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Can Soda Lead To Diabetes?

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

Do Diet Sodas Cause Diabetes?

I’m confused by news that drinks containing artificial sweeteners can lead to diabetes. I know you advise against the use of artificial sweeteners, but does this study mean that we should drink “regular” instead of diet sodas? You will be much better off not drinking any sodas at all. The results of the study connecting artificial sweeteners with metabolic syndrome, a collection of conditions that together dramatically increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes, by no means vindicate sugar. Instead, they suggest that artificial sweeteners are as bad for health as too much sugar. The study, from Israel, showed that artificial sweeteners altered the collection of bacteria (known as the microbiome) in the digestive tract in a way that caused blood glucose levels to rise higher than expected and to fall more slowly than they otherwise would. This finding may solve the longstanding mystery of why drinking artificially sweetened diet sodas doesn’t lead to weight loss. It also strongly suggests that the use of artificial sweeteners has been contributing to the worldwide obesity epidemic and rising rates of type 2 diabetes. To arrive at their conclusions, the Israeli researchers gave 10-week old mice water sweetened with saccharin, sucralose or aspartame, plain water, or sugar-sweetened water. After one week, the mice that received the artificially sweetened water had developed glucose intolerance, the first step on the path to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. With glucose intolerance, the body cannot easily handle large amounts of sugar. The researchers next gave the mice antibiotics, which killed the bacteria in the animals’ digestive systems. The glucose intolerance disappeared, supporting the hypothesis that this condition is caused by a change Continue reading >>

How Soda Raises Your Risk Of Prediabetes | Men's Health

How Soda Raises Your Risk Of Prediabetes | Men's Health

Chugging too much soda wont just give you a gut: Soda might also raise your risk of developing prediabetes as well, a new study published in The Journal of Nutrition suggests. In a study of over 1,600 people, those who drank regular soda more than 3 times a week were 46 percent more likely to develop prediabetes a disease where your blood sugar is elevated, but not quite at the diabetes thresholdover a 14-year period than those who didnt drink any of the beverage. Even just one 12-ounce can of soda more than three times a week is enough to raise your health risk. This link between soda and prediabetes persisted even after the researchers adjusted for potential factors that may be skewing the relationship, like calorie consumption, physical activity levels, and body mass indexes (BMI). (Here are 15 ways to cut hundreds of calories a day .) One possible reason is that the sugar content of regular soda may overwhelm the drinkers system with excess glucose and fructose, says lead study author Nicola McKeown, Ph.D., of Tufts University. The extra sugar rush raises the amount of sugar in your body in the short-term. But it can also mess with your system long-term, by changing the way the pancreas releases insulin, a hormone that allows your body to absorb glucose for energy. As a result, you can develop insulin resistance, a condition where your body needs higher and higher amounts of insulin to function, says McKeown. When your body cant churn out enough insulin to keep up with that demand, the glucose builds up in your blood, and you can develop prediabetes, and eventually diabetes . Diet soda, on the other hand, doesnt contain sugar, which may be why the study saw no link between the consumption of that kind of soft drink and prediabetes risk. (Still, other research has f Continue reading >>

