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Can Pregnancy Cause Your Blood Sugar To Rise?

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Home » About Diabetes » Pregnancy » Gestational Diabetes Gestational Diabetes Gestational diabetes is the type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Like other forms od diabetes, gestational diabetes affects the way the body uses the glucose [sugar] in the blood and as a result the blood sugars rise too high. The glucose in the blood is the body’s main source of energy. If gestational diabetes is untreated or uncontrolled, it can result in a variety of health problems for both that mother and baby. So it is important that a treatment plan is worked out to keep blood sugars within the normal range. The good news is that controlling blood sugars can help to ensure a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. Signs and Symptoms Most women do not have any signs or symptoms of gestational diabetes but your healthcare professional will check for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. When signs and symptoms do occur they include: Excessive thirst Increased urination. About 3 to 5% of all pregnant women develop gestational diabetes. The Causes of Gestational Diabetes Normal metabolism Normally during digestion the body breaks down the carbohydrates you eat into simple sugars [glucose] and this glucose is absorbed into the blood and transported around the body by the blood vessel system to provide the energy needed for all our activities. This process cannot take place without insulin. Insulin is produced in the pancreas, a gland behind the stomach, and helps the glucose to pass into the cells to provide energy and maintains normal levels of glucose in the blood. The liver also plays a part in maintaining normal blood glucose levels. When there is more glucose in the cells than your body needs for energy, it is removed from the blood and stored it in the liver Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes does not increase the risk of birth defects or the risk that the baby will be diabetic at birth. Also called gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), this type of diabetes affects between 3% and 20% of pregnant women. It presents with a rise in blood glucose (sugar) levels toward the end of the 2nd and 3rd trimester of pregnancy. In 90% if cases, it disappears after the birth, but the mother is at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. Cause It occurs when cells become resistant to the action of insulin, which is naturally caused during pregnancy by the hormones of the placenta. In some women, the pancreas is not able to secrete enough insulin to counterbalance the effect of these hormones, causing hyperglycemia, then diabetes. Symptoms Pregnant women generally have no apparent diabetes symptoms. Sometimes, these symptoms occur: Unusual fatigue Excessive thirst Increase in the volume and frequency of urination Headaches Importance of screening These symptoms can go undetected because they are very common in pregnant women. Women at risk Several factors increase the risk of developing gestational diabetes: Being over 35 years of age Being overweight Family members with type 2 diabetes Having previously given birth to a baby weighing more than 4 kg (9 lb) Gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy Belonging to a high-risk ethnic group (Aboriginal, Latin American, Asian or African) Having had abnormally high blood glucose (sugar) levels in the past, whether a diagnosis of glucose intolerance or prediabetes Regular use of a corticosteroid medication Suffering from ancanthosis nigricans, a discoloration of the skin, often darkened patches on the neck or under the arms Screening The Canadian Diabetes Association 2013 Clinical Practice Gui Continue reading >>

Higher Blood Sugar In Early Pregnancy Raises Babys Heart-defect Risk

Higher Blood Sugar In Early Pregnancy Raises Babys Heart-defect Risk

Higher blood sugar in early pregnancy raises babys heart-defect risk Elevated maternal blood sugar when the fetal heart is forming has been linked to a heightened risk for congenital heart defects, according to a new Stanford study. Higher blood sugar early in pregnancy raises the babys risk of a congenital heart defect, even among mothers who do not have diabetes, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine . The study was published online Dec. 15 in The Journal of Pediatrics . For many years, physicians have known that women with diabetes face an increased risk of giving birth to babies with heart defects. Some studies have also suggested a link between nondiabetic mothers blood sugar levels and babies heart defect risk. However, the new study is the first to examine this question in the earliest part of pregnancy, when the fetal heart is forming. Most women who have a child with congenital heart disease are not diabetic, said the studys senior author, James Priest , MD, assistant professor of pediatric cardiology. We found that in women who dont already have diabetes or develop diabetes during pregnancy, we can still measure risk for having a child with congenital heart disease by looking at their glucose values during the first trimester of pregnancy. The studys lead author is Emmi Helle, MD, PhD, an affiliate in pediatric cardiology and former postdoctoral scholar. One challenge associated with conducting the research was the fact that maternal blood glucose is not routinely measured in nondiabetic pregnant women. Instead, women typically receive an oral glucose tolerance test halfway through pregnancy to determine whether they have gestational diabetes, but this test is performed well after the fetal heart has formed. We Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar During Pregnancy

