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Can Statin Induced Diabetes Be Reversed

Beware: Statin Drugs Can Actually Cause Diabetes

Beware: Statin Drugs Can Actually Cause Diabetes

Statin drugs increase your likelihood of suffering exercise-related injury, according to a recent study, and the harmful effect increases with age Several recent studies have also concluded that statins can increase your risk of developing diabetes. One meta-analysis found that one out of every 498 people who are on a high-dose statin regimen will develop diabetes as a result of the drug, but the risk may be as high as one in 255 Statins provoke diabetes by raising your blood sugar- and insulin levels, and by robbing your body of certain valuable nutrients, such as vitamin D and CoQ10, which are both needed to maintain ideal blood glucose levels Like thalidomide, statin drugs are a class X drug with regard to pregnancy, meaning they are contraindicated and should NOT be taken by pregnant women If you’re on a statin drug, you MUST take CoQ10 to alleviate some of the most dangerous side effects By Dr. Mercola Tens of millions of Americans are taking cholesterol-lowering drugs - mostly statins - and some "experts" claim that many millions more should be taking them, including children as young as eight. I couldn't disagree more. Statins are HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, that is, they act by blocking the enzyme in your liver that is responsible for making cholesterol (HMG-CoA reductase). The enzyme that these drugs block is actually responsible for far more than making cholesterol. It also makes CoQ10 which is vital for your mitochondrial health. The fact that statin drugs cause side effects is well established - there are now 900 studies proving their adverse effects, which run the gamut from muscle problems to diabetes, to birth defects and increased cancer risk. Now you can add exercise-related muscle damage to the ever growing list of harmful side effects. Statins Can Continue reading >>

Do Statin Drugs Cause Diabetes? Risk Is Higher Than You Think

Do Statin Drugs Cause Diabetes? Risk Is Higher Than You Think

A shocking new study by researchers in Finland suggests that statins may increase the risk of diabetes, perhaps as much as 46 percent. This news has led to a flood of questions from concerned patients, asking if they should still be on their cholesterol lowering medications. As a practicing cardiologist, it is my responsibility to tell my patients that statins (cholesterol lowering medications such as Lipitor, Crestor, and Zocor) do have many great benefits. Not only do they lower cholesterol, but if someone has had a heart attack, bypass surgery or stent, there is no doubt that taking these medications can also decrease the risk of another coronary event, or death. I believe physicians and alternative practitioners who deny the benefits of statins entirely are on a fringe. But, what if statins are really not as effective as we think, and have side effects that we have not yet completely realized? Could it be that some of these statin critics are correct? History can be a great teacher as there are many instances in medicine where conventional wisdom has turned out to be wrong. Forty years ago, we did not know that environmental toxins could cause cancer or that stomach ulcers were often caused by bacteria. Could conventional wisdom also be wrong when it comes to statins? According to this Finnish study, statins, especially in higher doses, markedly increase the chance that someone may develop Type II diabetes. This likely occurs because these medications seem to decrease insulin production and inhibit the ability of the body to process insulin appropriately. In addition to diabetes, there are other possible ill effects of statins. An estimated 10-20 percent of people taking statins experience muscle aches that lead to them stop their medication. Others complain of a ki Continue reading >>

For Diabetics, The Correct Statin Matters

For Diabetics, The Correct Statin Matters

Statins can increase serum glucose and increase the risk of developing diabetes in certain patients, but that doesn’t mean your diabetic patients shouldn’t take them. In fact, the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/ American Heart Association (AHA) cholesterol treatment guidelines say that the “occurrence of a major ASCVD event represents a much greater harm to health status than does an increase in blood glucose.” The Food and Drug Administration concurs, noting in its safety label change on statins that the cardiovascular benefits of the widely used drugs typically outweighs the disadvantages of modestly higher blood sugar levels or incident diabetes. Still, when you’re treating a patient with diabetes, you would rather have all the medications working to improve blood glucose levels. Careful selection of the right statin can keep from reversing some hard-earned progress in reducing HbA1c levels, according to a study published online ahead of print in the December issue of Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports. The Data Researchers examined the connection between statins, glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance. They found that both dose and type of statin affected the risk of newly diagnosed diabetes and overall elevation of blood glucose levels, based on a review of 12 previous studies. Atorvastatin (10 or 20 mg) had a greater effect on blood sugar than the same doses of pravastatin or simvastatin in one study, while another showed that the higher-intensity statins such as atorvastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin increased the risk of newly diagnosed diabetes compared to treatment with fluvastatin or lovastatin over a 14-year period. Higher dose atorvastatin and simvastatin (80 mg) increased the risk of incident diabetes 12% compared to lower doses of Continue reading >>

What Statin Is Best For People With Diabetes?

