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Can Stem Cells Cure Type 2 Diabetes?

Stem Cell Therapy For Diabetes Type 1 And Diabetes Type 2

Stem Cell Therapy For Diabetes Type 1 And Diabetes Type 2

New treatments and advances in research are giving new hope to people affected by Diabetes Type 1 and Diabetes Type 2. StemGenex Medical Group provides adult stem cell Diabetes therapies to help those with unmet clinical needs achieve optimum health and better quality of life. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for Diabetes Type 1 & Diabetes Type 2 may help patients who don’t respond to typical drug treatment, want to reduce their reliance on medication, or are looking to try stem cell therapy before starting drug treatment. To learn more about becoming a patient and receiving adult stem cell therapy through StemGenex Medical Group, please contact one of our Patient Advocates at (800) 609-7795. Below are some frequently asked questions about stem cell therapy for Diabetes Type 1 and Diabetes Type 2. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the most common form of diabetes, is considered a metabolic disorder that results in high-blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) caused by an insulin resistance and deficiency. A normally functioning pancreas will secrete the insulin hormone in low amounts after eating a meal. The glucose (sugar) found in the foods we eat stimulate the secretion of the insulin hormone proportional to the size of each meal. The main role of insulin is to help move specific nutrients into the body’s cells, mainly sugar, which they use as a source of energy. When glucose levels in the bloodstream rise, the beta cells located in the pancreas increase the secretion of insulin to avoid hyperglycemia. In type 2 diabetes, this process works improperly. Instead of moving into your cells to be used as a source of energy, glucose builds up in your bloodstream. Unlike people diagnosed with type 1, the bodies of people with type 2 diabetes produce the hormone insulin. The two main problems caused by type 2 diabetes is the pancreas not producing enough insulin and the body not using the insulin sufficiently. A diagnosis of T2DM occurs when the body does not use the hormone insulin properly. The process of improper secretion and absorption is referred to as insulin resistance. In the early stages, the pancreas makes extra insulin to regulate the high blood glucose (sugar) levels, but over time it is not able to make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. When there isn’t enough insulin or the insulin is not used properly, glucose can’t get into the body’s cells as it should, causing body’s cells to not function normally. Although it is diagnosed far more than type 1 diabetes, the causes of type 2 diabetes are considered to be less understoo Continue reading >>

An Overview

An Overview

Nearly 400 million people worldwide are living with diabetes, and that number is expected to jump to almost 600 million by 2035, according to the International Diabetes Federation. For many people, diabetes can be controlled with diet, exercise and, often, insulin or other drugs. However, complications from diabetes can be serious and include kidney failure, nerve damage, vision loss, heart disease and a host of other health issues. In this section: What is diabetes? How is diabetes treated? How are we using stem cells to understand diabetes? What is the potential for stem cells to treat diabetes? At its most basic, diabetes is a condition in which the body cannot regulate or properly use sugar (called glucose) in the blood. The pancreas, which helps the small intestine digest food, has hundreds of thousands of cell clusters called islets of Langerhans where beta cells live. Beta cells produce insulin, which is released into the bloodstream when blood sugar levels reach a certain threshold. The insulin signals other cells in the body to take up sugar, the primary energy source for all the body’s cells. Type 1, also known as juvenile diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system attacks the beta cells in the pancreas. When the beta cells are damaged, they don’t produce insulin, or at least not enough insulin. Other cells never get the signal to take up sugar, so they don’t get the energy they need to function properly, and high sugar levels in the blood end up causing damage to the kidneys, eyes, nervous system and other organs. Type 2 diabetes, also called adult-onset diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, cells in the body become resistant to insulin. They don’t respond to the signals insulin sends out, so they don’t take up sugar from the blood. The beta c Continue reading >>