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar During Pregnancy

At some point during your pregnancy, your obstetrician will hand over a small bottle of a sugary flavored drink and ask you to down it just before you come to your next appointment. Within about 60 minutes of taking the drink, you'll have a blood sample taken. This is the glucose screening test for gestational diabetes, or high blood sugar during pregnancy. Between two and 10 of every 100 pregnant women in the United States develop gestational diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly every pregnant woman under a doctor’s care will take this test because, in some cases, it won’t present visible symptoms. Video of the Day The tricky part about gestational diabetes is that while a pregnant woman is dealing with nausea, backaches, headaches and all the other symptoms of a normal pregnancy, symptoms of increased blood sugar won't necessarily be apparent, notes the Texas Children's Hospital website. However, you could experience blurred vision, fatigue, increased thirst and urination, nausea or vomiting, frequent infections or weight loss despite an increased appetite. Risk Factors for Gestational Diabetes Due to the typical lack of symptoms, doctors test nearly everyone for gestational diabetes between 24 and 28 weeks. However, if you are considered high-risk for high blood sugar, your doctor might also screen you at your first prenatal appointment. Those who are considered high risk include women who are obese, have had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, have a family history of diabetes, previously gave birth to a big baby or one with a birth defect, have high blood pressure or are over age 35. Taking the glucose screening test, despite an absence of symptoms, is important for all pregnant women because of the effect high Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

Do Pregnancy Hormones Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Do Pregnancy Hormones Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Just for women, but men can learn from this too ! Pregnant? If you’ve been wondering if pregnancy hormones will affect blood sugar levels, the answer is yes, says the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The placenta is a flat, circular organ that links the unborn baby to the mother’s uterus during pregnancy. It produces several contrainsulin hormones, such as estrogen, progesterone, prolacin and human placental lactogen. The production of these hormones, along with increased levels of cortisol, can affect your body’s sensitivity to insulin, whether it is produced by your body, injection or pump. Although these hormones are essential to a healthy pregnancy, this hormonal “aggravation,” along with weight gain as your pregnancy progresses, can contribute to a rise in blood glucose levels, especially after the 18th week, says the ADA. The best way to ensure your glucose levels are under control is to know where they’re at all times. The ADA recommends frequent self-glucose monitoring (up to eight times a day when you are pregnant) to help identify changes in blood glucose levels. This will help you and your diabetes health team make necessary changes for the best blood glucose control throughout your pregnancy. Reprinted from 101 Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy with Diabetes by Patti B. Geil and Laura B. Heironymus. Copyright by the American Diabetes Association. Continue reading >>

Insulin Changes During Pregnancy

Insulin Changes During Pregnancy

Insulin requirements tend to change constantly throughout pregnancy as different hormones take effect and your baby grows. You need to be prepared to adjust your insulin doses on a regular basis. It is not uncommon to need to make adjustments to your dose at least once a week. If you are not sure how to adjust your insulin doses, ask your diabetes in pregnancy team for advice. Adjusting insulin doses in pregnancy is more challenging than usual, so make sure you know how to get in touch with your diabetes team and be prepared to contact them more often. Early pregnancy changes Many women find it extremely challenging to maintain optimal blood glucose levels in the early stage of pregnancy with so many hormonal and physical changes occurring. For around the first six to eight weeks of pregnancy your blood glucose levels may be more unstable. Following these early pregnancy changes to your blood glucose levels, you may find that your insulin requirements decrease until the end of the first trimester. You may need to adjust your insulin doses at this time to reduce the risk of severe hypos occurring, sometimes without much (or any) warning. Preventing a hypo is better than treating one. Try not to miss any meals or snacks and check your blood glucose levels regularly. Mid to late pregnancy changes From the second trimester of pregnancy, especially after 18 weeks your insulin requirements will usually start to rise. By around 30 weeks you may need as much as two or three times your daily pre- pregnancy insulin dose. This is because the hormones made by the placenta interfere with the way your insulin normally works - as the pregnancy hormones rise, so does your need for insulin. At this stage you are likely to need more mealtime, rapid-acting insulin, compared with the long- Continue reading >>

