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Can Testosterone Cause High Blood Sugar?

Testosterone And Blood Sugar Level

Testosterone And Blood Sugar Level

HealingWell.com Forum > Diseases & Conditions > Diabetes > Testosterone and blood sugar level I have been taking Androgel every evening for three yearsand eating carbs without limit.Over the years my fasting level crept up to 139. about a month ago, I was diagnosed as a diabetic with a A1Cof 6.8. Now, I have a blood glucosemonitor which I check frequently, correlating carbs intake at meals withglucose two hours later. My carb intakeis drastically down nowadays with a fasting level about 100-105. After a 50 gram meal, I typically read 120 two hours later,and a 30 gram meal produced about 120. Two days ago, I ran out of Androgel and for the first timein months, I did not dose Androgel. Oneday later, a 50 gram[carb] meal produced 156 reading. Aday later, a 30 gram[carb] mealproduced 145 reading. Assuming that theT-Level is inversely proportional to Glycemic level, the denial of Testosteroneseems to increase the blood glucose level by about 30 two hours after a typical meal of50 grams of carbs. Does anyone else who takes Androgel regularly experiencethis? I have been diagnosed with Low T. I have and am taking Androgel and some injections of Testosterone weekly. My blood sugar was running on the average of 230-290. They put me on Lantus and Humalog Insulin pens. Since my Testosterone level was 130, and then taking the shots and gel, my level went to the mid 900's. I feel good. My blood sugars can be from 70 to 120 in the mornings without taking insulin at all. I have eaten a high-carb meal and had a few beers and in 1-1/2 hours I am reading a 148. Before I would be in the 300's. I do believe that there is a link to low testosterone and blood sugar vs being a diabetic. They checked my pituitary for a tumor because my Luetinizing Hormone was almost a "0". I did an MRI and the Continue reading >>

Low Testosterone And Your Health

Low Testosterone And Your Health

Testosterone Replacement Treatment Options Researchers are unlocking the mysteries of how low testosterone is related to men's overall health. Along the way, they're uncovering connections between low testosterone and other health conditions. Diabetes , metabolic syndrome , obesity , and high blood pressure have all been linked to testosterone deficiency. Low testosterone isn't known to cause these health problems, and replacing testosterone isn't the cure. Still, the associations between low testosterone and other medical conditions are interesting and worth a look. Does Low Testosterone Indicate Poor Health? In recent years, researchers have noticed general links between low testosterone and other medical conditions. One showed that in 2,100 men over age 45, the odds of having low testosterone were: 1.8 times higher for men with high blood pressure Experts don't suggest that low testosterone causes these conditions. In fact, it might be the other way around. That is, men with medical problems or who are in poor general health might then develop low testosterone. Research into the relationship between low testosterone and several other health conditions is ongoing. A link between diabetes and low testosterone is well established. Men with diabetes are more likely to have low testosterone. And men with low testosterone are more likely to later develop diabetes. Testosterone helps the body's tissues take up more blood sugar in response to insulin . Men with low testosterone more often have insulin resistance : they need to produce more insulin to keep blood sugar normal. As many as half of men with diabetes have low testosterone, when randomly tested. Scientists aren't sure whether diabetes causes low testosterone, or the other way around. More research is needed, but s Continue reading >>

