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Can Thyroid Lead To Diabetes?

Hypothyroidism And Diabetes: How To Reverse It And Why Sugar Is Not The Problem

Hypothyroidism And Diabetes: How To Reverse It And Why Sugar Is Not The Problem

Hypothyroidism and diabetes tend to go hand-in-hand. Anyone who is diabetic will functionally become hypothyroid because their cells become blocked from using thyroid hormone efficiently. And anyone who is hypothyroid will have a tendency toward becoming pre-diabetic and eventually diabetic because of how their body compensates for their thyroid condition. In this article, which is based largely on the work of Dr. Raymond Peat, I’m going to show you how you can prevent this from happening, but in order for this to all make sense… …you first have to understand the truth about diabetes and the vicious cycle that causes it. Today, diabetes (along with a list of other health conditions) is blamed directly on the over-consumption of sugar. It’s oftentimes referred to as the “Sugar Disease”. And for those without a proper understanding of how the body works, this might make sense. When a diabetic consumes large amounts of glucose, their blood sugar rises. And a chronic rise in blood sugar can lead to various health complications. But, let me ask you this… Imagine you have a clogged sink drain while your water is running. As the water level continues to get higher and higher do you curse the water and blame it for clogging your sink? No, that wouldn’t make any sense. Would turning off the water and letting the water sit there solve your problem? Of course not. We all know the underlying problem that you have to fix is the clog itself. Then why are so many people guilty of taking this very approach with diabetes today? Diabetes is NOT a Sugar Disease Let’s get one thing straight… Diabetes is not a disease “caused” by sugar. You require insulin to deliver glucose to your cells. This is why in type 2 diabetes, insulin injections are prescribed to treat the Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Related Thyroid Diseases

The Relationship Between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Related Thyroid Diseases

Go to: 1. Introduction The role of hyperthyroidism in diabetes was investigated in 1927, by Coller and Huggins proving the association of hyperthyroidism and worsening of diabetes. It was shown that surgical removal of parts of thyroid gland had an ameliorative effect on the restoration of glucose tolerance in hyperthyroid patients suffering from coexisting diabetes [1]. There is a deep underlying relation between diabetes mellitus and thyroid dysfunction [2]. A plethora of studies have evidenced an array of complex intertwining biochemical, genetic, and hormonal malfunctions mirroring this pathophysiological association [2, 3]. 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a central target for modulation of insulin sensitivity and feedback of thyroid hormones associated with appetite and energy expenditure [3]. Hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) or thyroid over activity (Graves' disease) has been investigated to be associated with diabetes mellitus. A meta-analysis reported a frequency of 11% in thyroid dysfunction in the patients of diabetes mellitus [4]. Autoimmunity has been implicated to be the major cause of thyroid-dysfunction associated diabetes mellitus [5–7]. Unmanaged pro diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, may induce a “low T3 state” characterized by low serum total and free T3 levels, increase in reverse T3 (rT3) but near normal serum T4 and TSH concentrations [8]. The relation between T2DM and thyroid dysfunction has been a less explored arena which may behold answers to various facts of metabolic syndrome including atherosclerosis, hypertension, and related cardiovascular disorders. T2DM owes its pathological origin to inappropriate secretion of insulin, due to defective islet cell function or beta cell mass. Continuous consump Continue reading >>

Underactive Thyroid May Raise Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Underactive Thyroid May Raise Type 2 Diabetes Risk

