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Can Statins Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 Diabetes, Statins And Their Relationship To The Thyroid

Type 2 Diabetes, Statins And Their Relationship To The Thyroid

Connecting The Dots My journey started long before I ever knew anything about thyroid disease. At twenty-five years old, I found out my father had his first heart attack and that he also had type 2 diabetes. That side of the family had a predisposition to being overweight and not living a healthy lifestyle. This scared me so much that I took drastic measures. In 1989, I changed everything about my diet. Eliminating all white sugar, white flour, process foods and all hormone/antibiotic meats and dairy from my eating regiment. My family and friends thought I was crazy. I thought I would be able to manipulate my genetics and prevent the inevitable path to disease. Early on I battled with sugar imbalances and weight fluctuations for no apparent reason, but paid no attention to it as exercise fixed everything. Unknowingly, Hashimoto’s was already fixated on my physiology. Determined to beat the odds, I had to be consciously aware of what I ate and how I took care of myself. Diagnosed is 2012 with Hashimoto’s and hypothyroid, I now had a new challenge: getting well and getting this disease under control so I could live my life. The last five years has had its ups and downs. For the last two years, I have been trying to lower my total cholesterol and LDL, while my triglycerides and glucose have been doing the roller-coaster dance. Nothing seemed to be working. I turned 53 years old in June, two years from my father’s first heart attack. At the end of May, I had a sub fraction lipid test to determine what exactly my lipids were doing before deciding to add another drug to regiment and the results were disappointing. Having thyroid disease can increase your risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The research shows that under-treated patients have higher total Continue reading >>

Statins

Statins

Tweet Diabetes and statins have a complex relationship and are the focus of intense patient and healthcare debate. Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs. Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that are frequently used as part of diabetes care due to the knowledge that people with diabetes face a greater likelihood of heart attack and stroke. When used alongside good blood glucose control and other medication, the case for statins argues that they cut cholesterol levels and lower the risk of a cardiovascular event. Type 2 diabetes in particular is commonly linked with higher levels of cholesterol. How can I lower my risk of cardiovascular problems without taking statins? There are other ways to lower your cholesterol and reduce your risk of stroke and heart attacks. These methods include stopping smoking, reducing your alcohol intake, taking regular physical activity and ensuring your diet is not over-reliant on processed foods. In some people, a change in lifestyle can make enough of a difference to cholesterol levels for you to not require cholesterol lowering treatment such as statins. If, however, your cholesterol levels remain above the target cholesterol levels and factors such as age and family history of heart disease and stroke show you to be at a high risk of heart disease, your doctor will likely advise statin treatment. What do statins do for people with diabetes? Statins affect the way the liver manufactures cholesterol, lowering levels of LDL cholesterol (the so called ‘bad’ cholesterol) and raising levels of HDL cholesterol (the so called ‘good’ cholesterol). The terms good and bad cholesterol are used because, whilst we do need both types of cholesterol, having too high levels LDl cholesterol is linked with higher risks of heart disease whereas h Continue reading >>

Taking Statins Raises The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes By Nearly A Third: Findings Reopens Debate About The Pills Benefits And Side Effects

Taking Statins Raises The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes By Nearly A Third: Findings Reopens Debate About The Pills Benefits And Side Effects

Taking statins increases the risk of type 2 diabetes by nearly a third, researchers found. A decade-long study of more than 3,200 patients found those who took statins were 30 per cent more likely to develop the condition. Some six million Britons take statins every day to reduce their cholesterol and ward off heart disease. The pills are proven lifesavers, slashing the chance of a repeat attack, yet a scientific row over benefits and side effects has dragged on for years. Experts have long known there was a link between statins and diabetes – but doctors have always stressed that the advantages of the pills far outweigh the small chance of getting diabetes. Previous research had put the chance of developing type 2 diabetes at no more than 10 to 12 per cent greater than if someone did not take statins. The latest study, however, suggests the medication increases the risk by 30 per cent. The researchers, from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, think this may be because statins impair insulin production. In the journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care, they called for regular blood sugar tests of people taking statins. ‘Glucose status should be monitored and healthy lifestyle behaviours reinforced in high-risk patients who are prescribed statins for cardiovascular disease [prevention],’ they wrote. The scientists tracked overweight people already considered at risk of diabetes for ten years. At the start, 4 per cent took statins, but by the end roughly a third were taking the pills. No link was found between the potency of the statins used and diabetes risk. The researchers stressed that the additional risk of developing diabetes should be balanced against ‘the consistent and highly significant’ reduction in risk of heart attacks, strokes and deat Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Statins Link: Do The Cholesterol-busting Drugs Increase Risk?

