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Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Deadly?

World Diabetes Day 2012: Spreading Word On The Deadly Disease

World Diabetes Day 2012: Spreading Word On The Deadly Disease

Type 2 diabetes (the most common form of the disease) is a deadly epidemic! It’s estimated that: 26 million people in America have diabetes 95 percent of those are afflicted with Type 2 diabetes And another 79 million are suspected as pre-diabetic (at risk of developing the disease) Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body carries too much excess weight. It’s this weight storage that damages the body’s ability to use insulin (the hormone that controls blood sugar levels). “It causes all kinds of damage,” says Dr. Ronald Tammler, Endocrinologist at Mount Sinai Diabetes Center in New York, “At some point, the system breaks, and you get diabetes, damaged blood vessels, [or worse] heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, blindness and amputation.” On the other hand, Type 1 Diabetes ceases insulin production after the immune system attacks the pancreas and stops insulin production. Weight isn’t a factor for Type 1 diabetics, in fact, the cause is unknown. And while there are treatment options for Type 2 Diabetes—including insulin therapy, prescription medication, blood sugar monitoring, healthy eating and regular physical activity, and in extreme cases, bariatric surgery, living with diabetes isn’t easy. For the remaining millions of Americans not yet affected by Type 2 diabetes, the good news is you can proactively prevent the onset of the disease with simple healthy diet and active lifestyle choices. Dr. Tammler says, “Changing your lifestyle… what you eat and what physical activity you integrate into your life is more powerful than medications.” He also recommends the following for those at risk for Type 2 Diabetes: Avoid sugary sodas and juices Put the stop on your fast food addiction Curb late night, high-carbohydrate and fat snacks—such as potato c Continue reading >>

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Life Expectancy

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Life Expectancy

Type 2 diabetes typically shows up later in life, although the incidence in younger people is increasing. The disease, which is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar), or hyperglycemia, usually results from a combination of unhealthy lifestyle habits, obesity, and genes. Over time, untreated hyperglycemia can lead to serious, life-threatening complications. Type 2 diabetes also puts you at risk for certain health conditions that can reduce your life expectancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, diabetes is the 7th most common cause of death in the United States. However, there is no defining statistic to tell you how long you’ll live with type 2 diabetes. The better you have your diabetes under control, the lower your risk for developing associated conditions that may shorten your lifespan. The top cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes is cardiovascular disease. This is due to the fact that high blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels, and also because people with type 2 diabetes often have high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, and other factors that increase the risk of heart disease. When you have type 2 diabetes, there are many factors that can increase your risk of complications, and these complications can impact your life expectancy. They include: High blood sugar levels: Uncontrolled high blood sugar levels affect many organs and contribute to the development of complications. High blood pressure: According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), 71 percent of people with diabetes have high blood pressure. High blood pressure increases the risk of kidney disease, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and other complications. Lipid disorders: According to the ADA, 65 percent of those with diabetes have high low- Continue reading >>

Four Cups Of Coffee A Day ‘could Protect Against Deadly Diabetes’

Four Cups Of Coffee A Day ‘could Protect Against Deadly Diabetes’

GOOD news for coffee lovers. Drinking four cups of your favourite hot beverage a day could stave off type 2 diabetes. Getty - Contributor US researchers have discovered that a compound found in coffee improves cell function and insulin sensitivity in mice. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas doesn't produce enough of the hormone insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin. Insulin is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. If the body has problems producing or reacting to insulin then the blood sugar levels become too high. Previous studies have suggested drinking three or four cups of coffee a day can reduce the risk of developing the disease, but until now scientists did not know why. Initially scientists thought the caffeine in coffee was responsible for controlling insulin levels, but lab tests revealed a compound called cafestol was the key. Getty - Contributor Cafestol increased insulin production in the pancreas when they were exposed to glucose (sugar). It also increased the rate at which muscle cells were absorbing glucose as effectively as anti-diabetic drugs. Researchers from the American Chemical Society set out to see if the compound would help prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. ARE YOU AT RISK? What is diabetes, what’s the difference between types 1 and 2, what are the signs to watch out for and how is it treated? All you need to know In tests on mice given two different doses of cafestol both sets had lower blood sugar levels and improve insulin production after 10 days. Cafestol also didn't cause blood sugar levels to become too low, known as hypoglycemia, which is a possible side effect of some diabetes medication. The researchers hope the compound could one day be used in a drug to prevent diabetes in p Continue reading >>