One Sugar-sweetened Soda A Day Boosts Diabetes Risk

One Sugar-sweetened Soda A Day Boosts Diabetes Risk

One Sugar-Sweetened Soda A Day Boosts Diabetes Risk All it takes is one can of soda to increase risk of type 2 diabetes by 22%, according to a new study. In the study published in Diabetologia, researchers studied diet and drinking habits of about 28,500 people from Britain, Germany , Denmark,Italy, Spain , Sweden,France, Italy, and the Netherlands over a period of 15 years. Those who consumed a 12 oz serving of a sugared-beverage on average daily about the size of a soda can had a greater risk of developing diabetes compared to people who drank a can once a month or less. (MORE: Sugary Beverages Linked to 180,000 Deaths Worldwide ) The results are in line with other data from the U.S. that linked sugar-sweetened beverages like sodas and fruit juices with an increased risk of heart disease and diabetes. But the relationship is still an association, and does not establish that sugared beverages cause diabetes. The reason for the connection reflects the complex interaction among eating habits, body weight and other metabolic factors that contribute to the disease. In the current analysis, for example, the increased risk of diabetes only appeared among those drinking sugared sodas daily, and not among those who consumed fruit juices. But the association remained even after the scientists took into account the participantsbody mass index (BMI) and the total amount of calories they ate in a day, they still recorded an 18% increased risk of type 2 diabetes among the frequent soda drinkers. That suggests that the contribution of sugared drinks to diabetes risk may extend beyond its effect on weight the researchers found that even those who drank artificially sweetened soft drinks appeared to show an increased risk of diabetes, which disappeared once they adjusted for the infl Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease marked by higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. It is caused by the body’s inability to produce or use insulin, a hormone that acts to move glucose out of the blood and into cells to be used as energy. There are two types of diabetes: • Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes, is an autoimmune disease in which the body does not produce the hormone insulin. There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes, which represents 5% of diabetes cases. • Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, representing about 95% of all diabetes cases. It usually begins with insulin resistance, where the body does not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But over time, the pancreas loses its ability to produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar at normal levels. Type 2 diabetes is preventable. Prediabetes, also referred to as impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose, is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. People with prediabetes have a much higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, as well as an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Without intervention efforts, up to 30 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years5, and up to 70 percent will develop diabetes within their lifetime6. A 2016 study by UCLA found 13 million adults (46 percent of all adults in California) to have prediabetes or undiagnosed diabetes. An additional 2.5 million adults have diagnosed diabetes. Altogether, 15.5 million adults (55 percent of all California adults) have prediabetes or diabetes.7 Liquid sugar is a unique driver of today’s skyrocketing type 2 diabetes and obes Continue reading >>

Can Diet Soda Cause Diabetes?

Can Diet Soda Cause Diabetes?

Susan B. Sloane, BS, RPh, CDE, has been a registered pharmacist for more than 20 years and a Certified Diabetes Educator for more than 15 years. Her two sons were diagnosed with diabetes, and since then, she has been dedicated to promoting wellness and optimal outcomes as a patient advocate, information expert, educator, and corporate partner. Diet soda has become a staple in the American meal. There are virtually no calories in diet soft-drinks, so we can have as much as we want, right? Well, according to many current published studies, not so fast. Diet soda seems to be one factor in the obesity epidemic and in the development of diabetes. Wait, you say — it's chocolate cake, pizza, and even bread…but don't take away my diet soda! Studies have postulated several mechanisms for the increased risk of diabetes from consumption of diet soda. One ingredient in some diet soda, aspartame, has been shown to be metabolized in a way that potentially causes insulin production to increase too much. Aspartame is a protein derived from phenylalanine and aspartic acid, two proteins that when combined, taste sweet. It is also theorized that because diet soda tastes so sweet, it changes our cravings, making us actually want to eat things that taste sweet. Therefore, consuming more diet soda would prompt us to consume more calories, and not healthy calories. I myself have always thought I tend to eat more food if I have soda as a beverage. If I drink water at a meal, for example, I do tend to eat less. Try it and see for yourself! Another reason to avoid soda would be that soda is acidic in nature and generally not great for the stomach, especially if you suffer from reflux. Let's not forget that diet cola and other drinks can have a considerable amount of caffeine, which can raise Continue reading >>

Even If You're Lean, 1 Soda Per Day Ups Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Even If You're Lean, 1 Soda Per Day Ups Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

It's true that being overweight or obese is a leading risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes. But attention, skinny and normal-weight people: You may be vulnerable, too. Lots of lifestyle choices influence the risk of diabetes: everything from whether you smoke to how much you exercise (or don't). It turns out, what you choose to drink is also a risk factor. A new study published in the British Medical Journal finds that people in the habit of drinking one sugar-sweetened beverage — such as a soda or sweetened tea — every day had an 18 percent increased risk of developing the disease over a decade. That's compared with people who steer clear of sugary beverages. The researchers reached this estimate by pooling data from 17 previously published studies that had evaluated the link between sugary drinks and diabetes risk. And here's what upends conventional thinking: After the researchers adjusted their estimates for body weight, they found that — even for thin or normal-weight people — one sugary drink per day was associated with a 13 percent increased risk. "So even if people are lean, if they continue consuming sugar-sweetened beverages, they have a greater likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes," study author Fumiaki Imamura, of the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, told us. The studies he looked at were observational, so they can't prove cause and effect. But the link between sugary drinks and diabetes is solid, since researchers say they understand the biological mechanisms of how too much sugar can overwork the endocrine system. As we've reported, big soda companies including Coca-Cola and Pepsi have agreed to market more water and low-calorie beverages. And they've pledged to cut back on portions, too. But it's not clear that making Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Too Much Soda Pop Increase Diabetes Risk? If So, How?

