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Can Thyroid Problems Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Thyroid Meds Increase Risk For Elevated Blood Sugar

Thyroid Meds Increase Risk For Elevated Blood Sugar

Twenty-two million people are on Synthroid (levothyroxine) today in the United States. Millions of others are on other thyroid medications like Armour. Patients are usually on these medications for life once they start. Hidden deep within the drug literature precautions is startling information about blood sugar risks. Thyroid medications may pose a risk to your blood sugar levels. Of the millions of individuals who are on thyroid meds, have you been informed of this risky possibility? If you are not aware of this potential hazard, this information is for you! Managing health requires many things. Often you need to be a detective and dig deep within the literature and ask questions. This is indeed the case with thyroid medications. Hidden deep within thyroid medication literature is a surprising statement on the risk of elevated blood sugar levels. It is easily glossed over or not recognized at all. This information may not be present in the condensed version of drug safety information handed out by the pharmacist or on the online consumer versions for Synthroid or levothyroxine. Drug Safety Sheet Information Detective work on the topic of thyroid drug pharmacology provides this information. Abbvie Labs, the makers of Synthroid provide this statement on their website hidden deep within their professional literature in the miscellaneous section. “Addition of levothyroxine to antidiabetic or insulin therapy may result in increased antidiabetic agent or insulin requirements. Careful monitoring of diabetic control is recommended, especially when thyroid therapy is started, changed, or discontinued.” The only other statement found within Synthroid/levothyroxine professional literature on this risk was “Levothyroxine has a narrow therapeutic index. Regardless of the ind Continue reading >>

Dr. Chris Heimlich Dc, Scottsdale Phoenix Metro Area Doctor Shares How Hypothyroid Symptoms Are Affected By Blood Sugar Levels

Dr. Chris Heimlich Dc, Scottsdale Phoenix Metro Area Doctor Shares How Hypothyroid Symptoms Are Affected By Blood Sugar Levels

Let’s take a look at the important role of balanced blood sugar levels and your low thyroid symptoms Proper Blood Sugar levels are critical for anyone with low thyroid function. Normal blood glucose levels medically have a broad range of anywhere from 70 to 105. Functional or optimal blood glucose levels are 85 to 99. According to the American Diabetic Association, a blood sugar level reading of 106 to 126 is called, “Insulin resistance,” and anything above 127 is diabetes. I know you may be thinking, I don’t have diabetes. Here is the thing, you don’t have to be diabetic to have blood sugar problems. Your body does not like to have the range too high or too low. Anytime the range gets out of the normal, you start to get inflammatory chemicals released in the body. This is not a good thing. Here is a scary example of how the traditional model can go wrong. One of my patients, Todd, came in for me to take a look at his hip. During the exam I noticed several indicators pointing towards blood sugar problems. This guy was sharp. He had already figured he had diabetes. He had all the signs and symptoms. He did all the research on the web pertaining to it. He told me he had asked his doctor to test him. His doctor told him he was a lucky man. He did not have diabetes. His blood test showed he was one point away from it. Suffice it to say we took a different approach and Todd did not have to go on any medications. We were able to control it with diet, exercise, and proper supplementation. He no longer has any of the symptoms of diabetes. Here are a few symptoms of when the Glucose, or blood sugar, is not regulated properly: Poor memory, forgetful Fatigue after meals Increased thirst & appetite Waist girth is equal or larger than hip girth Feel shaky, jittery, tremors Continue reading >>

