diabetestalk.net

Can Pre Diabetes Be Reversed

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

Just a “little touch of sugar?” iStock/stocksnapper If you’re among the 79 million Americans with prediabetes—higher-than-normal levels of blood sugar, which boost your risk for full-blown diabetes and related health problems—don’t shrug it off. New research published in the journal The Lancet found that prediabetic patients who had at least one normal blood sugar reading, even for a short period of time, were 56 percent more likely to avoid progressing to diabetes during nearly six years of follow-up after the study. In other words, “This is your chance to take control,” says Matt Longjohn, MD, MPH, senior director of chronic disease prevention for the YMCA-USA. “Research proves that some simple, daily lifestyle changes can dramatically cut the risk for developing diabetes over the next couple of years by 58 percent, which is better than what is seen with frequently prescribed medications like metformin.” The key? Avoid these four roadblocks between you and a healthier future. iStock/martinedoucet The landmark Diabetes Prevention Program study, which followed 3,234 people with prediabetes for three years, revealed that everyday changes—switching up their eating habits and adding more physical activity—helped participants lose a little weight. Trimming just 5 percent to 7 percent of their body weight (that’s 12.5 pounds for a 180 pound person) and exercising slashed the odds for developing full-blown diabetes by a whopping 58 percent. This helps trim abdominal fat—the deep belly fat that settles in your torso, wraps itself around your internal organs, and even invades your liver. It messes with your liver’s ability to regulate blood sugar by pumping out inflammation-boosting compounds that make your body stop obeying insulin. Smart Move: St Continue reading >>

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

A prediabetes diagnosis can be alarming. This condition is marked by abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) most often due to insulin resistance. This is a condition in which the body doesn’t use insulin properly. It’s often a precursor to type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with prediabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. With prediabetes, you may also be at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, a prediabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you will definitely get type 2 diabetes. The key is early intervention; to get your blood sugar out of the prediabetes range. Your diet is important, and you need to know the right kind of foods to eat. How diet relates to prediabetes There are many factors that increase your risk for prediabetes. Genetics can play a role, especially if diabetes runs in your family. Excess body fat and a sedentary lifestyle are other potential risk factors. In prediabetes, sugar from food begins to build up in your bloodstream because insulin can’t easily move it into your cells. Eating carbohydrates doesn’t cause prediabetes. But a diet filled with carbohydrates that digest quickly can lead to blood sugar spikes. For most people with prediabetes, your body has a difficult time lowering blood sugar levels after meals. Avoiding blood sugar spikes can help. When you eat more calories than your body needs, they get stored as fat. This can cause you to gain weight. Body fat, especially around the belly, is linked to insulin resistance. This explains why many people with prediabetes are also overweight. You can’t control all risk factors for prediabetes, but some can be mitigated. Lifestyle changes can help you maintain balanced blood sugar levels as well as a healthy weight. Watch carbs with Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Getting diagnosed with prediabetes is a serious wake-up call, but it doesn't have to mean you will definitely get diabetes. There is still time to turn things around. “It’s an opportunity to initiate lifestyle changes or treatments, and potentially retard progression to diabetes or even prevent diabetes,” says Gregg Gerety, MD, chief of endocrinology at St. Peter’s Hospital in Albany, N.Y. Making these seven changes in your daily habits is a good way to start. Becoming more active is one of the best things you can do to make diabetes less likely. If it's been a while since you exercised, start by building more activity into your routine by taking the stairs or doing some stretching during TV commercials, says Patti Geil, MS, RD, author of What Do I Eat Now? “Physical activity is an essential part of the treatment plan for prediabetes, because it lowers blood glucose levels and decreases body fat,” Geil says. Ideally, you should exercise at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week. Let your doctor know about your exercise plans and ask if you have any limitations. If you're overweight, you might not have to lose as much as you think to make a difference. In one study, people who had prediabetes and lost 5% to 7% of their body weight (just 10-14 pounds in someone who weights 200 pounds) cut their chances of getting diabetes by 58%. See your doctor every three to six months, Gerety says. If you're doing well, you can get positive reinforcement from your doctor. If it's not going so well, your doctor can help you get back on track. "Patients like some tangible evidence of success or failure," Gerety says. Continue reading >>

Can My Prediabetes Be Reversed?