Can Drinking Too Much Soda Pop Increase Diabetes Risk? If So, How?

WHILE many people, some health professionals included, believe that consuming too much sugar causes diabetes, the American Diabetes Association and the scientific community at large have been trying for years to set the record straight. Sugar and other carbohydrates must be limited once a person develops diabetes, they say, but sugar itself doesn't cause the disease; excess weight and physical inactivity are the big lifestyle culprits. Now comes a report that makes the scientific consensus look incorrect and the commonly held "myth" look like reality. In yet another look at tens of thousands of women participating in the Nurses' Health Study, researchers at Harvard have found that those who drank at least one sugary soft drink a day, including fruit punch (as opposed to actual fruit juice) were at about twice the risk for developing adult onset, or type 2, diabetes as those who drank soda pop and other sweetened beverages less often than once a month. The media immediately picked up on it. "Study Links Sugar-Sweetened Soft Drinks and Diabetes" was the way the headline read in the Wall Street Journal. Other news outlets took a similar tack. Is it true? Does sugar, sweet soft drinks in particular, lead to diabetes development? The answer is yes, but no. As the. investigators themselves point out, the women who drank the most soda pop, specifically, those who increased their non-diet soda pop consumption over time, gained significantly more weight than women for whom soda was not a dietary mainstay. They put on more than 10 pounds in 4 years. In other words, much of the increase in diabetes risk came from weight gain rather than sugary beverages per se. Comments Karmeen Kulkarni, MS, RD, president-elect for Health Care and Education for the American Diabetes Association, " Continue reading >>

Soft Drinks And Disease

Soft Drinks And Disease

Soft drinks are the beverage of choice for millions of Americans, but sugary drinks increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and other chronic conditions. People who consume sugary drinks regularly—1 to 2 cans a day or more—have a 26% greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than people who rarely have such drinks. (46) A study that followed 40,000 men for two decades found that those who averaged one can of a sugary beverage per day had a 20% higher risk of having a heart attack or dying from a heart attack than men who rarely consumed sugary drinks. (47) A related study in women found a similar sugary beverage–heart disease link. (48) A 22-year-long study of 80,000 women found that those who consumed a can a day of sugary drink had a 75% higher risk of gout than women who rarely had such drinks. (49) Researchers found a similarly-elevated risk in men. (50) Dr. Frank Hu, Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, recently made a strong case that there is sufficient scientific evidence that decreasing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption will reduce the prevalence of obesity and obesity-related diseases. (51) Video: Watch Dr. Walter Willett discuss sugary drinks and health risks. Soft drinks and diabetes Strong evidence indicates that sugar-sweetened soft drinks contribute to the development of diabetes. The Nurses’ Health Study explored this connection by following the health of more than 90,000 women for eight years. The nurses who said they had one or more servings a day of a sugar-sweetened soft drink or fruit punch were twice as likely to have developed type 2 diabetes during the study than those who rarely had these beverages. (52) Learn more about diabetes. A similar increase in risk of diabetes with increasi Continue reading >>

Daily Soda May Raise Diabetes Risk

Daily Soda May Raise Diabetes Risk

Drinking just one 12-ounce soda a day may increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes, a new study from Europe suggests. In the study, people who drank a 12-ounce sugar-sweetened soda daily were 18 percent more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes over a 16-year period compared with those who did not consume soda. And people who drank two sodas daily were 18 percent more likely to have a stroke than those who drank one; those who drank three sodas daily saw the same risk increase compared with those who drank two, and so on. The results held even after the researchers took into account risk factors for Type 2 diabetes such as age and physical activity levels, body mass index (BMI) and the total daily calorie intake. The findings agree with earlier studies in the United States, which found daily soda consumption increased the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 25 percent. However, the study found only an association, and cannot prove soda consumption causes Type 2 diabetes. It's possible other factors not accounted for by the study influenced the disease risk. In addition, participants answered questions about their diet just once at the study's start, and it's possible they changed their diets over time, the researchers said. The researchers analyzed information from about 12,000 people who developed Type 2 diabetes between 1991 and 2007, and a randomly selected group of about 15,000 people, most of whom did not develop diabetes. All participants were taking part in a larger study looking into the interaction between diet, environmental factors and the risk of cancer and chronic diseases conducted in eight European countries. People who drank one or more glasses of sugar-sweetened soda a day were about 30 percent more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those who drank less than one Continue reading >>

