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Can Type 1 Diabetics Become Nurses

8 Things I Wish People Understood About Having Type 1 Diabetes

8 Things I Wish People Understood About Having Type 1 Diabetes

I was 25 and in the middle of my second year of law school when I started feeling tired, thirsty, and hungry. I had blurry vision all the time. I was lucky — I mentioned this to a friend, and she said whenever she complained about her eyes her dad tested her blood sugar, because that's how he got diagnosed with diabetes. I had a family history of both types, but I figured I was too old for Type 1 and too young and too much of a gym rat for Type 2. Still, I went to student health. I explained my typical diabetes symptoms and family history to a person we will call "Helpful Nurse." Helpful Nurse decided the best immediate course of action would be to gaslight me aggressively in the five minutes it took to get the results back on my sugar test. "We don't usually get people in here 'thinking' they have 'diabetes.'" Cool story. "See, your vision isn't that bad." It's usually 20/19. "I'm sure you're just stressed about finals." Yeah, especially since I've spent most of the semester unconscious. That's when we heard someone scream from the lab down the hall and around a corner, "Don't let her leave." The equipment in student health had a limited range. My test didn't generate a number. It just said "high." "High" means it was at least six times normal. No, my life isn't over. It's a pain in the ass, it's terrifying, but the treatments will on average get me through the day. I was waiting for a friend to take me to the ER when Helpful Nurse started talking about high- risk pregnancy and "not dying the way my grandmother died." Pregnancy? I have exams in a month. And I watched my T1 grandmother die. Thanks, Helpful Nurse, you can go now. Of course this was a Friday. I spent the weekend eating nothing but tofu and zucchini with my sugar camped at three or four times normal, and Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Childhood The Nurses Role

Diabetes In Childhood The Nurses Role

The nurse plays an important role in the education of diabetic children and their families, writes Deirdre Bowers The nurse plays an important role in the education of diabetic children and their families, writes Deirdre Bowers Education of diabetic children can take a lot of time and patience, but it is up to us as nurses to remain updated so that we can make life a little easier for these children and their families The nurse is the primary educator but acts as part of a team. This initially involves the paediatrician, the nurse or nurse specialist and the dietitian. Other professionals involved may include the psychologist, the social worker, the ophthalmologist, the GP, the public health nurse, the dentist and the chiropodist. All of these professionals have their own specialties, but their combined information given to children and their families can make it easier to understand diabetes and how to control it. Education should be approached on an individual basis, taking into consideration the age of the child, the IQ, previous knowledge of diabetes, social background and family support. It is the responsibility of the nurse to obtain any relevant information from the family and assess the type of approach most suited to them. The nurse is often the first person from the team to meet the child and the family, so a friendly approach is required. The aim of education is to teach the child to be as independent as possible, bearing in mind their age. The family also needs to be educated as a support team. A measure of responsibility for the child can avoid diabetes taking over the lives of the whole family. Other people may require education, eg. teachers, hobby instructors or babysitters. It is the responsibility of the nurse to provide all leaflets and relevant info Continue reading >>

A School Nurse Shares What Matters In T1d Care

A School Nurse Shares What Matters In T1d Care

A School Nurse Shares What Matters in T1D Care I stepped into meaningful life-changing work when I became a nurse. I started my nursing career in the Neonatal ICU. It was beautifully rewarding, but intensely demanding. When I made the change to school nursing, I wrestled with doubts about this role and if this work would be enough. Had I traded quality time with my family for career suicide? My first year as a school nurse, I found myself deep in Type 1 diabetes with two boys. Did I know what I was doing? Absolutely not. Learning to juggle the needs of two T1D boys with all the other parts of this job was really hard. I cried a lot. But, this is how I approached it: If my child needed nursing care at her school what would I want that care to look like? I wanted it to look like love, determination, knowledge, persistence, and to be as damn good as possible. This work is anything but insignificant. It is vital. It is necessary. It is deserved. My boys are amazing, and caring for them is more than just ajob. That is what T1D does. It binds ustogether in the struggle to manage it.Here is some of what I know for sure: One of the reasons I left the hospital was to build relationships. It is hard to say goodbye to a patient and never know the rest of his/her story. Here, I know the story. I am privileged to be a part of it. These families have been dealing with the effects of T1D for longer than I have been a nurse. You can study all you want about diabetes, but if you do not know your families, you will fail. I really try to care for my two boys as their families would. I am their advocate and their number one cheerleader throughout the school day. I have learned how to truly carb count; meaning I know that bagel really has 60 grams of carbs, but for this guy it is counts as Continue reading >>

