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Can Thyroid Problems Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Hyperthyroidism And Diabetes

Hyperthyroidism And Diabetes

A while back, I wrote about hypothyroidism and diabetes. Recently, there was a press release from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) about Hyperthyroidism: The Flip Side of the Thyroid Equation, and I decided to remind our readers that both hypo- (underactive) and hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid functioning) are issues for people with diabetes (PWD). It’s been known for years that diabetes and thyroid problems can go hand-in-hand. More specifically, type 1 diabetes, which itself is an autoimmune disorder, is frequently associated with other autoimmune disorders including autoimmune thyroid disorders. These autoimmune thyroid disorders may cause the thyroid to fail (in a disorder called Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, which leads to hypothyroidism), or, sometimes, to become overactive (in a disorder called Graves’ disease, which leads to hyperthyroidism). Both Hashimoto’s and Graves’ will have positive blood tests for thyroid antibodies. Hypothyroidism In general, hypothyroidism is far more common than hyperthyroidism, and can occur in both T2DM and T1DM. For more information on hypothyroidism, please see my previous essay. Hypothyroidism can sneak up on people, with symptoms developing so slowly that frequently patients just assume they were growing old prematurely. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, no matter what the cause, include fatigue, dry, coarse skin and hair, inability to tolerate cold weather, weight gain, hoarse voice, and heavy or irregular menstrual periods. Blood levels of thyroid hormone are low and levels of TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) are typically very elevated. Blood glucose control isn’t changed dramatically, but blood levels of cholesterol will become very elevated (and should return to normal with treatment of the Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Imbalances And Hashimoto’s

Blood Sugar Imbalances And Hashimoto’s

One Thing People with Hashimoto’s Can Do Right Away to Feel Better People often ask me if there was one thing that people with Hashimoto’s could do right away to feel better and that is balancing your blood sugar!! Balancing blood sugar levels should be one of the priorities for anyone who is hoping to overcome autoimmune thyroiditis and adrenal fatigue. Balancing my blood sugar made a big difference for me, helping with my anxiety levels and reducing my thyroid antibodies. Before I balanced my blood sugar, I would get “hangry” (hungry +angry) multiple times per day as the high carbohydrate foods I was eating were making me have huge blood sugar swings. What I didn’t know, is that these swings were also weakening my adrenals and causing a spike in my thyroid antibodies. Blood sugar imbalances have been described as adding “fuel to the fire” in autoimmune thyroid disease by many practitioners who focus on reversing Hashimoto’s. I wasn’t aware that I had blood sugar issues when I was first diagnosed (despite being a self-admitted sugar addict…). I was thin, so, therefore, I thought that it meant that I was healthy. I recently had this conversation with an overweight family member who thought he was in the clear to eat sugar because he did not have diabetes. But you see, diabetes takes many years to develop, and impaired carbohydrate tolerance, insulin resistance, blood sugar swings, and hypoglycemia may be seen for many years before. Researchers in Poland have found that up to 50% of patients with Hashimoto’s have an impaired tolerance to carbohydrates. This means that after consuming carbohydrate-rich foods, their blood sugar goes up too high, too quickly. This leads to a rapid, sometimes excessive release of insulin. These insulin surges can cause Continue reading >>

Thyroid Disease And Diabetes: Are They Related?

Thyroid Disease And Diabetes: Are They Related?