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism

This is the medical term for an underactive thyroid gland. One of the many things the thyroid gland is responsible for is to regulate metabolism. When not enough thyroid hormone is secreted, the metabolism slows[1]; secreting too much results in hyperthyroidism and a too-rapid metabolism. The thyroid gland is actually controlled by another gland, the pituitary gland. It signals the thyroid to produce its hormone and is responsible for the amount of thyroid hormone in the blood. Symptoms of hypothyroid are dry skin and coat, often a loss of hair at the rear portion of the body, sluggishness and weight gain even if the animal has his/her meals reduced, skin that is cold to the touch. The animal may also deliberately seek out warm places to lie. Forms of neuropathy can result from hypothyroidism[2], because it is an endocrine disease. In many hypothyroid cases, the true cause of the lack of thyroid function is never discovered--it's referred to as idiopathic hypothyroidism. The other is known as lymphocytic thyroiditis, where the body begins producing antibodies against the thyroid gland. Symptoms of hypothyroidism may not develop until 75% of the thyroid gland is destroyed; it may take 1-3 years from development of the condition to this point. Idiopathic and lymphocytic thyroiditis causes account for over 95% of hypothyroidism in dogs[3]. In less than 10% of hypothyroidism cases, the problem is not with the thyroid gland itself, but with the pituitary gland in the brain. The pituitary gland produces a thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)[4]; without this hormone to signal the thyroid gland to produce its thyroid hormone, the thyroid gland remains inactive[5]. Lack of iodine in the pet's diet can result in insufficient production of thyroid hormones with the result being a ty Continue reading >>

Hashimoto’s: Blood Sugar Blues

Hashimoto’s: Blood Sugar Blues

The human body is a wonderfully complex playground where hormones, immune cells, neurotransmitters, red and white blood cells, bacteria, and more all frolic. With Hashimoto’s that playground gets invaded by a hurricane of inflammation and this disrupts many of the systems that produce these things. In today’s post, we focus on how blood sugar problems can impact the thyroid and how Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism can also make blood sugar problems worse. It’s a two way street, people. The Poor, Dear Pancreas The endocrine gland that is responsible for helping maintain blood sugar balance is the pancreas. The poor, dear, much beleaguered pancreas. What does the pancreas do? Quite a lot actually, we really should be nicer to it. It does endocrine stuff and non-endocrine or exocrine stuff. Blood Sugar Balance and Absorption On the endocrine side it produces insulin, glucagon and somatostatin. Insulin and glucagon are involved in blood sugar metabolism and somatostatin is involved in intestinal absorption. The exocrine functions include secreting digestive enzymes into the small intestines. These breakdown proteins, fats and carbs in the diet. Studies have found pancreatic function was significantly reduced in patients with hypothyroidism. And, in many people today, the pancreas is under siege. Sugar Junkies Americans are addicted to sugar. In some measure, it’s their own doing. In other ways, it is the food industry and public health officials who decided that fat was evil when it was discovered that cholesterol was linked to heart disease in the 1980s. The National Academy of Science made sweeping recommendations at that time to get rid of dietary fat. Bye, Bye Fat – Hello Sugar So fat was taken out of many processed, fast foods and in an effort to make it tast Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar & Insulin Resistance Correlate With High T3

High Blood Sugar & Insulin Resistance Correlate With High T3

High blood sugar, insulin resistance, or high fasting blood glucose may all be caused by high T3 levels. Many on the T3-only protocol or high doses of desiccated thyroid notice their blood sugar levels rising and wonder why. It’s because thyroid levels, either too high or too low, have a direct impact on blood glucose. Hypothyroidism may cause high blood sugar & insulin resistance A1C levels of hypothyroid patients are generally higher than normal, and in one study, replacement with thyroid hormone brought the A1C down, but it did not lower fasting blood glucose. [1] A1C is a measure of average blood glucose levels over several months. This study shows that the hypothyroid condition will cause an overall higher average blood glucose than normal. Insulin resistance appears when thyroid levels are too low or too high. [2] Correcting the hypothyroid state is beneficial, but replacement with too much thyroid hormone may result in continued insulin resistance. A low T3/T4 ratio was found in pre-diabetics who had both high insulin levels and insulin resistance. These subjects had lower T3 levels and higher T4 levels than normal, glucose-tolerant subjects. This study confirms that a certain level of T3 is essential for normal glucose metabolism.[3] SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin) is secreted by the liver and is positively correlated with thyroid levels—it rises when hyperthyroid and falls when hypothyroid. Low levels therefore suggest a hypothyroid condition. Low SHBG is also a biomarker of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and a risk factor for developing high blood sugar and type 2 diabetes, especially in women. [5] High T3 & High T4 may cause high blood sugar and insulin resistance Blood sugar problems may be caused by high thyroid levels. The following are so Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Linked To Low Thyroid Function, New Study Suggests

