to sugar and used for energy. In Type I diabetes, the body doesn’t make enough insulin, a hormone that carries sugar from your blood to the cells that need it for energy. In Type II diabetes, the body stops responding to insulin. Both cases result in high blood sugar levels, which can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. So what does this have to do with that smile of yours — and how can you protect it? First, it’s important to understand the signs of diabetes and the roles they play in your mouth. The Symptoms of Untreated Diabetes The warning signs of diabetes affect every part of your body. After a blood test, you may be told by a doctor that you have high blood sugar. You may feel excessively thirsty or have to urinate a lot. Weight loss and fatigue are other common symptoms. Diabetes can also cause you to lose consciousness if your blood sugar falls too low. If diabetes is left untreated, it can take a toll on your mouth as well. Here's how: You may have less saliva, causing your mouth to feel dry. (Dry mouth is also caused by certain medications.) Because saliva protects your teeth, you’re also at a higher risk of cavities. Gums may become inflamed and bleed often (gingivitis). You may have problems tasting food. You may experience delayed wound healing. You may be susceptible to infections inside of your mouth. For children with diabetes, teeth may erupt at an age earlier than is Continue reading >>

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