Testosterone-replacement Therapy Improves Symptoms Of Metabolic Syndrome

Testosterone-replacement Therapy Improves Symptoms Of Metabolic Syndrome

Hormone-replacement therapy significantly improved symptoms of metabolic syndrome associated with testosterone deficiency in men, a new study from Germany finds. Hormone-replacement therapy significantly improved symptoms of metabolic syndrome associated with testosterone deficiency in men, a new study from Germany finds. The results will be presented June 25 at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston. Metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of complications that can increase the risk of heart and blood-vessel disease as well as type 2 diabetes. These complications include excess body weight, especially around the waist and torso, and abnormal concentrations of fat in the blood, known as lipids. In particular, patients with metabolic syndrome have high blood levels of the so-called bad fats, or triglycerides and low-density lipoproteins, and insufficient amounts of the healthy fats known as high-density lipoproteins. In addition, they often have high blood pressure and sugar, or glucose, levels. Previous research has linked metabolic syndrome to testosterone deficiency, which can cause decreased muscle and bone mass, depression, low energy, and decreased sex drive and ability. In addition, testosterone deficiency is also associated with the individual symptoms of metabolic syndrome, even when they are present without the other complications. "When indicated, testosterone treatment is both essential and safe in elderly patients with symptomatic late onset hypogonadism, or testosterone deficiency," said study lead author Aksam A. Yassin, M.D., Ph.D., Ed.D., chairman of the Institute of Urology & Andrology in Norderstedt-Hamburg, Germany. "Further analysis is needed to confirm if our findings are due to a direct effect of restoring physiologic testosterone l Continue reading >>

Could Testosterone Therapy Benefit Men With Type 2 Diabetes?

Could Testosterone Therapy Benefit Men With Type 2 Diabetes?

Could testosterone therapy benefit men with type 2 diabetes? Men with type 2 diabetes and low testosterone levels can benefit significantly from testosterone treatment, according to a study published in Diabetes Care. With testosterone treatment, fat turned to muscle in men with diabetes. Senior author Dr. Paresh Dandona, of the Department of Medicine in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Buffalo (UB), NY, and his coauthors already knew that low testosterone levels coincide with significantly decreased insulin sensitivity. In 2004, they demonstrated a link between low testosterone levels and type 2 diabetes . Six years later, they extended this to obesity . In a study of more than 2,000 men, they observed that 33% of participants with type 2 diabetes, whether obese or not, had low testosterone levels, as did 25% of non-diabetic, obese males. In 2012, the team found that teenage boys with obesity have 50% less testosterone than their lean peers. The researchers had also associated obesity with oxidative and inflammation . Inflammatory mediators are known to interfere with insulin signaling. Testosterone: anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing? In the present study, the team hypothesized that testosterone may be an anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing agent, since it has been known for some time that testosterone reduces adiposity and increases skeletal muscle. The participants were 94 men with type 2 diabetes, of whom 44 had low testosterone levels. Before treatment, those with low testosterone levels expressed significantly lower levels of insulin-signaling genes and diminished insulin sensitivity. The men with low testosterone were randomized to receive a testosterone injection or a placebo every week for 24 weeks. Testo Continue reading >>

Testosterone And Diabetes

Testosterone And Diabetes

What if I told you that I knew of a cure for adult onset diabetes (in men)? Or what if I told you that there was a simple injection that would completely reverse the diabetes of many middle-aged and senior patients? Well, it's true and very few doctors know about it. How did I find out about it? Well, I was told by one (pretty large) HRT clinic that every one of their type II diabetic patients was able to completely get off of insulin. Now a couple of them still had to take Metformin, but still it is incredible that all of these men were able to completely get off of insulin. This should be front page medical press news, but, unfortunately, no one is interested. How does this HRT clinic do it? They simply take their men to fairly high testosterone levels - about an average of 1000 ng/dl via weekly injections and then make sure that estradiol is managed biweekly doses of Arimidex (if needed). So the typical man in this clinic is hypogonadal with testosterone less than 400 ng/dl and then gets boosted to the level of a 20 year old. Here is the key: in general, as testosterone rises, insulin levels fall. And, as insulin levels fall, insulin resistance is decreased and blood sugar levels fall. This is why increasing testosterone so significantly completely eliminates their need for insulin. CAUTION: Can all low testosterone men be cured of their type II diabetes through HRT? Probably not. Nor am I saying that everyone should go on HRT. But I mention the above story, because it is definitely something to discuss with a knowledgeable physician if you are having insulin-related issues. Even if it halves your need for insulin, that would be an impressive accomplishment, right? Men with Metabolic Syndrome (prediabetes) should take note that testosterone therapy has actually been Continue reading >>

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Linked To Reducing Blood Sugar Levels?

