diabetestalk.net

Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Cured By Weight Loss?

The Cure For Type 2 Diabetes Is Known, But Few Are Aware

The Cure For Type 2 Diabetes Is Known, But Few Are Aware

The cure for type 2 diabetes is known, but few are aware I recently posted to Facebook about a cure for diabetes and suggested someone try it. Just six days later, I received the following message from a friend: I just wanted to drop you a line and thank you for that post… My lab results at the beginning of the month were 230. After just this last week it’s down to 155. I think I’ll be in normal range within a month. Really miraculous… It’s really been a game changer for me already and I wanted you to know how much I appreciated the info and how much of a difference I think it will make in my life. Four months later, the friend posted this to Facebook: I started on this regiment when Nathan posted about it [four months ago]. My blood glucose level at that time, while taking two daily glucose meds, was 235. Two weeks ago, my [fasting] glucose level, WITHOUT the meds, was 68. If you google “diabetes cure” you are directed to websites like WebMD and the Mayo Clinic where you find information on diet, exercise, medication, and insulin therapy, but nothing about the cure. This lack of information may have to do with the fact that Americans spend $322 billion a year to treat diabetes, $60 billion a year on weight-loss programs, and $124 billion a year on snack foods. This is about 3% of the US economy! Because so many peoples’ livelihoods are supported by diabetes and its main cause, obesity, the viral effect of people getting cured and telling others is greatly diminished. Because of this understandable stifling of the message, if you are like my Facebook friend and have already experienced the type 2 diabetes cure for yourself — there are thousands of you out there — it is important for you to share your success stories as far and wide as possible. You c Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Reversed With Weight Loss: Super Low-calorie Diet May Cure The Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Reversed With Weight Loss: Super Low-calorie Diet May Cure The Disease

Update | Hundreds of people went on an extreme diet with the hopes of curing their Type 2 diabetes. For some of them, it worked. A study published in The Lancet on Tuesday chronicles a remarkable change in the health of its participants. One of the findings—that a calorie-restricted diet leads to weight loss—is hardly groundbreaking. But the effect that losing weight had on diabetes was dramatic. For nearly half of the people on the diet (86 percent of the 36 people lost more than 30 pounds), their diabetes appeared to be gone a year later. The technical term the authors used was “remission.” That term indicates that the levels of red blood cells connected to sugar molecules had fallen below a certain limit even without medication. That limit, often used as a shorthand to diagnose diabetes, is known as HbA1c. It's an indicator of average long-term blood sugar levels and may also be related to the risk of developing complications from diabetes. "'Cure' implies absolute and lasting absence of disease—such as curing tuberculosis. Remission recognises that the person is still susceptible to diabetes and emphasises that continued attention to weight control is vital," said Dr. Roy Taylor, a researcher at Newcastle University and one of the authors of the paper. If the people in this study regain the weight, "then it is certain that the diabetes will come back." Dr. Sona Shah, an endocrinologist at NYU Langone Health, said that doctors knew that if a person lost between 5 to 10 percent of their weight, it could help improve their HbA1c levels. “I’ve seen that many times in many of my patients.” “It gives more evidence and credibility to what we’ve been doing,” she said. "If we can get them controlled by lifestyle alone, I think that’s a huge goal for m Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious, long-term medical condition. It develops mostly in adults but is becoming more common in children as obesity rates rise across all age groups. Several factors contribute to type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor. Type 2 diabetes can be life-threatening. But if treated carefully, it can be managed or even reversed. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. When your blood sugar (glucose) levels rise, the pancreas releases insulin. This causes sugar to move from your blood to your cells, where it can be used as an energy source. As glucose levels in your blood go back down, your pancreas stops releasing insulin. Type 2 diabetes impacts how you metabolize sugar. Either your pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or your body has become resistant to its effects. This causes glucose to build up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia. There are several symptoms of untreated type 2 diabetes, including: excessive thirst and urination fatigue increased hunger weight loss, in spite of eating more infections that heal slowly blurry vision dark patches on the skin Treatment for type 2 diabetes includes monitoring your blood sugar levels and using medications or insulin when needed. Doctors also recommend losing weight through diet and exercise. Some diabetes medications have weight loss as a side effect, which can also help reverse diabetes. If you start eating healthier, get more exercise, and lose weight, you can reduce your symptoms. Research shows that these lifestyle changes, especially physical activity, can even reverse the course of the condition. Studies that show the reversal of type 2 diabetes include participants who have lived with the condition for only a few years. Weight loss is the primary fact Continue reading >>

Can Weight Loss Cure Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Weight Loss Cure Type 2 Diabetes?