Type 2 Diabetes And Statins Link: Do The Cholesterol-busting Drugs Increase Risk?

Scientists have linked the condition to taking statins, which are prescribed to lowers levels of high cholesterol. High cholesterol can increase the risk of heart attack or a stroke and even increase the risk of heart disease. Statins are one of the most commonly prescribed medications in the UK. There has been much controversy surrounding statins over the past few decades, with many experts questioning if the benefits of the drugs still outweigh any potential risks. However, a study has revealed taking statins can increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The use of statins in people aged 60 and over increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by nine per cent, according to a new study. The researchers, from the University of Glasgow, stressed the risk is low, especially when compared with the beneficial effect that statins have on reducing heart problems. The study, which was published in The Lancet looked at more than 91,000 people prescibred the medication. Earlier this year, researchers from the University of Queensland found women over 75 face a 33 per cent higher chance of developing diabetes if they are taking statins. Experts said the risk also increase to over 50 per cent for women taking higher doses of statins. Dr Mark Jones, from the University of Queensland, said: “We found that almost 50 per cent of women in their late seventies and eighties in the study took statins and five per cent were diagnosed with new-onset diabetes.” He said: “Statins are highly prescribed in this age group but there are very few clinical trials looking at their effects on older women.” Researchers from UCL and the University of Oxford have since revealed that the slight increase in risk of developing type 2 diabetes during statin treatment could be a consequen Continue reading >>

Statins And Type 2 Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Statins And Type 2 Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Statins are a type of drug prescribed to patients with high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. They work by blocking a substance needed to make LDL cholesterol, or “bad” cholesterol, in your liver. As it travels through the blood, LDL cholesterol deposits fatty particles on the arterial walls in the heart and brain. Over time, buildup can cause a blockage that can lead to heart attack or stroke. Statins help lower LDL cholesterol. This can lower your risk of stroke and heart attack. Statins also help to: reduce inflammation improve the health of the lining of blood vessels reduce the risk of blood clots Statins have been used for more than 25 years. In February 2012, though, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advised health providers and consumers that the use of statins may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Statins are usually safe and provide many benefits. As with many drugs, you and your doctor must weigh the pros and cons of taking a statin drug. The FDA still believes in the benefits of statins. The 2012 announcement isn’t meant to urge all people to stop taking statins. Rather, it advises doctors to monitor the blood sugar levels of their patients who take these drugs. The American Diabetes Association states that the benefits of taking a statin outweigh the risk of acquiring diabetes. The American Heart Association suggests that there isn’t enough data to support stopping your statin use if you have type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a disorder that affects how much insulin your body releases, how your body uses it, or both. Insulin is a hormone your pancreas makes and releases after your body breaks food down into glucose. The hormone helps transport the glucose from your blood into your body’s cells, where it is us Continue reading >>

Can Cholesterol Drugs Cause Diabetes?

Can Cholesterol Drugs Cause Diabetes?

For every prescription drug that is developed and offers benefits to patients, there are those that also pose significant risks. Physicians must always weigh the benefits to risks in order to make informed decisions as to whether a particular medication should be used for treatment. Recent findings suggest statins, a class of prescription drug used to treat high cholesterol levels, increase the risk of developing diabetes. No one argues the fact that statins are able to prevent major cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, in patients who have already experienced a previous cardiovascular episode and are very likely to experience another one. But there is cause for concern over the widespread use of statins in patients with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and the potential for these patients to eventually develop another disease, diabetes. What Do Statins Do Exactly? Elevated blood cholesterol levels, specifically LDL (the bad kind), have been shown to increase a person’s risk of heart attacks and stroke. By testing LDL levels in patients, a fairly accurate prediction can be made of future cardiac events. [1] As more research has been gathered on the role of LDL levels and heart disease, national guidelines have called for optimal LDL cholesterol levels to be lowered. Enter statins. Statins have the ability to block a critical step in the formation of LDL cholesterol within the liver, hence, the overall level of LDL in the blood drops. Because of this, statins are currently the most commonly-prescribed class of drug used to treat high cholesterol. Until very recently, statins were thought to be safe and well tolerated by patients, though some studies reported temporary memory loss that disappeared once medication was switched. Though there is al Continue reading >>