School Nurses Reveal: What Our Favorite D-parents Do

School Nurses Reveal: What Our Favorite D-parents Do

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney School Nurses Reveal: What Our Favorite D-Parents Do You rely on school staff to care for your child for most of his or her waking hours during the academic year, and type 1 diabetes can make that a tall order. In honor of National School Nurse Day (observed on the Wednesday between May 6 and May 12 each year), make their job a little easier: Consider adopting one of these habits or solutions that members of the National Association of School Nurses say has made a real difference to them. Its very helpful when a parent schedules a conference and meetswith me before a child with diabetes starts theschool year.The first few weeks of school are hectic, and I want to be ready to receive your child the minute he or she walks in the school.As we know, children are individuals, and what works for one child may not be the best for another. Yes, we need to know the medical information like ratios and correction factors, but its also important to hear what challenges the child is struggling with, and what is going well. I want to bea very important part of your childs healthcare team and provide the support that your child needs to be successful. Susan Hoffmann, M.S.N., R.N., N.C.S.N., member of theDelaware School Nurse Association, and school nurse at WB Simpson Elementary School in Wyoming, Del. I have multiple students with type 1 diabetes, and keeping parents updated can become quite difficult.Fortunately, the parents I work with agreed to use a web-based program which has allowed me to communicate throughout the day with them. Parents receive text messages and/or emails informing them of blood sugar checks, insulin given, carbohydrate counts, [and other care management information]. This helps simplify my communication, and parents Continue reading >>

Managing Type-1 Diabetes Without A School Nurse

Managing Type-1 Diabetes Without A School Nurse

Managing Type-1 Diabetes without a school nurse Posted by Carrie Chandler on July 02, 2014 If you own a computer or a TV, you've heard about recent school nurse shortages. We've heard about them, too, and it's worrisome. School should be a safe place - a place where students can test their chops in the spring musical, or harness their inner math whiz. It shouldn't be a place for worrying about administering your own insulin, and that's why it's imperative for schools to be able to manage serious student health needs, with or without a full-time school nurse. Let's start by recognizing the facts. The facts state that the school nurse to student ratio for many schools is too high.The facts also state that the number of students with at least one chronic disease is increasing, which means each student requires more care. This is why student health care at school matters. It matters because more and more students need to monitor their diabetes, asthma, or ADHD at the one place they spend nearly half of their adolescent lives. Students are in need of care, but at schools without a school nurse, or with a part-time nursing staff, it means that non-medical staff may need to step up and help students manage their chronic diseases, including Type-1 Diabetes. Understanding how Type-1 Diabetes affects students According to the American Diabetes Association, Type-1 Diabetes is a condition where the body does not create insulin, a substance we all need in order to convert delicious food to energy. Think of insulin as the helping hand that turns a crisp, juicy apple into energy for hanging on the monkey bars at recess. But for those students with diabetes, their body can't transform an apple into energy, so they need a little extra help. The "extra help" I'm referring to is added in Continue reading >>

On Being A Nurse, Mother To A Type 1 Diabetic, And A Diabetes Educator

On Being A Nurse, Mother To A Type 1 Diabetic, And A Diabetes Educator

I am fortunate enough to have been chosen as the new Diabetes Educator. I could not feel more excited and fulfilled in my newest adventure being with the Endocrinology Team! Although I’ve enjoyed functioning in many roles as an registered nurse, I have found my niche being in a position that serves to educate and support individuals in their health journey; particularly with a chronic condition. I will preface this by saying that although I consider myself a supportive member of an interdisciplinary team, I fell short in being a supportive mother. You see, my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) on mother’s day last year. Since that day, I found that what makes me likable as a bedside nurse did not translate well into being a T1D mother. I’m positive I became the ultimate helicopter mom demanding to oversee his injections, peeking at his glucometer, and hawk-eyeing his nutritional intake. You say, “Good job! You’re a great mother!” Thank you. I tried to be the best right hand man to my then 12-year-old son. The reality, though, is I did everything wrong in supporting him in his journey into physical, emotional, and mental well-being. Looking back at my actions, I truly did mean well. After all, I love and care for him! But, he begged to differ. Since then, I’ve changed my relationship with him and was able to educate myself on how I can better support him. So, I thought I could share tips on Diabetes Etiquette from the Behavioral Diabetes Institute. Nurse educators encourage those who don’t have diabetes to understand how to support their loved ones. Do understand that diabetes is hard work. It’s a full time job with no time off. It involves thinking about what, when, and how much is eaten, all the while factoring in exercise, medication, stres Continue reading >>

