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Can Strep Throat Cause High Blood Sugar

Streptococcal Infections (invasive Group A Strep, Gas)

Streptococcal Infections (invasive Group A Strep, Gas)

You are Here: Home Page > Communicable Disease > Streptococcal Infections (invasive group A strep, GAS) Streptococcal Infections (invasive group A strep, GAS) Group A streptococci are bacteria commonly found in the throat and on the skin. The vast majority of GAS infections are relatively mild illnesses, such as strep throat and impetigo . Occasionally, however, these bacteria can cause much more severe and even life threatening diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis (occasionally described as "the flesh-eating bacteria") and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). In addition, people may carry group A streptococci in the throat or on the skin and have no symptoms of disease. These bacteria are spread by direct contact with nose and throat discharges of an infected individual or with infected skin lesions. The risk of spread is greatest when an individual is ill, such as when people have strep throat or an infected wound. Individuals who carry the bacteria but have no symptoms are much less contagious. Treatment of an infected person with an appropriate antibiotic for 24 hours or longer eliminates contagiousness. However, it is important to complete the entire course of antibiotics as prescribed. Household items like plates, cups and toys do not play a major role in disease transmission. What is invasive group A streptococcal disease? Invasive GAS disease is a severe and sometimes life-threatening infection in which the bacteria have invaded parts of the body, such as the blood, deep muscle and fat tissue or the lungs. Two of the most severe, but least common, forms of invasive GAS disease are called necrotizing fasciitis (infection of muscle and fat tissue) and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (a rapidly progressing infection causing low blood pressure/shock and Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia is a hallmark sign of diabetes (both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes) and prediabetes. Other conditions that can cause hyperglycemia are pancreatitis, Cushing's syndrome, unusual hormone-secreting tumors, pancreatic cancer, certain medications, and severe illnesses. The main symptoms of hyperglycemia are increased thirst and a frequent need to urinate. Severely elevated glucose levels can result in a medical emergency like diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS, also referred to as hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state). Insulin is the treatment of choice for people with type 1 diabetes and for life-threatening increases in glucose levels. People with type 2 diabetes may be managed with a combination of different oral and injectable medications. Hyperglycemia due to medical conditions other than diabetes is generally treated by treating the underlying condition responsible for the elevated glucose. Blood Sugar Swings: Tips for Managing Diabetes & Glucose Levels A number of medical conditions can cause hyperglycemia, but the most common by far is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes affects over 8% of the total U.S. population. In diabetes, blood glucose levels rise either because there is an insufficient amount of insulin in the body or the body cannot use insulin well. Normally, the pancreas releases insulin after a meal so that the cells of the body can utilize glucose for fuel. This keeps blood glucose levels in the normal range. Type 1 diabetes is responsible for about 5% of all cases of diabetes and results from damage to the insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is far more common and is related to the body's inability to effectively use insulin. In addition to type 1 and type 2, gestational diabe Continue reading >>

Strep Throat/high Bgs

Strep Throat/high Bgs

I am on antibiotics, I am drinking tons of tea and water but no exercise, feel so lousy stuck in be, my numbers will not move past 191!!! No matter how much insulin I have taken! All I have eaten is a few hard boiled eggs and chicken broth today! Any suggestions on how to bring these numbers down? Any and all responses are greatly appreciated, I feel awful D.D. Family Glucose Disregulation since 2005 I am on antibiotics, I am drinking tons of tea and water but no exercise, feel so lousy stuck in be, my numbers will not move past 191!!! No matter how much insulin I have taken! All I have eaten is a few hard boiled eggs and chicken broth today! Any suggestions on how to bring these numbers down? Any and all responses are greatly appreciated, I feel awful Well, infections commonly cause elevated blood sugars. Your body naturally raises your levels to give you energy to fight the infection. Some antibiotics can also cause elevated blood sugars. Your blood sugar is high, but by no means dangerously high. I would recommend that you just not worrry about it too much. Monitor your blood sugar and if it does not go down within a day or so of starting your antibiotic course, then check with your doctor. If it goes higher, then you might be concerned. Thank you for responding, went to bed early last night, I take Levemire and Novolog, I only increased the novolog yesterday, I took 8 units throughout the day with barely any food, i usually take 3-4 a day (1:15) this morning I woke up and was 197, took my Usual Levemire and 3 units novolog to correct and my antibiotic is Augmenten (sp?) Barely have eaten today except for chicken broth and sugar free jello (throat so sore) I am finally at 127. Still not great but I will take it. I was very scared so thank you so much for your help Continue reading >>