underactive thyroid, or hypothyroidism, may be at greater risk for type 2 diabetes -- even if their thyroid hormone levels are kept within normal range, a new study finds. As the Dutch researchers explained, thyroid hormones are essential for the regulation of metabolism -- the conversion of food into either energy or fat. However, an underactive thyroid gland slows metabolism, and that can lead to weight gain, the scientists said. Prior studies suggested that hypothyroidism is tied to reduced insulin sensitivity -- a precursor for type 2 diabetes. In the new eight-year-long study, a team led by Dr. Layal Chaker of Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam tracked almost 8,500 people averaging 65 years of age. All of the participants had a blood test to measure their blood sugar levels as well as their thyroid function. They were re-evaluated every few years to check for the onset of type 2 diabetes. The participants' medical records were also reviewed. After nearly eight years, 1,100 of the participants developed prediabetes -- slightly elevated blood sugar levels -- and 798 developed full-blown diabetes. Chaker's team found that low thyroid function boosted the risk for type 2 diabetes by 13 percent. People who had an underactive thyroid and prediabetes were at even greater risk of progressing to type 2 diabetes -- the risk for type 2 diabetes was 40 percent higher for this group. The study could only point to an association between hypothyroidism and diabetes, it couldn't prove cause and effect. However, "these findings suggest we should consider screening people with prediabetes for low thyroid function," Chaker said in a news release from the Endocrine Society. The findings were slated for presentation Sunday at the society's annual meeting, in Boston. "We found it surpr Continue reading >>

Hypothyroidism And Diabetes

Hypothyroidism And Diabetes

Hypothyroidism Hypothyroidism Symptoms Hypothyroidism Diagnosis Hypothyroidism Treatment Causes of Hypothyroidism Hypothyroidism Diet Hypothyroidism & Iodine Is Hypothyroidism Genetic Pregnancy & Hypothyroidism Diabetes & Hypothyroidism Yoga & Hypothyroidism Link Between Hypothyroidism and Diabetes Some studies show that people with diabetes are at higher risk of having hypothyroidism. In addition, thyroid diseases are more common among females and several studies have shown that around 30% of females with type 1 diabetes also have a thyroid disease. Some reports also indicate that there's a higher prevalence of hypothyroidism in type 2 diabetic patients. How Hypothyroidism Can Lead to Diabetes When a person has hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is not able to produce enough hormones to stimulate their metabolism. Hence, the person's body functions slow down. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas and used to activate the absorption of blood sugar and to use it as a source of energy. During hypothyroidism the production of insulin is reduced as the pancreas works slower. Once there is not enough insulin and the pancreas fails to turn blood sugar into energy, it can lead to diabetes. Thyroid Dysfunction Affects People With Diabetes Changes in the metabolism of carbohydrates are observed in hypothyroidism but clinical evidences of the abnormalities are rarely visible. Hypoglycemia is rare in some isolated thyroid hormone deficiencies. In some cases, a hypothyroid patient can have an increased chance of having hypopituitarism. Several studies show that hypothyroidism can also pave the way for an array of plasma lipid metabolism abnormalities such as the concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and high level of triglyceride. Subclinical hypothyroid Continue reading >>

Background

Background

Hyperthyroidism is a condition of thyroid hyperfunction and overproduction of thyroid hormones. Autoimmune Graves' disease is the most common cause in young people, especially women, and toxic goitre or toxic adenoma are more common in older individuals. BACKGROUND In 1786 Caleb Perry made the first description of the association between goitre and exophthalmos. In 1835 Graves and in 1840 von Basedow independently described the condition associated with their names. Toxic multinodular goitre (Plummer's disease) was first described in 1913. Graves' disease accounts for nearly 60% of cases of hyperthyroidism, and occurs at a median age which is 20 years younger than patients with adenoma (about 10% of cases), and 10 years younger than multinodular goitre (30% of cases). Adenoma and multinodular goitre have a higher prevalence in iodine-deficient areas than in iodine-sufficient ones[1]. These different groups of patients have different relationship to diabetes. Diabetes is more likely to occur in hyperthyroid patients [2], and glucose intolerance is often present in untreated hyperthyroidism. Autoimmune thyroid disease also frequently occurs within type 1 diabetes (anti-TPO antibodies are present in up to 50% of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients) or vice versa, in the Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndromes[3], due to overlapping HLA associations. Thyroid dysfunction does not cause type 1 diabetes, but patients with Graves' disease are more likely to develop type 1 diabetes, and vice versa. EPIDEMIOLOGY A Japanese study showed that patients on treatment for hyperthyroid Graves’ disease are almost twice as likely to develop type 2 diabetes than members of the general population, are less likely to have been overweight, and are less likely to have a family history of Continue reading >>

