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Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Cured With Weight Loss?

Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Cured Or Reversed With Weight Loss?

Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Cured Or Reversed With Weight Loss?

Type 2 diabetes is not curable, and cannot be reversed with weight loss. Weight loss and regular exercise will help overweight patients with type 2 diabetes return to normal blood glucose (sugar), but diabetes will never go away. With a healthy lifestyle that includes diet, exercise and possibly medication including insulin injections that will help blood glucose stay in the normal range. Diabetes can be well-managed. Source: Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Many doctors and patients do not realize that weight loss can reverse type 2 diabetes. Instead, there is a widespread belief that the disease is "progressive and incurable," according to a new report published in the BMJ. This is despite there being "consistent evidence" that shedding around 33 pounds (15 kilograms) often produces "total remission" of type 2 diabetes, note Prof. Mike E. J. Lean and other researchers from the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom. The thrust of their paper is that greater awareness, when combined with better recording and monitoring of remissions, could result in many more patients no longer having to live with type 2 diabetes and a massive reduction in healthcare costs. The global burden of type 2 diabetes has nearly quadrupled over the past 35 years. In 1980, there were around 108 million people with the disease, and by 2014, this number had risen to 422 million. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is a disease that results when the body becomes less effective at using insulin to help cells to convert blood sugar, or glucose, into energy. Excess body weight is a main cause of this type of diabetes. In the United States, an estimated 30.3 million people, or around 9.4 percent of the population, have diabetes - including around 7.2 million who do not realize it. Diabetes accounts for a high portion of the national bill for taking care of the sick. The total direct and indirect cost of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. was estimated to be $245 billion in 2012. In that year, of the $13,700 average medical spend for people with diagnosed diabetes, more than half (around $7,900) was directly attributed to the disease. Treatment 'focuses on drugs' Prof. Lean and colleagues note that the current management guideli Continue reading >>

Why It Pays To Lose Weight If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

Why It Pays To Lose Weight If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

The point is not to get skinny. The point is to gain the benefits of exercise.(ISTOCKPHOTO) About eight out of every 10 people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, and excess weight—particularly around the bellyis a major cause of type 2 diabetes. Some people can even "cure" the disease with massive weight loss (including bariatric surgery). However, the relationship between weight and type 2 diabetes is a tricky one. Complex relationship between genes, weight, and diabetes An unexplained weight loss is sometimes a sign that's something wrong. So when you are finally diagnosed and treated you may actually gain weight. In addition, it's not clear if extra weight causes diabetes, or if some underlying genetic component contributes to both. "A lot of folks who are overweight and who are sedentary won't get diabetes. So there's an important genetic contribution to developing diabetes that's out of people's control," says William Bornstein, MD, an endocrinologist at the Emory Clinic in Atlanta. "Secondly, it may be actually harder for folks with diabetes to lose weight, that that may be part of the disease as well." Certain diabetes drugs, such as sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, and insulin, are associated with weight gain, too. However, the blood-sugar-lowering benefits of these drugs outweigh the risks of gaining weight. (Others, such as Byetta and metformin, may result in weight loss). While it may feel like the deck is stacked against youparticularly if you've lost and regained weight in the pastyou should still make an all-out effort to shed excess pounds. Now that you have type 2 diabetes, the goal isn't to get back into your high school jeans, but to prevent heart attacks, save your vision, and avoid amputations. Trying to lose weight is im Continue reading >>

Does Weight Loss Cure Type 2 Diabetes?

Does Weight Loss Cure Type 2 Diabetes?

Losing weight could reverse type 2 diabetes, according to the media, but is it true? We look at the research behind the headlines. Diabetes occurs when your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin that is being produced. Type two diabetes is much more common than type 1 and being overweight is one of the factors that increase the risk of developing this condition. We already know that losing weight can help you control your type 2 diabetes. This study, published in The Lancet, investigated the use of a weight management approach which includes a low calorie meal-replacement diet, followed by a transition back onto a healthy diet. In the study participants were supported through this change and to maintain their weight loss gradually by health professionals. The research The researchers looked at 30 patients aged 20-65 who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes within the past six years (on average, they'd had diabetes for three years), and were not using insulin. They were classed as significantly overweight or obese due to their BMI (body mass index), and they were from Scotland and the Tyneside region of England. Nearly half of people in the weight loss group had normal blood glucose measurements a year later Half of the group were put a strict weight loss programme, called the Counterweight-Plus weight management programme, in which their normal diet was replaced by milkshakes and soups for three to five months, with a maximum 853 calories each day – about a third of the average energy needs of a man and less than half those of a woman. This was followed by a gradual reintroduction of solid food, and support to maintain their weight loss long-term. If they were taking tablets for diabetes, these were stopped at the start of Continue reading >>