Group A Streptococcal Infections: Learn About Treatment

Group A Streptococcal Infections: Learn About Treatment

Learn the symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis Group A Streptococcus is defined as a gram-positive bacterial genus composed of Streptococcus pyogenes strains. Group A Streptococcus strains have a similar surface antigen recognized by specific laboratory tests, termed the Lancefield group A antigen. Lancefield groups (there are about 18 Lancefield groups) are composed of different Streptococcus species groups that have specific antigens and are distinguished by specific antibody tests. In addition, group A Streptococcus strains are beta-hemolytic (beta-hemolytic means the bacteria lyse red blood cells suspended in agar plates with secreted substances, see for example, Fig. 3). These tests are mentioned because they are frequently used to distinguish group A Streptococcus bacteria from group B, group C, and other Streptococcus groups. Group A Streptococcus bacteria appear as pairs and chains when gram-stained (see Fig. 1); these bacteria are also termed "beta strep , GAS, and GABHS." Although these bacteria can harmlessly colonize people on their throat and skin, sometimes they can cause mild to serious diseases. GAS bacteria have been causing diseases in humans probably since humans first developed. Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) bacteria have many components that contribute to the pathogen's ability to cause disease: Lipoteichoic acid on its surface helps the GAS bacteria to bind to epithelial cell membranes. M proteins (over 100 types on the GAS bacterial strains) help the bacteria resist immunologic host defenses. Exotoxins (for example, DNAses A, C and D, streptolysin S, proteinase, streptokinase, and pyrogenic exotoxins [A-D]) Human immune system stimulators (for example, streptolysin O, DNAse B, and hyaluronidase) Exotoxins cause the scarlet fever rash , damage organs, Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Infection: How To Spot The Signs

Diabetes And Infection: How To Spot The Signs

Diabetes can slow down your body's ability to fight infection. The high sugar levels in your blood and tissues allow bacteria to grow and help infections develop more quickly. Common sites for these problems are your bladder, kidneys, vagina, gums, feet, and skin. Early treatment can prevent more serious issues later on. What to Look For Most infections in people with diabetes can be treated. But you have to be able to spot the symptoms. Tell your doctor immediately if you have any of the following: Fever over 101 F Pain, tenderness, redness, or swelling Wound or cut that won't heal Red, warm, or draining sore Sore throat, scratchy throat, or pain when you swallow Sinus drainage, nasal congestion, headaches, or tenderness along upper cheekbones White patches in your mouth or on your tongue Flu-like symptoms (chills, aches, headache, or fatigue) or generally feeling "lousy" Painful or frequent peeing or a constant urge to go Bloody, cloudy, or foul-smelling pee *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety information. Continue reading >>

The Root Cause Of Type 1 Diabetes Could Be A Common Childhood Viral Infection

The Root Cause Of Type 1 Diabetes Could Be A Common Childhood Viral Infection

A young child becomes very thirsty very often and seems tired all the time. A visit to the pediatrician determines she has type 1 diabetes. The onset of type 1 diabetes may seem sudden, and it can be, but the disease may actually have been triggered by common childhood viruses years earlier. Type 1 diabetes—also called diabetes mellitus—was previously called juvenile-onset diabetes because most people affected with this disease are diagnosed as children and young adults. It isn't the most common form of diabetes and only 5% of people with diabetes have type 1. That doesn't make it any less serious—in fact, it can be a life-threatening disease. When we eat something, our body converts carbohydrates and starches in the food into sugar (glucose), which is then processed by our bodies to either be used or stored for later. People with type 1 diabetes have trouble keeping their blood sugar level even: It spikes when they eat something and goes very low if they don't. That's because their pancreas doesn't make insulin, the hormone that in a healthy human moves glucose from the blood into cells where it can be used for energy, keeping it from spiking after eating. Type 1 diabetics must constantly monitor their blood sugar and take insulin to keep their levels within a normal range to keep this process running. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, a disease where the body forms antibodies to itself and attacks parts of its own body. In this case, antibodies are formed to the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. Experts believe type 1 diabetes may be caused by a genetic risk factors and environmental factors, including viruses. A viral link to type 1 diabetes is one of the findings in a new study led by Hanna Honkanen and Heikki Hyöty in th Continue reading >>

Can Infection Raise Blood Sugar Levels In Nondiabetics?