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which is characterized by the combination of relative insulin deficiency and insulin resistance, cannot be reversed with existing therapeutic strategies. Transplantation of insulin-producing cells (IPCs) was once thought to be the most promising strategy for treating diabetes, but the pace from the laboratory to clinical application has been obstructed due to its drawbacks. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) harbor differentiation potential, immunosuppressive properties, and anti-inflammatory effects, and they are considered an ideal candidate cell type for treatment of DM. MSC-related research has demonstrated exciting therapeutic effects in glycemic control both in vivo and in vitro, and these results now have been translated into clinical practice. However, some critical potential problems have emerged from current clinical trials. Multi-center, large-scale, double-blind, and placebo-controlled studies with strict supervision are required before MSC transplantation can become a routine therapeutic approach for T2DM. We briefly review the molecular mechanism of MSC treatment for T2DM as well as the merits and drawbacks identified in current clinical trials. Mesenchymal stem cellsType 2 diabetes mellitusInsulin resistance Over recent decades, diabetes mellitus (DM) has become one of the major public healthcare problems worldwide [ 1 ]. It is estimated that 415 million adults have diabetes worldwide, and a further 318 million adults are estimated to have impaired glucose tolerance, and thus, be at high risk of developing diabetes in the future [ 2 ]. DM is a major risk factor for ischemic heart disease and stroke, which collectively account for high rates of morbidity and mortality among adult patients [ 3 ]. In addition, DM is the most comm Continue reading >>

Are Stem Cells The Next Frontier For Diabetes Treatment?

Are Stem Cells The Next Frontier For Diabetes Treatment?

Are Stem Cells the Next Frontier for diabetes treatment? Diabetes is a devastating disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The major forms of the disease are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system aberrantly destroys the insulin-producing beta cells (b-cells) of the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes, the more common form, is characterized both by insulin resistance, a condition in which various tissues in the body no longer respond properly to insulin action, and by subsequent progressive decline in b-cell function to the point that the cells can no longer produce enough additional insulin to overcome the insulin resistance. Researchers are actively exploring cell replacement therapy as a potential strategy to treat type 1 diabetes, because patients with this disease have lost all or nearly all b-cell function. However, if a safe and cost-effective means for replenishing b-cells were developed, such a treatment strategy could also be useful for the larger population with type 2 diabetes. One of the major challenges of cell replacement therapy is the current insufficient supply of b-cells from human organ donors. This article focuses on stem cells as potential sources for deriving new b-cells. Diabetes: A Critical Health Issue for the 21st Century According to the International Diabetes Federation, diabetes currently affects 7% of the world's population nearly 250 million individuals worldwide. 1 This total is expected to rise to 380 million by 2025 as a result of aging populations, changing lifestyles, and a recent worldwide increase in obesity. Although projections for increases in diabetes prevalence suggest that the greatest percentage gains will occur in Asia and South America, 2 , 3 all nations will experience a rising disease Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Treatment Teaches Rogue Immune Cells To Behave

New Diabetes Treatment Teaches Rogue Immune Cells To Behave

(Getty Images) A treatment targeting wayward immune cells in people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes may help even years later, a new study finds. For the treatment, researchers take blood from a person with diabetes and separate out the immune system cells (lymphocytes). They briefly expose those cells to stem cells from umbilical cord blood from an unrelated infant. Then they return the lymphocytes to the patient's body. The researchers have dubbed this treatment "stem cell educator therapy," because when exposed to the stem cells, the errant lymphocytes seem to re-learn how they should behave. "Stem cell educator therapy is a safe approach" with long-term effectiveness, said the study's lead author, Dr. Yong Zhao, an associate scientist at Hackensack University Medical Center in New Jersey. Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease, occurs when the body's immune system cells mistakenly attack the insulin-producing (beta) cells in the pancreas. This leaves people with Type 1 diabetes with little to no insulin. They need insulin injections to survive. Researchers have long thought that any cure for Type 1 diabetes would have to stop the autoimmune attack, while regenerating or transplanting beta cells. But Zhao and his team developed a new approach to the problem — educating the immune cells that had been destroying beta cells so they stop attacking. In Type 2 diabetes, Zhao said immune cell dysfunction is responsible for chronic inflammation that causes insulin resistance. When someone is insulin-resistant, their body's cells can't properly use insulin to usher sugar from foods into cells for use as energy. Instead, the sugar builds up in the blood. The researchers hoped the stem cell educator would help decrease insulin resistance for people with Type 2 diabetes. In ear Continue reading >>