What Statin Is Best For People With Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, you’re at a higher risk for heart disease and stroke. This makes it especially important to control other risk factors for cardiovascular problems, such as high cholesterol. Fortunately, there are medications called statins that are quite effective at lowering your low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad” cholesterol. Which statin is most appropriate if you have diabetes? It depends on your overall cardiovascular risk, but the recommendations lean toward a moderate-intensity or high-intensity statin. There are several different types of statins. Some are more potent than others. They each work a little differently, but they all help lower cholesterol by interfering with a substance your body needs to make cholesterol in the liver. Statins have become some of the most widely prescribed medications in the world. They include atorvastatin (Lipitor), rosuvastatin (Crestor), as well as other generic and brand name versions. The optimal LDL level for most healthy people is between 70 and 100 mg/dL. If your LDL numbers exceed that range, your doctor should look at your overall heart disease and stroke risk to decide whether you should be placed on statins. Recent guidelines presented by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association expanded the number of potential statin users. Doctors used to base their decision to prescribe a statin primarily on a person’s LDL score. Now, other risk factors are also considered. In general, statins are usually recommended for people who have: diagnosed cardiovascular disease an LDL cholesterol level of 190 mg/dL or higher diabetes and an LDL of 70 mg/dL or higher a 10-year heart attack risk of 7.5 percent or higher and an LDL of at least 100 mg/dL Statins and diabetes risk: What you need to Continue reading >>

Incident Diabetes And Statins: The Blemish Of An Undisputed Heavy Weight Champion?

Incident Diabetes And Statins: The Blemish Of An Undisputed Heavy Weight Champion?

… All that glisters is not gold … –William Shakespeare, Merchant of Venice, Act 2, Scene 7 In the aftermath of multiple clinical trials involving thousands of participants, statins or 3-hydroxy-methlyglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have arguably emerged as the undisputed heavy weight champions of therapeutic strategies for the modulation of cholesterol concentrations and inflammation for primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular (CV) events, including stroke [1-4]. Alas, to all good pharmacologic interventions the well-known phrase ‘… all that glisters is not gold …’ may be quite applicable here, as attendant collateral damage (side effects) may reduce the usefulness of these agents which currently fill our arsenals in disease warfare. Here-to-fore, myalgia, myopathy, rhabdomyolysis and derangement of liver enzyme levels have been traditional concerns associated with the use of statins, until we became aware of the arrival of new-onset diabetes at the scene in the wake of burgeoning pharmaco-epidemiological evidence. The link between statin therapy and diabetes was first heralded by a post hoc analysis of the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS) [5], with a claim of beneficial effects of pravastatin on incident diabetes, and later re-ignited by the finding of increased incident diabetes with rosuvastatin treatment in Justification for the Use of Statins in Primary Prevention: an intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) [6]. There now exists a body of evidence to support the notion that statins are diabetogenic, culminating in the recent action by the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to include the risk of hyperglycaemia and development of type II diabetes in the s Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Dilemma For Statin Users

The Diabetes Dilemma For Statin Users

San Diego, Calif. We’re overdosing on cholesterol-lowering statins, and the consequence could be a sharp increase in the incidence of Type 2 diabetes. This past week, the Food and Drug Administration raised questions about the side effects of these drugs and developed new labels for these medications that will now warn of the risk of diabetes and memory loss. The announcement said the risk was “small” and should not materially affect the use of these medications. The data are somewhat ambiguous for memory loss. But the magnitude of the problem for diabetes becomes much more apparent with careful examination of the data from large clinical trials. Statins have been available since the 1980s but their risk of inducing diabetes did not surface for nearly 20 years. When all the data available from multiple studies was pooled in 2010 for more than 91,000 patients randomly assigned to be treated with a statin or a sugar pill (placebo), the risk of developing diabetes with any statin was one in every 255 patients treated. But this figure is misleading since it includes weaker statins like Pravachol and Mevacor — which were introduced earlier and do not carry any clear-cut risk. It is only with the more potent statins — Zocor (now known as simvastatin), Lipitor (atorvastatin) and Crestor (rosuvastatin) — particularly at higher doses, that the risk of diabetes shows up. The cause and effect was unequivocal because the multiple large trials of the more potent statins had a consistent excess of diabetes. For those statins, the higher the dose, the more diabetes, though we don’t have enough data yet to say with precision at which dose excess diabetes showed up for each drug. What we do know is that diabetes showed up. The numbers increase to one in 167 for patients ta Continue reading >>