Can Infection Raise Blood Sugar Levels In Nondiabetics?

Even if you do not have diabetes, you can experience drops and spikes in blood sugar levels for many reasons. If your blood sugar level gets too high or too low, you might develop many symptoms and/or health problems. Stress, poor diet, illness and infections can all cause your blood sugar level to change, and if you notice the warning signs, it is important to talk to your physician about the best treatment approach. Video of the Day After a meal, your body breaks food down into glucose either for immediate use, or else it's stored for later use. The hormone insulin, as well as other chemicals, regulate how much glucose is in your system. If the level of glucose in your bloodstream gets too high, many complications can result. A general goal for everyone is to keep your blood sugar levels no higher than 100 mg/dL, says MedlinePlus. A blood sugar level higher than this can indicate not just diabetes, but also some forms of cancer, Cushing syndrome, an imbalance of various hormones, thyroid disorders or it might be the body's reaction to stress, trauma or an infection. Infections and Blood Glucose Levels When your body is under mental or physical stress, such as when fighting off an infection, hormones such as cortisol are released to help your body cope. The hormones that are released to fight off the infection might have the side effect of raising your blood sugar levels, so your body has the energy it needs to get better. This effect can happen to both diabetics and nondiabetics. If you have an infection and are concerned about your blood sugar levels, it is important to know the warning signs of nondiabetic hyperglycemia, which are the same symptoms that occur in diabetics: hunger, sweating, shakiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, thirst, sleepiness, confusion, diffic Continue reading >>

Group B Strep Infection

Group B Strep Infection

Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a type of gram-positive streptococcal bacteria also known as Streptococcus agalactiae. This type of bacteria (not to be confused with group A strep , which causes strep throat ) is commonly found in the human body (this is termed colonization), and it usually does not cause any symptoms. However, in certain cases, it can be a dangerous cause of various infections that can affect nonpregnant adults, pregnant women, and their newborn infants. In the United States, approximately 26,500 cases of severe GBS infection occur annually across all age groups. Group B strep infection is the most common cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis in the United States. Group B strep infection can also afflict nonpregnant adults with certain chronic medical conditions, such as diabetes , cardiovascular disease , obesity , and cancer . The incidence of group B streptococcal disease in adults increases with age, with the highest rate in adults 65 years of age and older (25 cases per 100,000). Although the incidence of neonatal group B strep infection has been decreasing, the incidence of GBS infection in nonpregnant adults has been increasing. Read about other tests performed during the third trimester of pregnancy Group B strep bacteria can normally be found in about 25% of all healthy pregnant women. Group B strep is commonly found in the intestine, vagina, and rectal area. Most women who are carriers of the bacteria (colonized) will not have any symptoms; however, under certain circumstances, perinatal group B strep infection of both the mother and/or the newborn can develop. In newborns, if the GBS infection develops in the first week of life, it is termed early onset disease. If the GBS infection develops from 1 week to 3 months of age, it is referred t Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Strep Throat

Hypoglycemia And Strep Throat

Treato found 20 discussions about Strep Throat and Hypoglycemia on the web. Symptoms and conditions also mentioned with Hypoglycemia in patients' discussions Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose, or blood sugar. Your body needs glucose to have enough energy. After you eat, your blood absorbs glucose. If you eat more sugar than your body needs, your muscles, and liver store the extra. When your blood sugar begins to fall, a hormone tells your liver to release glucose. Read more on MedlinePlus.gov. He's doing great...had some low blood sugar at first but ... "Chriostopher Thomas and I are home now. He's doing great...a real nursing champ....thank goodness my milk came in early Monday b/c he was HUNGRY...my sweet big boy! Couldn't believe how big he was!! He's doing great...had some low blood sugar at first but that isn't unusual with a big baby. I'm doing good...it's true what they say about a quicker recovery from a planned csection....getting around much better this time. Neil is off picking up big bro Alex from daycare...should be interesting when he gets home. Of course he couldn't read more... let Chris have all the attention so he had to projectile vomit Sunday night....he went to the doc yesterday and had strep throat (who knew vomiting was a big sign of that!) and is on antibiotics and doing fine now. Doctors say its fine for him to be around Chris now. Will update more later and send more pics as possible. Thanks for all the well wishe!!!" Mayo Clinic University Hospital Johns Hopkins Hospital Cleveland Clinic Major Hospital College Medical Center University Medical Center Yaz Methimazole Zoladex Tylenol Oxycodone Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does no Continue reading >>