Statin Use Linked To Heightened Type 2 Diabetes Risk In Susceptible Individuals

Statin Use Linked To Heightened Type 2 Diabetes Risk In Susceptible Individuals

Long term use of statins to lower blood fats and stave off cardiovascular disease is associated with a 30 per cent heightened risk of developing type 2 diabetes in susceptible individuals, suggests a large study published in the online journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care. The findings held true irrespective of the criteria used to determine the need for treatment, suggesting that these factors weren't major contributors to diabetes risk, say the researchers. They base their findings on 3234 participants in the US Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS). This is a long-term follow up study to a randomised clinical trial which looked at whether modest weight loss through lifestyle changes or treatment with metformin could reduce or delay development of type 2 diabetes in people at high risk. The trial participants were given standard advice on healthy eating and exercise and were randomly assigned to either an intensive lifestyle programme, treatment with metformin, or a dummy drug (placebo). At the end of the trial they were invited to take part in DPPOS, during which their blood fats and blood pressure were measured annually. Blood glucose was measured twice a year, at which point new statin treatment was recorded. At the start of DPPOS fewer than 4 per cent of participants were taking statins, but use of these drugs gradually increased until after 10 years around a third of the participants were taking them. The most commonly prescribed statins were simvastatin (40%) and atorvastatin (37%). The likelihood of a prescription rose substantially after a diagnosis of diabetes. However, statin use was itself associated with a heightened risk of being diagnosed with diabetes, irrespective of which treatment group the participants had been in during the trial. Continue reading >>

Statin Use And Risk Of Diabetes Mellitus

Statin Use And Risk Of Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: STATINS IN DIABETES Statins are used for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Other benefits due to statins are not mediated by their lipid lowering properties[8] but due to its pleiotropic effects. In conditions like heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, vascular disease and hypertension the non-lipid lowering pleotropic benefits of statins have been observed[9]. These pleiotropic effects mediated by statins can be due to inhibition of isoprenoid synthesis which in turn inhibits intracellular signaling molecules Rho, Rac and Cdc42. The predominant mechanism that has been postulated is inhibition of Rho and its activation to Rho kinase[10]. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and insulin deficiency. The insulin resistance contributes to the abnormal lipid profile associated with type 2 diabetes[11]. Dyslipidemia contributes to increased cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes[12]. A linear relationship exists between cholesterol levels and cardiovascular diseases in diabetics even if we ignore the baseline LDL[13]. By predominantly lowering LDL-Cholesterol and due to minor effects on other lipoproteins, statins appear to be beneficial[12]. In Heart Protection Study which was done in diabetics, the decrease in cardiovascular events like first major coronary event, stroke were to the tune of 22% as compared to placebo[14]. It was recommended by American Diabetes Association that statin therapy should be initiated in individuals with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors with target LDL cholesterol of 100 mg/dL[15]. Investigators are also of the opinion that statin therapy should depend not on the LDL levels but the cardiovascular complications accompanying diabetes[16]. Other studies wh Continue reading >>

Statins Linked To Increased Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Statins Linked To Increased Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Lowering the "bad" form of cholesterol with statin drugs could increase diabetes risk, a study suggests. Scientists found that people with naturally lower levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol were less likely to develop heart disease but slightly more vulnerable to Type 2 diabetes. Reducing LDL levels by taking statins may have the same effect, they believe. Lead researcher Dr Michael Holmes, from Oxford University, said: "What we've shown in this study is that the role played by blood lipid levels in disease is a complex one. "While the effect of taking LDL cholesterol-lowering drugs such as statins may slightly increase a person's risk of developing diabetes this effect is greatly outweighed by their benefits in the form of preventing people from suffering from a life-altering heart attack or stroke." The team analysed large data sets of information about genetic make-up to tease apart the possible effects on heart disease and diabetes risk of LDL and so-called "good" cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), which is said to be protective. They also looked at the influence of triglyceride blood fats which are associated with heart disease. Cases of heart disease were more likely to occur among people with genetic mutations that increased their levels of LDL or triglycerides, the research showed. But genetic variants that raised either LDL or HDL cholesterol levels, and possibly triglyceride levels, slightly reduced the chances of developing Type 2 diabetes. How to | Manage and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes Six tips from Dr David Cavan, the UK's leading expert on diabetes self-management and author of Reverse Your Diabetes: The Step-by-Step Plan to Take Control of Type 2 Diabetes. Limit yourself to two standard alcoholic drinks a day. Alcohol is Continue reading >>

