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Can Type 1 Diabetics Take Sleeping Pills

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis Diagnostic tests include: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates diabetes. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as pregnancy or an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use these tests: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time and may be confirmed by repeat testing. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. If you're diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may also run blood tests to check for autoantibodies that are common in type 1 diabetes. These tests help your doctor distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes when the diagnosis is uncertain. The presence of ketones — byproducts from the breakdown of fat — in your urine also suggests type 1 diab Continue reading >>

Sleeping Pill Use Tied To Poorer Survival For Heart Failure Patients

Sleeping Pill Use Tied To Poorer Survival For Heart Failure Patients

SATURDAY, May 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new study suggests that the use of sleeping pills greatly increases the risk of serious heart problems and death in people with heart failure. "Sleeping problems are a frequent side effect of heart failure and it is common for patients to be prescribed sleeping pills when they are discharged from hospital," study author Dr. Masahiko Setoguchi explained in a news release from the European Society of Cardiology. However, "given that many heart failure patients have difficulty sleeping, this is an issue that needs further investigation in larger studies," he said. In the study, the Japanese team examined the medical records of 111 heart failure patients admitted to a Tokyo hospital from 2011 to 2013. The patients were followed for up to 180 days after they left the hospital. Patients who took sleeping pills -- drugs called benzodiazepine hypnotics -- were eight times more likely to be readmitted to hospital for heart failure or to die from heart-related causes than those who did not take sleeping pills, the researchers found. While the study couldn't prove cause and effect, the researchers theorize that benzodiazepine sleeping pills may affect both heart function and breathing. Heart failure patients "who use sleeping pills, particularly those who have sleep-disordered breathing, should be carefully monitored," Setoguchi concluded. Findings presented at medical meetings are typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. However, one expert agreed that the findings are cause for concern. "The results from this small, single-center study raise a potential alarm about the use of benzodiazepines in a heart failure population," said Dr. Sean Pinney, director of the advanced heart failure and cardiac tran Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Insulin Prescription Assistance

Diabetes & Insulin Prescription Assistance

If you or your loved one are one of the millions of Americans living with a chronic disease like diabetes while struggling to pay for costly insulin and assorted medications—you’re not alone. Simplefill Prescription Assistance can provide valuable diabetes help by assisting with Lantus, Humalog or Novolog and additional types of insulin. We help hundreds of diabetes patients receive the diabetes insulin assistance they need so they can focus on living well. We also advocate on our patients’ behalf through grant services, communicating with doctors, filling prescriptions, and keeping up to date on the changes to Medicare and Medicaid. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is split into different types: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, typically called juvenile diabetes, effects mostly children and young adults. As you eat, your pancreas breaks down the sugar and starches in food and converts them into energy with the help of a hormone called insulin. Everything we do requires energy—from waking up in the morning to brushing our teeth to even just simply blinking. In type 1 diabetes patients, their bodies don’t produce insulin. In order to live healthfully, type 1 diabetes patients must take insulin to give their pancreas the hormone it needs to break down food properly. Through insulin injections, exercise and a balanced diet, type 1 diabetes patients can live long, full lives. In type 2 diabetes patients, insulin is produced, but patients’ bodies cannot keep up with the demand. The excess sugar, instead of being converted into energy, becomes free floating in the blood stream. There are numerous causes for this including genetics, weight, cell communication problems and more. Part of managing type 2 diabetes for most patients involves much of the same recom Continue reading >>

How Can Type 1 Diabetes Affect Sleep?

How Can Type 1 Diabetes Affect Sleep?

We all know the miserable after-effects of a poor night’s sleep. Unfortunately, that dreary, frazzled, anxious state can be a more common reality for for someone with Type 1 diabetes. Doctors at the Sleep Disorders Program at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center estimate that 40-50% of people with diabetes complain of poor sleep. And getting a good night’s rest can help in blood glucose management as well as overall health. So what should you watch out for if you have Type 1? And how can you better your odds of a good night’s rest? Here are the most common sleeping disorders that you may be faced with and some basic advice on how to maintain healthy sleep hygiene. Sleep Apnea A person with sleep apnea stops and starts breathing repeatedly while asleep, preventing them from achieving deeper states of sleep. Warning signs of sleep apnea include: daytime drowsiness excessive nighttime snoring There are two kinds of sleep apnea – Obstructive sleep apnea – occurs when the upper airway or throat region narrows, oxygen levels decrease, and eventually the brain triggers a response to wake the person up (at least enough to take a full breath and reopen the airway). Central sleep apnea – occurs when brain signals to the muscles that control breathing are confused. Both types of sleep apnea prevent a person from getting the kind of deep, restful sleep needed to wake up feeling refreshed. While scientific research has long highlighted a correlation between Type 2 diabetes and obesity and an increased risk for obstructive sleep apnea, sleep apnea occurrences is also high in those with Type 1 diabetes. Some studies have found obstructive sleep apnea in as many as 30% of adults with Type 1 diabetes. And the majority of those tested maintained a healthy, normal weig Continue reading >>