Child Health - The Nurses Role In Childhood Diabetes

Child Health - The Nurses Role In Childhood Diabetes

Child health - The nurses role in childhood diabetes Focus on the role of the nurse in the treatment and management of childhood diabetes The nurse is the primary educator but acts as part of a team. This initially involves the paediatrician, the nurse or nurse specialist and the dietician. Other professionals involved may include the psychologist, the social worker, the opthalmologist, the GP, the public health nurse, the dentist and the chiropodist. All of these have their own specialties, but all the combined information given to children and their families can make it easier to understand diabetes and how to control it. Education should be approached on an individual basis, taking into consideration the age of the child, the IQ, previous knowledge of diabetes, social background and family support. It is the responsibility of the nurse to obtain any relevant information from the family and assess the type of approach most suited to them. The nurse is often the first person from the team to meet the child and the family, so a friendly approach is required. The aim of education is to teach the child to be as independent as possible, bearing in mind his/her age. The family also needs to be educated as a support team. A measure of responsibility for the child can avoid diabetes taking over the lives of the whole family. Other people may require education, eg teachers, hobby instructors or babysitters. It is the responsibility of the nurse to provide all leaflets and relevant information for these people. There are various models available and the nurse should be familiar with all models and new or updated information. The sales reps from any of the companies are happy to provide this. Involve the child from day one when using a glucometer, encouraging them to press the Continue reading >>

Gcsucolonnade

Gcsucolonnade

Flying down the highway, 8-year-old Hannah Young watched the scenery outside whiz past the moving car. She sat inside with her parents and three brothers as they made the long drive back from a family vacation to Florida. Suddenly, Hannah realized she needed to use the restroom. The brood pulled over, filed out, took a bathroom break and piled back into the car to continue their drive. Moments later, Hannah needed to use the restroom again. Slightly annoyed, the family stopped at the next exit and again, filed out, let Hannah use the restroom, piled back in and took off. Hannahs parents, Joe and Beckye Young did not think a thing of it. Hannah was a young girl; she probably drank too much water before the car ride. Again, about 30 minutes later, Hannah needed to use the restroom. And again. And again. At nearly every exit the family approached during the five hour drive. Beckye decided that a visit to the pediatrician was in order. We called the doctor that morning and told the pediatricians office she had a bladder infection, she said. Beckye and Hannah, along with her three brothers, went to the doctor, as a pit stop on their way to school registration with the expectation that the doctor would prescribe some medication for a bladder infection, and they would be on their way. Dr. Harrell asked me if Joe could come pick up the other kids, Beckye said. She told me that Hannah and I needed to go immediately to Scottish Rite for more testing. After a long wait at Scottish Rite, the test results were in. We were shocked, overwhelmed with the diagnosis, Beckye said. No one in our family had ever had Type 1 diabetes. To the familys, and to Hannahs dismay, diabetes would become part of their everyday lives. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), about 1.25 mil Continue reading >>

The School Nurse Who Cares For 8 Kids With Type 1

The School Nurse Who Cares For 8 Kids With Type 1

Read When the School Nurse Wont Help with Your Childs Pump. Over the last year, Peters school nurse, Sarah Barquero (aka Nurse Sarah) has become a pivotal part of our daily lives. I sat down with Nurse Sarah recently to talk about how she sees her role as an educator, and about an important extra step she has taken in her job that has changed the way Peter thinks about diabetes and himself. Nurse Sarah has an unusual patient portfolio. At our school, Wedgwood, Peter is one of eight kids with Type 1 diabetes; it is the largest concentration of kids with Type 1 in any Seattle public elementary school. Thats a lot of pods, CGMs, and carb counts to manage. In the spring of 2015, after comparing notes with Anna Barash, another school nurse, Barquero decided to create a diabetes group in her school. I wanted to do something for the T1 kids, Barquero explains. I wanted them to be able to talk to each other in a supportive environment so that diabetes becomes more normalized in school. To her knowledge, the Wedgwood diabetes group is the only one of its kind in the district, which serves more than 53,000 students. The group, with an age range of six to ten years, is less of a support group and more of a learning space for kids who are figuring out how to navigate life with diabetes. My first goal for every kid is to get them as independent as they can be for their age, says Barquero. With fourth-graders we talk about good snack choices for lows so they can check their blood sugar in the classroom. For a kindergartner, its obviously different. Just watching a six-year-old learn to take his own blood sugar and tell me what hes going to do thats huge. Coaching a six-year-old to check his own blood sugar is an achievement on its own. But Nurse Sarahs diabetes group is also a way f Continue reading >>