A Deadly Form Of Diabetes That Doctors Sometimes Miss

A Deadly Form Of Diabetes That Doctors Sometimes Miss

HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- Addie Parker was a happy 4-year-old who appeared to have the flu. But within hours she was in a coma. Tragically, her parents weren't familiar with the signs of type 1 diabetes -- extreme fatigue, thirst and sweet-smelling breath, among others -- in time to save their little girl. Soon after she was diagnosed, Addie's brain hemorrhaged. She died six days later, about a month shy of her fifth birthday. Experts say a lack of awareness of the signs of type 1 diabetes is all too common. Just this month, a Wisconsin toddler died apparently because of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. "Addie had flu symptoms," recalled her mother, Micki Parker, who works in the operating room at a nearby hospital but was unfamiliar with type 1 diabetes. "By the next morning, she was throwing up every hour," Parker said. Addie didn't have a fever, but later that day, she couldn't get up from the bathroom floor because she was so dizzy. Eventually, the Parkers learned that Addie's blood sugar level was 543 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) -- more than four times higher than normal, according to the American Diabetes Association. Most people have heard of type 2 diabetes, but type 1 diabetes is far less common. It can strike at any age -- even though it used to be known as juvenile diabetes -- and it always requires treatment with injected insulin or insulin delivered through a pump. People with type 1 diabetes don't produce insulin, a hormone needed to convert the food you eat into fuel for the body. Without insulin, glucose (blood sugar) rises to unhealthy levels. Untreated, type 1 diabetes causes serious complications and even death. But it's often mistaken for other illnesses -- even by doctors. "There's an underawareness of type 1 diabete Continue reading >>

Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes And Pregnancy

Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes And Pregnancy

Problems of Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well controlled in a pregnant woman with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes could lead to problems for the woman and the baby: Birth Defects The organs of the baby form during the first two months of pregnancy, often before a woman knows that she is pregnant. Blood sugar that is not in control can affect those organs while they are being formed and cause serious birth defects in the developing baby, such as those of the brain, spine, and heart. Download Chart[PDF – 167KB] An Extra Large Baby Diabetes that is not well controlled causes the baby’s blood sugar to be high. The baby is “overfed” and grows extra large. Besides causing discomfort to the woman during the last few months of pregnancy, an extra large baby can lead to problems during delivery for both the mother and the baby. The mother might need a C-Section to deliver the baby. The baby can be born with nerve damage due to pressure on the shoulder during delivery. C- Section (Cesarean Section) A C-section is a surgery to deliver the baby through the mother’s belly. A woman who has diabetes that is not well controlled has a higher chance of needing a C-section to deliver the baby. When the baby is delivered by a C-section, it takes longer for the woman to recover from childbirth. High Blood Pressure (Preeclampsia) When a pregnant woman has high blood pressure, protein in her urine, and often swelling in fingers and toes that doesn’t go away, she might have preeclampsia. It is a serious problem that needs to be watched closely and managed by her doctor. High blood pressure can cause harm to both the woman and her unborn baby. It might lead to the baby being born early and also could cause seizures or a stroke (a blood clot or a bleed in the brain that ca Continue reading >>

‘i Was 26 And Most Type 1 Diabetics Are Diagnosed In Childhood': The Deadly Danger Too Many Diabetics Aren't Warned About

‘i Was 26 And Most Type 1 Diabetics Are Diagnosed In Childhood': The Deadly Danger Too Many Diabetics Aren't Warned About