Handling Diabetes When You're Sick

Handling Diabetes When You're Sick

Whether your head feels like it's stuffed with cotton because you have a cold or you're spending a lot of time on the toilet because of a stomach bug, being sick is no fun for anyone. For people with diabetes, being sick can also affect blood sugar levels. The good news is that taking a few extra precautions can help you keep your blood sugar levels under control. When you get sick whether it's a minor illness like a sore throat or cold or a bigger problem like dehydration or surgery the body perceives the illness as stress. To relieve the stress, the body fights the illness. This process requires more energy than the body normally uses. On one hand, this is good because it helps supply the extra fuel the body needs. On the other hand, in a person with diabetes, this can lead to high blood sugar levels. Some illnesses cause the opposite problem, though. If you don't feel like eating or have nausea or vomiting, and you're taking the same amount of insulin you normally do, you can develop blood sugar levels that are too low. Blood sugar levels can be very unpredictable when you're sick. Because you can't be sure how the illness will affect your blood sugar levels, it's important to check blood sugar levels often on sick days and adjust your insulin doses as needed. Your diabetes management plan will help you know what to do when you're sick. The plan might tell you: how to monitor your blood glucose levels and ketones when you're sick what changes you might make to your food and drink and diabetes medications In addition, people with diabetes should get the pneumococcal vaccine, which protects against some serious infections. You should also get a flu shot every year. These vaccines may help you keep your diabetes under better control and cut down on the number of sick d Continue reading >>

Strep Throat And Type 1 Diabetes

Strep Throat And Type 1 Diabetes

Treato found 30 discussions about Type 1 Diabetes and Strep Throat on the web. Symptoms and conditions also mentioned with Strep Throat in patients' discussions Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Read more on MedlinePlus.gov. Amoxicillin vs. Echinacea Amoxicillin vs. Amoxil Amoxicillin vs. Throat Lozenges Amoxicillin vs. Goldenseal Amoxicillin vs. Strepsils Mayo Clinic Cleveland Clinic Johns Hopkins Hospital University Hospital Major Hospital MD Anderson Cancer Center Arkansas Children's Hospital Yaz Methimazole Zoladex Tylenol Oxycodone Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any Continue reading >>

Infections In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus: A Review Of Pathogenesis

Infections In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus: A Review Of Pathogenesis

Go to: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a clinical syndrome associated with deficiency of insulin secretion or action. It is considered one of the largest emerging threats to health in the 21st century. It is estimated that there will be 380 million persons with DM in 2025.[1] Besides the classical complications of the disease, DM has been associated with reduced response of T cells, neutrophil function, and disorders of humoral immunity.[2–4] Consequently, DM increases the susceptibility to infections, both the most common ones as well as those that almost always affect only people with DM (e.g. rhinocerebral mucormycosis).[4] Such infections, in addition to the repercussions associated with its infectivity, may trigger DM complications such as hypoglycemia and ketoacidosis. This article aims to critically review the current knowledge on the mechanisms associated with the greater susceptibility of DM for developing infectious diseases and to describe the main infectious diseases associated with this metabolic disorder. Continue reading >>