Anniecoops - The Thoughts Of A Nurse With Type 1 Diabetes

Anniecoops - The Thoughts Of A Nurse With Type 1 Diabetes

The thoughts of a nurse with type 1 diabetes After 34 years I can still remember her. Why is it that some people we care for seem to make an indelible mark on our memory? She was the wife of a patient. I worked in Scarborough so lots of older people came on holiday, lots and lots of them; seeking sunshine, the Spa and the long line of slot machines, ice cream and bingo on the front. They came in droves when the sun came out, despite the continued chill of the North Sea. Of course some of them became unwell. He had chest pain. An older gentleman. He was tall, upright and smart. She in contrast was tiny, like a little bird. I cant remember where she came from but she had a strong accent, possibly Eastern European. She seemed very exotic. I was a nearly qualified third year student, close to my finals and, as a result, was allowed to work on the three bedded coronary care unit that was part of the male medical ward. I was always wary of getting too close to families but she was all alone. No family nearby. No other visitors but her. It was before open visiting but we used to let her come and go. She seemed to take a shine to me. She used to chat ten to the dozen and sometimes I just couldnt keep up. Eventually their hotel or b&b booking must have finished because she moved into a room we had for relatives. She asked me daily to go and have tea with her. She wanted to read my tea leaves! I wasnt sure about this at all! Eventually I relented and we had tea. She tipped my china tea cup up and looked inside. She said: I see a place, its name starts with L, I can see money, not riches but enough. She looked up at me, with pale blue eyes and said I can see a tall dark stranger and you will marry him within the year. I thought she was so sweet; I hugged her and went off to my ea Continue reading >>

Tips For School Nurses

Tips For School Nurses

Tips for School Nurses provide ideas to help the school nurse coordinate diabetes care in the school setting. Tips include planning for the care newly diagnosed or returning student, where to seek training resources, preparation for field trips, what information to provide to transportation, and other information. Meet with parent/guardian before the school year begins or after diagnosis to review the student's Diabetes Medical Management Plan/physician's orders (DMMP) and secure needed diabetes supplies, equipment, medication, and snacks. Determine if parents/ guardian is authorized to make adjustments to insulin as indicated in the student's DMMP. Make sure the parent/guardian provides notification of any changes to the student's diabetes regimen and obtains an updated DMMP to document changes. Seek out training as needed to update your skills and gain knowledge about new technologies such as the insulin pump or continuous glucose monitor. Put an Emergency Action Plan in place for prompt recognition and treatment of hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) and make sure the student has immediate access to a quick-acting form of glucose (regular soda, fruit juice, glucose tabs). Put an Emergency Action Plan in place for prompt recognition and treatment of hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) and make sure the student has immediate access to a water and insulin as prescribed in the DMMP. Inform school employees that a student with diabetes should never be sent anywhere alone if feeling hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic. Inform parent/guardian that their child has rights under relevant federal laws such as Section 504 and be a member of the team that determines eligibility for services under federal law and develops the 504 plan or other written accommodations plan. Identify and recr Continue reading >>

Jobs Diabetics Can Not Have

Jobs Diabetics Can Not Have

My question is, who has the right to say an insulin dependent diabetic will have poor control of their diabetes? Question is because I have recently found out my Type 1 diabetic son will not be able to join the military, become an astronaut, drive a tractor trailer, fly an airplane or become a police officer. My son may have 60 plus years of great control. He may have 60 years of poor control. But no one will know this until it happens. In every single job I listed above, you have drug addicts working in them positions. But they are disciplined when they have a positive drug test. So why can't the same be done with an insulin dependent diabetic. Who is to say they may have a low while on duty or while driving or flying? How can that be an assumption? Do these people truly believe every single insulin diabetic will have one or many lows in their diabetic lifetime while working? I can totally understand their reasoning, but who is to say they will have a low while on duty? I am not a physician, but a volunteer and a mom of a type 1 diabetic and the daughter of a type 2.I feel the same way you do, but my husband and I tell our daughter that she can be anything she wants to be.Who knows they might change the rules or better yet FIND A CURE!! You have to realize that if a person has a severe low in the military, as a pilot or in a big rig, it is not just there life at stake; they are risking the life of others.I do know that in the state I live before a diabetic teenager gets there drivers permit and license the doctor has to sign a statement that the person has been in good control for at least 6 months.I know several teens that have not been able to get there permits yet. I have also read about and, met diabetics that have had such severe lows that the local EMTs know her Continue reading >>