If you define cure as it’s most commonly understood: “a healing or remedy by which health is restored,” then in all accuracy, weight loss is not a “cure” for type 2 diabetes. That is, there is no remedy that will resolve the disease itself. However, while diabetes is not reversible from a diagnostic standpoint (once you have it, you have it), diabetes can be reversible from a physiological standpoint in many. That is, you can work to get your blood glucose within a normal healthy range, maintaining glucose control so you are functioning like a non-diabetic. So, while there is no “cure” per se, that doesn’t mean there aren’t a multitude of “treatments” that you can apply to improve symptoms, reduce risk and sometimes reverse physiological trends. And weight loss can be one of those “treatments” that can help. Let go of the ‘quick fix' mentality You have to be careful. Looking for a “cure” can conjure up the kind of thinking that tends to gravitate along the lines of ‘quick fix,’ the same as we find in fad dieting in which you go ‘on’ something for a period of time to ‘fix’ the issue and can then go back “off” it and resume your previous pattern. This happens a lot in the weight loss industry. And it's something that gets us all in a trap in many instances, going around in circles for years on end. You know, you lose some weight, feel better, then go back to your old habits and bam…all positive effects achieved by weight loss will simply be thwarted once weight is regained. And you feel terrible because you ‘fell off the wagon.' Lifestyle (and Weight Loss) Can Greatly Impact Type 2 Diabetes While no one can guarantee complete hormonal restoration with diabetes, lifestyle changes may be able to slow, halt and reverse phys Continue reading >>

Diabetes 'cure': Diet & Exercise Work For Some

Diabetes 'cure': Diet & Exercise Work For Some

People with Type 2 diabetes can reverse their condition with diet and exercise, although remission is not very common, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After one year of regular counseling sessions to encourage weight loss and physical activity, 11.5 percent of obese adults with Type 2 diabetes saw their condition at least partially reverse — meaning their blood sugar levels decreased to those of a prediabetic, without the need for medication. Just 2 percent of those who did not receive intensive counseling partially reversed their diabetes. After four years, the rate of partial diabetes remission in the counseling group declined slightly, to 7 percent. Full remission — achieving normal blood sugar levels — was rarer, with just 1.3 percent of people in the counseling group and 0.1 percent in the non-counseling group meeting this goal after one year. Type 2 diabetes has traditionally been seen as a progressive disease that is managed rather than cured. Recent studies have suggested it can be reversed with weight loss surgery, or by following an extreme diet that mimics surgery. However, until this study, little was known about the rate of long-term diabetes reversal without surgery or extreme dieting. About 26 million Americans have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study confirms that complete Type 2 diabetes remission is rare, but that partial remission is an obtainable goal for some patients, the researchers said. Experts said that, because the definitions of complete or partial diabetes remission are arbitrary, researchers should not focus on these measures. What's more important is that patients improve their weight and blood sugar levels, as people in this study did, said Dr Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Be Cured?

Can Diabetes Be Cured?

I'm 47 years old and was recently diagnosed with diabetes. I'm about 25 pounds overweight and lead a sedentary lifestyle, but I'm starting a diet and an exercise program. Will my diabetes go away if I lose weight, watch my diet, and exercise regularly? — Mary, Alaska It is wonderful that you are changing your lifestyle to become healthier! This will benefit you greatly, not only in controlling your blood sugar but also in improving your cholesterol levels, strengthening your bones, and improving your heart function. These changes come with a long list of health benefits, but whether they will allow you to stop taking medicines completely depends on several factors: The length of time that you had undiscovered, or "hidden," diabetes The length of time you've had diagnosed diabetes How well your pancreas is functioning, including how much insulin it is producing, and the extent of insulin resistance associated with excess weight As you probably know, the cause of diabetes among most adults is twofold. It's caused by insulin resistance resulting from excess weight, and inadequate insulin production in the pancreas. These two causes are also interrelated. Many people whose diabetes is primarily the result of excess weight and insulin resistance can potentially reduce their glucose levels by losing a significant amount of weight and controlling their sugar levels through diet and exercise alone. This assumes that their pancreas is still producing an adequate amount of insulin. A good number of diabetics, however, have the illness but don't know it for at least five years before diagnosis. This is crucial because over time, the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas decline in function. Often, by the time a patient is diagnosed, a critical number of cells have stopped prod Continue reading >>