Statin Use May Increase Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes, Study Finds

Statin Use May Increase Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes, Study Finds

Patients susceptible to type 2 diabetes were at increased risk of developing the condition once they started using statins, a study has found. Statin use was associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes in patients already at increased risk, even when the results were controlled for the clinical criteria for treatment with these drugs. The study, conducted by researchers in the US and published in BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care, looked at just over 3,000 patients with elevated BMIs and blood glucose levels who were taking part in a wider study to look at the effect of different interventions on preventing type 2 diabetes. The patients were randomised to receive an intensive lifestyle intervention, metformin or a placebo. Patients were followed up for an average of 10 years and researchers found that patients who had started taking statins during the follow-up period had a 36% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with those who had not. The risk of developing diabetes fell only slightly when the data were controlled for variables such as cholesterol levels and the use of antihypertensive medications that lead to the patient needing statin treatment in the first place, suggesting that these factors were not major contributors to diabetes risk. The researchers found no link between the potency of the statin and the risk of diabetes. The authors said in the paper: ‘For individual patients, a potential modest increase in diabetes risk clearly needs to be balanced against the consistent and highly significant reductions in myocardial infarction, stroke and cardiovascular death associated with statin treatment. Nonetheless, glucose status should be monitored and healthy lifestyle behaviours reinforced in high-risk patients who are prescrib Continue reading >>

Fighting Statin-induced Diabetes With Coq10

Fighting Statin-induced Diabetes With Coq10

Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs sold under trade names such as Lipitor® and Crestor®. They have been shown to benefit people at risk for heart disease caused by elevated LDL-cholesterol and/or C-reactive protein. For appropriate patients, statin drugs reduce cardiovascular death and disability rates.1-3 But despite these benefits, evidence suggests that statins, especially high doses of potent statins, may increase the risk, especially in older patients, of developing diabetes.3-6 Compelling data reveals that supplementing with CoQ10 can significantly reduce these glucose control issues. Facts about Statins and Diabetes Studies show that some statins, such as rosuvastatin (Crestor®), are associated with a 27% increased risk of developing new-onset type II diabetes.7 This is just one of many studies showing this harmful connection.4-6 One meta-analysis that utilized results from 13 statin studies involving more than 91,000 participants demonstrated an across-the-board increased diabetes risk of 9%,8 and found the highest risk in trials involving older subjects. Another meta-analysis showed that those taking higher doses of statins had a 12% higher risk of developing diabetes compared with subjects receiving “moderate” doses.9 These two alarming studies have made it apparent that older patients on more intensive statin regimens are at the greatest risk of developing diabetes from their treatment.3,10 Naturally, this poses a dilemma for anyone who is on, or considering starting, statin therapy. Is lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease worth the risk of developing diabetes which in turn could, paradoxically, increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease?6 Experts generally say it’s a worthwhile gamble, because the benefits for cardiovascular d Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Statins 'outweigh Diabetes Risk'

Benefits Of Statins 'outweigh Diabetes Risk'

"Statins increase risk of diabetes, but benefits are still worth it, say experts," The Guardian reports. A large study found the medication lead to a modest increase in weight and subsequent diabetes risk. The authors report that these risks were more than offset by the reduction in cardiovascular disease, but these results were not provided in the study. The study involved nearly 130,000 people, which found that statin use (used to lower cholesterol levels) increases the risk of type 2 diabetes by 12% and is associated with weight gain of around quarter of a kilo (half a pound) over four years. It found indirect evidence that the protein statins target to reduce cholesterol could be at least partly responsible for the effect on type 2 diabetes as well. This evidence was based on looking at the effect of natural genetic variations that affect the protein, and not on a direct analysis of the effect of statins. Importantly, the authors themselves note that this “should not alter present guidance on prescription of statins for prevention of [CVD]”. They do suggest that lifestyle changes, such as exercise, should be emphasised as still being an important part of heart disease prevention in people who are taking statins. This seems reasonable, and it is likely to be part of what doctors already recommend. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from University College London, Glasgow University, and a large number of international universities and institutes. It was funded by the Medical Research Council, the National Institutes of Health, the British Heart Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, the National Institute on Aging, Diabetes UK and several other European grants. The study was published in the peer-reviewed medical journal The Lancet o Continue reading >>

Do Statins Increase Type 2 Diabetes Risk?

Do Statins Increase Type 2 Diabetes Risk?

