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Can Type 1 Diabetics Take Dayquil

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / what kind of cold medicine can diabetics take article What Kind of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take? Medical Author: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. My mother just found out she has diabetes. What can she take for a cough or cold, since most of the medicines have a lot of sugar? There are a few things I'd like to mention before I get straight to your answer. Ifyour mother's cough is accompanied by other symptoms, such as fever , chills , sore throat , or other systemic symptoms, she should be assessed by a physician. Likewise, is she is coughing up phlegm (sputum) that is thick, green, otherwise has color, or is excessive in amount, she should be seen by a doctor. In addition, if she identifies triggers, such as dander, or pollen , this may be more than a simple cough , and should be investigated. Finally, it is common sense that she and anyone with diabetes (or without diabetes , for that matter) should not smoke. There are over-the-counter remedies available without sugar , and if in doubt, your pharmacist should be able to point you in the right direction. In particular, Benylin Adult is sugar and alcohol free, and provides some relief from a non-productive (dry) cough. This should not be used in conjunction with MAOIs , in pregnancy or in nursing mothers. The active ingredient inthis formula is Dextromethorphan, and it is PPA (phenylpropanolamine) free. Another possibilityis Robitussin CF. This preparation has been re-formulate Continue reading >>

Dayquil: Info To Know

Dayquil: Info To Know

DayQuil is made for use during the day. Unlike NyQuil, it doesnt contain the active ingredient doxylamine, which is an antihistamine that can make you feel drowsy. Acetaminophen is a fever reducer and a pain reliever. It works by changing the way your body senses pain. It also changes how your body regulates its temperature. Dextromethorphan suppresses your urge to cough. The third ingredient, phenylephrine, is a nasal decongestant. It reduces the swelling of the blood vessels in your nasal passages. DayQuil comes in liquid-filled capsules called LiquiCaps. It also comes as a liquid that you drink. The following table lists the recommended dosage for each form by age group. Ask your doctor for the correct dosage for children ages 4 to 5 years, and dont give DayQuil to children who are younger than 4 years. swelling of your face, throat, tongue, or lips swelling of your hands, legs, ankles, or feet Contact your doctor right away or get emergency medical help if you have any of these symptoms while taking DayQuil. The active ingredients in DayQuil can interact with other drugs. These interactions may affect the way the drugs work or increase your risk of harmful side effects. If you use the drugs listed below or any other drugs, supplements, or herbs, check with your doctor before using DayQuil. The acetaminophen in DayQuil can interact with the following drugs: The phenylephrine and dextromethorphan in DayQuil can interact with drugs called monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Even if youve stopped taking MAOIs, interactions can still occur if youve used them within the past two weeks. Examples of these drugs include: Also, dont use DayQuil if you drink more than three alcoholic drinks per day. This combination can cause serious liver damage. Generally, DayQuil is a sa Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

Cough, Cold, Congestion…and Diabetes?

Cough, Cold, Congestion…and Diabetes?

This article is for informational purposes only. Please consult with your MD before taking any cough and cold medications! During cough and cold season, the cold remedy aisle at the local supermarket or pharmacy is packed with people looking for a fix for their coughing, sneezing, sniffling and aching due to the common cold, virus, or flu. Sales of cough and cold syrup and cough drops soar. Tis the season to buy tissues! Be advised that many cough/cold syrups are made palatable by adding some form of sugar or carbohydrate. For those with Met A, the inclusion of carb has no great significance and allows the “spoonful of medicine” to go down. For those with Met B, this hidden carbohydrate can have major consequences regarding insulin release, fat gain, blood sugar readings, cravings…and all the symptoms of uncontrolled Met B. Liquid DayQuil and NyQuil contain significant carbs. A 2 Tbls dose contains 19 grams of carbohydrate! And that 19 grams of carbohydrate comes straight from pure sugar used to make the cough syrup taste more palatable. As we know, just being “under the weather” with a cough, cold, or flu causes blood sugar and insulin release to rise. If you are feeling sick for a few days, it is a great idea to temporarily retreat to Step 1. The rise in stress hormones caused by illness/healing automatically causes a rise in blood sugar, insulin release, and fat gain…cravings, too! Step 1 is a great safety net. If it’s just a mild cough, a slight runny nose….no problem. But if you are coughing, sneezing, head is aching, nose is running, joints are aching….you should consider a spoonful of Step 1. So, what to do about cough/cold medicines? Opt for the capsules or caplets! I think we feel that the “cough syrup” is more effective but, except for th Continue reading >>