Radical Diet Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, New Study Shows

Radical Diet Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, New Study Shows

A radical low-calorie diet can reverse type 2 diabetes, even six years into the disease, a new study has found. The number of cases of type 2 diabetes is soaring, related to the obesity epidemic. Fat accumulated in the abdomen prevents the proper function of the pancreas. It can lead to serious and life-threatening complications, including blindness and foot amputations, heart and kidney disease. A new study from Newcastle and Glasgow Universities shows that the disease can be reversed by losing weight, so that sufferers no longer have to take medication and are free of the symptoms and risks. Nine out of 10 people in the trial who lost 15kg (two-and-a-half stone) or more put their type 2 diabetes into remission. Prof Roy Taylor from Newcastle University, lead researcher in the trial funded by Diabetes UK, said: “These findings are very exciting. They could revolutionise the way type 2 diabetes is treated. This builds on the work into the underlying cause of the condition, so that we can target management effectively. “Substantial weight loss results in reduced fat inside the liver and pancreas, allowing these organs to return to normal function. What we’re seeing … is that losing weight isn’t just linked to better management of type 2 diabetes: significant weight loss could actually result in lasting remission.” Worldwide, the number of people with type 2 diabetes has quadrupled over 35 years, rising from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014. This is expected to climb to 642 million by 2040. Type 2 diabetes affects almost 1 in 10 adults in the UK and costs the NHS about £14bn a year. Type 2 diabetes is usually treated with medication and in some cases, bariatric surgery to restrict stomach capacity, which has also been shown to reverse the disease. Continue reading >>

Reverse Type 2 Diabetes - This Is How Much Weight You Should Lose To Cure Condition

Reverse Type 2 Diabetes - This Is How Much Weight You Should Lose To Cure Condition

Type 2 diabetes is generally perceived as incurable, but for many patients it can be reversed with sustained weight loss of around 15kg, experts have revealed in the BMJ. Louise McCombie at the University of Glasgow and colleagues have said some patients and doctors might not realise that type 2 diabetes can be reversed. The team has called for greater awareness, documentation, and surveillance of remissions to improve health outcomes and reduce healthcare costs. Type 2 diabetes now affects about 3.2 million people in the UK. The NHS currently spends almost £1 billion a year - £22 million a day - on antidiabetes drugs, and costs are rising worldwide as diabetes rates and drug prices escalate. Emily Burns, Head of Research Communications at Diabetes UK, said: “The ability to put type 2 diabetes into remission could be transformative for millions of people around the World, and evidence is building to suggest that it's possible. “In the meantime, we need to ensure that those who do achieve remission are recognised in the right way and receive the right care. “Diabetes UK is funding crucial research to find out how to put type 2 into remission, who might benefit and whether it's effective for the long-term." Current guidelines advise reducing blood sugar levels and cardiovascular risks, primarily with drugs and general lifestyle advice. But many patients still develop complications and life expectancy remains up to six years shorter than in people without diabetes, the authors have said. The diagnosis also carries important social and financial penalties for individuals, as well as poor health prospects. In contrast, consistent evidence shows that weight loss is associated with extended life expectancy for people with diabetes. The experts said weight loss of aroun Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet Reversing diabetes is a term that usually refers to a significant long-term improvement in insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes that are able to get their HbA1c below 42 mmol/mol (6%) without taking diabetes medication are said to have reversed or resolved their diabetes. This also known as putting diabetes into remission. Loss of body weight can be particularly beneficial in helping to reverse the progression of diabetes. With time and dedication, type 2 diabetes can be reversed and the results can be very rewarding, with less tiredness and better all-round health. If you think you need to come off your diabetes medication, ensure you speak to your healthcare team before doing so. Understanding how diabetes progresses The most common cause of type 2 diabetes is obesity-related, which generally follows a vicious cycle pattern: Diet high in calories -particularly if high in refined carbohydrates. Insulin levels in the bloodstream rise to cope with the high- and quick-acting carb intake. Weight is gained around the belly (central or truncal obesity). Consistently high insulin levels lead to the body’s cells becoming resistant to insulin and commonly lead to weight gain. High insulin levels also increase weight gain. Insulin resistance leads to an increase in blood sugar levels, particularly after meals. The pancreas produces more insulin to cope with rising blood sugar levels. High sugar levels lead to feelings of lethargy and high insulin levels lead to increased hunger. Hunger often leads to overeating and lethargy, with less physical activity being taken. Overeating, less activity and high insulin levels all lead to further weight gain and more insulin resistance. Consistently high demand on the pancreas to produce ext Continue reading >>