The Link Between Statin Drugs, Diabetes And Cholesterol

The Link Between Statin Drugs, Diabetes And Cholesterol

The Link Between Statin Drugs, Diabetes and Cholesterol Is it really type II diabetes or drug-induced hyperglycemia? Several studies prove statin drugs can raise blood sugar levels; Statin drugs send messages to your liver to STOP making any more cholesterolso the liver sends the sugar back OUT to your bloodstream and now you get diagnosed with type II diabetes. Statins deplete vitamin D and reduce the bodys ability to create active vitamin D (calcitriol) a substance that is eventually converted to its active hormone form; Statins reduce cholesterol you must have cholesterol to make vitamin D; Statins also suppress your natural coenzyme Q10 responsible for making energy in every cell in your body, primarily produced in your liver; 99 out of 100 people do NOT need a statin drug; Part of seeing past the drug propaganda is to understand that cholesterol is NOT the cause of heart disease. If your physician is urging you to check your total cholesterol, then you should know that this test will tell you virtually nothing about your risk of heart disease, unless it is 330 or higher. We all know how important antioxidants are to our health and longevity. We also know that diagnosed cases of type II diabetes are currently in epidemic proportions in the U.S. What do those facts have to do with this investigative report? Everything. Coenzyme Q10, for example, is not only a powerful antioxidantit also plays a major role in maintaining healthy blood glucose levels; when youre prescribed a statin drug, it depletes your levels of CoQ10, hence losing the benefit of blood glucoseregulation. Additionally, a study published in the AmericanJournal of Clinical Nutrition determined that raising vitaminD serum levels from 25 to 75 nmol/L can improve insulinsensitivity by a whopping 60 percen Continue reading >>

Statin Side Effects: Weigh The Benefits And Risks

Statin Side Effects: Weigh The Benefits And Risks

Statin side effects can be uncomfortable, making it seem like the risks outweigh the benefits of these powerful cholesterol-lowering medications. Doctors often prescribe statins for people with high cholesterol to lower their total cholesterol and reduce their risk of a heart attack or stroke. While statins are highly effective, they have been linked to muscle pain, digestive problems and mental fuzziness in some people and may rarely cause liver damage. Statins include atorvastatin (Lipitor), fluvastatin (Lescol), lovastatin (Altoprev), pitavastatin (Livalo), pravastatin (Pravachol), rosuvastatin (Crestor) and simvastatin (Zocor). Having too much cholesterol in your blood increases your risk of heart attacks and strokes. Statins block a substance your liver needs to make cholesterol. This causes your liver to remove cholesterol from your blood. If you think you're experiencing side effects from statins, don't just stop taking the pills. Talk to your doctor to see if a change of dosage or even a different type of medication might be helpful. What are statin side effects? Muscle pain and damage One of the most common complaints of people taking statins is muscle pain. You may feel this pain as a soreness, tiredness or weakness in your muscles. The pain can be a mild discomfort, or it can be severe enough to make your daily activities difficult. Oddly enough, most randomized controlled studies of statins indicate that people taking statins develop muscle pain at the same rate as people taking placebo. But up to 29 percent of the people who start taking statins report muscle pain and many discontinue statins because of it. Many of these people do well when they are switched to a different variety of statin. Very rarely, statins can cause life-threatening muscle damage call Continue reading >>

Drug Induced Diabetes

Drug Induced Diabetes

Tweet A number of medications have side effects which include the raising of blood glucose levels. Drug induced diabetes is when use of a specific medication has lead to the development of diabetes. In some cases the development of diabetes may be reversible if use of the medication is discontinued, but in other cases drug-induced diabetes may be permanent. Drug induced diabetes is a form of secondary diabetes, in other words diabetes that is a consequence of having another health condition. Which drugs can induce diabetes? A number of drugs have been linked with an increased risk development of type 2 diabetes. Corticosteroids Thiazide diuretics Beta-blockers Antipsychotics Is diabetes permanent? Diabetes may not be permanent but this can depend on other health factors. With some medications, blood glucose levels may return back to normal once the medication is stopped but, in some cases, the development of diabetes may be permanent. Managing drug induced diabetes If you need to continue taking the medication that has brought on diabetes, it may make your diabetes more difficult to control than would otherwise be the case. If you are able to stop the course of medication, you may find your blood glucose levels become slightly easier to manage. Following a healthy diet and meeting the recommended exercise guidelines will help to improve your chances of managing your blood glucose levels. Can drug induced diabetes be prevented? It may be possible to reduce the risk of developing diabetes by ensuring you to keep to a healthy lifestyle whilst you are on the medication. Being on smaller doses of the medication or shorter periods of time may help to reduce the likelihood of developing high blood sugar levels and diabetes. Doctors will usually try to put you on the smallest e Continue reading >>