I am often asked about the relationship between thyroid disease and diabetes. The unfortunate truth: Patients with diabetes do have a higher incidence of thyroid disorders. The Relationship Between Thyroid Disorders and Diabetes Just to get some perspective, up to 30 percent of female type 1 patients with diabetes have thyroid disorders of some type. The cause is thought to be related to the fact that thyroid disease and diabetes are both autoimmune disorders. An autoimmune disorder occurs when our bodies create antibodies that mistakenly destroy or injure normal body tissue, such as the pancreas in the case of diabetes or the thyroid. In other words, one autoimmune disorder makes you more prone to getting others. Type 1 diabetes has more of an autoimmune component than type 2 diabetes, so it is probably more likely to be associated with thyroid issues. In general, people with type 1 diabetes have a one in three chance of developing a thyroid disorder. The thyroid is the largest gland in the endocrine system, producing important hormones that regulate energy and metabolism in the body. But the body can overproduce thyroid hormones, leading to hyperthyroidism, or more commonly, not produce enough thyroid hormone, leading to hypothyroidism. It is important that patients with diabetes watch for signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism especially, as it is more commonly seen in this patient population. Signs of Thyroid Disorders Signs of hypothyroidism can include fatigue, edema, pallor and weight gain just to name a few. Sometimes symptoms of thyroid disorders overlap with symptoms of poor diabetes control, making it hard for clinicians to tell what is going on with a patient based solely on symptom complaints. This is why blood tests for thyroid disorders are routinely done a Continue reading >>

Can Abnormal Thyroid Function Affect The Course Of Diabetes?

Can Abnormal Thyroid Function Affect The Course Of Diabetes?

There are a lot of connections between thyroid and blood sugar control, such as metabolic rate and mitochondrial function. There is also a strong indication – according to a study published earlier this month by The Endocrine Society – that the thyroid hormone T3 controls and regulates the release of insulin, suggesting that low thyroid function could raise the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, especially in people with prediabetes. The study, involving nearly 8.500 people, has found that among participants presenting a mild elevation in blood glucose, those with hypothyroidism or even low-normal thyroid function had a 13 per cent higher chance of developing type 2 diabetes and that risk rose up to 40 per cent for people with prediabetes. A 2003 study also found thyroid disorder to be more common in diabetic females than males. In this new study, 1,100 participants ended up developing prediabetes while 798 developed type 2 diabetes over the course of an average follow-up lasting nearly eight years. We have known for years that undiagnosed thyroid disease leads to type 2 diabetes. Yet so few physicians ever test patients with prediabetes or slightly high blood sugars for thyroid disease. For the lead investigator of the study and MD of the Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, Layal Chaker, these findings indicate that screening people with prediabetes for low thyroid function should be systematic. Most experts currently recommend thyroid screening only for people with type 1 diabetes, as they have a greatly increased risk of thyroid disease. Yet balanced thyroid hormones are essential to metabolic health. When out of whack they have the power to deregulate fat storage and insulin release, two risk factors for type 2 diabetes. It is thought that the thyroid hormone Continue reading >>

Thyroid, Blood Sugar, And Metabolic Syndrome

Thyroid, Blood Sugar, And Metabolic Syndrome

This article is part of a special report on Thyroid Disorders. To see the other articles in this series, click here. According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, 27 million Americans suffer from thyroid dysfunction – half of whom go undiagnosed. Subclinical hypothyroidism, a condition in which TSH is elevated but free T4 is normal, may affect an additional 24 million Americans. Taken together, more than 50 million Americans are affected by some form of thyroid disorder. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), also affects 50 million Americans, and insulin resistance, one of the components of metabolic syndrome, affects up to 105 million Americans. That’s 35% of the population. Metabolic syndrome has become so common that it’s predicted to eventually bankrupt our healthcare system. Both metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance are risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, two of the leading causes of death in the developed world. With such a high prevalence of both thyroid dysfunction and metabolic syndrome, you might suspect there’s a connection between the two. And you’d be right. Studies show an increased frequency of thyroid disorders in diabetics, and a higher prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in people with thyroid disorders. That’s because healthy thyroid function depends on keeping your blood sugar in a normal range, and keeping your blood sugar in a normal range depends on healthy thyroid function. How high blood sugar affects the thyroid Metabolic syndrome is defined as a group of metabolic risk factors appearing together, including: abdominal obesity; high cholesterol and triglycerides; high blood pressure; insulin resistance; tendency to form blood clots; and, inflammation. Metabolic syndrome is caused by chronic hyperglyc Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Greg has , so when he started feeling sluggish and tired all the time — even after getting a good night's sleep — he chalked it up to high blood sugar levels. But he'd been doing a great job sticking to his meal plan, exercising, and taking his diabetes medicines, and his blood sugar checks showed his levels were in a healthy range. What was going on? Greg went to see his doctor, and tests revealed that he had a problem with his thyroid. People with type 1 diabetes have a greater risk for certain health problems (like Greg's thyroid problem). Like type 1 diabetes, these are often autoimmune disorders. Most teens with type 1 diabetes never need treatment for any other autoimmune disorder. But some do. So it can help to find out more about the diseases that can happen to people with type 1 diabetes. What Are Autoimmune Disorders? In autoimmune disorders, a person's immune system mistakenly attacks the body's healthy tissues as though they were foreign invaders. If the attack is severe enough, it can affect how well that body part works. For example, type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that affects the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas can't make insulin because the immune system attacks the pancreas and destroys the cells that make insulin. People with type 1 diabetes are also more prone to having other autoimmune problems. Doctors aren't exactly sure why autoimmune diseases happen, but a person's genes probably play a role. Doctors think this is because family members of people with type 1 diabetes are more likely to have autoimmune diseases, too. Although certain autoimmune disorders are linked to diabetes, they are not actually caused by the diabetes — they're just more likely to happen to people who have the disease. Autoimmune diseases that people Continue reading >>