Hannah Postles discovered she had type 1 diabetes after going to A&E with blurred vision. It wasn’t her only symptom. For the previous three weeks, she’d been thirsty, drinking two bottles of water at lunch, had lost weight and felt run down. Scroll down for video ‘My boss suggested I might have diabetes after looking up my symptoms online, but my GP seemed to dismiss it because of my age,’ says Hannah, a press officer for the University of Sheffield. ‘I was 26 and most type 1 diabetics are diagnosed in childhood.’ Luckily, Hannah spoke to a doctor friend who told her to go to A&E, where she was tested for diabetes, and immediately put on an insulin drip. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body doesn’t make insulin, the hormone that regulates glucose levels in the blood. Typically, people with type 1 diabetes are diagnosed around the age of 12 — although occasionally adults are diagnosed in later life. Type 2 diabetes, which can be diagnosed at any age, occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin itself does not work properly. Not only did Hannah have diabetes, her blood sugar levels were so out of control by the time she was diagnosed that she had developed diabetic ketoacidosis, a life-threatening condition when blood glucose levels remain persistently high for days or weeks. The condition can be caused by illness or infection or by the mismanagement of diabetes — which, as Hannah, now 29, discovered, can be the result of not knowing you have it. Symptoms include vomiting, headaches, abdominal pain and, if left too long, coma and even death. Had Hannah not gone to A&E, she might have died. In July 2012, new mother Nicky Rigby, 26, from the Wirral, did die from undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. She’d assumed her chronic tiredness a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease caused by inherited and/or acquired deficiency in production of insulin by the pancreas, or by the ineffectiveness of the insulin produced. Such a deficiency results in increased concentrations of glucose in the blood, which in turn damage many of the body's systems, in particular the blood vessels and nerves. There are two principle forms of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes (formerly known as insulin-dependent) in which the pancreas fails to produce the insulin which is essential for survival. This form develops most frequently in children and adolescents, but is being increasingly noted later in life. Type 2 diabetes (formerly named non-insulin-dependent) which results from the body's inability to respond properly to the action of insulin produced by the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is much more common and accounts for around 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide. It occurs most frequently in adults, but is being noted increasingly in adolescents as well. Certain genetic markers have been shown to increase the risk of developing Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is strongly familial, but it is only recently that some genes have been consistently associated with increased risk for Type 2 diabetes in certain populations. Both types of diabetes are complex diseases caused by mutations in more than one gene, as well as by environmental factors. Diabetes in pregnancy may give rise to several adverse outcomes, including congenital malformations, increased birth weight and an elevated risk of perinatal mortality. Strict metabolic control may reduce these risks to the level of those of non-diabetic expectant mothers. Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) refer to levels of blood glucose concentration above the normal r Continue reading >>

What It’s Like To Have Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

What It’s Like To Have Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

One of the greatest dangers of type 2 diabetes is that it can be slow and silent. Many people with the condition don’t experience any symptoms at all, even though their unbalanced blood sugar is already affecting their cells and tissue. You might be one of those people. How can you tell if you're at risk for developing type 2 diabetes? You may be more likely to develop the condition if you: Are overweight, with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or higher Are inactive Are age 45 or older Have a family history of type 2 diabetes Are African-American, Hispanic, American Indian, Asian-American, or a Pacific Islander Have low levels of HDL, or the “good” cholesterol Have high levels of triglycerides (a type of fat) in your blood Although the telltale signs of type 2 diabetes may develop slowly over many years, the condition will cause symptoms for many people. Do any of these sound familiar? Increased thirst Frequent urination Increased hunger Unexplained weight loss Extreme fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Sores that are slow to heal Skin, bladder, or gum infections Whether you're experiencing any of these symptoms or not, uncontrolled levels of high blood sugar over time can lead to tissue damage throughout your body, from your eyes to your toes. Uncontrolled Diabetes Is Scary — and Even Deadly Type 2 diabetes damages essential systems in your body: your blood vessels, nerves, or both. The consequences of uncontrolled diabetes can be very serious, and some can eventually be fatal. They include: Infections Amputations due to infections in the feet These complications sound scary — and they are. Fortunately, controlling your blood-glucose levels can help prevent many of these secondary problems, or at least manage them if they have already developed. Take Action Tod Continue reading >>

Avoid Diabetes Deadly Effects – By Early Action

Avoid Diabetes Deadly Effects – By Early Action

Summary: One in four Americans with type 2 diabetes doesn’t know they have the disease. Walking around with untreated diabetes more than doubles your risk of stroke, heart attack, and early death. Add years to your life by knowing your status, and then managing the condition. This article provides a two-minute online assessment, which shows if you are at risk. [This article first appeared on the website LongevityFacts.com. Author: Brady Hartman.] Today, one in eight adult Americans has diabetes, according to the latest report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Amazingly, one in four of them doesn’t know they have the disease. Walking around with untreated diabetes more than doubles your risk of severe health complications, including stroke, heart attack, and early death. You can add years to your life by managing type 2 diabetes, a disease which can be treated with inexpensive tablets. Minimize the health-harming effects of type 2 diabetes by getting tested and treated early. This article provides ADA guidelines as to who should get tested for type 2 diabetes. Additionally, you can assess your risk of having diabetes using the free online assessment included in this article. Article Takeaways One in four people with the disease is unaware they have diabetes, a practice that steals years from their lives unnecessarily. They don’t know they have the disease because they haven’t taken the test. Early detection and proper treatment for type 2 diabetes can help the prevent the deadly effects of the disease and add years to a diabetic’s life Typical treatment for type 2 diabetes starts with inexpensive, once a day tablets. Use a free online assessment to know your risk. If you are at high risk, then take the test for type 2 diabetes. Wha Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 10 Deadliest Myths