Thyroid Disease And Diabetes

Thyroid Disease And Diabetes

CLINICAL DIABETES VOL. 18 NO. 1 Winter 2000 PRACTICAL POINTERS Thyroid Disease and Diabetes By Patricia Wu, MD, FACE, FRCP Thyroid disease is common in the general population, and the prevalence increases with age. The assessment of thyroid function by modern assays is both reliable and inexpensive. Screening for thyroid dysfunction is indicated in certain high-risk groups, such as neonates and the elderly. Hypothyroidism is by far the most common thyroid disorder in the adult population and is more common in older women. It is usually autoimmune in origin, presenting as either primary atrophic hypothyroidism or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thyroid failure secondary to radioactive iodine therapy or thyroid surgery is also common. Rarely, pituitary or hypothalamic disorders can result in secondary hypothyroidism. Approximately 4 million people in the United States are hypothyroid and receive thyroxine replacement therapy. By contrast, hyperthyroidism is much less common, with a female-to-male ratio of 9:1. Graves' disease is the most common cause and affects primarily young adults. Toxic multi-nodular goiters tend to affect the older age-groups. Diabetic patients have a higher prevalence of thyroid disorders compared with the normal population (Table 1). Because patients with one organ-specific autoimmune disease are at risk of developing other autoimmune disorders, and thyroid disorders are more common in females, it is not surprising that up to 30% of female type 1 diabetic patients have thyroid disease. The rate of postpartum thyroiditis in diabetic patients is three times that in normal women. A number of reports have also indicated a higher than normal prevalence of thyroid disorders in type 2 diabetic patients, with hypothyroidism being the most common disorder. Table Continue reading >>

Low Thyroid Function And Type 2 Diabetes

Low Thyroid Function And Type 2 Diabetes

Study finds hypothyroidism tied to type 2 diabetes. Having too little thyroid hormone in the blood–even in the low-normal range–raises the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, especially in people with prediabetes, a new study in nearly 8,500 people finds. Adults in the lowest third of thyroid function levels had a 1.4 time higher risk of progressing from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes than those in the highest third of thyroid function, according to a study presented at the Endocrine Society annual meeting. Dutch researchers used a cohort of adults without diabetes at baseline, ages 45 and older, and found those with higher thyroid-stimulating hormone had a 1.2-fold increased risk of developing diabetes. Patients diagnosed with prediabetes have a 40% greater likelihood of developing diabetes if they are also diagnosed with hypothyroidism. Layal Chaker, MD, of Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, Netherlands, in his presentation, added that, “Low thyroid function is associated with higher risk of developing diabetes, but also the progression from prediabetes to diabetes and this is even within the normal range of thyroid function, “Low thyroid function as represented by higher TSH [thyroid-stimulating hormone] is with a 1.2-fold increased risk of diabetes and a 1.4-fold increased risk for progression from prediabetes.” She added that, over a lifetime, 70% to 75% of people diagnosed with prediabetes will progress to diabetes. Dr. Chaker presented the results at ENDO 2016. Thyroid hormone is important for metabolism, and thus important in controlling weight and cholesterol metabolism. Therefore, Dr Chaker and her team hypothesized that thyroid hormone could also be important in the development of type 2 diabetes. To test their hypothesis, the research team evalua Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Thyroid Disorder