Will You Have Type 1 Diabetes With Dayquil - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Type 1 Diabetes With Dayquil - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 57 year old man who takes Lutein NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

From cough syrup to decongestants, here are the over-the-counter drugs that may affect your blood glucose Continue reading >>

Metformin And Vicks Dayquil Daytime Cold / Flu (old Formulation) Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Metformin And Vicks Dayquil Daytime Cold / Flu (old Formulation) Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences. Continue reading >>

Treating A Cold With Type Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

Treating A Cold With Type Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

I am type 2 and also use CPAP machine. I use the cloth mask I had a cold the beginning of Dec and I made home made chicken soup, green tea with lemon and garlic I got sugar free cough meds along with mucinex. I got it cleared up in 5 days. It was my first cold as a diabetic in 10 years. I also put vicks on chest every night I have been diabetic for almost 8 years I normal make the tea with lemon and garlic starting in Oct which I did but went on vacation in Nov and did not do it during that time and feel I paid for not doing it. Chicken soup and drinking hot green tea is my first go to. I also take extra vitamin C in pill form, not chewable because of sugar. If it gets bad and I need more help I use a nasal spray that opens up the sinuses, especially at night. I try to avoid antihystamine or decongestant drugs if I can but use them sometimes. I don't use cough syrups because of the sugar. I buy Robitussin cough suppressants in pill form and Ricola, sugar free throat lozenges if I need those things, especially at night. If I need something for fever or pain I use Ibuprofen. I don't tolerate aspirin well and Tylenol doesn't seem to do any good. I have T2 Diabetes and I treat a cold like anyone else. I also was recently diagnosed with sleep apnea and picked up my CPAP machine December 5 of last year. The day I got it, I caught a nasty cold. I ate normally and took Nyquil before bed and used my machine with no problem. You can buy OTC sugar free cold medications. I had some but can rarely find it because it flies off the shelf. If I can't find it, I get the regular brand. I take Nyquil for 3 nights and Dayquil during the day for three days with absolutely no problems. If the cold has not cleared up, I skip and night then take the Nyquil another 2 nights. My CPAP heats the Continue reading >>

Cold Medications For Diabetics

Cold Medications For Diabetics

I've acquired a miserable cold with head and chest congestion along with sneezing, coughing and a runny "doze"! Tis the season... or nearly the season... I suppose... This is my first real lulu of a cold since being diagnosed diabetic... and I hope it's the last... Dream on, Cheri... I thought I'd share with you what the pharmacist told me today: Do not take things like hot cold medications, non-sugar-free cough syrups. In larger pharmacies there are sugar-free expectorant cough syrups available and they will order the same in for me upon request. If you have high blood pressure and or diabetes: Do not take any pill, tablet or capsual form of decongestants. They all raise both blood pressure and blood gulcose levels. Diabetics can use nasal sprays quite safely, though, apparently... according to the pharmacist... I HATE nasal sprays or anything else that has to be taken into my body THAT way!!! LOL! Grrr.... So I said to Daryl, our pharmacist, "Other than nasal sprays, sugar-free cough syrups, and homemade chicken soup there isn't anything else that I can do for this wretched cold." He said, "NO!" I did try one experiment this afternoon, though. I made a hot lemon drink with real juice from real lemons and added a packet of "Equal" sugar substitute to it! This really helped to stop this wretched coughing quite a bit. I try it again before I go to bed tonight. We diabetics can take sugar-free cought syrups, but watch out for the sugar-alcohol levels in them, nasal sprays, chicken soup, low sodium of course, and hot lemon drinks made with real lemons and quality sugar subsitutes. I sure hope that this helps some of you... Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With A Cold Or Flu