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Linked To Low Thyroid Function, New Study Suggests

A low thyroid function has been found to be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Researcher Dr. Layal Chaker said, “Low thyroid function is associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes and also of progression from prediabetes to diabetes. Of course, we’ve always screened for thyroid disorders in patients with type 1 diabetes, because of the autoimmune association…But there’s overlap between the symptoms of hypothyroidism and type 2 diabetes.” The study included 8,452 individuals over the age of 45 without diabetes, but with low thyroid hormone levels. After an average 7.9-year follow-up, 1,100 developed prediabetes and 798 developed type 2 diabetes. Low hormone levels were found to be a risk factor for diabetes and higher T4 hormone levels were associated with a lower risk of diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 29.1 million Americans have diabetes of which 8.1 million cases are undiagnosed. With such high numbers, diabetes prevention should really be on the forefront of health. We currently know and understand many causes of type 2 diabetes. Being overweight, eating a poor diet, not getting enough sleep, and not exercising can all contribute to the onset of type 2 diabetes. But did you know your thyroid could also be a cause of diabetes? The relation between thyroid disease and diabetes Thyroid disorders affect nearly as many Americans as diabetes – about 27 million. Both diabetes and thyroid disorders affect the endocrine system – glands that secrete hormones useful for bodily functions. So it is not surprising that those with diabetes may also have a thyroid disorder, and vice versa. In diabetes, the body has a difficult time using insulin, and since the thyroid is responsible for the metabolism, it then gr Continue reading >>

Hyperthyroidism Symptoms

Hyperthyroidism Symptoms

When you have hyperthyroidism, your body is producing excessive amounts of the thyroid hormones T3 and T4. Since these hormones regulate your metabolism (how your body processes and uses energy), having too high a level will cause symptoms related to a high metabolism. In essence, hyperthyroidism speeds up some of your body's processes. However, not everyone with hyperthyroidism will experience all of the symptoms listed below. These are all the possible symptoms, but symptoms vary based on how long your thyroid gland has been producing too much T3 and T4, how much extra T3 and T4 you have, and your age. Here's what you may experience with hyperthyroidism: Appetite change (decrease or increase) Difficulty sleeping (insomnia) Fatigue Frequent bowel movement—perhaps diarrhea Heart palpitations Heat intolerance Increased sweating Irritability Light menstrual periods—perhaps even missed periods Mental disturbances Muscle weakness Nervousness Problems with fertility Shortness of breath Sudden paralysis Tremor/shakiness Vision changes Weight loss-but perhaps weight gain Dizziness Thinning of hair Itching and hives Possible increase in blood sugar If Graves' disease is the underlying cause of your hyperthyroidism, there are some additional symptoms associated with that. Please read our article on Graves' disease symptoms to learn more about those. Continue reading >>

Thyroid Disease And Diabetes

Thyroid Disease And Diabetes

CLINICAL DIABETES VOL. 18 NO. 1 Winter 2000 PRACTICAL POINTERS Thyroid Disease and Diabetes By Patricia Wu, MD, FACE, FRCP Thyroid disease is common in the general population, and the prevalence increases with age. The assessment of thyroid function by modern assays is both reliable and inexpensive. Screening for thyroid dysfunction is indicated in certain high-risk groups, such as neonates and the elderly. Hypothyroidism is by far the most common thyroid disorder in the adult population and is more common in older women. It is usually autoimmune in origin, presenting as either primary atrophic hypothyroidism or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thyroid failure secondary to radioactive iodine therapy or thyroid surgery is also common. Rarely, pituitary or hypothalamic disorders can result in secondary hypothyroidism. Approximately 4 million people in the United States are hypothyroid and receive thyroxine replacement therapy. By contrast, hyperthyroidism is much less common, with a female-to-male ratio of 9:1. Graves' disease is the most common cause and affects primarily young adults. Toxic multi-nodular goiters tend to affect the older age-groups. Diabetic patients have a higher prevalence of thyroid disorders compared with the normal population (Table 1). Because patients with one organ-specific autoimmune disease are at risk of developing other autoimmune disorders, and thyroid disorders are more common in females, it is not surprising that up to 30% of female type 1 diabetic patients have thyroid disease. The rate of postpartum thyroiditis in diabetic patients is three times that in normal women. A number of reports have also indicated a higher than normal prevalence of thyroid disorders in type 2 diabetic patients, with hypothyroidism being the most common disorder. Table Continue reading >>