Natural Thyroid Treatment Options. Low Blood Sugar Can Sabotage Thyroid Function

Natural Thyroid Treatment Options. Low Blood Sugar Can Sabotage Thyroid Function

Natural Thyroid Treatment Options Naperville IL . How to keep Your blood sugar in a Healthy Range. Dr Richard Hagmeyer Naperville Institute For NeuroMetabolic Solutions. Naperville IL If You Suffer With Low Thyroid Function You Need To KNow How To Keep Your Blood Sugar In a Healthy Range. Healthy Thyroid Function is absolutley dependent on Healthy blood sugar levels. Blood Sugar problem are rampant among Americans but they pose a special problem to those of you suffering with Hypothyroidism and Hashimotos Thyroidits. It’s important to understand that whether you have high or low blood sugar, you probably have some degree of insulin resistance. Insulin is a fat storing hormone that takes sugar in the blood and shuttles it into the cells. Insulin resistance occurs when the insulin receptors on the cell fail to respond and consequently your blood sugar stays elevated. Elevated Insulin levels are at the root of many disease processes such as Heart disease, PCOS, Fibroids, Hormonal imbalances, Leptin Resistance, and of course Cancer. Reactive Hypoglycemia is another all too common problem for those suffering with thyroid problems or autoimmune Hashimotos. Too much insulin due to chronic spikes in blood sugar (cereal, toast, bagel for Breakfast, Latees, Pastries, soda, sandwiches, past salad) cause the blood sugar levels to swing from high to low. As the blood sugar drops so does your energy, mood, mental function. This is called Reactive Hypoglycemia because the drop in blood sugar causes the symptoms just mentioned two to five hours after eating. This is an early stage of Insulin Resistance and Type II diabetes. Remember Insulin is a fat storing hormoes, so the more insulin resistant you become, the more difficult your struggle will be with weight loss. So now that we hav Continue reading >>

People With Type 1 Diabetes At Risk Of Thyroid Disease

People With Type 1 Diabetes At Risk Of Thyroid Disease

Link between 'sister diseases' is rooted in immune system problem, expert says Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, March 15, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- People who have type 1 diabetes are more likely than others to develop an autoimmune thyroid condition. Though estimates vary, the rate of thyroid disease -- either under- or overactive thyroid -- may be as high as 30 percent in people with type 1 diabetes, according to Dr. Betul Hatipoglu, an endocrinologist with the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. And the odds are especially high for women, whether they have diabetes or not, she said, noting that women are eight times more likely than men to develop thyroid disease. "I tell my patients thyroid disease and type 1 diabetes are sister diseases, like branches of a tree," she said. "Each is different, but the root is the same. And, that root is autoimmunity, where the immune system is attacking your own healthy endocrine parts." Hatipoglu also noted that autoimmune diseases often run in families. A grandparent may have had thyroid problems, while an offspring may develop type 1 diabetes. "People who have one autoimmune disease are at risk for another," explained Dr. Lowell Schmeltz, an endocrinologist and assistant professor at the Oakland University-William Beaumont School of Medicine in Royal Oak, Mich. "There's some genetic risk that links these autoimmune conditions, but we don't know what environmental triggers make them activate," he explained, adding that the antibodies from the Continue reading >>