Managing Diabetes With A Cold Or Flu

The cold and flu season is on its way. And while sick days bring everyone down, people with type 2 diabetes have some special considerations when they're under the weather. In addition to choosing the right cold medications and checking in with your doctor about possible dosage changes, good diabetes care means being prepared for the days when you would rather not drag yourself out of bed for a glucose check or a snack. Pick the Right Cold Medicine “A lot of [cold and flu] medications, particularly cough syrup, are high in glucose,” says internist Danny Sam, MD, the program director of the residency program at Kaiser Permanente in Santa Clara, Calif. His practice specializes in adult diabetes. If you have diabetes, your best bet is a medicine that is clearly labeled sugar-free. Almost every major pharmacy has a store brand of sugar-free cold or cough medicine, says Dr. Sam. If you have questions, ask your pharmacist for help. Check Blood Sugar Often “Diabetes is not as well controlled when you are sick,” observes Sam. This is because when your body fights infection, it releases a chemical cascade that can alter your body’s glucose and insulin response. As a result, you may need to check your blood sugar more often than you usually do. People with type 2 diabetes may need to check their blood sugar four times a day, and should check their urine for ketones anytime their blood sugar level is higher than 300 mg/dL. Other medications you may need to take when you are sick can affect your blood sugar levels: Aspirin may lower blood sugar levels Certain antibiotics may decrease blood sugar levels in those taking some oral diabetes medications Decongestants may raise blood sugar levels Adjust Your Plan “You have to monitor your blood sugar more frequently and you m Continue reading >>

What Should A Person With Diabetes Do If They Get Sick With Flu Or Cold?

What Should A Person With Diabetes Do If They Get Sick With Flu Or Cold?

There are everyday actions people can take to stay healthy. Try to avoid close contact with sick people. Flu spreads mainly person-to-person through the coughing or sneezing of infected people. If you get sick, the CDC recommends that you stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them. Be sure to continue taking your diabetes pills or insulin. Don’t stop taking them even if you can’t eat. Your health care provider may even advise you to take more insulin during sickness. Test your blood glucose every four hours, and keep track of the results. Drink extra (calorie-free) liquids, and try to eat as you normally would. If you can’t, try to have soft foods and liquids containing the equivalent amount of carbohydrates that you usually consume. Weigh yourself every day. Losing weight without trying is a sign of high blood glucose. Check your temperature every morning and evening. A fever may be a sign of infection. Call your health care provider or go to an emergency room if any of the following happen to you: You feel too sick to eat normally and are unable to keep down food for more than 6 hours. You're having severe diarrhea. You lose 5 pounds or more. Your temperature is over 101 degrees F. Your blood glucose is lower than 60 mg/dL or remains over 300 mg/dL. You have moderate or large amounts of ketones in your urine. You're having trouble breathing. You feel sleepy or can't think clearly. For more information, see: Continue reading >>