Transcending Diabetes And Insomnia

Transcending Diabetes And Insomnia

If you asked me what the hardest physical challenge has been in my life, my answer would surprisingly not be the challenges of living with type one, insulin dependent diabetes. Instead I have to say it has been chronic insomnia. It became so bad at one point even a sleeping pill would not give me relief. The worst period was when I was still dancing in the corp de ballet of the New York City Ballet, a few years after my diagnosis of diabetes, when I was still struggling to find the right insulin regime. On a typical day, my walk home from the theater after a performance was phase one of winding down from 10 hours of dancing and performing. I would shower and remove my stage make-up at the theater, and as I walked home from Lincoln Center to my upper West Side apartment I would try to let the day go. I would rehash all the steps I wished I had executed better and all the highs and elation of the evening. The music hummed in my head. I’d eat dinner, catch up with the happenings of the day, check my blood sugar levels one last time, take my shot of insulin, and at last, head for bed. Tomorrow would be a full day of dancing with class, rehearsals and a show. As exciting as it was to perform with the New York City Ballet, performing every night for months at a time was exhausting. I was exhausted. A good night’s sleep was essential if I was to perform at my peak. But sleep I did not. I’d lie down and no sooner would my head hit the pillow than my body would wake up. It felt like someone turned on the light switch and all of a sudden I was buzzing. I was in over drive. I tried to stay calm, hoping my herbs for relaxation and sleep would eventually work. I’d remind myself of all the recommendations for sleep I had learned: relaxing my muscles, quieting my mind, securin Continue reading >>

After The Birth With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

After The Birth With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

Your insulin dose should be reduced to about a quarter less than the dose you were taking before you became pregnant to make sure you don’t become hypoglycaemic. If you treat you diabetes with insulin and are breastfeeding, you are at higher risk of having a hypo so you should keep a snack available before or during feeds. Your diabetes team should discuss all this with you before you have your baby. Most women are able to have skin-to-skin contact with the baby just after they are born, and you should be able to keep your baby with you unless there is a medical reason they need to be admitted into intensive or special care. You and/or your baby may receive some extra care and monitoring just after the birth if needed, and you will definitely need to stay in hospital for at least 24 hours, until the team are happy that your baby has healthy blood glucose levels and is feeding well. Once the team is happy that you and the baby are healthy, the regular appointments at the diabetes clinic will stop, but you still need to keep on top of your care. After you are discharged from antenatal services, you will be referred back to your standard diabetes service. Managing your glucose levels with a new baby If you were taking insulin before you became pregnant, you or your healthcare team will need to monitor your glucose levels regularly to check what dose you should be on now. Many women find it very difficult to maintain the levels of control they had before they became pregnant once they have a baby to care for and nights of broken sleep. Talk to your team about the level you can aim for. Breastfeeding with type 1/2 diabetes You can return to your previous medications as soon as your baby is born. But if you are breastfeeding, you need to make sure that any medication you ar Continue reading >>