Stem Cell Therapy Promising For Type 2 Diabetes

Stem Cell Therapy Promising For Type 2 Diabetes

Home / Conditions / Type 2 Diabetes / Stem Cell Therapy Promising for Type 2 Diabetes Stem Cell Therapy Promising for Type 2 Diabetes Human embryonic stem cell therapy was recently shown to reverse type 1 diabetes in mice, and now new mouse studies suggest a role for stem cells in the treatment of type 2 diabetes Obese, diabetic mice treated with a combination of transplanted stem cell-derived pancreatic progenitor cells and insulin-sensitizing drugs showed improved glucose metabolism and rapid weight loss. Mice receiving an antidiabetes drug without the stem cell transplants remained glucose intolerant. Researcher Timothy J. Kieffer, PhD, of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, and colleagues wrote that, Stem cell-based treatments may prove to be an effective therapeutic strategy for type 2 diabetes. Dr. Kieffer added that, Our data suggest that transplanted human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived insulin-producing cells thrive following chronic exposure to high-fat diets, at least in immunodeficient mice. Thus, stem cells are candidates for restoring functional beta cells in an insulin-resistant, obese setting. In earlier research, Kieffer and colleagues first showed that hESC-derived pancreatic progenitor cells reversed diabetes in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. The research team has also recently developed a seven-stage protocol to more quickly convert hESC into insulin-secreting pancreatic cells, which was shown to rapidly reverse diabetes in the type 1 diabetes mouse model within 40 days. Based on evidence showing that, like patients with type 1 diabetes, those with type 2 diabetes have reduced beta cell mass and declining beta cell function during the transition to active disease, the researchers hypothesized that hESC-derived insulin-secre Continue reading >>

Bone Marrow Derived Stem Cell Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Bone Marrow Derived Stem Cell Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Bone marrow derived stem cell therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus 1Hematology Department, the Lebanese Canadian and Notre Dame University Hospitals, Beirut, Lebanon; 2Neurosurgery Department, the Lebanese Canadian Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon; 3Endocrinology Department, Al-Saydet Hospital, Zgharta, Lebanon; 4Endocrinology Department, The Middle East and Notre Dame University Hospitals, Beirut, Lebanon; 5Endocrinology Department, the Lebanese Canadian Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon Correspondence to: Tarek Wehbe, MD. The Notre Dame University Hospital, Notre Dame St., Jounieh, Lebanon. Email: [email protected] . Received 2016 Sep 2; Accepted 2016 Nov 21. Copyright 2016 Stem Cell Investigation. All rights reserved. In this study, 6 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) underwent autologous bone marrow mononuclear stem cell (BM-MNSC) infusion into the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries without pretreatment with any myeloablative or immune-suppressive therapy. Five of 6 (83%) showed normalization of their fasting glucose and the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) with significant reduction of their medication requirements. The HbA1C dropped on average 2.2 points. The three patients with diabetic complications showed improvement or stabilization and most patients reported improved energy and stamina. The durations of response varied between 6 months and 2 years. No patients had any significant adverse effects. Keywords: Type 2 diabetes (T2D), stem cells, bone marrow mononuclear cells, glycosylated hemoglobin Diabetes incidence is on the rise, afflicting 810% of the world population with as many suspected of having pre-diabetes. This incidence will likely double in the next few decades due to the widespread sedentary lifestyles and dietary indiscretions. Ninety-five percent of the Continue reading >>

Diabetes: How Could Stem Cells Help?

Diabetes: How Could Stem Cells Help?

Diabetes is a common life-long condition and the number of children being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is increasing. The symptoms can be controlled but there is no cure. For many, diabetes means living with daily insulin injections and the possibility of long-term damage to their health. All the cells in your body need energy. This energy is carried around the body as sugar (glucose) in the blood. There are several types of diabetes. What they all have in common is a problem with regulating normal levels of sugar in the blood. Normally, blood sugar levels are controlled by the release of the hormone insulin. Insulin is made by cells in the pancreas called beta cells that are arranged into clusters together with other pancreas cells. These clusters are called islets of Langerhans. In one human pancreas there are roughly one million islets. Where is the pancreas?: located in the abdomen, next to the small intestine and stomach. The cells in the pancreas that make insulin (beta cells) are highlighted in red in this video by Dror Sever and Anne Grapin-Botton. Continue reading >>