Vicks Nyquil/dayquil

Vicks Nyquil/dayquil

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Sooooo.........Im sick! haha and it sucks and I cant sleep at night and my throat is killing me.I know before having the big D that nyquil and dayquil worked soooo great for me. Now I want to take it now...does anyone know if it has any affect on my blood sugar? high or low.Does anyone have experience? Thanks guys! Hi Amber, sorry to hear you're not feeling well. Check your medicine to see if it's sugar free (or has no added sugar on the label). You can also get throat lozengers that are sugar free for your sore throat. If there's no sugar it should not affect your blood sugar readings. However, being sick can elevate your blood sugars. Keep drinking lots of fluids and checking your BGLs every two hours. I think the gelcaps are sugar free, the liquid does have sugar though I use NyQuil and Dayquill when I'm sick; I don't think it affects my blood sugar one way or the other. I just went thru about a month of sickness, complete with fever, chills, sore throat, and now a lingering cough. Nyquil/Dayquil combo kept me comfortable during the worst of it, and it helps to get a good night of sleep to get you back on your feet and healed. There is a bit of an impact on my blood sugar but it's only noticeable if I don't have a fever, in that situation my BG is all over the place on it's own so nyquil is not the worry. Dayquil caplets don't have any impact. So far as cough meds are concerned I have to have the tessalon pearls. You take one with a whole 8 oz of water. They have no sugar, most cough syrups are loaded with sugars. So watch what you take otc. Nyquil is the ONLY cold medicine that has ever w Continue reading >>

Can I Take Other Medicines With Metformin?

Can I Take Other Medicines With Metformin?

It is important to tell your doctor or pharmacist what medicines you are already taking, including those bought without a prescription and herbal medicines, before you start treatment with metformin. Similarly, check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any new medicines while taking metformin, to make sure that the combination is safe. There may be an increased risk of developing lactic acidosis if you take medicines that can affect your kidney function with metformin. These include the following: diuretic medicines such as furosemide non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen or naproxen. It's best to check with your doctor before taking this type of painkiller with metformin. If you are prescribed any of the following medicines with metformin you may be more likely to get low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia), so your doctor may want you to monitor your blood sugar levels more frequently if you start treatment with one of these: ACE inhibitors such as captopril disopyramide MAOI antidepressants, such as phenelzine, tranylcypromine or isocarboxazid other antidiabetic medicines, such as sulphonylureas (eg gliclazide, glibenclamide) or insulin. Medicines that can increase blood sugar levels as a side effect may make all antidiabetic medicines, including metformin, less effective at controlling blood sugar. Medicines that can increase blood sugar levels include the following: antipsychotic medicines, such as chlorpromazine, olanzapine, risperidone beta-2-agonists, such as salbutamol, salmeterol corticosteroids, such as prednisolone glucosamine oestrogens and progestogens, such as those in oral contraceptives thiazide diuretics, such as bendroflumethiazide. Your doctor may want to monitor your blood sugar if you start or stop treatment with any of Continue reading >>

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

When taking medicine, you must always read labeling carefully and be aware of possible side effects. When you have Type 1, you have the added consideration of how it will affect your blood glucose levels as well as any devices that you depend on for your diabetes management. And as with anything you digest, you must know the carb count, administering insulin as needed. Apart from daily medication such as birth control, having a sick-day protocal is always smart for the unexpected bug. This way, you’ll be stocked ahead of time with essentials to ease your mind and decrease additional stress over your care. Here are some must-knows about over-the-counter medication and what it means for your Type 1. Cold Medicine Being sick stresses the body, and when your body’s stressed it releases blood-glucose raising hormones. These hormones can even prevent insulin from properly lowering your levels. Consider the following when taking cold medicine: Opt for pill forms – if possible, pills over syrups are better for their lack of carbohydrates. Check for added sugars – When taking syrups, double-check the labels of over-the-counter brands to make sure they don’t have added sugar. See if there’s a sugar-free option – Though small doses of sugar don’t pose a huge risk, your safest bet is to ask your pharmacist about sugar-free syrups. Check your BGLs frequently – This should be triple the time you typically check. Being sick makes you more susceptible to BGL extremes. Administer insulin accordingly – Medicine, just like food, must be dosed for. Blood Glucose Levels Even without sugar, short-term cold medicines can send your blood glucose levels spinning. Aspirin has been known to lower glucose levels Pseudoepinephrine, the decongestant found in most over-the-counter Continue reading >>

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Sympt Continue reading >>

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