How Soda Impacts Diabetes Risk

How Soda Impacts Diabetes Risk

Sweetened sodas are hugely popular throughout America. Because they are consumed in such volume, any negative health effects should be thoroughly investigated. In this article, we ask whether soda does indeed increase the risk of diabetes. The average can of soda is roughly 20 ounces and contains 15-18 teaspoons of sugar and more than 240 calories. These high levels of quick-digesting carbs do not lower calorie intake at mealtimes. In other words, they are an addition to the daily calorie intake, rather than a replacement. In modern society, the effects of this excessive energy intake are worsened by people's lower levels of physical activity. Because of sedentary lifestyles, the energy sodas provide is often not needed and is stored in the body instead. Contents of this article: Here are some key points about soda and diabetes. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Although there is a link between diabetes and soda consumption, the reasons why are still unclear Soda that is cola-flavored my carry additional risks Some studies show a relationship between excess soda in the diet and heart problems Soda and diabetes People who drink one, two, or more cans of soda a day are much more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than people who rarely drink soda. In fact, according to a study published in 2010, the risk of developing diabetes is 26 percent higher for people who have one or more sugary drinks each day. Young adults and Asians who consume one or more sweetened drinks daily are at an even greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. How does drinking sweetened drinks lead to diabetes? Drinking too many sweetened drinks means that the body stores excess energy in the form fat, so, drinking too much soda can play a part in people becoming overweight Continue reading >>

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Is Diet Soda Safe For Diabetes?

Managing blood sugar levels is an everyday goal for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While eating sugar doesn’t cause either type of diabetes, keeping tabs on carbohydrate and sugar intake is an important part of managing both types of diabetes. Eating healthfully can also reduce your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is linked to the development of type 2 diabetes. In fact, obesity is one of the leading causes of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of American adults are considered obese. Obesity puts you at risk for diabetes, as well as other troublesome conditions. Eating processed foods that are high in sugar, unhealthy fats, and empty calories increases your risk of gaining too much weight. Drinking sugary drinks is also a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. If you are working to keep your blood sugar in check or manage your weight, you might choose diet soda. Low in calories and sugar, diet sodas appear to be a good alternative to sugary drinks. Diet coke and A&W’s diet root beer, for example, claim to be entirely sugar-free. Unfortunately, even though they contain no actual sugar, they are loaded with artificial sweeteners and other unhealthy additives. At one time, there was much debate over the safety of artificial sweeteners. Many feared that these sweeteners caused certain types of cancer. Studies performed in the 1970s suggested that the artificial sweetener saccharin was linked to bladder cancer. Since that time, however, saccharin has been deemed safe. Both the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) consider the sweetener nontoxic. Aspartame, another common yet controversial sweetener, has also gained clearance fo Continue reading >>

Sugary Drinks May Raise Diabetes Risk

Sugary Drinks May Raise Diabetes Risk

(ISTOCKPHOTO) Drinking colas and other sugary drinks is tied to an increased risk of pre-diabetes, but diet soda is not, a recent study suggests. Previous studies on the link between diet sodas and diabetes have been mixed; some research pointing to a potential connection has suggested this relationship may be explained at least in part by soda drinkers being overweight or obese. In the new study, however, adults who routinely consumed at least one can of soda or other sugar-sweetened beverages a day were 46 percent more likely to develop elevated blood-sugar levels than people who rarely or never drink cola. “Emphasis should be placed on substituting sugar-sweetened beverages with water, unsweetened teas or coffee,” said senior study author Nicola McKeown, a nutrition researcher at Tufts University in Boston. “For daily consumers of sugary drinks, kicking the habit may be a difficult challenge, and incorporating an occasional diet soda, while increasing fluids from other sources, may be the best strategy to ultimately remove sugar-sweetened beverages from the diet,” McKeown added by email. Globally, about 1 in 9 adults have diabetes, and the disease will be the seventh-leading cause of death by 2030, according to the World Health Organization. Most of these people have Type 2, or adult-onset, diabetes, which happens when the body can’t properly use or make enough of the hormone insulin to convert blood sugar into energy. People with blood sugar levels that are slightly elevated, but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis, are sometimes described as having “pre-diabetes” because many will go on to develop diabetes. In the current study, researchers examined data collected on 1,685 middle-aged adults over about 14 years. At the start of the study, none of Continue reading >>