Stem Cell Treatment & Therapy For Diabetes Type 2 In Chicago, Il

Stem Cell Treatment & Therapy For Diabetes Type 2 In Chicago, Il

Why Choose Stem Cell Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes? For people suffering from Type 2 diabetes, stem cell therapy can offer a respite from the symptoms of the disease. Although stem cell therapy cannot cure it, receiving stem cell therapy for diabetes Type 2 from TruStem Cell Therapy has the potential to improve a patients quality of life significantly by reducing symptoms and complications related to Type 2 diabetes, as well as slowing its progression. For patients receiving stem cell diabetes treatment, it is possible to see improvements in any one or multiple disease-related complications such as stabilization of blood sugar levels, lower blood sugar levels, frequent urination, fatigue, poor wound healing, etc. How Does Stem Cell Diabetes Treatment Work? TruStem Cell Therapy provides access to diabetes treatment that utilizes a patients stem cells isolated from his or her own fat tissue. There are multiple benefits afforded by the utilization of adipose-derived stem cells, including their ability to differentiate into a broad variety of cell types (neurons, bone, cartilage, muscle, tendon, etc.), they are present at comparatively much higher levels than other stem cell types; possess higher immunomodulatory capacity; and they do not endanger a patients health the way other stem cells might. There are three steps to the treatment process: Approximately 150 to 250 ccs of a patients own fat tissue is harvested through a minimally invasive procedure. Generally, this fat tissue is collected from around the patients belly region. Process and activate. Harvested fat tissue is taken immediately to the on-site laboratory for processing. At this stage, an optimized protocol is used to isolate the maximum number of stem cells from collected fat tissue. Administer. TruStem Cell Th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 - Stem Cells Treatment Clinic

Diabetes Type 2 - Stem Cells Treatment Clinic

Diabetes Type 2 Stem Cell Treatment Diabetes type 2 is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar and lack of insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the metabolism of carbohydrates. It is typically a chronic disease with a ten-year shortened life expectancy and symptoms such as: increased thirst, frequent urination, and constant hunger. There are a number of associated complications including: two to four times the risk of a cardiovascular disease and stroke, a 20-fold increase in lower limb amputations, and increased hospitalizations. Type 2 diabetes is the largest cause of non-traumatic blindness and kidney failure. It is associated with an increased risk of cognitive dysfunction and dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease. Other complications include: sexual dysfunction and frequent infections. Causes of type 2 diabetes: - obesity - poor diet - low activity level - genetics and family history Other diabetes risk factors include old age, high blood pressure, history of gestational diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome, impaired glucose intolerance and ethnicity, as African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans are prone to an increased incidence of diabetes because of a history of gestational diabetes. With Type 2 Diabetes the body becomes insensitive and less able to produce insulin, which transports glucose from the bloodstream into body tissues. Instead the sugar volume in the blood builds up. The pancreas may increase insulin production but it does not rectify the problem. Other symptoms of this disease include blurred vision, fatigue, increased appetite, thirst and urination, slow-healing or frequent infections and erectile dysfunction. In both forms of diabetes, unless treated, blood sugar will rise uncontrolla Continue reading >>

Stories Of Hope: A Stem Cell Therapy For Diabetes

Stories Of Hope: A Stem Cell Therapy For Diabetes

Home Stories of Hope: A Stem Cell Therapy for Diabetes Stories of Hope: A Stem Cell Therapy for Diabetes The last thing Maria Torres expected was to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. She exercised, ate well and kept her weight under control. There had to be some mistake. Maria asked her doctor to repeat the tests, but the results were the same. At 43, for reasons no one could fully explain, she had diabetes, and her life was going to change dramatically. It really scared me, says Maria. I thought I was going to die soon. That Maria doubted her diagnosis is no surprise. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, and she didnt fit the profile. Most likely, some undiscovered genetic component had made her susceptible to the disease. Regardless, she now had to rework her life to manage the diabetes. Her cells had developed a condition called insulin resistance. Though her pancreas was producing insulin, which tells cells to take in blood sugar, the cells were not cooperating. As a result, glucose was accumulating in her blood, putting her at risk for heart disease, nerve damage, eye issues and a host of other problems. To help her cells absorb glucose, she needs regular insulin injections. Maria injects the hormone five times a day and must often measure her blood sugar levels even more frequently. Faithfully following this regimen has kept her alive for 20 years, but insulin is not a cure. Even with the regular injections, she faces dramatic mood swings and more serious complications as glucose levels rise and fall. One of the most promising strategies to cure diabetes is to transplant beta cells, which sense blood sugar levels and produce insulin to reduce them. Patients with type 1 diabetes would benefit because new beta cells would replace the ones theyd lost t Continue reading >>

Stem Cell-based Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Shows Promise

Stem Cell-based Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Shows Promise