I read that taking rosuvastatin (Crestor) may increase the risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Is this true for other statins? I'm a 55-year-old woman who is taking a low dose of Lipitor. My last fasting blood sugar showed that I'm at a pre-diabetes stage. You are correct. There is concern that at least two of the statin drugs, Crestor and simvastation (Zocor), are associated with an increased risk of the development of type 2 diabetes. A recent meta-analysis (pooled data from several studies) suggests there may be one additional case of diabetes for every 498 patients treated. However, statin therapy prevented one major cardiovascular event (stroke or heart attack) for every 155 patients treated. Every medicine that we take has potential benefit and potential risk. A reasoned and individual decision needs to be made between the health care provider and the patient regarding what is best. The risks of statins include a small incidence of liver and muscle problems which almost always resolve with stopping the medicine. Besides the recent link to type 2 diabetes, there is also some work that indicates statins occasionally cause reversible memory problems. On the plus side, there is no doubt that statins decrease cholesterol build up in the blood vessels that go the heart and the brain. They can even help "melt away" plaque build-up that is already there. When those vessels get clogged, heart attacks and strokes can occur. In a study recently published, people on statins when their cancer was diagnosed (as compared to those not on statins) had better survival and less metastatic disease. Statin use has also been associated with less Parkinson's disease and less Alzheimer's disease. The higher your risk for cardiovascular events, the more absolute benefit is derived from stati Continue reading >>

Playing The Odds With Statins: Heart Disease Or Diabetes?

Playing The Odds With Statins: Heart Disease Or Diabetes?

Last year my cholesterol shot up despite living nowhere near a decent barbeque joint. I was totally stressed. I wasn't overweight. But I was pretty sedentary. My doctor prescribed a high dose of Lipitor, a powerful statin. For women of a certain age, statins are supposedly the best thing since Lycra for keeping wayward bodies in check. Statins interfere with the synthesis of low-density lipoprotein, the "bad" cholesterol. LDL is a prime suspect in heart disease, the top killer of women. The statin cut my cholesterol like buttah. But statins can also increase the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, muscle and/or liver damage. Heart trouble and diabetes run in my family. Was I trading a heart attack for diabetes? "We give statins to people with diabetes," was all my doc said. That didn't answer my question. I knew from an unrelated test that I did not currently have coronary artery disease, so I decided to investigate the statin situation. In 2012 the Food and Drug Administration slapped a black box warning on statins, saying that they could raise blood glucose levels in people at high risk of Type 2 diabetes. That meant an increase of anywhere from 9 to 27 percent in relative risk – in absolute terms about 0.3 excess cases of diabetes for every 100 people who are treated for a year with high-intensity statins (which lower cholesterol by 50 percent or more) and 0.1 excess cases of diabetes for every 100 people treated with moderate-intensity statins (which lower cholesterol by 30 to 50 percent.) Because doctors disagree on who should get statins, in 2013 the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association issued guidelines advising doctors not to treat to a cholesterol target, but to prescribe statins if patients fit into one of four risk categories an Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Type 2

Diabetes - Type 2

Description An in-depth report on the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of type 2 diabetes. Alternative Names Type 2 diabetes; Maturity onset diabetes; Noninsulin-dependent diabetes Highlights Diabetes Statistics According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Diabetes Fact Sheet, nearly 26 million American adults and children have diabetes. About 79 million Americans aged 20 years and older have pre-diabetes, a condition that increases the risk for developing diabetes. Diabetes and Cancer Type 2 diabetes increases the risk for certain types of cancer, according to a consensus report from the American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society. Diabetes doubles the risk for developing liver, pancreatic, or endometrial cancer. Certain medications used for treating type 2 diabetes may possibly increase the risk for some types of cancers. Screening for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus The American Diabetes Association recommends that pregnant women without known risk factors for diabetes get screened for gestational diabetes at 24 - 28 weeks of pregnancy. Pregnant women with risk factors for diabetes should be screened for type 2 diabetes at the first prenatal visit. Aspirin for Heart Disease Prevention The American Diabetes Association now recommends daily low-dose (75 - 162 mg) aspirin for men older than age 50 and women older than age 60 who have diabetes and at least one additional heart disease risk factor (such as smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, family history, or albuminuria). Guidelines for Treatment of Diabetic Neuropathy The anticonvulsant drug pregabalin (Lyrica) is a first-line treatment for painful diabetic neuropathy, according to recent guidelines released by the American Academy of Neurol Continue reading >>

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