Statins May Cause Diabetes

Statins May Cause Diabetes

Cholesterol-lowering drugs, so called statins, may decrease the risk for heart disease somewhat. But they may also lead to side effects, such as: muscle pain, muscle fatigue, disorientation and a lower IQ, fatigue, impotence and so on. One side effect that has long been known is that statins increase the risk of developing diabetes. You could, for example, have read about this on my Swedish blog three years ago and in my Swedish book The Food rEvolution, 2011. Now, a few years later, it’s been added as a “very important” update of the text in the Swedish catalogue of approved drugs, FASS: Diabetes is a possible side effect. Hence another reason not to spread statins far and wide to heart-healthy individuals with “high cholesterol” – which is often defined as 200 mg/dl and above. Most of the healthy population has a total cholesterol number above 200 mg/dl, so this is one of the more obvious cases of disease mongering (the “selling of sickness”) you can imagine. When it comes to heart disease (angina, previous heart attack) the benefit of statin treatment might be worth the risk. But if you treat your normal cholesterol number with statins you risk getting diabetes for no good reason. Does this sound like a good idea? Hardly, but it happens many times every day. Continue reading >>

Statin-induced Diabetes: Will It Change Clinical Practice?

Statin-induced Diabetes: Will It Change Clinical Practice?

Statin-Induced Diabetes: Will It Change Clinical Practice? 1Department of Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas; 2Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Scott and White Hospitals/Texas A&M Health Science Center, Temple, Texas; 3Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, and Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Houston, Texas. Corresponding author: Christie M. Ballantyne, [email protected] . Author information Copyright and License information Copyright 2009 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. See the article " Statin Therapy and Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis " in volume 32 onpage1924. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. An increase in the incidence of physician-diagnosed diabetes with rosuvastatin in Justification for the Use of Statins in Primary Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) published recently revived clinical interest in the effects of statins on glycemic control. The study showed that, after almost 2 years of follow-up in men and women with elevated levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein but average LDL cholesterol, rosuvastatin therapy was associated with a mild but significant increase in the identification of new-onset diabetes (3% in the statin arm, 2.4% in the placebo arm; P < 0.01) ( 1 ). The potential association between statin use and new-onset diabetes gained attention in 2001 when a post hoc analysis of another primary prevention statin trial, the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS), reported that trea Continue reading >>

Side Effects Prompt Patients To Stop Cholesterol Drugs

Side Effects Prompt Patients To Stop Cholesterol Drugs

With one-quarter of adults over age 45 taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, it figures that more than a few people would have trouble sticking with the program. More than a few, actually. A big new study of statin use in the real world found that 17 percent of patients taking the pills reported side effects, including muscle pain, nausea, and problems with their liver or nervous system. That's a lot higher than the 5 to 10 percent reported in the randomized controlled trials that provided evidence for regulatory approval of the medicines. This study, which was published in Annals of Internal Medicine, looked at more than 100,000 people who'd been prescribed statins from 2000 through 2008 at two academic medical centers. About two-thirds of people with side effects quit taking statins. All in all, half of all the people who been prescribed the drugs quit them at last temporarily. Twenty percent quit for more than a year. It's tough to get people to take medicine to reduce the odds of disease years from now, notes Dr. Scott Grundy, a cholesterol researcher at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. "The vast majority of people don't have side effects," he wrote in an editorial accompanying the study. "Not continuing the drug has a lot more to do with people just not wanting to take drugs for a lifetime." People have decidedly mixed feelings about the side effects associated with statins, according to a 2012 NPR-Truven Health Analytics poll. The worry, of course, is that the ranks of statin quitters include people at high risk of heart disease, for whom the daily dose of cholesterol-lowering drug can reduce the risk of deadly heart attacks. "Statins are important drugs, especially for patients with known heart disease," says Dr. Alexander Turchin, an assistant profe Continue reading >>

What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About The Statin And Diabetes Connection

What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About The Statin And Diabetes Connection