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Linked To Reducing Blood Sugar Levels?

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Linked to Reducing Blood Sugar Levels? Data from two observational registries indicated that long-term testosterone replacement therapy in diabetic men was associated not only with better sexual function and weight loss, but also significant reductions in blood sugar. Indeed, A1c levels typically fell by two percentage points over the course of seven or eight years of treatment a huge effect considering that metformin and other diabetes medications typically reduce A1c by roughly one percentage point. Both studies, which were presented at the American Urological Association Annual Meeting in New Orleans, also noted significant declines in fasting blood sugar levels. The first of those studies followed 77 hypogonadal diabetics from Hamburg, Germany for up to 11 years. All of the men received testosterone injections, which increased their total testosterone levels from an average of 7.6 nmol/L at the beginning of the study to 17-20 nmol/L at the 8-year follow-up. Free testosterone levels rose from150 pmol/L to 400-500 pmol/L over the same period. Average scores on the erectile function section of the International Index of Erectile Function rose from 6.14 at baseline to 18.22 at eight years. Patient weight, on the other hand, declined an average of 18.24% (p<0.0001), while average waist circumference fell from 115.03 cm to 96.47 cm (p<0.0001). As for blood sugar, the average patients fasting glucose level fell from 146.26 mg/dL to 83.72 mg/dL (p<0.001) over 8 years of treatment and the average patients A1c level fell from 7.87% to 5.99%. The second of the studies followed 120 hypogonadal diabetics for up to seven years. All the men received testosterone injections, which boosted average testosterone levels from 10 nmol/L at baseline to 15 Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Testosterone Supplement On Insulin Sensitivity, Glucose Effectiveness, And Acute Insulin Response After Glucose Load In Male Type 2 Diabetics.

The Effect Of Testosterone Supplement On Insulin Sensitivity, Glucose Effectiveness, And Acute Insulin Response After Glucose Load In Male Type 2 Diabetics.

Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China. Our understanding of the effect of androgens on insulin action and glucose metabolism is incomplete. Several different models and methods have been used to study androgen effects, with some studies indicating that higher testosterone levels are associated with increased insulin resistance. In polycystic ovary syndrome, where high testosterone levels are frequently found, affected patients have a higher risk of diabetes. In contrast, increased insulin resistance was found in both hypergonadotropic and hypogonadotropic men with hypoandrogenism, patients with Klinefelter's syndrome and men with idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency. Insulin resistance is considered to be one of the cornerstones in the state that ultimately leads to clinically established type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, men with type 2 diabetes have relative hypogonadism. Therefore, supplementation with testosterone might play a role in improving both insulin resistance and hypogonadism. The study population consisted of 11 male patients with type 2 diabetes. Their mean age was 57.7 +/- 3.41 years, the body mass index (BMI) was 24.4 +/- 1.02 kg/m2, and the waist-to-hip ratio (W/H) was 0.91 +/- 0.05. The patients were all treated with oral hypoglycemic agents. The men received androgen injections every 3 weeks intramuscularly for 12 weeks. The injections were testosterone depot 100 mg/3 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, glucose effectiveness and area under acute insulin response were calculated from "minimal model" algorithms. There were no significant differences in the value of BMI, W/H ratios, plasma lipid concentrations, testosterone, homeostasis model assessment (HOM Continue reading >>

Type 2 Sex & Diabetes: Is Testosterone The Wonder Drug?

Type 2 Sex & Diabetes: Is Testosterone The Wonder Drug?