Can My Prediabetes Be Reversed?

A lot of ladies ask me - Can My Prediabetes Be Reversed? Read on to find out what reversal means and if you can do it. Ladies, ladies from far and wide -- I’ve got great news for you! The U.S. Department Of Health And Human Services confirms that Insulin Resistance, Prediabetes and Metabolic Syndrome ALL can be reversed! We can celebrate! But before the celebrations begin we need to talk about 4 things --- 1. The Odds Of You Getting Type 2 Diabetes 2. What Does Reversing Prediabetes Mean? 3. How Long Does It Take To Reverse Prediabetes? 4. Can I Get Prediabetes Again? The Odds Of You Getting Type 2 Diabetes 15 to 30% of Prediabetics will get Type 2 Diabetes within 5 years, so time is of the essence! That means if you’re thinking about trying for reversal, the time to start is now! And to make matters even more front and center, 70% of Prediabetics will get Type 2 Diabetes in their lifetime. So, if you have Prediabetes, you have a 70% chance of getting Diabetes. Knowing you have a 70% chance of getting a life-threatening disease is even more of a kick in the butt to get going – now! You need to be learning everything you can so you can reverse your Prediabetes and leave Type 2 Diabetes in the dust! What Does Reversing Prediabetes Mean? Reversing Prediabetes means you have restored all of your abnormal blood tests back to normal. Prediabetes (those nasty numbers you DON'T want) A1C: 5.7 – 6.4% (or 38.8 – 46.4 mmol/mol) (or 6.5 – 7.6 mmol/L) ​ Fasting Blood Glucose: 100 – 125 mg/dL (or 5.6 mmol/L – 6.9 mmol/L) Prediabetes Reversed (those glorious numbers you DO want) A1C: less than 5.7% (or less than 38.8 mmol/mol) (or less than 6.5 mmol/L) ​ Fasting Blood Glucose: less than 100 mg/dL (or less than 5.6 mmol/l) NOTE! Do keep in mind that only blood tests Continue reading >>

Prediabetes And Lifestyle Modification: Time To Prevent A Preventable Disease

Prediabetes And Lifestyle Modification: Time To Prevent A Preventable Disease

Go to: Abstract More than 100 million Americans have prediabetes or diabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which individuals have blood glucose levels higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. People with prediabetes have an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes. An estimated 34% of adults have prediabetes. Prediabetes is now recognized as a reversible condition that increases an individual’s risk for development of diabetes. Lifestyle risk factors for prediabetes include overweight and physical inactivity. Increasing awareness and risk stratification of individuals with prediabetes may help physicians understand potential interventions that may help decrease the percentage of patients in their panels in whom diabetes develops. If untreated, 37% of the individuals with prediabetes may have diabetes in 4 years. Lifestyle intervention may decrease the percentage of prediabetic patients in whom diabetes develops to 20%. Long-term data also suggest that lifestyle intervention may decrease the risk of prediabetes progressing to diabetes for as long as 10 years. To prevent 1 case of diabetes during a 3-year period, 6.9 persons would have to participate in the lifestyle intervention program. In addition, recent data suggest that the difference in direct and indirect costs to care for a patient with prediabetes vs a patient with diabetes may be as much as $7000 per year. Investment in a diabetes prevention program now may have a substantial return on investment in the future and help prevent a preventable disease. Distribution of members with prediabetes by body mass index for Kaiser Permanente Southern California Antelope Valley and Kern Service Areas Body mass index, kg/m2 Antelope Valley, no. (%) Kern, no. (%) ≥ 30 4403 (54) 3534 (51) 25–29 2192 Continue reading >>