'more People Need To Know Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible' Argues Report

'more People Need To Know Type 2 Diabetes Is Reversible' Argues Report

What is the issue? "Type 2 diabetes could be beaten into remission if patients shed around 15kg, [2.4 stones]," reports BBC News. In the past type 2 diabetes was thought to be a lifelong condition. There is increasing evidence that even if it can't be cured, it is possible to put the condition into remission through weight loss. A pressing problem is, as The Daily Telegraph reports, that "less than 1 in 1,000 people" achieve remission. Achieving weight loss through a combination of diet and exercise could mean that you do not have to start taking medication for type 2 diabetes. What is diabetes remission? Type 2 diabetes means the body can no longer maintain healthy blood sugar levels through production of the hormone insulin. When average blood sugar rises to harmful levels (usually described as 6.5% or 48mmol/moll HbA1c, a measure of long-term blood sugar control), people are diagnosed with diabetes. While improved diet and exercise is recommended, most people with diabetes are treated with anti-diabetic medicines to manage their blood sugar. The aim is to prevent the development of complications such as heart disease, leg ulcers and eye damage. Although many factors affect the development of type 2 diabetes, it often accompanies weight gain. In recent years, doctors have noticed that some obese patients who lose a lot of weight, whether through very low calorie diets or weight loss surgery, have blood sugar levels that drop back to normal, and stay that way without diabetes medicines. This has fueled interest in "reversing" diabetes through major weight loss. Instead of curing diabetes, doctors talk about diabetes being "in remission". This is because it can be a two-way process – if people put weight back on, they may become diabetic again. What is the basis for t Continue reading >>

Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes

Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a medical condition that prevents the body from properly processing blood sugar. Type 2 diabetes is highly associated with excess weight and afflicts many obese people, putting them at risk of disabling symptoms and complications. Because type 2 diabetes and its precursors are closely tied to obesity, weight loss is often all that is needed to improve or resolve them. Even a moderate amount of weight loss can help many people reduce diabetes medications and even put the disease into remission. When we eat foods that contain carbohydrates, our bodies break them down into a sugar called glucose. Glucose travels through the bloodstream and supplies energy to all of our cells. However, before our cells can use glucose as energy, they need a hormone called insulin. The pancreas detects the presence of glucose in our blood after we eat and releases insulin to balance our blood sugar levels. “Insulin takes the blood sugar that’s floating around in our bloodstream and puts it into the places we need it,” says Dr. Craig Primack, a medical obesity specialist. According to Dr. Primack, insulin is “like the key in the lock,” opening the door for our muscles, organs and fat to take in glucose and put it to use. When insulin is no longer able to fulfill this crucial role, we can gradually develop type 2 diabetes as our cells become unable to process high levels of glucose in the blood. Though it is not entirely clear why insulin stops functioning properly, it is generally agreed that obesity and physical inactivity are contributors to type 2 diabetes. Obesity. When our bodies have more fatty tissue, especially in the abdomen, our cells become more resistant to insulin and more is required to reduce blood sugar levels. Inactivity. Because physical activity uses u Continue reading >>