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Thyroid Disorder

At the clinic today, a patient came in for an initial assessment for Diabetes Self-Management Education. She was taking thyroid medication along with her diabetes and other medications. She was not the first patient that I have seen lately who is taking thyroid medication. I was aware of the link between diabetes and thyroid disease, and had some basic information. I thought it would be interesting to look into the dynamics a little further. After all, the pancreas and the thyroid both fall within the endocrine system. Now let’s take a look at why people with diabetes often seem to have thyroid disorder, and the reasons behind it. What is thyroid disease? In order to understand the relationship between diabetes and thyroid disease, it is helpful to understand what thyroid disease is. At the front of your neck, just under your Adam’s apple is where you will find the thyroid gland. Thyroid disease is a problem that happens when the thyroid gland either under produces or over produces the thyroid hormones. Thyroid hormones are responsible for regulating the body’s metabolism. From research, the percent of the population that will develop thyroid disease is 7 percent. The percentage of people with diabetes who have thyroid disease is greater than the general population. We will dig in a little deeper to find the reasons why, and examine the link between the two. Note from Kirk and Health Institute: A high percentage of low thyroid is “Hashimoto’s”, which like Graves disease is an auto-immune in origin and most often creates low thyroid symptoms. To address Hashimoto’s and Graves affectively you must focus on the immune system, medication can be supportive but does not address the cause. Autoimmune conditions are best managed by change in diet and reducing infl Continue reading >>

Thyroid Disease And Diabetes

Thyroid Disease And Diabetes

Diabetes and thyroid disease are both endocrine, or hormone, problems. When thyroid disease occurs in someone with diabetes, it can make blood glucose control more difficult. The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in your lower neck just beneath your skin. It regulates your body’s metabolism, the processes of using and storing energy, by releasing a substance called thyroid hormone. If it produces too much thyroid hormone, your metabolism quickens (hyperthyroidism), too little and your body functions slow down (hypothyroidism). Hyperthyroidism Symptoms Pounding heart Quick pulse Increased sweating Weight loss despite normal or increased appetite Shortness of breath when exercising Muscle weakness or tremors Trouble concentrating Change in menstrual periods Thick skin on the knees, elbows, and shins Hypothyroidism Symptoms Sluggishness Depression Feeling of being cold even when others feel warm Constipation Weight gain unrelated to increase in eating Low blood pressure Slow pulse Effects on Diabetes Hyperthyroidism. When your metabolism quickens, your medicines go through your body quicker. Your blood glucose level may rise because your usual dosage does not stay in your body long enough to control it. Hyperthyroidism and low blood glucose can be hard to tell apart. If you are sweating and having tremors from hyperthyroidism, you may think you have low blood glucose and eat extra food, causing your blood glucose to rise. Using your glucose meter to verify low blood glucose levels can help you avoid this problem. Hypothyroidism. When your metabolism slows, your blood glucose level may drop because your diabetes medicine doesn’t pass through your body as quickly as usual and so stays active longer. In hypothyroidism, it is often necessary to reduce your dose of diabet Continue reading >>

Thyroid Meds Increase Risk For Elevated Blood Sugar

Thyroid Meds Increase Risk For Elevated Blood Sugar

Twenty-two million people are on Synthroid (levothyroxine) today in the United States. Millions of others are on other thyroid medications like Armour. Patients are usually on these medications for life once they start. Hidden deep within the drug literature precautions is startling information about blood sugar risks. Thyroid medications may pose a risk to your blood sugar levels. Of the millions of individuals who are on thyroid meds, have you been informed of this risky possibility? If you are not aware of this potential hazard, this information is for you! Managing health requires many things. Often you need to be a detective and dig deep within the literature and ask questions. This is indeed the case with thyroid medications. Hidden deep within thyroid medication literature is a surprising statement on the risk of elevated blood sugar levels. It is easily glossed over or not recognized at all. This information may not be present in the condensed version of drug safety information handed out by the pharmacist or on the online consumer versions for Synthroid or levothyroxine. Drug Safety Sheet Information Detective work on the topic of thyroid drug pharmacology provides this information. Abbvie Labs, the makers of Synthroid provide this statement on their website hidden deep within their professional literature in the miscellaneous section. “Addition of levothyroxine to antidiabetic or insulin therapy may result in increased antidiabetic agent or insulin requirements. Careful monitoring of diabetic control is recommended, especially when thyroid therapy is started, changed, or discontinued.” The only other statement found within Synthroid/levothyroxine professional literature on this risk was “Levothyroxine has a narrow therapeutic index. Regardless of the ind Continue reading >>