One Woman Shares How To Reverse Prediabetes By Cutting Sugar | Everyday Health

One Woman Shares How To Reverse Prediabetes By Cutting Sugar | Everyday Health

Drink this, and youll have no problem with the sugar, he said. I stared down at the glass of water with cut-up chunks of okra floating in it that he held out to me. It will filter it out of your blood, he added. I felt queasy, and a little annoyed. I had just turned down a plate of apple pie and ice cream that my aunts in-laws had offered me in their home, even though I had already explained that I eat a low-sugar diet to prevent the return of prediabetes. The man of the house who had diabetes himself meant well, and truly believed that I would rather drink slimy okra water than forgo a sweet treat. Yes, okra is a good source of dietary fiber, which can help slow down the release of sugar into the blood , but it certainly is not a cure that allows people with diabetes or those at risk for the disease to eat desserts with impunity. More important, I have already done something that he and many other people simply do not believe is possible: I have beaten my addiction to sugar and lowered my A1C , thereby reducing my prediabetes diagnosis. The plate of gooey ice cream and flaky apple pie looked barely more appealing to me than the okra water. Turning it down didnt leave me feeling deprived. Why I Quit Sugar and How You Can Do It, Too Thats because five years after reversing a prediabetes diagnosis, I think its safe to say I have kicked a lifelong sugar habit. As a tween, that craving was so intense that I would lift sugar packets from a restaurant table when no one was looking, excuse myself to go to the restroom, and, once safely hidden in a stall, pour the crystals straight down my throat. Over three decades later, in the midst of a divorce, I was self-soothing with weekly slabs of vegan Mississippi Mud pie when my doctor informed me that my A1C was 6.3 percent, on the Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Can Be Reversed

Prediabetes Can Be Reversed

Yes, you can stop diabetes before it begins, but you won’t receive the care you need if you don’t even know you have the problem. Screening is now recommended for everyone beginning at 45 years of age. Publisher’s Comment: Since you can have a normal fasting blood sugar and still have diabetes and prediabetes, why not use the A1c test. Even though the A1c test is not recommended for diagnosing diabetes and prediabetes, it is certainly and inexpensive and easy to do test. And if their A1c is in the high 5’s you can do a glucose tolerance test. You can delay or stop diabetes if you catch it before it truly begins. Doctors call this early stage prediabetes. The condition exists when your blood sugar levels rise higher than normal, yet remain lower than those found in diabetes. Studies show that effective treatments can prevent the progression of prediabetes to diabetes. Here’s where new guidelines from the American Diabetes Association enter. Based on the updated advice, many more people should get tested for prediabetes than in the past. And some folks should begin receiving the tests well before middle age, the association says. Scientists estimate that an unprecedented 54 million Americans have prediabetes. Without treatment, most people with the condition will go on to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus within 10 years, studies show. Full-blown diabetes causes abnormally high blood sugar levels that may lead to serious health problems. Even before then, though, people with prediabetes face many of the same health risks as diabetics. For example, people with prediabetes have 1 1/2 times greater risk of heart disease and stroke compared while diabetics have two to four times increased risk. The American Diabetes Association recommends a blood test for all adults Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