Weight Loss As A Cure For Type 2 Diabetes

Weight Loss As A Cure For Type 2 Diabetes

Weight Loss as a Cure for Type 2 Diabetes Expert Rev Endocrinol Metab.2011;6(4):557-561. Although individuals with obesity and Type 2 diabetes are insulin resistant, pancreatic -cell failure is the core defect that distinguishes individuals who eventually develop diabetes. This process is known to occur well before the onset of hyperglycemia. Although clinical trial data support the effectiveness of intensive lifestyle modification in delaying the onset of diabetes in obese subjects, less is known about the effects of, and mechanisms underlying, bariatric surgery, particularly gastric bypass surgery, on diabetes. The paper under evaluation clarifies the role of both lifestyle intervention and gastric bypass surgery on pancreatic -cell function and raises questions regarding the role of weight loss versus incretin-related mechanisms on recovery of -cell failure. The current pandemic of Type 2 diabetes and obesity has created an urgent need to identify effective therapeutic interventions targeting both of these chronic debilitating conditions. Obesity and diabetes are closely interrelated (see Figure 1) in that risk factors such as physical inactivity and poor diet lead to weight gain and precipitate insulin resistance in important insulinsensitive tissues, particularly skeletal muscle, liver and adipose tissue. It is known that obese and insulin-resistant diabetic patients have a positive energy balance, high fat and high carbohydrate intake, increased abdominal adipose tissue, elevated free fatty acids, increased secretory products of adipocytes mediating inflammation, including TNF- and IL-6, and reduced secretion of adiponectin.[ 1 , 2 ] These factors have been shown to be part of the underlying mechanisms of glucose intolerance and contribute to reduced skeletal mus Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Cured Through Weight Loss, Newcastle University Finds

Type 2 diabetes can be cured through weight loss, Newcastle University finds Type 2 diabetes can be reversed with weight loss, scientists have shownCredit:Bill Cheyrou/ Alamy Millions of people suffering from Type 2 diabetes could be cured of the disease if they just lost weight, a new study suggests. Scientists at Newcastle University have shown the disease is caused by fat accumulating in the pancreas and losing less than one gram from the organ can reverse the life-limiting illness and restore insulin production. Type 2 diabetes affects 3.3 million people in England and Wales and, until now, was thought to be chronic. It can lead to blindness, stroke, kidney failure and limb amputation. For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal Professor Roy Taylor, Newcastle University But now researchers at Newcastle have shown that the disease can be reversed , even in obese people who have had the condition for a long time. 18 obese people with Type 2 diabetes who were given gastric band surgery and put on a restricted diet for eight weeks were cured of their condition. During the trial the patients, aged between 25 and 65, lost an average of 2.2 stone, which was around 13 per cent of their body weight. Crucially they also lost 0.6 grams of fat from their pancreas, allowing the organ to secrete normal levels of insulin. The team is now planning a larger two year study involving 200 people with Glasgow University to check that the findings can be replicated and weight loss can be sustained for two years. For people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight allows them to drain excess fat out of the pancreas and allows function to return to normal, said Professor Roy Taylor, of Newcastle Uni Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It? - Topic Overview

Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It? - Topic Overview

Can you "reverse" type 2 diabetes? Can you cure it? Diabetes can go into remission. When diabetes is in remission, you have no signs or symptoms of it. But your risk of relapse is higher than normal.1 That's why you make the same daily healthy choices that you do for active type 2 diabetes. There is no known cure for type 2 diabetes. But it can be controlled. And in some cases, it goes into remission. For some people, a diabetes-healthy lifestyle is enough to control their blood sugar levels. That means losing weight if you are overweight, eating healthy foods, and being more active. But most people with type 2 diabetes also need to take one or more medicines or insulin. Of those people who don't need diabetes medicine, some find that their diabetes does "reverse" with weight control, diabetes-healthy eating, and exercise. Their bodies are still able to make and use insulin, and their blood sugar levels go back to normal. Their diabetes is in remission. "Complete remission" is 1 year or more of normal A1c and fasting glucose levels without using diabetes medicine. When you have complete remission, you still get tested for high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and kidney and eye problems. You do regular foot checks.1 "Prolonged remission" is 5 years or more of normal A1c and blood sugar levels without using diabetes medicine. You might have lab tests less often. But your doctor will still check on any heart, eye, foot, or other health problems you have had from diabetes, even if they are better than before.1 Remission is most likely in the early stage of diabetes or after a big weight loss. It can also happen after bariatric surgery for weight loss, which can trigger healthy changes in the body's insulin system. Remission is less likely in the later st Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious, long-term medical condition. It develops mostly in adults but is becoming more common in children as obesity rates rise across all age groups. Several factors contribute to type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor. Type 2 diabetes can be life-threatening. But if treated carefully, it can be managed or even reversed. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. When your blood sugar (glucose) levels rise, the pancreas releases insulin. This causes sugar to move from your blood to your cells, where it can be used as an energy source. As glucose levels in your blood go back down, your pancreas stops releasing insulin. Type 2 diabetes impacts how you metabolize sugar. Either your pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or your body has become resistant to its effects. This causes glucose to build up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia. There are several symptoms of untreated type 2 diabetes, including: excessive thirst and urination fatigue increased hunger weight loss, in spite of eating more infections that heal slowly blurry vision dark patches on the skin Treatment for type 2 diabetes includes monitoring your blood sugar levels and using medications or insulin when needed. Doctors also recommend losing weight through diet and exercise. Some diabetes medications have weight loss as a side effect, which can also help reverse diabetes. If you start eating healthier, get more exercise, and lose weight, you can reduce your symptoms. Research shows that these lifestyle changes, especially physical activity, can even reverse the course of the condition. Studies that show the reversal of type 2 diabetes include participants who have lived with the condition for only a few years. Weight loss is the primary fact Continue reading >>

Weight Can In Fact Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, Study Shows

Weight Can In Fact Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, Study Shows

Mario Anzuoni—Reuters A new study discovered that weight loss really can cure diabetes. In a paper published in the Lancet, researchers in the United Kingdom discovered that patients with Type 2 diabetes went into remission when they lost weight, Time reports. Half of the patients in the study went on a 6-month diet plan, while the other half did not. Those that dieted and lost an average of 30 pounds saw their diabetes start to disappear. None of the patients took any daibetes medication for the disease during the study and instead focused exclusively on the effects of weight loss on the chronic condition. The diet involved three to five months of a liquid diet averaging no more than 850 calories a day, followed by two to eight weeks of reintroducing food. Patients were also given nutritional education and cognitive behavioral therapy. Researchers hope to point out with the study that diabetes doesn’t have to be a life-long sentence, and instead is something that can be fought with hard work. However, the weight loss treatment is only effective if done during the first few years of the onset of Type 2 diabetes. Patients who have been living with the disease for 10 years or more have also suffered a loss of some cells which make the weight loss method alone ineffective. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2: Symptoms Cured With This Weight Loss Diet - Patient Loses 30kg | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes Type 2: Symptoms Cured With This Weight Loss Diet - Patient Loses 30kg | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes type 2: Woman cured condition with this weight loss diet plan Diabetes type 2: Symptoms CURED with this weight loss diet - patient loses 30kg Crowe was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in June 2017. She also suffers from psoriatic arthritis and osteoarthritis. She was showing signs of diabetes before the diagnosis - including hot flushes, extreme thirst and a frequent need to urinate. After being horrified by the diagnosis, she joined Diabetes.co.uks Low Carb Program. Crowe has now lost four stone and seven pounds since her heaviest weight. Diabetes type 2: Patient completely came off medication after losing 30kg Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. People should be aware signs and symptoms of diabetes are not always obvious and the condition is often diagnosed during GP check ups. Diabetes type 2: Symptoms include fatigue and frequent urination The plan addresses three sources of sugar in the diet. That includes natural sources - fruit and honey - or sugars added to products. It also includes sugar from digesting carbohydrates. Its available to download on smartphones, and is personalised for every single patient. The Low Carb Programs creator, Arjun Panesar, said: The Low Carb Program is demonstrating that it is possible to place type 2 diabetes into remission using a nutrition focused approach. Most people who complete the program improve their blood glucose levels, sustainably lose weight and reduce their dependency on medication. Diabetes type 2: The diet plan addresses sugar in carbohydrates Diabetes type 2: Regular exercise could lower your risk of condition Since starting the diet plan, Crowes cholesterol and Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Reversed With Weight Loss: Super Low-calorie Diet May Cure The Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Reversed With Weight Loss: Super Low-calorie Diet May Cure The Disease