Melatonin

Melatonin

A hormone secreted by the pineal gland that may help regulate a person’s circadian (approximately 24-hour) rhythm, including the sleep-wake cycle. Darkness stimulates the production and release of melatonin, and light suppresses its activity. The normal circadian melatonin cycle can be disrupted by any number of factors, including too much light at night, too little light during the daytime, rapid travel across time zones, and shift work. Melatonin also appears to regulate other cycles, including the menstrual cycle in women. It appears to influence when menstruation begins, the frequency and duration of the menstrual cycle, and when menopause occurs. Synthetic melatonin supplements have been used for sleep disorders and a number of other medical conditions. The condition for which melatonin use has the most scientific support is jet lag. Several randomized, controlled human trials have suggested that taking melatonin orally the day of travel (close to the preferred bedtime at the destination) and continued for several days, can reduce some of the symptoms of jet lag. Specifically, melatonin use appears to reduce the number of days needed to establish a normal sleep pattern, decreases the amount of time it takes to fall asleep, improves alertness, and reduces daytime fatigue. There is also relatively good scientific evidence that melatonin can improve delayed sleep-phase syndrome (in which the individual goes to bed very late and wakes up very late), sleep disturbances in children with neuropsychiatric disorders, and insomnia in the elderly, and can enhance sleep in healthy individuals. One study published in the journal Sleep showed that taking melatonin 30 minutes before bedtime improved sleep efficiency (total sleep time divided by the scheduled time in bed) in exp Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Importance Of Sleep

Diabetes And The Importance Of Sleep

To paraphrase the old Cole Porter love song: Birds do it, bees do it, even educated fleas do it. Let's do it, let's . . . sleep? "Sleep is a biological imperative," says Stuart Quan, M.D., a Harvard Medical School professor of sleep medicine and editor of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. "You can't not sleep," he says. Virtually all animals sleep. Fruit flies have been shown to have sleep cycles, and even sea sponges have sleeplike periods, Quan says. While experts have different theories on why we sleep, it's well proven that getting too little has serious consequences for your health and diabetes. Shorting yourself on shut-eye can worsen diabetes and, for some people, even serve as the trigger that causes it. People who don't sleep enough may: -- impair the body's use of insulin. -- have higher levels of hormones that cause hunger. -- crave junk food. No snooze, you lose People who don't get enough sleep often have higher levels of chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Lack of sleep also can increase production of cortisol (the body's primary stress hormone), impair memory and reflex time, elevate blood sugar, and increase appetite -- ultimately promoting weight gain, says Carol Touma, M.D., an endocrinologist at the University of Chicago who focuses on sleep research and metabolism. And the more you weigh, the worse you sleep. Research by Madhu H. Rao, M.D., an endocrinologist at the University of California, San Francisco, found that a person's body mass index (BMI) affects slow-wave sleep, the deep sleep cycles needed for maximum rest. Very preliminary results of Rao's current research on the effects of sleep restriction in healthy volunteers show an increase in insulin resistance in the range of 10 to 15 percent. But mysteries remain. Will sleeping m Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetics Have 'sleeping' Insulin Cells Which Could Be Woken, Say Scientists

Type 1 Diabetics Have 'sleeping' Insulin Cells Which Could Be Woken, Say Scientists

Type 1 diabetics have been offered new hope after scientists discovered that many of their insulin-producing cells are not dead, only dormant. Diabetes is a condition where the body stops producing enough insulin to regulate sugar levels in the blood. Scientists thought that people developed type 1 after the number of insulin producing cells dropped by around 90 per cent. “This is incredibly exciting, and could open the doors to new treatments" Professor Noel Morgan of Exeter University Medical School. But a new study suggests that is only the case for very young people. After the age of six, many of the cells are still present, they have just stopped functioning. Researchers at the University of Exeter believe it may be possible to awaken the dormant cells and reverse the disease. Around 400,000 people have been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in Britain, and most did not develop the disease until after the age of six. “This is incredibly exciting, and could open the doors to new treatments for young people who develop diabetes,” said Professor Noel Morgan of Exeter University Medical School. “It was previously thought that teenagers with type 1 diabetes had lost around 90 per cent of their beta cells but, by looking in their pancreas, we have discovered that this is not true. “In fact, those diagnosed in their teens still have many beta cells left – this suggests that the cells are dormant, but not dead. If we can find a way to reactivate these cells so that they resume insulin release, we may be able to slow or even reverse progression of this terrible disease." The discovery of dormant cells could lead to the end of daily injections for people Photo: Alamy The British team worked with scientists at the University of Oslo to look at nearly 400 pancreas sam Continue reading >>