Do Pregnancy Hormones Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Do Pregnancy Hormones Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Do Pregnancy Hormones Affect Blood Sugar Levels? Pregnant? If youve been wondering if pregnancy hormones will affect blood sugar levels, the answer is yes, says the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The placenta is a flat, circular organ that links the unborn baby to the mothers uterus during pregnancy. It produces several contrainsulin hormones, such as estrogen, progesterone, prolacin and human placental lactogen. The production of these hormones, along with increased levels of cortisol, can affect your bodys sensitivity to insulin, whether it is produced by your body, injection or pump. Although these hormones are essential to a healthy pregnancy, this hormonal aggravation, along with weight gain as your pregnancy progresses, can contribute to a rise in blood glucose levels, especially after the 18th week, says the ADA. The best way to ensure your glucose levels are under control is to know where theyre at all times. The ADA recommends frequent self-glucose monitoring (up to eight times a day when you are pregnant) to help identify changes in blood glucose levels. This will help you and your diabetes health team make necessary changes for the best blood glucose control throughout your pregnancy. Reprinted from 101 Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy with Diabetes by Patti B. Geil and Laura B. Heironymus. Copyright by the American Diabetes Association. Used by permission. All rights reserved. If you spend time on social media, why not get your diabetes tips there also? Lifescript has just launched a dedicated type 2 diabetes Facebook page that will offer diabetes tips, recipes, inspiration and more. Youll get advice, find friends, and discover solutions to everyday living. Come join us! Thanks for signing up for our newsletter! You should see it in your inbox very soon. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a condition in which the body can't produce enough insulin, or it can't use it properly. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose (sugar) to enter the cells to be used as fuel. When glucose cannot enter the cells, it builds up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia or high blood sugar. Damage from diabetes comes from the effects of hyperglycemia on other organ systems including the eyes, kidneys, heart, blood vessels, and nerves. In early pregnancy, hyperglycemia can result in birth defects. What are the different types of diabetes? There are three basic types of diabetes including: Type 1 diabetes. Also called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Type 1 diabetes usually develops in children or young adults, but can start at any age. Type 2 diabetes. A metabolic disorder resulting from the body's inability to make enough, or properly use, insulin. It used to be called noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Gestational diabetes. A condition in which the blood glucose level is elevated and other diabetic symptoms appear during pregnancy in a woman who has not previously been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is a serious disease, which, if not controlled, can be life-threatening. It is often associated with long-term complications that can affect every system and part of the body. Diabetes can contribute to eye disorders and blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation, and nerve damage. What happens with diabetes and pregnancy? During pregnancy, the placenta supplies a growing fetus with nutrients and water. The placenta also makes a variety of horm Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels During Pregnancy

Blood Sugar Levels During Pregnancy

Tweet Blood glucose control is one of the most important factors during pregnancy. Tight blood glucose control, helps to ensure the best chance of a successful pregnancy. Diabetes control is important for people who have diabetes going into their pregnancy as well as people who develop diabetes during their pregnancy (gestational diabetes). What is gestational diabetes? It has been reported that on average 2% to 4% of women develop temporary diabetes also known as gestational diabetes. This happens because they are unable to produce an increased amount of insulin to overcome the resistance levels. In gestational diabetes there is not normally any show of external symptoms normally recognised as characteristic of the disease for example excessive thirst, tiredness and increased urination. Blood sugar control during pregnancy Good blood glucose control reduces the risks of complications developing for the mother and baby. The target HbA1c for mothers before and during pregnancy is 6.1% (or 43 mmol/mol). [91] People with diabetes before their pregnancy will be advised to keep excellent control of their blood sugar before and throughout the pregnancy. The first eight weeks of the pregnancy are a critical period and so it is highly recommended that strong control is achieved prior to becoming pregnant wherever possible. Mothers who develop gestational diabetes will be treated initially with diet and exercise but may be put onto oral hypoglycaemics (tablets) or insulin injections if blood sugar levels remain high. Diabetes management To help you to meet the challenging blood glucose targets, you will be expected to test your blood glucose before each meal and 1 hour after eating. People taking insulin for their diabetes will also need to test before bed each night. You will h Continue reading >>