Update | Hundreds of people went on an extreme diet with the hopes of curing their Type 2 diabetes. For some of them, it worked. A study published in The Lancet on Tuesday chronicles a remarkable change in the health of its participants. One of the findings—that a calorie-restricted diet leads to weight loss—is hardly groundbreaking. But the effect that losing weight had on diabetes was dramatic. For nearly half of the people on the diet (86 percent of the 36 people lost more than 30 pounds), their diabetes appeared to be gone a year later. The technical term the authors used was “remission.” That term indicates that the levels of red blood cells connected to sugar molecules had fallen below a certain limit even without medication. That limit, often used as a shorthand to diagnose diabetes, is known as HbA1c. It's an indicator of average long-term blood sugar levels and may also be related to the risk of developing complications from diabetes. "'Cure' implies absolute and lasting absence of disease—such as curing tuberculosis. Remission recognises that the person is still susceptible to diabetes and emphasises that continued attention to weight control is vital," said Dr. Roy Taylor, a researcher at Newcastle University and one of the authors of the paper. If the people in this study regain the weight, "then it is certain that the diabetes will come back." Dr. Sona Shah, an endocrinologist at NYU Langone Health, said that doctors knew that if a person lost between 5 to 10 percent of their weight, it could help improve their HbA1c levels. “I’ve seen that many times in many of my patients.” “It gives more evidence and credibility to what we’ve been doing,” she said. "If we can get them controlled by lifestyle alone, I think that’s a huge goal for m Continue reading >>

Can You Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

It sounds too good to be true: reversing type 2 diabetes through exercise and healthy eating. While certain lifestyle changes are key to managing diabetes, whether you can actually turn back time so that it's like you never had diabetes is a different matter. That depends on how long you've had the condition, how severe it is, and your genes. "The term 'reversal' is used when people can go off medication but still must engage in a lifestyle program in order to stay off," says Ann Albright, PhD, RD. She's the director of diabetes translation at the CDC. Shedding extra pounds and keeping them off can help you better control your blood sugar. For some people, reaching a healthier weight will mean taking fewer medications, or in rarer cases, no longer needing those medications at all. Losing 5% to 10% of your body weight and building up to 150 minutes of exercise a week may help you to slow or stop the progress of type 2 diabetes. "If you sit [inactive] most of the day, 5 or 10 minutes is going to be great," Albright says. "Walk to your mailbox. Do something that gets you moving, knowing that you're looking to move towards 30 minutes most days of the week." In one study, people with type 2 diabetes exercised for 175 minutes a week, limited their calories to 1,200 to 1,800 per day, and got weekly counseling and education on these lifestyle changes. Within a year, about 10% got off their diabetes medications or improved to the point where their blood sugar level was no longer in the diabetes range, and was instead classified as prediabetes. Results were best for those who lost the most weight or who started the program with less severe or newly diagnosed diabetes. Fifteen percent to 20% of these people were able to stop taking their diabetes medications. Continue reading >>

Is Weight Loss A Cure For Type 2 Diabetes?

Is Weight Loss A Cure For Type 2 Diabetes?