The 411 On Diabetes + Thyroid Disease

The 411 On Diabetes + Thyroid Disease

My dad has hypothyroidism, as does my grandmother. For my whole life, my dad has taken a tiny little pill every morning to make sure his metabolism functions properly. I always thought that compared to diabetes, thyroid disease wasn't very "serious" — all my dad needed to do was pop a pill! — and that it was nothing I needed to worry about anyway. But then, because of my diabetes and my "genetic predisposition," my endocrinologist insisted on starting to examine my thyroid regularly... But despite my risk factors, I never knew much about thyroid disease. Now's as good a time as any to learn. January is actually National Thyroid Awareness Month, so for this edition of our 411 series on diabetes complications and co-morbidities, we're taking a look at another body part in distress: the thyroid. What Does It Do Again? The thyroid is a little butterfly-shaped gland that lives in the middle of your neck, and it's part of the body's endocrine system, where diabetes also dwells. This system controls your body's metabolism. One of the thyroid's primary responsibilities is to manage your metabolism by producing two thyroid hormones: T3 and T4. An overactive thyroid can cause weight loss, a quick heartbeat, and other signs that your body is "on the go" a little too much. The opposite, an underactive thyroid, leaves people feeling sluggish, and causes weight gain and slow heartbeat. Essentially, your body's normal equilibrium slows down. Turns out, thyroid issues are incredibly common. They're so widespread, in fact, that Oprah was all on about it a few years ago. Thyroid disease affects 30 million people in the US — and some experts think thyroid disease may affect nearly 56 million Americans. Note that "thyroid disease" is actually an umbrella term for several different co Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar & Insulin Resistance Correlate With High T3

High Blood Sugar & Insulin Resistance Correlate With High T3

High blood sugar, insulin resistance, or high fasting blood glucose may all be caused by high T3 levels. Many on the T3-only protocol or high doses of desiccated thyroid notice their blood sugar levels rising and wonder why. It’s because thyroid levels, either too high or too low, have a direct impact on blood glucose. Hypothyroidism may cause high blood sugar & insulin resistance A1C levels of hypothyroid patients are generally higher than normal, and in one study, replacement with thyroid hormone brought the A1C down, but it did not lower fasting blood glucose. [1] A1C is a measure of average blood glucose levels over several months. This study shows that the hypothyroid condition will cause an overall higher average blood glucose than normal. Insulin resistance appears when thyroid levels are too low or too high. [2] Correcting the hypothyroid state is beneficial, but replacement with too much thyroid hormone may result in continued insulin resistance. A low T3/T4 ratio was found in pre-diabetics who had both high insulin levels and insulin resistance. These subjects had lower T3 levels and higher T4 levels than normal, glucose-tolerant subjects. This study confirms that a certain level of T3 is essential for normal glucose metabolism.[3] SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin) is secreted by the liver and is positively correlated with thyroid levels—it rises when hyperthyroid and falls when hypothyroid. Low levels therefore suggest a hypothyroid condition. Low SHBG is also a biomarker of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and a risk factor for developing high blood sugar and type 2 diabetes, especially in women. [5] High T3 & High T4 may cause high blood sugar and insulin resistance Blood sugar problems may be caused by high thyroid levels. The following are so Continue reading >>