Hypothyroidism And Diabetes

Hypothyroidism And Diabetes

Hypothyroidism Hypothyroidism Symptoms Hypothyroidism Diagnosis Hypothyroidism Treatment Causes of Hypothyroidism Hypothyroidism Diet Hypothyroidism & Iodine Is Hypothyroidism Genetic Pregnancy & Hypothyroidism Diabetes & Hypothyroidism Yoga & Hypothyroidism Link Between Hypothyroidism and Diabetes Some studies show that people with diabetes are at higher risk of having hypothyroidism. In addition, thyroid diseases are more common among females and several studies have shown that around 30% of females with type 1 diabetes also have a thyroid disease. Some reports also indicate that there's a higher prevalence of hypothyroidism in type 2 diabetic patients. How Hypothyroidism Can Lead to Diabetes When a person has hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is not able to produce enough hormones to stimulate their metabolism. Hence, the person's body functions slow down. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas and used to activate the absorption of blood sugar and to use it as a source of energy. During hypothyroidism the production of insulin is reduced as the pancreas works slower. Once there is not enough insulin and the pancreas fails to turn blood sugar into energy, it can lead to diabetes. Thyroid Dysfunction Affects People With Diabetes Changes in the metabolism of carbohydrates are observed in hypothyroidism but clinical evidences of the abnormalities are rarely visible. Hypoglycemia is rare in some isolated thyroid hormone deficiencies. In some cases, a hypothyroid patient can have an increased chance of having hypopituitarism. Several studies show that hypothyroidism can also pave the way for an array of plasma lipid metabolism abnormalities such as the concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and high level of triglyceride. Subclinical hypothyroid Continue reading >>

Thyroid, Blood Sugar, And Metabolic Syndrome

Thyroid, Blood Sugar, And Metabolic Syndrome

This article is part of a special report on Thyroid Disorders. To see the other articles in this series, click here. According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, 27 million Americans suffer from thyroid dysfunction – half of whom go undiagnosed. Subclinical hypothyroidism, a condition in which TSH is elevated but free T4 is normal, may affect an additional 24 million Americans. Taken together, more than 50 million Americans are affected by some form of thyroid disorder. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), also affects 50 million Americans, and insulin resistance, one of the components of metabolic syndrome, affects up to 105 million Americans. That’s 35% of the population. Metabolic syndrome has become so common that it’s predicted to eventually bankrupt our healthcare system. Both metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance are risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, two of the leading causes of death in the developed world. With such a high prevalence of both thyroid dysfunction and metabolic syndrome, you might suspect there’s a connection between the two. And you’d be right. Studies show an increased frequency of thyroid disorders in diabetics, and a higher prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in people with thyroid disorders. That’s because healthy thyroid function depends on keeping your blood sugar in a normal range, and keeping your blood sugar in a normal range depends on healthy thyroid function. How high blood sugar affects the thyroid Metabolic syndrome is defined as a group of metabolic risk factors appearing together, including: abdominal obesity; high cholesterol and triglycerides; high blood pressure; insulin resistance; tendency to form blood clots; and, inflammation. Metabolic syndrome is caused by chronic hyperglyc Continue reading >>