18. How Do You Know If Your Child Has Strep Throat?

18. How Do You Know If Your Child Has Strep Throat?

18. How do you know if your child has strep throat? Strep throat is an infection caused by the group A streptococcus pyogenes (strep) bacteria and is more common in children than in adults. Children with strep throat often have a fever and complain of sore throat (without cough), headache and stomach ache. They may also have swollen, tender glands in the neck, or sores around the nose. Scarlet fever, a rare form of strep infection, is characterized by a sore throat, more general symptoms, such as fatigue, and a red rash on the body that feels like sandpaper. Some children can get very serious complications, such as rheumatic fever, heart disease or kidney disease, if the infection is not treated completely with antibiotics. The strep bacteria are found in an infected persons saliva. The infection spreads through the air when the infected person talks, coughs or sneezes. The spread of infection can be stopped by treating the infected person with an antibiotic. How is strep throat diagnosed and treated? It is difficult to diagnose strep throat just by looking at the throat. The physician often takes a swab of the throat to see if strep bacteria is present. If strep throat is diagnosed, the physician will prescribe an antibiotic, usually penicillin. This medication comes in the form of a pill, a liquid or an injection. If treatment is begun soon after the infection has started, the child will feel better very soon. This treatment almost always prevents the serious complications that can result from strep throat. Watch your child for signs of strep throat if another child has it. Encourage proper dental hygiene and gargling with a warm salt water solution to prevent infection. If you suspect your child has strep throat, contact your physician. If your child has strep throa Continue reading >>

Children With Type 1 Diabetes At Risk For Life-threatening Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Children With Type 1 Diabetes At Risk For Life-threatening Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Two weeks before a family vacation last spring, 10-year-old Hailey Evans started to drink a lot more water. Her parents didn’t think much of it, given that Hailey had just joined a running team at her school in Northern Virginia and was exercising more. Not long after landing in Bolivia, where one of Hailey’s grandparents lives, she complained of a stomachache and nausea. Altitude sickness, her parents figured. Then Hailey took a sudden turn for the worse. Hospitalized the next day, she was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes within an hour. A few hours after that, she was in coma caused by swelling in her brain and severe dehydration. The next morning, April 20th, Hailey died, two weeks shy of her 11th birthday. Hailey’s devastated parents, Vanessa and Derrick Evans, now have joined a growing chorus of voices determined to raise awareness of Type 1 diabetes and push for more regular blood sugar testing. While Type 1 diabetes is the second most common chronic illness of childhood—trailing only asthma—it can mimic other common ailments and often is missed until it has taken a potentially deadly turn. “We had no idea,” Vanessa Evans says. “I wish I would have known, because maybe taking her to the doctor sooner would have saved her life. I would have never thought this could happen to anyone, much less us, yet here we are, left without our beautiful daughter. I don’t wish this pain on anyone. As we learned the hard way, with this disease, every minute, every hour, every day counts.” Cases of Type 1 diabetes are increasing worldwide, particularly in young children. Warning signs can include extreme thirst, frequent urination, a fruity breath odor and blurred vision, as well as generalized symptoms such as fatigue, nausea, stomachache, appetite changes and we Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemic Crises

Hyperglycemic Crises

What They Are and How to Avoid Them One type results in about 100,000 hospitalizations a year with a mortality rate of under 5%. The other is thought to cause fewer hospitalizations, yet the mortality rate is about 15%. Severe hyperglycemic conditions, known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS), involve very serious imbalances in blood chemistry and usually require that a person be hospitalized until normal blood chemistry is restored. Because they can occur in anyone with diabetes, everyone should know what causes them, how to prevent them, how they are treated, and when to seek medical attention. The body in balance Glucose metabolism is a complex balancing act. In people who don’t have diabetes, a number of interconnected processes help the body to use glucose and keep blood glucose levels in the normal range. The body constantly balances glucose extracted from foods and produced by the liver with glucose utilization by the body’s tissues. When there is ample glucose in the bloodstream, the liver converts some of it into glycogen for storage. When the body needs more energy, such as during a prolonged period of fasting or activity, the liver converts stored glycogen back into glucose so that it can be used by the body’s tissues. The liver also can create glucose from amino acids and fats. Insulin lowers blood glucose levels both by slowing down the liver’s glucose production and by helping the body’s tissues to use glucose for energy. If the blood glucose level goes too low, other hormones, called counterregulatory hormones, work against the action of insulin to raise blood glucose levels. These hormones include glucagon, epinephrine, growth hormone, and cortisol. All work by prodding the liver to release glucose and by Continue reading >>

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