Pregnancy If You Have Diabetes

Pregnancy If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes and plan to have a baby, you should try to get your blood glucose levels close to your target range before you get pregnant. Staying in your target range during pregnancy, which may be different than when you aren’t pregnant, is also important. High blood glucose, also called blood sugar, can harm your baby during the first weeks of pregnancy, even before you know you are pregnant. If you have diabetes and are already pregnant, see your doctor as soon as possible to make a plan to manage your diabetes. Working with your health care team and following your diabetes management plan can help you have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. If you develop diabetes for the first time while you are pregnant, you have gestational diabetes. How can diabetes affect my baby? A baby’s organs, such as the brain, heart, kidneys, and lungs, start forming during the first 8 weeks of pregnancy. High blood glucose levels can be harmful during this early stage and can increase the chance that your baby will have birth defects, such as heart defects or defects of the brain or spine. High blood glucose levels during pregnancy can also increase the chance that your baby will be born too early, weigh too much, or have breathing problems or low blood glucose right after birth. High blood glucose also can increase the chance that you will have a miscarriage or a stillborn baby.1 Stillborn means the baby dies in the womb during the second half of pregnancy. How can my diabetes affect me during pregnancy? Hormonal and other changes in your body during pregnancy affect your blood glucose levels, so you might need to change how you manage your diabetes. Even if you’ve had diabetes for years, you may need to change your meal plan, physical activity routine, and medicines. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a condition in which the body can't produce enough insulin, or it can't use it properly. Insulin is the hormone that allows glucose (sugar) to enter the cells to be used as fuel. When glucose cannot enter the cells, it builds up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia or high blood sugar. Damage from diabetes comes from the effects of hyperglycemia on other organ systems including the eyes, kidneys, heart, blood vessels, and nerves. In early pregnancy, hyperglycemia can result in birth defects. What are the different types of diabetes? There are three basic types of diabetes including: Type 1 diabetes. Also called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system destroys, or attempts to destroy, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Type 1 diabetes usually develops in children or young adults, but can start at any age. Type 2 diabetes. A metabolic disorder resulting from the body's inability to make enough, or properly use, insulin. It used to be called noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Gestational diabetes. A condition in which the blood glucose level is elevated and other diabetic symptoms appear during pregnancy in a woman who has not previously been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is a serious disease, which, if not controlled, can be life-threatening. It is often associated with long-term complications that can affect every system and part of the body. Diabetes can contribute to eye disorders and blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation, and nerve damage. What happens with diabetes and pregnancy? During pregnancy, the placenta supplies a growing fetus with nutrients and water. The placenta also makes a variety of horm Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Sometimes pregnancy causes the blood sugar to rise in women who do not have diabetes. This is called gestational diabetes. What is diabetes? Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. For further information about diabetes, see separate leaflets called Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. Sometimes pregnancy causes the blood sugar to rise in women who do not have diabetes. This is called gestational diabetes (see below). How does pregnancy affect diabetes? How does pregnancy affect diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Pregnancy makes the body need more insulin to control the levels of sugar (glucose) in the body. Therefore, women with diabetes usually need more treatments to control their blood sugar when t Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes refers to diabetes that is diagnosed during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies, usually in the second half of the pregnancy. It almost always goes away as soon as your baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated during your pregnancy, you may experience some complications. Causes Pregnancy hormones cause the body to be resistant to the action of insulin, a hormone made by your pancreas that helps your body use the fuels supplied by food. The carbohydrates you eat provide your body with a fuel called glucose, the sugar in the blood that nourishes your brain, heart, tissues and muscles. Glucose also is an important fuel for your developing baby. When gestational diabetes occurs, insulin fails to effectively move glucose into the cells that need it. As a result, glucose accumulates in the blood, causing blood sugar levels rise. Diagnosis Gestational diabetes is diagnosed with a blood test. Your blood glucose level is measured after you drink a sweet beverage. If your blood sugar is too high, you have gestational diabetes. Sometimes one test is all that is needed to make a definitive diagnosis. More often, an initial screening test is given and, if needed, a longer evaluation is performed. Gestational diabetes usually does not occur until later in pregnancy, when the placenta is producing more of the hormones that interfere with the mother's insulin. Screening for gestational diabetes usually takes place between weeks 24 to 28. However, women at high risk are usually screened during the first trimester. Risk Factors There are a number of risk factors associated with gestational diabetes, including: Being overweight Giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Having a parent or siblin Continue reading >>

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