Diabetes: 10 Deadliest Myths

More than 24 million Americans have diabetes, and many people who have the disease don't know it. What can be done to reduce the risk of this devastating illness, which can lead to heart attack, stroke, blindness, and amputations? Quite a bit, says diabetes expert Dr. Neal Barnard, president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. The key, he says, is not to fall victim to common myths about the disease. Here are 10 of the worst. Myth: Diabetes Doesn't Run in My Family, So I'm Safe Many people develop diabetes despite the fact that they have no family history of the disease. Heredity certainly plays a role, but studies involving identical twins show it is not the only factor. When one twin has type 1 diabetes, the other has a fifty-fifty chance of having it, too. For type 2 diabetes, twins are more likely to share the diagnosis - the odds of the second twin having it can be as high as 75 percent. But even then, the reason may be that their diets and weight gain are similar. Bottom line? To minimize your risk for diabetes, you need to exercise and watch what you eat no matter what your family history is. Myth: Diabetes Is Caused by Eating Carbohydrates Diabetes is least common in the population groups whose diets emphasize carbohydrates. Take Japan, where rice is a traditional staple. Prior to 1980, fewer than 5 percent of the adult population there had diabetes. But once fast food and meat started to displace rice, diabetes became much more prevalent. By 1990 the prevalence of diabetes in Japan had doubled. In the U.S., the risk for type 2 diabetes is highest among frequent meat-eaters. Vegans have the lowest risk, and other groups (semi-vegetarians, fish-eaters, and lacto-ovo-vegetarians) are in between. The real problem seems to be not carbohydrates, but Continue reading >>

Silent Hypoglycemic Episodes Can Be Deadly For Type 2’s

Silent Hypoglycemic Episodes Can Be Deadly For Type 2’s

A correlation may exist between asymptomatic episodes of ventricular arrhythmias and silent hypoglycemic episodes…. Markolf Hanefeld, MD, PhD, of Technical University Dresden in Germany, and colleagues believe this may provide an explanation for the risk of sudden death during instances of hypoglycemia in patients with coexisting diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In the study, patients were only able to identify a few minor symptomatic hypoglycemic episodes, but with continuous monitoring there was a multitude of serious ventricular arrhythmias recorded, reported the research team at the annual European Association for the Study of Diabetes meeting. Hanefeld stated in his verbal presentation that what motivated him and his research team to conduct the study was data from other studies showing severe hypoglycemic events being associated with cardiovascular deaths. This spurred the team to recruit 29 men and 1 woman with diagnosed diabetes and documented cardiovascular disease. The participants were monitored continuously with a Medtronic MiniMedGold device to track interstitial subcutaneous glucose levels for 2-5 days. They also were monitored continuously with an Amedec ECGPro for 5 days. By the end of the study, the research team was able to demonstrate that episodes of mild hypoglycemia, even those that were asymptomatic, were correlated with episodes of ventricular arrhythmia. The patient population was typically 68 years old with an average A1c of 7.3%, and were maintained on an insulin or oral antidiabetes regimen. Of the 30 participants, 19 participants did not have a severe hypoglycemic event, which is classified as a blood glucose level less than 3.1 mmol/L (56 mg/dL). A hypoglycemic episode was classified as anytime a blood glucose level was less than 70 m Continue reading >>

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Late Update: To be completely clear, the goal of this post is to point out how unproductive this question is. It comes up from time to time in the forums, but only leads to division. We all, regardless of type, have plenty to share with each other. Now, on to the original article. On our Facebook page, we discussed the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In the process, some type 1s and type 2s both suggested that they had it worse. Before we look at this question, let’s review the difference between the two types. The Difference Between Type 1 & Type 2 Imagine insulin is the key that opens your cells and lets sugar enter. If sugar can’t enter, it builds up in the blood, makes you hungry and thirsty, and causes your body to turn to fat for energy. The symptoms of diabetes. In type 1, your pancreas stops making keys. You need to put keys in your body (i.e. inject insulin) or sugar can’t get into your cells. In type 2 diabetes, the keyhole is rusty. You have keys, but they have trouble opening the cells. You either need more keys or a way to make the lock work better. You can take a little rust off the lock by exercising, losing weight, or taking medication. This is an imperfect analogy, but hopefully it highlights the basic difference. So Which Type Is Worse? This is a maddening question. Every person is unique, and neither type is a cake walk! Type 1s need insulin to live – but type 2s can require enormous amounts of insulin as their resistance to it increases and their insulin production declines. Type 2s can walk around undiagnosed for 5 years and have complications when diagnosed. People with type 1 usually get diagnosed quickly and can take immediate action. But don’t type 1s live with diabetes for a longer period of time? Not always! Some type Continue reading >>