The Sleep-diabetes Connection

The Sleep-diabetes Connection

Whenever diabetes patients enter Lynn Maarouf’s office with out-of-control blood sugar levels, she immediately asks them how they are sleeping at night. All too often, the answer is the same: not well. “Any time your blood sugar is really high, your kidneys try to get rid of it by urinating,” says Maarouf, RD, the diabetes education director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. “So you are probably getting up and going to bathroom all night long -- and not sleeping well.” Diabetes and sleep problems often go hand in hand. Diabetes can cause sleep loss, and there’s evidence that not sleeping well can increase your risk of developing diabetes. Maarouf says high blood sugar is a red flag for sleep problems among people with diabetes for another reason. “People who are tired will eat more because they want to get energy from somewhere,” she says. “That can mean consuming sugar or other foods that can spike blood sugar levels.” “I really push people to eat properly throughout the day and get their blood sugars under control so they sleep better at night,” Maarouf says. “If you get your blood sugar under control, you will get a good night sleep and wake up feeling fabulous with lots of energy.” “There is some evidence that sleep deprivation could lead to pre-diabetic state,” says Mark Mahowald, MD, director of the Minnesota Regional Sleep Disorders Center in Hennepin County. According to Mahowald, the body's reaction to sleep loss can resemble insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes. Insulin’s job is to help the body use glucose for energy. In insulin resistance, cells fail to use the hormone efficiently, resulting in high blood sugar. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough in Continue reading >>

Sleeping Pills And Older People: The Risks

Sleeping Pills And Older People: The Risks

About 1 in 3 people is expected to have insomnia at some time in their life,1 but difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep, or having sleep that is not refreshing occur more commonly as people age.2-4 Factors such as pain (eg, from arthritis), menopausal hot flushes, or needing to go to the toilet can cause some people to have difficulty falling asleep or cause them to wake up during the night.3 It's also more common for older people to nap during the day and sleep less at night.3 Are sleeping pills the answer? Your doctor may discuss sleeping pills as a potential treatment if non-medicine treatments for insomnia haven't worked on their own.1,5 Sleeping pills are sometimes prescribed if your doctor expects your sleep problem to be short term or if the reasons for the insomnia are being treated but sleeping problems continue.1,6 When it comes to sleeping pills, it is important that you understand the risks, how to use them safely and know when not to use them.1,6 Never take sleeping pills (or any other medicine) that have been prescribed for someone else. It is also important to realise that complementary medicines (which include herbal remedies) can have potential adverse effects and interact with other medicines you take. What are the risks? Like all medicines (including complementary medicines and those obtained over the counter without a prescription), sleeping pills can cause side effects. For sleeping pills, potential side effects include drowsiness, light-headedness, memory loss and poor concentration.5,7 It's quite easy to become dependent on some types of sleeping pills, making it difficult to stop taking them without having rebound sleep problems or unpleasant 'withdrawal' effects.5-7 You may wake up feeling groggy (a 'hangover') after using some sleeping Continue reading >>

About Gliclazide

About Gliclazide

Gliclazide is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that is made doesn't work properly. This causes high blood sugar levels. Gliclazide lowers your blood sugar by increasing the amount of insulin your body produces. Gliclazide is available on prescription. It comes as tablets. Key facts Gliclazide works by increasing the amount of insulin that your body makes. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. If you take gliclazide once a day, it's best to take it in the morning with breakfast. Gliclazide can sometimes make your blood sugar level too low (hypoglycaemia). Carry some sweets or fruit juice with you to help when this happens. Gliclazide may make you put on weight. Gliclazide may also be called by the brand names Bilxona, Dacadis, Diamicron, Laaglyda, Nazdol, Vamju, Vitile, Ziclaseg, and Zicron. Who can and can't take gliclazide Gliclazide is only for adults. Do not give this medicine to children under 18 years. Gliclazide isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to gliclazide or any other medicines in the past have severe kidney or liver disease have a rare illness called porphyria are taking miconazole (a treatment for fungal infections) are breastfeeding have an illness called G6PD-deficiency need to have surgery How and when to take it The dose of gliclazide can vary. Take this medicine as prescribed by your doctor. Swallow your gliclazide tablets whole with a glass of water, do not chew them. Different types of gliclazide tablets Gliclazide comes as 2 different types of tablets - normal (standard-release) and long-acting (slow-release). Standard-release tablets releas Continue reading >>