It has been estimated that ∼10% of the U.S. population will be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes by the year 2010. Cardiovascular disease accounts for 75% of all related deaths in diabetic patients. While the use of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors has contributed to a marked reduction in mortality in cardiovascular deaths, the benefit in type 2 diabetes has been disappointing. Patients with type 2 diabetes have a sixfold increased risk of a first-time myocardial infarction compared with nondiabetic patients (1). Additionally, diabetic patients have twice the risk of myocardial infarction. As cardiovascular mortality is the leading single cause of death in the U.S. and because patients with type 2 diabetes have a three- to eightfold increased risk of death, new treatment strategies need to be considered for this disease and its prevention (1). Dixon and O’Brien (2) describe the effects of laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery on the development of type 2 diabetes. All patients had severe obesity (BMI ≥35.0 kg/m2). One year after surgery, 64% patients had remission of diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes decreased from 10 to 5.6%. An additional 26% of patients with diabetes had an improvement in their control of diabetes. Gastric band surgery resulted in an average weight loss of 27 kg. HbA1c was reduced from 7.8 to 6.2%. The 1.6% fall in HbA1c was also associated with a 58-mg/dl decrease in fasting blood glucose concentration. Sjostrom et al.(3) demonstrated that over an 8-year period, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes increased from 8 to 25% in patients with severe obesity. However, unlike the short-term benefits described in the Dixon and O’Brien study, the prevalence of diabetes was 11% at baseline and 11% at 8 years after a 40-lb sustained weight loss. This Continue reading >>

Reverse Type 2 Diabetes - This Is How Much Weight You Should Lose To Cure Condition

Reverse Type 2 Diabetes - This Is How Much Weight You Should Lose To Cure Condition

Type 2 diabetes is generally perceived as incurable, but for many patients it can be reversed with sustained weight loss of around 15kg, experts have revealed in the BMJ. Louise McCombie at the University of Glasgow and colleagues have said some patients and doctors might not realise that type 2 diabetes can be reversed. The team has called for greater awareness, documentation, and surveillance of remissions to improve health outcomes and reduce healthcare costs. Type 2 diabetes now affects about 3.2 million people in the UK. The NHS currently spends almost £1 billion a year - £22 million a day - on antidiabetes drugs, and costs are rising worldwide as diabetes rates and drug prices escalate. Emily Burns, Head of Research Communications at Diabetes UK, said: “The ability to put type 2 diabetes into remission could be transformative for millions of people around the World, and evidence is building to suggest that it's possible. “In the meantime, we need to ensure that those who do achieve remission are recognised in the right way and receive the right care. “Diabetes UK is funding crucial research to find out how to put type 2 into remission, who might benefit and whether it's effective for the long-term." Current guidelines advise reducing blood sugar levels and cardiovascular risks, primarily with drugs and general lifestyle advice. But many patients still develop complications and life expectancy remains up to six years shorter than in people without diabetes, the authors have said. The diagnosis also carries important social and financial penalties for individuals, as well as poor health prospects. In contrast, consistent evidence shows that weight loss is associated with extended life expectancy for people with diabetes. The experts said weight loss of aroun Continue reading >>

Radical Diet Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, New Study Shows

Radical Diet Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, New Study Shows

A radical low-calorie diet can reverse type 2 diabetes, even six years into the disease, a new study has found. The number of cases of type 2 diabetes is soaring, related to the obesity epidemic. Fat accumulated in the abdomen prevents the proper function of the pancreas. It can lead to serious and life-threatening complications, including blindness and foot amputations, heart and kidney disease. A new study from Newcastle and Glasgow Universities shows that the disease can be reversed by losing weight, so that sufferers no longer have to take medication and are free of the symptoms and risks. Nine out of 10 people in the trial who lost 15kg (two-and-a-half stone) or more put their type 2 diabetes into remission. Prof Roy Taylor from Newcastle University, lead researcher in the trial funded by Diabetes UK, said: “These findings are very exciting. They could revolutionise the way type 2 diabetes is treated. This builds on the work into the underlying cause of the condition, so that we can target management effectively. “Substantial weight loss results in reduced fat inside the liver and pancreas, allowing these organs to return to normal function. What we’re seeing … is that losing weight isn’t just linked to better management of type 2 diabetes: significant weight loss could actually result in lasting remission.” Worldwide, the number of people with type 2 diabetes has quadrupled over 35 years, rising from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014. This is expected to climb to 642 million by 2040. Type 2 diabetes affects almost 1 in 10 adults in the UK and costs the NHS about £14bn a year. Type 2 diabetes is usually treated with medication and in some cases, bariatric surgery to restrict stomach capacity, which has also been shown to reverse the disease. Continue reading >>

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