Thyroid Disorders & Type 1 Diabetes: Diabetes Forecast

Thyroid Disorders & Type 1 Diabetes: Diabetes Forecast

A few years ago I felt extremely sluggish and I kept thinking it was blood sugar symptoms. When I talked to my endocrinologist about this, she checked my thyroid levels and “hypothyroid” was added as a new diagnosis on my chronic illness list. It wasn’t a surprise because it runs in my family and I know my immune system is more susceptible because of type 1 diabetes. But since my diagnosis, I have learned that there are a lot of people who live with both diabetes and thyroid issues. There are some interesting connections that you might not know about. Here’s an excerpt from the January edition of Diabetes Forecast article “Thyroid Disorders and Type 1 Diabetes” written by Allison Tsai. “Common things occur commonly” is an old medical school adage used to remind future doctors that two common diseases will frequently overlap but aren’t necessarily related. The link between type 2 diabetes and thyroid disease is a perfect example of this, says Peter Arvan, MD, PhD, professor of internal medicine and chief of the Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes at the University of Michigan. In the United States, nearly 28 million people have type 2 diabetes and 20 million have some form of thyroid disease. This means that people with type 2 diabetes frequently have thyroid disease as well. But type 2 does not increase your risk for thyroid disease. People with type 1 are even more likely to have thyroid problems, even though type 1 doesn’t directly cause thyroid disease. According to the American Diabetes Assocation’s 2016 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease occurs in 17 to 30 percent of people with type 1. The Regulator The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in the neck that produces two hormones, triiodothyronine, Continue reading >>

Thyroid Disorders And Diabetes

Thyroid Disorders And Diabetes

Thyroid disorders are very common in the general U.S. population, affecting up to 27 million Americans, although half that number remains undiagnosed. It is second only to diabetes as the most common condition to affect the endocrine system — a group of glands that secrete hormones that help regulate growth, reproduction, and nutrient use by cells. As a result, it is common for an individual to be affected by both thyroid disease and diabetes. Since the thyroid gland plays a central role in the regulation of metabolism, abnormal thyroid function can have a major impact on the control of diabetes. In addition, untreated thyroid disorder can increase the risk of certain diabetic complications and can aggravate many diabetes symptoms. Luckily, abnormal thyroid function can easily be diagnosed by simple blood tests, and effective treatment is available. For all of these reasons, periodic screening for thyroid disorder should be considered in all people with diabetes. What is the thyroid? The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland located in the neck, just below the Adam’s apple and above the collarbone. It produces two hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), which enter the bloodstream and affect the metabolism of the heart, liver, muscles, and other organs. The thyroid gland operates as part of a feedback mechanism involving the hypothalamus, an area of the brain, and the pituitary gland, which is located within the brain. First, the hypothalamus sends a signal to the pituitary through a hormone called TRH (thyrotropin-releasing hormone). When the pituitary gland receives this signal, it releases TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone) to the thyroid gland. Upon receiving TSH, the thyroid responds by producing and releasing the two thyroid hormones (T3 and T4). The Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Poses Risk Of Thyroid Disease