Two Diet Drinks A Day Could Double The Risk Of Diabetes, Study Finds

Two Diet Drinks A Day Could Double The Risk Of Diabetes, Study Finds

Two diet drinks a day could double the risk of diabetes, study finds Diet drinks were linked with a raised risk of diabetesCredit:John Taylor Two fizzy drinks a day could double the risk of diabetes - even if they are diet versions -a Swedish study has found. Research by the Karolinska Institute on 2,800 adults found that those who consumed at least two 200ml servings of soft drinks daily were 2.4 times as likely to suffer from a form of type 2 diabetes. Many fizzy drinks are sold in 330ml cans, meaning that one and a half cans would be enough to double the risk. Those who drank a litre of such drinks saw a 10-fold rise in their chance of suffering from the condition. The increased risks were the same regardless of whether the drinks were sugary or artificially sweetened, the research published in the European Journal of Endocrinology found. Researchers said the sugary drinks may have induced insulin resistance, triggering the cases of diabetes. The new research examined links between soft drink consumption and diabetesCredit:Frank Augstein/AP The artificial sweeteners in the diet drinks may stimulate and distort appetite, they said, increasing food intake, and encouraging a sweet tooth. Such sweeteners might also affect microbes in the gut leading to glucose intolerance. The research was a retrospective study, which relied on participants to recall their diet habits. Josefin Edwall Lfvenborg, lead author, said soft drinks might influence glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, leading to the increased risk of latent auto-immune diabetes, a form of type 2 diabetes. In this study we were surprised by the increased risk in developing autoimmune diabetes by drinking soft drinks, he said. We next plan on investigating what could counter this risk. More research was nee Continue reading >>

Can Too Much Soda Lead To Diabetic Amputations?

Can Too Much Soda Lead To Diabetic Amputations?

Can Too Much Soda Lead to Diabetic Amputations? The New York City Department of Health is raising eyebrows with its provocative new public-service ad linking type 2 diabetes and growing portion sizes. Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2012 Globs of fat pouring out of soda bottles, bloodied drinkers slumped on the sidewalk: When it comes to their public-service ads, the New York City Department of Health has gotten a reputation for its brash, in-your-face attitude (much like the city it serves). In its latest campaign, the department is highlighting the connection between type 2 diabetes , portion sizes, and obesity. And, like a recent Georgia campaign against childhood obesity , the New York ad is causing lots of controversy. In the ad, three full soda cups small, medium, and large are arranged in size order, with a diagonal line labeling them as "then" (the smallest cup) to "now" (the largest). In the background sits an overweight man whose right leg has been amputated at the knee; his crutches lean against the wall behind him. In arresting capital letters, a red banner imposed over the image reads, "Portions Have Grown: So Has Type 2 Diabetes, Which Can Lead to Amputations." Thomas Farley, the city's health commissioner, is making no apologies for the arresting ad. "These are hard-hitting images because we really felt we need to drive home a point that large portions are not completely benign," he told Reuters . The campaign's overall message is that reducing portion sizes can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes , which is linked to obesity and poor eating habits (unlike type 1 diabetes). It's true that portion sizes Continue reading >>

One Can Of Soda A Day Raises Diabetes Risk, Study Suggests

One Can Of Soda A Day Raises Diabetes Risk, Study Suggests

Shutterstock By: Rachael Rettner, MyHealthNewsDaily Senior Writer Published: 04/24/2013 06:05 PM EDT on MyHealthNewsDaily Drinking just one 12-ounce soda a day may increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes, a new study from Europe suggests. In the study, people who drank a 12-ounce sugar-sweetened soda daily were 18 percent more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes over a 16-year period compared with those who did not consume soda. And people who drank two sodas daily were 18 percent more likely to have a stroke than those who drank one; those who drank three sodas daily saw the same risk increase compared with those who drank two, and so on. The results held even after the researchers took into account risk factors for Type 2 diabetes such as age and physical activity levels, body mass index (BMI) and the total daily calorie intake. The findings agree with earlier studies in the United States, which found daily soda consumption increased the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 25 percent. However, the study found only an association, and cannot prove soda consumption causes Type 2 diabetes. It’s possible other factors not accounted for by the study influenced the disease risk. In addition, participants answered questions about their diet just once at the study’s start, and it’s possible they changed their diets over time, the researchers said. The researchers analyzed information from about 12,000 people who developed Type 2 diabetes between 1991 and 2007, and a randomly selected group of about 15,000 people, most of whom did not develop diabetes. All participants were taking part in a larger study looking into the interaction between diet, environmental factors and the risk of cancer and chronic diseases conducted in eight European countries. People who drank one or more glasses Continue reading >>

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