Dear Diabetes Health, I am 57 years old. About five years ago, I saw my doctor because I was feeling tired. My waist size was up, and I was not interested in sex. I almost never got an erection. The doctor diagnosed type 2 diabetes and put me on metformin. He also prescribed Viagra, which helped sometimes, but not all the time. My last A1c was 7.3%, but my sex drive is still missing in action. The Viagra isn’t working anymore. It’s difficult for my wife, and I don’t like it either. I don’t want to have injections in my penis or stuff like that, but I’m feeling really down about this. Do you have any advice for me? – Jim in Michigan Dear Jim, We’re not doctors, but you have the classic symptoms of low testosterone. Feeling tired and sad, gaining fat, and losing interest in sex all point to problems with testosterone, or “T,” as it’s often called. You should get tested because there are medical and self-care things that you can do to increase your T levels. The good news is that these things are very good for diabetes, too. Men with diabetes are more than twice as likely as other men to have low T levels. In fact, more than 50 percent of men with diabetes have low T levels. According to Professor Evan David Rosen, M.D., Ph.D., this is not simply due to aging testicles. There is a connection between type 2 (possibly type 1 as well) and low T. According to urology professor Abraham Morgentaler, “Normal T is helpful for diabetes control. T therapy increases muscle mass and lowers body fat, and both of these changes are helpful with blood sugar control. This supports the idea that normalizing T may be helpful for diabetes.” Studies show that raising T levels lowers insulin resistance, improves cholesterol levels, and reduces abdominal fat in men with t Continue reading >>

Testosterone And Diabetes

Testosterone And Diabetes

Low testosterone in men is linked with increased visceral fat, leading to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes Testosterone is a steroid hormone and is frequently referred to as the male sex hormone as men have significantly higher levels of the hormone than women. Research has shown a significant link exists between low levels of testosterone and type 2 diabetes in men whilst showing associations between high testosterone levels in women with type 2 diabetes. What is the functional role of testosterone? Testosterone is in a family of steroid hormones known as androgens. Testosterone in males is important for the development of masculine features including the male genitals and other male characteristics including facial hair, deepening of the voice and muscle development. In females, testosterone is associated with maintaining libido after the menopause and women with significantly high levels of testosterone may experience irregular periods and increased body hair and muscle mass. Testosterone also plays an important part in other functions of the body including how fat is deposited on the body, the maintenance of bone mineral density, regulating metabolism, maintaining libido . How is testosterone linked with diabetes? Testosterone has been shown to influence how our body deposits fat. Body fat can be stored either as subcutaneous fat, that is fat is stored just underneath the skin or as visceral fat, which is stored around the abdominal organs. Visceral fat has been shown to be closely associated with increased risks of type 2 diabetes as well as heart disease, Alzheimers disease and cancer. Research has shown that low testosterone levels in men are linked with increased deposition of visceral fat, leading to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Conversely, it Continue reading >>

Low Testosterone Reduces Blood Sugar Regulation, Increases Diabetes Risk

Low Testosterone Reduces Blood Sugar Regulation, Increases Diabetes Risk

Low testosterone reduces blood sugar regulation, increases diabetes risk The new understanding of the hormone's effect on insulin production could lead to better treatment men with testosterone due to age or prostate cancer. By Stephen Feller |April 28, 2016 at 4:27 PM NEW ORLEANS, April 28 (UPI) -- Although scientists have known low testosterone increases risk for diabetes, a recent study has shown the effect low levels of the hormone have on blood glucose. Researchers at Tulane University found low testosterone increases the risk, which they say could lead to new treatments for men with low testosterone due age or prostate cancer treatment. "We have found the cause -- and a potential treatment pathway -- for type 2 diabetes in testosterone-deficient men," Dr. Franck Mauvais-Jarvis, a professor in the Tulane University School of Medicine said in a press release . For the study, published in the journal Cell Metabolism , researchers used mice bred with pancreatic beta cells lacking a receptor for testosterone, feeding them a diet high in fat and sugar and tested their body's response to it. Mice without receptors all secreted less insulin and developed glucose intolerance conditions similar to diabetes. The researchers then tested the effects of testosterone and glucose on human islet cells treated with a drug to inhibit the function of receptors, showing the same decreased insulin production exhibited in the mice. After observing the effect in human cells, researchers cultured mouse and human cells to observe the effects of testosterone on insulin production could be blocked by glucagon-like peptide-1 -- suggesting testosterone amplifies the effects of GLP-1, often used to treat diabetes. "Our study shows that testosterone is an anti-diabetic hormone in men," Mauvais- Continue reading >>