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism

This is the medical term for an underactive thyroid gland. One of the many things the thyroid gland is responsible for is to regulate metabolism. When not enough thyroid hormone is secreted, the metabolism slows[1]; secreting too much results in hyperthyroidism and a too-rapid metabolism. The thyroid gland is actually controlled by another gland, the pituitary gland. It signals the thyroid to produce its hormone and is responsible for the amount of thyroid hormone in the blood. Symptoms of hypothyroid are dry skin and coat, often a loss of hair at the rear portion of the body, sluggishness and weight gain even if the animal has his/her meals reduced, skin that is cold to the touch. The animal may also deliberately seek out warm places to lie. Forms of neuropathy can result from hypothyroidism[2], because it is an endocrine disease. In many hypothyroid cases, the true cause of the lack of thyroid function is never discovered--it's referred to as idiopathic hypothyroidism. The other is known as lymphocytic thyroiditis, where the body begins producing antibodies against the thyroid gland. Symptoms of hypothyroidism may not develop until 75% of the thyroid gland is destroyed; it may take 1-3 years from development of the condition to this point. Idiopathic and lymphocytic thyroiditis causes account for over 95% of hypothyroidism in dogs[3]. In less than 10% of hypothyroidism cases, the problem is not with the thyroid gland itself, but with the pituitary gland in the brain. The pituitary gland produces a thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)[4]; without this hormone to signal the thyroid gland to produce its thyroid hormone, the thyroid gland remains inactive[5]. Lack of iodine in the pet's diet can result in insufficient production of thyroid hormones with the result being a ty Continue reading >>

Insulin, Blood Sugar And Thyroid – Hidden Cause Of Thyroid Problems #1:

Insulin, Blood Sugar And Thyroid – Hidden Cause Of Thyroid Problems #1:

How do insulin and blood sugar levels affect your thyroid? Well let’s quickly review insulin and blood sugar regulation. The reader’s digest version goes like this; eat carbs, then your blood sugar rises which then causes a release of insulin. A reasonable amount of carbs and stimulation of this process is OK and actually good, however most people are consuming far too much carbohydrate which then causes a myriad of problems. You could fill an entire book on this topic alone, but for now lets focus on the thyroid connection. Insulin and blood sugar primarily influence your thyroid through; Stress hormones Inflammation Digestive problems; dysbiosis/infections Provoking autoimmunity Lets work through each one of these. Stress hormones, specifically cortisol, are intimately linked to your blood sugar levels and imbalances in stress hormones levels will cause problems with your thyroid. Said another way, blood sugar levels have a profound impact on stress hormones and stress hormones effect your thyroid (see picture). When cortisol levels become too high you will experience a decrease in TSH. When cortisol levels become too low you will have impaired conversion of T4 to T3. 1-8 Cortisol actually acts to increase your blood sugar levels, this will have more relevance in a moment. When people eat too much carbohydrate they tend to fall into a pattern called reactive hypoglycemia, here is what this looks like. You wake up and have a banana, bowl of cereal and some OJ. This, to some, is known as a healthy breakfast but for most people this is a fast ticket to numerous health problems. This large bolus of carbohydrate will cause a rush of glucose into your systems causing a blood sugar spike. Now this blood sugar spike is damaging to tissues of your body so the body reacts b Continue reading >>