Silly Diabetes Questions Doctors & Nurses Ask Patients

Silly Diabetes Questions Doctors & Nurses Ask Patients

Silly Diabetes Questions Doctors & Nurses Ask Patients I had an eye appointment the other day and as the nurse was taking vitals as such, one of the questions she asked was, Whats was the range of your glucose readings in the last 30 days? I hate questions like that. Personally, I really think that question is pretty much meaningless in the Type 1 world. In 30 days, my glucose may go from 40 to 400 despite my best efforts. So I said, Oh, probably 40 to 400, and got a head shake at how bad those numbers were. It just irritated me & made me feel defensive so I said that my last A1c was X.X percent so my endo and I are happy with that. I also mentioned that there were things that can happen that are not entirely under my control. Things like the 15 or so different processes in your body that can affect glucose readings, only 3 or 4 of which I can really influence. Bad site, miscount carbs, hot weather and skunky insulin, WTF days hell, just being human. You know what the nurse wrote in my record? Type 1 diabetic, blood sugars fluctuate quite a bit per pt as a type one diabetic blood sugars are not under our control. Reading that, it seems like I am not even trying. JFC, I get tired of that crap. The uninitiated expect so much without even realizing it. I have plenty of self-esteem issues all on my own, I really dont need any help from any one else, thank you very much. Listen, Im about worn smooth at the moment. I try really hard to just let people do their jobs as I know they dont write these questions. I just dont think Im going to answer it next time. Im sure, they will pressure me to. I think Ill just say: Thats really a silly question, almost meaningless for a Type 1. The last 2 times Ive answered it? Ive gotten the wow, those arent good numbers reaction from you guy Continue reading >>

Nurses With Diabetes- Page 3

Nurses With Diabetes- Page 3

I'm not a nurse yet, still a student. I was diagnosed with type 1 November last year. Was a bit of a shock since I was 19 when diagnosed (20 now) - I thought only kids and younger teenagers got type 1. But it was caught early, I knew the signs, but blamed it on other things until I started losing weight. My bsl was only 25.1mmol/l (451) and ketones were only .6. I've been managing fine while on clinicals, but do drop my dose of lantus and novorapid (insulin aspart) so I run a higher than usual. I'm still scared of hypos even though I've had a 1.6 (28) and 1.8 (32) & got through both okay. Also too embarrassed to let anyone around me know or find out I have D. Do you all let those you work with know about your D or do you keep it to yourself? . Also too embarrassed to let anyone around me know or find out I have D. Do you all let those you work with know about your D or do you keep it to yourself? Your instructor should be aware for your safety. I've only told one of my coworkers so far, but will need to tell more. I found it hard to work at night, mostly because I was too lazy to bring my own food and the did not make good choices in the cafeteria. Also, it was not open till 0100, so I was at work 8 hours before food was available. I work days now and have learned to manage my blood sugars much better. As for "too high" numbers. The ADA recommends your blood sugar be less than 130 at all times. I found it hard to concentrate when my bs was higher than 150 or so. And on two occasions I had to be rescued at work when my BS was < 70. So the key is to monitor frequently, hydrate yourself, eat right and be glad there are things you can do to stay healthy! I don't know if anyone will read this since this thread is pretty old, but I have type I diabetes and would love to beco Continue reading >>

Top Type1 Diabetes Tips From Nurse Robbie, Cde, Rn | Adw Diabetes

Top Type1 Diabetes Tips From Nurse Robbie, Cde, Rn | Adw Diabetes

Posted by Roberta Kleinman | Nov 30, 2016 | Diabetes Management , Newsletters , Type 1 | 1 | I attended the 2nd Annual Type 1 Diabetes Conference in Naples, Florida earlier this month. The conference was created last year by the mother of a child who developed type 1 diabetes to give back to the local community. The number one purpose of the conference was to educate families about type 1 diabetes and raise money for an organization called Help a Diabetic Child (helpadiabeticchild.org) for those children who cant afford their diabetes supplies/medications with or without health insurance. I only counsel diabetes patients over age 18 so attending this meeting gave me a different perspective on treating and caring for children with diabetes. Seeing newly diagnosed and already diagnosed children interacting with their parents, volunteers and the speakers was gratifying. The desire for up-to-date information was huge and the connection between the attendees was extremely visible. Some of the young parents in the audience stated they often feel like they failed their children since this disease has taken over all of their lives. In their hearts they knew they did not cause the disease, but their heads wanted concrete answers as to why it happened. I was impressed that most of the young adults listened as intently as their parents and the smaller children stayed seated and well behaved in order to let their parents focus on the information. There were many volunteers available to help out if the children needed to break away and since it was held at the YMCA there was a playground available. I wanted to share information about type 1 diabetes for those of you who are unfamiliar. Although called diabetes it is really quite different than type 2. Here is what you need to know: Continue reading >>

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