Your First Vet Visit: Diagnosing Feline Diabetes

Your First Vet Visit: Diagnosing Feline Diabetes

Your first vet visit: diagnosing feline diabetes Your veterinarian can diagnose diabetes with a simple, in-office physical examination of the cat and laboratory tests, which will determine if there is an abnormally high level of sugar in the bloodstream and urine. Your veterinarian may ask if your cat has exhibited any of the following symptoms, indicating a possibility of feline diabetes: Increased thirst Sudden increase in appetite Sudden weight loss (despite an increase in appetite) Increased urination Increased lethargy Understanding your cat's diagnosis The food your cat eats is broken down into glucose during the digestion process. Glucose is the fuel that provides energy needed by the cells of the body to sustain life. As glucose enters the bloodstream, the cat's pancreas secretes insulin. Insulin is a hormone released in small amounts to properly balance the blood sugar (glucose) levels in the blood. Feline diabetes is similar to human diabetes, and occurs when your pet either doesn't produce or is unable to process insulin, a hormone that helps regulate glucose or sugar in the bloodstream. Just like humans, diabetic cats are diagnosed primarily with Type 2 diabetes.The types of diabetes in cats are based on the human classification system. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 form of diabetes is defined as an absolute insulin deficiency. In this form, the pancreas is not able to produce enough insulin to regulate the glucose in the bloodstream, leading to persistent high glucose levels in the blood. This type of diabetes is very rare in the cat. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes in cats, occurs when the cells in the cat's body don't respond to the insulin that is being provided. As a result, the cat becomes hyperglycemic (high blood sugar), wh Continue reading >>

Why Doctors Believe This Toxic Myth

Why Doctors Believe This Toxic Myth

The single most dangerous idea you are likely to encounter after getting a diabetes diagnosis is the belief that science has proven, beyond a doubt, that no matter what you do, your Type 2 Diabetes will get worse. Your doctors probably believe this. Though they may give lip service to the idea that you can control your disease through diet, exercise, and drugs, most family doctors actually believe that nothing you can do will make much difference in your long-term outcome. This is why they are not likely to urge you to take an aggressive approach to managing your disease but merely write prescriptions for drugs that, if they do anything at all, do a mediocre job of controlling your blood sugars. They've Seen Poor Outcomes Among Their Own Patients Doctors will tell you that they've treated lots of patients with type 2 diabetes and that few, if any, of their patients can control their diabetes with diet. They'll say that their patients cannot lose weight, and that even with good control they end up with complications. What they don't understand is that the diet they have been recommending, thanks to the American Diabetes Association's partnership with so many national and state health authorities, is a high carbohydrate, low fat diet that contains so much sugar and starch it would raise the blood sugar of most normal people. Bananas and whole wheat bread won't control diabetes, but a diet that lowers your intake of starches and sugars often will--no matter how much fat it contains. They Think the UKPDS Study "Proved" People with Good Control Deteriorate Doctors will also tell you that a large-scale study, the UKPDS (United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study) proved that even with good control patients with Type 2 diabetes inevitably deteriorated over time. The UKPDS, they Continue reading >>

Sepsis And Diabetes

Sepsis And Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (life-long) autoimmune disease that has a significant impact on your life. Having diabetes means you must work to control your blood glucose (sugar) levels to be sure that they don’t get too high or too low. The amount of glucose in your blood is important. Your body needs glucose for energy, but too much of it can destroy body tissues and too little can starve your body of nutrients. People who have diabetes are also at risk of developing wounds and sores that don’t heal well. While the wounds are present, they are at high risk of developing infection. And, again because of the diabetes, the infections can get severe quickly. When infection overwhelms the body, the body can respond by developing sepsis and going into septic shock. Sometimes incorrectly called blood poisoning, sepsis is the body’s often deadly response to infection. Sepsis kills and disables millions and requires early suspicion and rapid treatment for survival. Sepsis and septic shock can result from an infection anywhere in the body, such as pneumonia, influenza, or urinary tract infections. Worldwide, one-third of people who develop sepsis die. Many who do survive are left with life-changing effects, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), chronic pain and fatigue, organ dysfunction (organs don’t work properly) and/or amputations. What is diabetes? Your pancreas is a small organ (about 6” by 1.5”) that is part of your digestive system. It is connected to your small intestine and it lies just below your stomach towards the back. Your pancreas has a few roles, one is to help digest the food you eat and another is to secrete (send out) insulin, which stimulates your cells to use the glucose in the food and drink you consume. When a person has diabetes, the pancre Continue reading >>

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