Q. What is the relationship between long-term statin use (specifically atorvastatin) and adult-onset type 2 diabetes? Lipitor was prescribed for me in 1998 and has successfully lowered my cholesterol. In the past year my blood sugar went up substantially, and I’ve experienced preliminary symptoms of diabetes. I have no risk factors: my weight is normal and I walk at least two miles a day with additional daily weight-bearing exercise. I have no family history of diabetes. My diet is primarily Mediterranean because I’m married to a Sicilian. It’s a little high in carbs but low in red meat and high in seafood and plant proteins. I’ve stopped taking the statin. Will my metabolism return to normal? The Statin and Diabetes Connection A. In 2003 we started getting questions from readers about elevated blood sugar as a side effect of Lipitor. One of the first questions was the following (published in our syndicated newspaper column on 1/20/2003): “Recently, our physician prescribed Lipitor for my husband and myself. We both have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. We both take Glyburide and my husband takes Avandia as well. “Since we started on Lipitor, our blood sugar has been rising rapidly. My husband asked the doctor about changing to Tricor, but he was told it would not help him much and he should stay with Lipitor. It seems that Lipitor is affecting our blood sugar. Is this possible?” We contacted University of California, San Diego, statin researcher Beatrice Golomb, MD, PhD. Dr. Golomb responded: “There are two studies that have shown unexpected significant increases in blood sugar or in hemoglobin A1C (which is an index of blood sugar over time) with statin use. Though increases are modest on average, some people appear to experience more considerable Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed In Just Four Months, Trial Shows

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed In Just Four Months, Trial Shows

Type 2 diabetes can be reversed in just four months, trial shows Lifestyle changes coupled with drugs reversed diabetes in 40 per cent of patients in just four monthsCredit:Alamy Type 2 diabetes can be reversed in just four months by cutting calories, exercising and keeping glucose under control, a trial has shown. Although the condition is considered to be chronic, requiring a lifetime of medication , Canadian researchers proved it was possible to restore insulin production for 40 per cent of patients. The treatment plan involved creating a personalised exercise regime for each trial participant and reducing their calories by between 500 and 750 a day. The participants also met regularly with a nurse and dietician to track progress and continued to take medication and insulin to manage their blood sugar levels. After just four months, 40 per cent of patients were able to stop taking their medication because their bodies had begun to produce adequate amounts of insulin again. Encouraging exercise and cutting calories allowed the pancreas to rest, scientists believeCredit:Getty The researchers at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, said the programme worked because it gavethe insulin-producing pancreas a rest. "The research might shift the paradigm of treating diabetes from simply controlling glucose to an approach where we induce remission and then monitor patients for any signs of relapse," said the study's first author, Dr Natalia McInnes, of McMaster. "The idea of reversing the disease is very appealing to individuals with diabetes. It motivates them to make significant lifestyle changes. This likely gives the pancreas a rest and decreases fat stores in the body, which in turn improves insulin production and effectiveness." The number of people in the UK with ty Continue reading >>

Statins And Diabetes

Statins And Diabetes

Statins, the group of cholesterol-lowering drugs that includes atorvastatin (brand name Lipitor), simvastatin (Zocor), and rosuvastatin (Crestor), have been under increased scrutiny during the last couple of years as studies have linked them to an elevated risk of Type 2 diabetes. Most recently, as David Spero noted in a January blog post here at DiabetesSelfManagement.com, a study of statins in postmenopausal women found a 48% higher risk of diabetes among women who took one of these drugs compared with those who did not. Since this was not a randomized clinical trial, its results are not conclusive. But enough studies have raised concerns that last week, as a New York Times opinion piece notes, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) added a warning on diabetes risk to the label of all statins. As the Times piece explains, statins are the most widely prescribed drugs in the world, and they have been in use since the 1980’s. But more powerful statins have achieved widespread use only in the last decade or so, and it appears that these drugs are associated with the greatest diabetes risk. With 20 million Americans taking statins and an estimated risk of developing diabetes from the drugs of 1 in 200, 100,000 people could have diabetes as a result of these drugs. Furthermore, the piece notes, among people without existing heart disease who take statins, the drugs prevent only one heart attack or stroke for every 50 people taking them. Although it is clear from those numbers that statins provide no overwhelming heart-risk reduction or diabetes-risk increase to most people who take them, it is also clear that the heart-related benefit from these drugs is statistically greater than their diabetes-related risk. One particular study, published last year in the Journal of Continue reading >>

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