Hypothyroidism And Diabetes: How To Reverse It And Why Sugar Is Not The Problem

Hypothyroidism And Diabetes: How To Reverse It And Why Sugar Is Not The Problem

Hypothyroidism and diabetes tend to go hand-in-hand. Anyone who is diabetic will functionally become hypothyroid because their cells become blocked from using thyroid hormone efficiently. And anyone who is hypothyroid will have a tendency toward becoming pre-diabetic and eventually diabetic because of how their body compensates for their thyroid condition. In this article, which is based largely on the work of Dr. Raymond Peat, I’m going to show you how you can prevent this from happening, but in order for this to all make sense… …you first have to understand the truth about diabetes and the vicious cycle that causes it. Today, diabetes (along with a list of other health conditions) is blamed directly on the over-consumption of sugar. It’s oftentimes referred to as the “Sugar Disease”. And for those without a proper understanding of how the body works, this might make sense. When a diabetic consumes large amounts of glucose, their blood sugar rises. And a chronic rise in blood sugar can lead to various health complications. But, let me ask you this… Imagine you have a clogged sink drain while your water is running. As the water level continues to get higher and higher do you curse the water and blame it for clogging your sink? No, that wouldn’t make any sense. Would turning off the water and letting the water sit there solve your problem? Of course not. We all know the underlying problem that you have to fix is the clog itself. Then why are so many people guilty of taking this very approach with diabetes today? Diabetes is NOT a Sugar Disease Let’s get one thing straight… Diabetes is not a disease “caused” by sugar. You require insulin to deliver glucose to your cells. This is why in type 2 diabetes, insulin injections are prescribed to treat the Continue reading >>

Thyroid Disorders And Diabetes

Thyroid Disorders And Diabetes

Thyroid disorders are very common in the general U.S. population, affecting up to 27 million Americans, although half that number remains undiagnosed. It is second only to diabetes as the most common condition to affect the endocrine system — a group of glands that secrete hormones that help regulate growth, reproduction, and nutrient use by cells. As a result, it is common for an individual to be affected by both thyroid disease and diabetes. Since the thyroid gland plays a central role in the regulation of metabolism, abnormal thyroid function can have a major impact on the control of diabetes. In addition, untreated thyroid disorder can increase the risk of certain diabetic complications and can aggravate many diabetes symptoms. Luckily, abnormal thyroid function can easily be diagnosed by simple blood tests, and effective treatment is available. For all of these reasons, periodic screening for thyroid disorder should be considered in all people with diabetes. What is the thyroid? The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland located in the neck, just below the Adam’s apple and above the collarbone. It produces two hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), which enter the bloodstream and affect the metabolism of the heart, liver, muscles, and other organs. The thyroid gland operates as part of a feedback mechanism involving the hypothalamus, an area of the brain, and the pituitary gland, which is located within the brain. First, the hypothalamus sends a signal to the pituitary through a hormone called TRH (thyrotropin-releasing hormone). When the pituitary gland receives this signal, it releases TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone) to the thyroid gland. Upon receiving TSH, the thyroid responds by producing and releasing the two thyroid hormones (T3 and T4). The Continue reading >>

Hashimoto’s: Blood Sugar Blues

Hashimoto’s: Blood Sugar Blues

The human body is a wonderfully complex playground where hormones, immune cells, neurotransmitters, red and white blood cells, bacteria, and more all frolic. With Hashimoto’s that playground gets invaded by a hurricane of inflammation and this disrupts many of the systems that produce these things. In today’s post, we focus on how blood sugar problems can impact the thyroid and how Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism can also make blood sugar problems worse. It’s a two way street, people. The Poor, Dear Pancreas The endocrine gland that is responsible for helping maintain blood sugar balance is the pancreas. The poor, dear, much beleaguered pancreas. What does the pancreas do? Quite a lot actually, we really should be nicer to it. It does endocrine stuff and non-endocrine or exocrine stuff. Blood Sugar Balance and Absorption On the endocrine side it produces insulin, glucagon and somatostatin. Insulin and glucagon are involved in blood sugar metabolism and somatostatin is involved in intestinal absorption. The exocrine functions include secreting digestive enzymes into the small intestines. These breakdown proteins, fats and carbs in the diet. Studies have found pancreatic function was significantly reduced in patients with hypothyroidism. And, in many people today, the pancreas is under siege. Sugar Junkies Americans are addicted to sugar. In some measure, it’s their own doing. In other ways, it is the food industry and public health officials who decided that fat was evil when it was discovered that cholesterol was linked to heart disease in the 1980s. The National Academy of Science made sweeping recommendations at that time to get rid of dietary fat. Bye, Bye Fat – Hello Sugar So fat was taken out of many processed, fast foods and in an effort to make it tast Continue reading >>

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