Low Testosterone Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

Low Testosterone Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

Low Testosterone Levels and Type 2 Diabetes A new study has found that a significant number of men who have Type 2 diabetes may have low testosterone levels, a condition that can trigger erectile dysfunction but can be treated with testosterone replacement therapy. The study, published in the April 2007 issue of the journal Diabetes Care, looked at 355 men over the age of 30 who had Type 2 diabetes. The researchers found that 17% of these men had low testosterone levels, and an additional 25% had borderline low levels of the male sex hormone. Obesity, as measured by body-mass index and waist circumference, was strongly associated with low testosterone levels in men. Of the men in the study who were found to have low testosterone levels, 70% reported erectile dysfunction and 63% reported low sex drive. The major symptoms of low testosterone levels tend to be low sex drive, reduced erection strength, reduced physical strength, fatigue, and changes in mood. As we revealed in the previous blog entry Diabetes and Erectile Dysfunction: Two New Studies, erectile dysfunction is reported by about half of men with diabetes, with increasing age being an important factor. Testosterone levels also decline in men with age. Other factors that may play a role in causing erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes are impaired circulation from blood vessel damage and neuropathy , or nerve damage. A combination of factors is often responsible for erectile dysfunction. Other studies have shown that men with erectile dysfunction who do not improve with use of sildenafil (brand name Viagra) are often found to have low testosterone levels. Whats more, 60% of these men do see improvement when testosterone replacement therapy is added to the sildenafil treatment. Testosterone replacement therap Continue reading >>

High Levels Of Testosterone Linked To Diabetes And Prostate Problems

High Levels Of Testosterone Linked To Diabetes And Prostate Problems

High levels of testosterone linked to diabetes and prostate problems A study of men in Bolivia's indigenous Tsimane tribe suggests men with lower levels of the sex hormone are less likely to develop a number of significant health problems In contrast to bodybuilders, power athletes appeared to have an improved level of muscle qualityPhoto: Alamy High levels of testosterone in men are linked to an increased risk of developing diabetes and prostate problems, according to a new study . Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, studied 350 members of the indigenous Tsimane people in a remote region of the Bolivian rainforest, who have naturally low levels of the male sex hormone, and found that they had low levels of blood glucose, which significantly decreases their risk of developing diabetes. There were almost no cases of enlarged prostate among the tribesmen. Levels of testosterone among Tsimane males is typically 30 per cent lower than American men of the same age. They also have much lower rates of obesity, heart disease and hypertension than men in advanced western nations. Publishing the study's findings in the Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, Dr Benjamin Trumble of the University of California said: "Abdominal ultrasounds show [the Tsimane] have significantly smaller prostates an age-adjusted 62 per cent smaller prostate size as compared to men in the US. "We know testosterone and androgens [male sex hormones] are involved because of studies showing that eunuchs and people who dont have testes have very low rates of [prostate enlargement]." Testosterone levels fall as we get older, but at a slow steady rate (Photo: Alamy) Typically, adult males have seven or eight times more testosterone in their bodies than adult females. Testosterone Continue reading >>