Type 1 Diabetes Poses Risk Of Thyroid Disease

HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- People who have type 1 diabetes are more likely than others to develop an autoimmune thyroid condition. Though estimates vary, the rate of thyroid disease -- either under- or overactive thyroid -- may be as high as 30 percent in people with type 1 diabetes, according to Dr. Betul Hatipoglu, an endocrinologist with the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. And the odds are especially high for women, whether they have diabetes or not, she said, noting that women are eight times more likely than men to develop thyroid disease. "I tell my patients thyroid disease and type 1 diabetes are sister diseases, like branches of a tree," she said. "Each is different, but the root is the same. And, that root is autoimmunity, where the immune system is attacking your own healthy endocrine parts." Hatipoglu also noted that autoimmune diseases often run in families. A grandparent may have had thyroid problems, while an offspring may develop type 1 diabetes. "People who have one autoimmune disease are at risk for another," explained Dr. Lowell Schmeltz, an endocrinologist and assistant professor at the Oakland University-William Beaumont School of Medicine in Royal Oak, Mich. "There's some genetic risk that links these autoimmune conditions, but we don't know what environmental triggers make them activate," he explained, adding that the antibodies from the immune system that destroy the healthy tissue are different in type 1 diabetes than in autoimmune thyroid disease. Hatipoglu said that people with type 1 diabetes are also more prone to celiac disease, another autoimmune condition. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, destroying them. Insulin is a hormone that's necessar Continue reading >>

Hypothyroidism And Diabetes

Hypothyroidism And Diabetes

People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have a high risk for hypothyroidism, a disorder that occurs when the thyroid gland produces lower amounts of thyroid hormones than the body needs. This is important because hypothyroidism, which slows down the metabolism, can complicate blood sugar control. A slow metabolism (the rate that the body uses energy) means that diabetes medications can remain in the body longer, increasing the risk of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugars. Hypothyroidism also increases total cholesterol and LDL (low-density lipoprotein or “bad cholesterol”) levels and causes increased triglyceride levels, all associated with heart disease and stroke. People with type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder, are particularly vulnerable to thyroid disorders. This is because people with one autoimmune disorder – a condition where the body attacks its own tissues and organs – are at a greater risk of developing additional autoimmune conditions like thyroid disease. People with type 2 diabetes are also prone to develop thyroid disorders. Although the science is not yet clear, there may be a connection with aging, since type 2 diabetes and hypothyroidism often occurs in older adults. There may also be a connection with weight gain, since hypothyroidism is associated with additional weight. What is Hypothyroidism? The source of the problem is the thyroid, a butterfly-shaped gland located in the front of the neck below the larynx or voice box. Made up of two lobes, one located on either side of the windpipe, the job of the gland is to store hormones and release them into the bloodstream, where they circulate throughout the body, acting on virtually every tissue and cell. The thyroid makes two hormones – triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). T3 is made from Continue reading >>

Hyperthyroidism And Diabetes

Hyperthyroidism And Diabetes

Hyperthyroidism can make blood glucose control difficult, so proper diagnosis and treatment are important. People with type 1 diabetes are at a high risk for hyperthyroidism, a condition caused by the overproduction of thyroid hormones. This excess of hormones speeds up the metabolism, the rate at which the body uses energy. Hyperthyroidism is usually associated with poor blood glucose control and a need for additional insulin. A increased metabolism “clears” insulin from the system at a faster rate, and an increased production and absorption of glucose can raise blood sugars. All of this can lead to insulin resistance – where cells are unable to respond to insulin in order to use glucose for energy. In extreme cases, this can lead to dangerously high blood sugars and diabetic ketoacidosis. Hyperthyroidism can also aggravate diabetic heart conditions. It can cause a rapid heart rate as well as arrhythmia (an irregular heartbeat). People with type 1 diabetes are particularly vulnerable to developing hyperthyroidism because thyroid disorders often result from problems with the immune system. The most common cause of hyperthyroidism in people under 40 is Graves’ disease, an autoimmune disorder. People with type 2 diabetes can also be affected by hyperthyroidism. However, people with type 2 are more likely to have hypothyroidism, a condition where the body produces too little thyroid hormones and the metabolism is slowed. What is Hyperthyroidism? The source of the problem is the thyroid, a butterfly-shaped gland located in the front of the neck below the larynx or voice box. The thyroid consists of two lobes, one located on either side of the windpipe. The job of the gland is to store hormones and release them into the bloodstream, where they circulate throughout th Continue reading >>

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