Natural Thyroid Treatment Options. Low Blood Sugar Can Sabotage Thyroid Function

Natural Thyroid Treatment Options. Low Blood Sugar Can Sabotage Thyroid Function

Natural Thyroid Treatment Options Naperville IL . How to keep Your blood sugar in a Healthy Range. Dr Richard Hagmeyer Naperville Institute For NeuroMetabolic Solutions. Naperville IL If You Suffer With Low Thyroid Function You Need To KNow How To Keep Your Blood Sugar In a Healthy Range. Healthy Thyroid Function is absolutley dependent on Healthy blood sugar levels. Blood Sugar problem are rampant among Americans but they pose a special problem to those of you suffering with Hypothyroidism and Hashimotos Thyroidits. It’s important to understand that whether you have high or low blood sugar, you probably have some degree of insulin resistance. Insulin is a fat storing hormone that takes sugar in the blood and shuttles it into the cells. Insulin resistance occurs when the insulin receptors on the cell fail to respond and consequently your blood sugar stays elevated. Elevated Insulin levels are at the root of many disease processes such as Heart disease, PCOS, Fibroids, Hormonal imbalances, Leptin Resistance, and of course Cancer. Reactive Hypoglycemia is another all too common problem for those suffering with thyroid problems or autoimmune Hashimotos. Too much insulin due to chronic spikes in blood sugar (cereal, toast, bagel for Breakfast, Latees, Pastries, soda, sandwiches, past salad) cause the blood sugar levels to swing from high to low. As the blood sugar drops so does your energy, mood, mental function. This is called Reactive Hypoglycemia because the drop in blood sugar causes the symptoms just mentioned two to five hours after eating. This is an early stage of Insulin Resistance and Type II diabetes. Remember Insulin is a fat storing hormoes, so the more insulin resistant you become, the more difficult your struggle will be with weight loss. So now that we hav Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Thyroid Disorder

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Thyroid Disorder

At the clinic today, a patient came in for an initial assessment for Diabetes Self-Management Education. She was taking thyroid medication along with her diabetes and other medications. She was not the first patient that I have seen lately who is taking thyroid medication. I was aware of the link between diabetes and thyroid disease, and had some basic information. I thought it would be interesting to look into the dynamics a little further. After all, the pancreas and the thyroid both fall within the endocrine system. Now let’s take a look at why people with diabetes often seem to have thyroid disorder, and the reasons behind it. What is thyroid disease? In order to understand the relationship between diabetes and thyroid disease, it is helpful to understand what thyroid disease is. At the front of your neck, just under your Adam’s apple is where you will find the thyroid gland. Thyroid disease is a problem that happens when the thyroid gland either under produces or over produces the thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones are responsible for regulating the body’s metabolism. From research, the percent of the population that will develop thyroid disease is 7 percent. The percentage of people with diabetes who have thyroid disease is greater than the general population. We will dig in a little deeper to find the reasons why, and examine the link between the two. Note from Kirk and Health Institute: A high percentage of low thyroid is “Hashimoto’s”, which like Graves disease is an auto-immune in origin and most often creates low thyroid symptoms. To address Hashimoto’s and Graves affectively you must focus on the immune system, medication can be supportive but does not address the cause. Autoimmune conditions are best managed by change in diet and reducing infl Continue reading >>

Why Low Thyroid Symptoms Can Be Affected By Blood Sugar Levels

Why Low Thyroid Symptoms Can Be Affected By Blood Sugar Levels

Dr. Karl R.O.S. Johnson, DC, Shelby Township, Macomb County Metro Detroit Area Doctor Shares How and Why Hypothyroid Symptoms Can Be Affected by Blood Sugar Levels Let’s Take A Look At The Important Role Of Balanced Blood Sugar Levels And Your Low Thyroid Symptoms Proper Blood Sugar levels are critical for anyone with low thyroid function. Normal blood glucose levels medically have a broad range of anywhere from 70 to 105. Functional or optimal blood glucose levels are 85 to 99. According to the American Diabetic Association, a blood sugar level reading of 106 to 126 is called, “Insulin resistance,” and anything above 127 is diabetes. I know you may be thinking, I don’t have diabetes. Here is the thing, you don’t have to be diabetic to have blood sugar problems. Your body does not like to have the range for blood sugar too high or too low. Anytime the range gets out of the normal functional range (85-99), you start to get inflammatory chemicals released in the body. These inflammatory chemicals are called cytokines and they are not a good thing. The events that are triggered by inflammatory cytokines are like a domino effect that is difficult to stop and can lead to autoimmune conditions! Here is a scary example of how the traditional model can go wrong. One of my patients, Carol, came in for me to take a look at her health challenges. During the exam I noticed several indicators pointing towards blood sugar problems, such as difficulty with memory (she was forgetting where she was put her students school assigments, etc.), belly fat issues and being overweight. This gal already knew she was headed towards diabetes based on tests she had from her medical practitioner. Suffice it to say we took a different approach and Carol did not have to go on any medication Continue reading >>