Millions Of Diabetics Could Be ‘cured’ By Losing Weight And Eating Healthier

Millions Of Diabetics Could Be ‘cured’ By Losing Weight And Eating Healthier

MILLIONS of Type 2 diabetics could be “cured” by losing weight. A study put 298 volunteers on a low-calorie soup and shakes diet. Getty - Contributor After a year, 57 per cent of those who shed from 1st 8lbs to 2st 5lbs were in remission. This rose to 86 per cent of those losing more. The weight loss enabled the pancreas, which helps control blood sugar, to work properly again. Failing to control the disease increases the risk of stroke, heart disease and limb amputations. Getty - Contributor Study leader Prof Roy Taylor, of Newcastle University, said: “Significant weight loss could result in lasting remission.” Patient Isobel Murray, 65, from North Ayrshire, lost over 3½ stones after 17 weeks on the low calorie diet and no longer needs her drugs. She said: “I am one of the lucky ones to have gone into remission. I don’t think of myself as a diabetic anymore. “When the doctors told me that my pancreas was working again, it felt fantastic.” Dr Elizabeth Robertson, from Diabetes UK, said: “These findings demonstrate the potential to transform the lives of millions of people. “We’re very encouraged by these initial results, and the building of robust evidence that remission could be achievable for some people." The NHS spent £957million on diabetes drugs last year – around £2.6million a day. Around 10 per cent of the NHS budget is spent treating diabetes and its complications. Scarlett Moffatt reveals her diabetes scare before three-stone weight loss Continue reading >>

You Can Potentially Reverse Type 2 Diabetes—if You Lose This Many Pounds

You Can Potentially Reverse Type 2 Diabetes—if You Lose This Many Pounds

More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Even more alarming is the fact that many don’t even realize they have the deadly condition—and those are just two of the many surprising facts about type 2 diabetes. Despite the staggering numbers, there is a way out: Not only do exercise and a good diet help, researchers now know exactly how much weight type 2 diabetics need to lose to resolve many or all of their symptoms. In research from Scotland that was just published in BMJ, investigators tracked patients with type 2 diabetes for almost 10 years, and found that those who had followed a restricted-calorie diet and lost at least 33 pounds no longer had diabetes. These findings built on a series of clinical trials begun in 2011, in which people who had recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were able to maintain a normal blood sugar level while staying on a calorie-restrictive diet, Time magazine reports. One of the study’s authors, Mike Lean, professor of human nutrition at the University of Glasgow in Scotland explained to Time that type 2 sufferers need to act within the first five years of their diagnosis to see the most effective results. “Type 2 diabetes is a disease best avoided by avoiding the weight gain that drives it,” he said. “For people who do develop it, evidence-based weight-loss programs could help them achieve lasting remission. Not all can do it, but they should all be given the chance with good support. Taking tablets or injections for life to reduce blood sugar is a poor second-rate treatment.” Many people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes aren’t aware the cure is in their hands, Lean explained. Doctors must also take the lead, he says, so that patients under Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Type 2 Diabetes Is 'reversible Through Weight Loss'

Many doctors and patients do not realize that weight loss can reverse type 2 diabetes. Instead, there is a widespread belief that the disease is "progressive and incurable," according to a new report published in the BMJ. This is despite there being "consistent evidence" that shedding around 33 pounds (15 kilograms) often produces "total remission" of type 2 diabetes, note Prof. Mike E. J. Lean and other researchers from the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom. The thrust of their paper is that greater awareness, when combined with better recording and monitoring of remissions, could result in many more patients no longer having to live with type 2 diabetes and a massive reduction in healthcare costs. The global burden of type 2 diabetes has nearly quadrupled over the past 35 years. In 1980, there were around 108 million people with the disease, and by 2014, this number had risen to 422 million. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is a disease that results when the body becomes less effective at using insulin to help cells to convert blood sugar, or glucose, into energy. Excess body weight is a main cause of this type of diabetes. In the United States, an estimated 30.3 million people, or around 9.4 percent of the population, have diabetes - including around 7.2 million who do not realize it. Diabetes accounts for a high portion of the national bill for taking care of the sick. The total direct and indirect cost of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. was estimated to be $245 billion in 2012. In that year, of the $13,700 average medical spend for people with diagnosed diabetes, more than half (around $7,900) was directly attributed to the disease. Treatment 'focuses on drugs' Prof. Lean and colleagues note that the current management guideli Continue reading >>

More in diabetes