Stem cell-based therapy for type 2 diabetes shows promise In a new study published in the journal Stem Cell Reports, researchers reveal how a combination of stem cell transplantation and antidiabetic medication successfully treated mice with type 2 diabetes. This image shows the transplanted pancreatic beta cells derived from human embryonic stem cells. Image credit: Jennifer Bruin, University of British Columbia Senior study author Timothy Kieffer, of the University of British Columbia in Canada, and colleagues say the findings could lead the way for the first ever stem cell-based insulin replacement therapy being tested in humans with type 2 diabetes . It is estimated that more than 29 million people in the US have diabetes . Type 2 diabetes accounts for around 90-95% of these cases. The condition occurs as a result of the body being unable to produce enough of the hormone insulin or use it effectively. This leads to high blood glucose levels. In order to manage blood glucose levels, patients with type 2 diabetes are often treated with oral medication - such as metformin - insulin injections, or a combination of both. Kieffer and colleagues note, however, that such treatments can cause gastrointestinal problems, weight gain and low blood glucose levels, and some patients may not even respond to them. With these factors in mind, the team tested a potential alternative treatment approach for patients with type 2 diabetes. Improved glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity with beta cell transplantation The team created a mouse model of type 2 diabetes by inducing some markers of the disease in the animals - obesity , low response to insulin and high blood glucose levels - by feeding them a high-fat diet. Next, the team transplanted mice with encapsulated pancreatic proge Continue reading >>

Combination Of Stem Cell And Drug Therapy Could Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Combination Of Stem Cell And Drug Therapy Could Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Stem cell research is heralding a new age of possiblemedical treatments as scientists use them to grow transplantable cells andorgans. Now, it appears those new treatments might include one fortype 2 diabetes. Existing research has already found avenues to treat type 1diabetes. This less-common, early-onset form of diabetes occurs when the body’simmune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas,often while fighting an infection elsewhere in the body. By using stem cells,doctors can grow new insulin-producing cells to replace those that the pancreashas lost. However, type 2 diabetes – which makes up 90 percent ofdiabetes cases worldwide – is harder to treat. It typically occurs in adults asa result of excess weight or hormonal imbalances. While people with type 2 diabetes do lose some of theirinsulin-producing cells, their primary problem is elsewhere. Their cells havebecome resistant to insulin. Although insulin is present in the body, the cellscan no longer use insulin to keep blood sugar levels in check. Simply regrowingthe missing insulin-producing cells is not enough to solve the problem. Now, in new research published in StemCell Reports, scientists may have found a way. Read More: Scientists Make Insulin-Producing Cells from Stem Cells to Cure Type 1 Diabetes » A Two-Pronged Approach To create a mouse model of type 2 diabetes, the researchersput mice on a high-fat, high-carb diet. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes soonfollowed. The mice became overweight, intolerant to glucose (blood sugar), andresistant to insulin. Their blood sugar levels skyrocketed. Next came the attempt to reverse the induced diabetic state.The research team cultured human embryonic stem cells and prepared them to besafely implanted into the diabetic mice. Once t Continue reading >>

Enhanced Stem Cells For Treating Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 & 2

Enhanced Stem Cells For Treating Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 & 2

Updated November 22, 2017 – In the unfortunate event you or perhaps a family member are coping with diabetes you should be aware of its consequences on the body and mind. Diabetes is usually termed the “silent killer” mainly because it strikes the body slowly and without warning. Newly diagnosed diabetic patients are usually not worried about it since their symptoms are often no more severe than recurrent urination and increased thirst. A number of other individuals have no symptoms at all. Treating Diabetics With Stem Cells As time goes by however, the effects of both kinds of diabetes become increasingly serious and may lead to death. These symptoms include heart disease, eye issues, kidney failure, nerve damage and erectile dysfunction, to name a few. Hypoglycemia (acute low blood sugar) and hyperglycemia (high level of blood sugar) are the key contributors to the effects of diabetes. According to recent research, some of the oral diabetes medications can also help contribute to heart malfunction.(Kao and Chen 2012)* That is exactly why it’s important that women and men who are clinically diagnosed as “diabetic” immediately seek treatment to relieve hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. These conditions often trigger the more harmful, degenerative ailments. The regeneration center can help treat DM with our innovative enriched and expanded Mesenchymal cells treatment for Diabetes safely and without any artificial medicines or need for regular insulin dependency.(Yong Zhao et al. 2013)* Reverse Hyperglycemia with Insulin Producing Beta-Cells Stem Cell treatments for diabetes fights the disease at its origins in the pancreas. Decreasing hyperglycemia as well as associated complications (see above). According to recent research, it can also relieve hypoglycemia or Continue reading >>

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