Diabetes Control In Thyroid Disease

Diabetes Control In Thyroid Disease

In Brief Thyroid disease is commonly found in most types of diabetes. This article defines the prevalence of thyroid disease in diabetes and elucidates through case studies the assessment, diagnosis, and clinical management of thyroid disease in diabetes. Thyroid disease is a pathological state that can adversely affect diabetes control and has the potential to negatively affect patient outcomes. Thyroid disease is found commonly in most forms of diabetes and is associated with advanced age, particularly in type 2 diabetes and underlying autoimmune disease in type 1 diabetes. This article defines the prevalence of thyroid disease in diabetes, discusses normal physiology and screening recommendations for thyroid disease, and elucidates through case studies the assessment, diagnosis, and clinical management of thyroid disease and its impact on diabetes. Thyroid Disease Prevalence The prevalence of thyroid disease in the general population is estimated to be 6.6%, with hypothyroidism the most common malady.1 Participants attending a health fair in Colorado (n = 25,862) were screened for thyroid disease, using thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T4) measurements. Of the participants, 9.5% were found to have an elevated TSH level. Also, 6% of study participants were diagnosed with thyroid disease before the screening. However, 40% of those already diagnosed had elevated TSH levels, indicating inadequate treatment. In the undiagnosed population with TSH elevations, 9.9% were found to have an unrecognized thyroid abnormality. Several studies, including the Colorado study, have documented a higher prevalence of thyroid disease in women, with prevalence rates ranging from 4 to 21%, whereas the rate in men ranges from 2.8 to 16%.1 Thyroid disease increases with age. Continue reading >>

The Full Article Title:

The Full Article Title:

BACKGROUND Hypothyroidism causes many metabolic abnormalities as well as multiple clinical symptoms. Some studies suggest that blood sugar may be affected in hypothyroidism and levels may increase. Indeed, it has been noted that patients with diabetes who also have hypothyroidism may have higher levels of Hemoglobin A1C (HBA1C). This test is done to diagnose and monitor control of blood sugar by patients with diabetes. An elevated HBA1C usually indicates worse control of diabetes. This study was done to look at the effect of thyroid hormone treatment on HBA1c levels in patients with hypothyroidism. This study was also done to look at the effect thyroid hormone treatment has on the diagnoses of pre diabetes and the control of diabetes after treatment. Anantarapu S et al Effects of thyroid hormone replacement on glycated he n non-diabetic subjects with overt hypothyroidism. Arch Endocrinol Metab. September 25 2015 [Epub ahead of print]. This study was done at a large hospital in India. Patients who were newly diagnosed with hypothyroidism were studied. They were at least 20 years old. Blood tests were done before starting the thyroid hormone and 3 months after the tests showed normal thyroid hormone levels. An HBA1C test and an oral glucose tolerance test were done on all patients. The results showed a significant drop in the HBA1c levels for patients diagnosed as having pre diabetes (HBA1C between 5.7 to 6.5 %) and diabetes (HBA1C above 6.5%) after starting thyroid hormone therapy. There was no change in the number of patients with elevated fasting glucose levels or impaired glucose tolerance after treatment with thyroid hormone. The body weight did not change to a great extent. This study suggests that hypothyroidism may be falsely increasing the levels of the HBA1C tes Continue reading >>

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