The Link Between Low Testosterone And Diabetes

The Link Between Low Testosterone And Diabetes

The connection might not seem obvious at first, but low testosterone and diabetes often go hand in hand. In fact, men with type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to have low testosterone as men who don't have diabetes. However, the link between these two conditions does not mean that low testosterone actually causes diabetes. It is possible that some of the lifestyle factors that increase the risk of diabetes also increase the risk of low testosterone. The good news? In addition to sticking to a heart-healthy diet and exercise, certain treatments may help both low testosterone and diabetes. Low Testosterone and Diabetes: What’s the Link? Low testosterone levels in men are associated with insulin resistance or reduced insulin sensitivity, says Ahmer Farooq, DO, assistant professor of urology at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Ill. When you have insulin resistance, your body produces insulin but doesn't use it properly. As a result, glucose builds up in your blood rather than being absorbed by cells. Insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes and increase your risk for a number of health problems, including heart disease. A study published in 2013 in the journal BioMed Research International found that low testosterone levels may help predict if a man will develop insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes in the future. According to the researchers, in a group of more than 300 obese and non-obese men, 44 percent had both type 2 diabetes and low testosterone, compared with 33 percent who had low testosterone but did not have diabetes. The researchers also noted that 25 percent of those with type 2 diabetes and low testosterone were not obese, concluding that low testosterone is linked to insulin resistance regardless of body weight. Yet, body weight can be a fa Continue reading >>

Testosterone Therapy Helps Men With Diabetes

Testosterone Therapy Helps Men With Diabetes

Testosterone Therapy Helps Men with Diabetes Health , Diseases & Conditions , Diabetes , Treatment Diminished energy, reduced lean muscle mass, decreased libido, erectile dysfunctionthese symptoms are common in men with low levels of the hormone testosterone. Men with type 2 diabetes are particularly prone to this hormonal deficiencyit affects about one-third of themand it can make their blood sugar problems even worse. Good news: Testosterone replacement therapy has multiple benefits for such men, a recent study shows. Participants included 81 men with diabetes. Some had normal levels of free testosterone (the amount of the hormone in the bloodstream)some had low levels of less than five nanograms per deciliter (ng/dL). At the start of the study, all the men were given a battery of tests and, as expected, men with low testosterone had a bunch of problems. They had more body fat, less lean muscle and more inflammation, and they were more insulin-resistantmeaning their bodies were less able to recognize and respond to insulin. Next, the men with low testosterone were divided into two groups. One group received injections of testosterone every two weeks for 24 weeksthe other group received placebo injections. What the testosterone did: In the placebo group, nothing improved. However, among the men who received testosterone injections, insulin resistance improved by nearly 30%and that was enough of an improvement to essentially get rid of their insulin resistance. Whats more, these men lost an average of 4.5 pounds of fat and gained 4.5 pounds of lean muscletheir inflammation decreasedand they reported significant improvement in libido and increased satisfaction with their erections. Men with diabetes: Doctors generally do not screen diabetes patients for testosterone def Continue reading >>

Testosterone’s Overlooked Role In The Treatment Of Diabetes In Men

Testosterone’s Overlooked Role In The Treatment Of Diabetes In Men

For most of my 60 years, I’ve dreamed of finding a medical treatment or cure that could improve humankind. It has been my mission and lifetime quest. Fifteen years ago, I rediscovered the reparative properties of bioidentical testosterone. It not only reversed my slide into old age, but also reversed my male patients’ diabetes. A hospital-supervised study soon followed, showing that testosterone replacement for men with diabetes was more important than oral diabetic medications, and for some, more important than insulin. What I could not imagine then was that almost every diabetes specialist, my affiliated national hospital chain, and the state-supervised health insurance carrier would brand me an “enemy of the state” and move to destroy my medical practice and credibility. The American Medical Association provided no support. This is the story of the inexpensive hormone that can displace up to $20 billion in direct pharmaceutical sales yearly—if only the truth becomes known. Historical Perspective In the First World War, an unsubstantiated report alleged that a dead soldier’s testicles were transplanted into the abdominal wall of a man with gangrene. The story goes that the man recovered and did not require amputation. This story might have been considered whimsical, were it not for the work of the Danish physician Jens Moller, MD, between 1950 and 1984.1 Dr. Moller and approximately 250 other European doctors used injections of bioidentical testosterone to treat diabetes, gangrene, and related heart disease in more than 10,000 male and female patients. Dr. Moller’s enthusiasm overshadowed the observation that the high testosterone dosages used increased the incidence of heart disease in the women who were treated. This led to his public humiliation, a di Continue reading >>

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