Metformin And Type 1 Diabetes – An Experiment

Metformin And Type 1 Diabetes – An Experiment

Metformin is not usually prescribed for Type 1 diabetes, but over the past couple years, inspired in part by Mike’s experience on it (see here, here, here and here), I’ve become interested in trying it. Not only has it been in widespread use as a treatment for Type 2 diabetes since its approval in 1994, but it’s currently being investigated for potential cognitive and anti-cancer benefits as well. As Mike has asked, “Could metformin be the new aspirin?” The typical explanation for why metformin is not prescribed to people with Type 1 diabetes is that metformin increases your insulin sensitivity — and given that, by definition, people with Type 1 don’t make any insulin, it won’t help them. But I see two obvious holes in that logic. First, people with Type 1 diabetes do have insulin in their bodies; it’s just administered in a different way (i.e. injected subcutaneously, rather than secreted by the pancreas). And as anyone who’s struggled with the dawn phenomenon knows, people with Type 1 diabetes experience insulin resistance, too. And second, metformin does more than just affect insulin sensitivity. It also appears to regulate the genes responsible for causing the liver to release glucose into your blood. As you may know, your pancreas and your liver work closely together to maintain a proper level of glucose in the blood. When you’ve got a lot of glucose in your blood, your pancreas secretes insulin to remove it (provided you don’t have Type 1 diabetes!). And when you don’t have sufficient external glucose – like when you’re sleeping — your liver releases some stored glucose so that your blood sugar does not drop too low. To put this a different way, insulin is what keeps a non-diabetic person’s blood glucose from getting too high; the Continue reading >>

Sleeping Aids And Diabetes

Sleeping Aids And Diabetes

People with diabetes certainly aren't immune to issues with insomnia or other sleeping problems that occur with age, jet lag or seasonal affective disorder. When that happens, sometimes counting sheep just doesn't cut it. But there has been concern discussed recently in the D-OC about using sleep aids with diabetes. A thread on TuDiabetes starts off with the notion that "any kind of sleep aid is taboo for an insulin-dependent diabetic." So we decided to put on our Mythbusters hat and investigate whether this claim is true or false... Although there aren't any recommended sleep aids specifically for people with diabetes, Kelley Champ Crumpler, a diabetes nurse educator and the wife of an endocrinologist, primarily recommends melatonin to treat sleeping problems. Melatonin is a naturally occurring hormone in your system that helps to control your sleep and wake cycles. Unlike insulin, melatonin is a hormone that is synthetically made and can be ingested, so a natural supplement is available over-the-counter (usually found in the vitamin section of your grocery store). "We have them start with a small, 1 mg tablet before bed, and can taper up as needed," Kelley says. "Melatonin won't render you useless like other sleep aid/hypnotics will. It's even safe for children to use." If that doesn't work, Kelley says that using an antihistamine that contains either diphenhydramine (found in Benadryl or nighttime pain relievers like Tylenol PM or Advil PM) or doxyalimine (found in the over-the-counter sleep-aid tablets Unisom). Anecdotal evidence on some of the diabetes forums shows that melatonin and antihistamines are the most popular way of treating insomnia. These meds are also "light" enough that they won't knock you out so much that you won't wake up naturally in an emergency Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Affected By Insomnia?

How Is Diabetes Affected By Insomnia?

Who’s At Risk and Why? Diabetes is worse when combined with insomnia symptoms, doctors have conclusively discovered. In fact, insomnia makes most medical diseases much worse in ways we are only just now finding out and can chemically disrupt the body’s insulin balance enough to even be a root cause for certain types of diabetes. The Chemistry of the Sleep-Wake Cycle Since diabetics are sensitive to blood glucose levels and chemical balances in the body, it’s illustrative to explore just how detrimental disruptions in the sleep cycle can be. Studies have shown that diabetes worsens when adult sufferers sleep less than 6 hours per night or more than 9.(1) The loss of normal sleep hours or addition of sleep hours seems to undo the body’s chemistry and completely throw off-balance the blood glucose levels. Doctors don’t know for sure the exact chemistry behind this phenomenon outside of the observation. This underscores the importance of the sleep cycle chemistry. Further studies have shown that chronic insomnia in healthy people can also instigate diabetes. Loss of sleep interrupts insulin balance—leads to insulin resistance—which in turn can lead to more severe medical problems and Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Management Much of the challenge for diabetics is proper and long-term management of their diabetes. When the sleep-wake cycle is also mismanaged, so too is the diabetes. Like many other medical diseases and conditions, diabetes is sensitive to sleep disturbances. But insomnia, as a set of symptoms, is usually secondary to something else. Insomnia is characterized in a number of ways: you could have problems going to sleep (sleep onset insomnia), problems waking up and going back to sleep (middle of the night insomnia), or waking up in the early dawn unab Continue reading >>

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