8 Actions To Take If You Have Prediabetes

8 Actions To Take If You Have Prediabetes

Changing the Path to Type 2 A whopping 86 million Americans have prediabetes. That’s according to the latest statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) -- that's 37 percent of American adults over age 20 and 51 percent of adults over age 65. Research shows about 70 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes over time. Despite these scary stats, only 11 percent of people who have prediabtes know it. The good news is you can prevent or slow the progression of prediabetes to type 2. Numerous research studies conducted over the last 30 years show that early and aggressive management with continued vigilance over time is what prevents or delays type 2 diabetes. And the earlier you detect it and put your plan into action, the better. Here are eight ways to manage prediabetes. 1. Get Tested to Know for Sure. Do you have family -- parents or siblings -- with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes? Are you carrying extra weight around your middle? Don't get enough exercise? These are a few of the risk factors for prediabetes. A good first step to see if you are at high risk is to use the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test. You can take the test by visiting diabetes.org/risk. If you’re at high risk, schedule an appointment with your health care provider to get a check of your blood glucose level -- or, better yet, your A1C (an average of your blood glucose over two to three months). See the blood test results to diagnose prediabetes on the next page. 2. Max Out Your Insulin-Making Reserves. It's well known that at the center of the storm of the slow and steady onset of prediabetes is insulin resistance -- the body's inability, due to excess weight and genetic risk factors, to effectively use the insulin th Continue reading >>

Study: Successfully Reversing Pre-diabetes With Weight-loss

Study: Successfully Reversing Pre-diabetes With Weight-loss

discovered that adults who managed to reduce their weight and their waist circumference within a year of being diagnosed with pre-diabetes were twice as likely to reverse their pre-diabetes diagnosis and thus have a lower overall diabetes risk. Dr. Danielle Bodicoat, a lecturer in epidemiology at the University of Leicester in the UK and fellow researchers examined a pre-diabetes cohort study group of participants who received yearly type 2 diabetes screening over the course of five years. The adults in the study who lost 3% of their baseline body weight within a year were much more likely to return to normal glucose tolerance than those who did not lose any weight or gained weight. Dr. Bodicoat and team looked at data from 817 adults who were diagnosed with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance at baseline (using 75 grams of oral glucose) who took part in the ADDITION-Leicester study. The average A1c of the participants was 5.9%. There were about the same number of men as women participants. Their average age was 60. Of the participants, 68% had impaired glucose tolerance, 18% had impaired fasting glucose, and 14% had both. The study participants received yearly type 2 diabetes screening for 5 years or until they became diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Dr. Bodicoat and team decided to use logistic regression models to explore changeable risk factors for regression to normal glucose tolerance at 1 year. How Big An Impact Can Weight Loss Have? After 1 year, researchers found that 54% of the participants returned to normal glucose tolerance, effectively reversing their pre-diabetes diagnosis. Of the participants, 6% ended up developing type 2 diabetes. Researchers adjusted for risk factors and reported that 18.6% of the participants who lost a mean of 3% o Continue reading >>

Reversing Prediabetes

Reversing Prediabetes

Nobody likes to be told that they have prediabetes. But such a diagnosis doesn’t mean nothing can be done. A new study from the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom has found that adults who lose weight or reduce their waistlines within a year of receiving a diagnosis of prediabetes are significantly more likely to return to normal glucose tolerance than adults who don’t. The researchers analyzed data from 817 people with a mean age of 60 (53% were women). Within the group, 68% had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), 18% had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and 14% had both. (IGT and IFG are signs of prediabetes.) The subjects were screened for diabetes every year for five years (unless they developed diabetes before then). After one year, more than half (54%) of the patients had returned to normal glucose tolerance. About 40% still had impaired glucose tolerance and about 6% had developed Type 2 diabetes. The most interesting finding was that participants who had lost 3% of their body weight or lost more than 3 centimeters (slightly less than 1 1/4 inches) around their waistlines within the first year were twice as likely to return to normal glucose tolerance than those who didn’t. The participants who regained normal glucose tolerance at the one-year mark were also more likely to remain free of diabetes than those who still had impaired glucose tolerance after a year. The lead researcher on the study, Danielle Bodicoat, PhD, summed up her team’s findings by saying, “This study emphasizes the importance of encouraging people with raised glucose levels to make health lifestyle choices…. Losing weight or reducing your waist circumference may be the most important part of this.” Want to learn more about prediabetes? Read “Prediabetes: What to Know” Continue reading >>

Can I Reverse My Prediabetes Naturally

Can I Reverse My Prediabetes Naturally

Prediabetes is a state in which the blood glucose levels are not high enough to qualify as hyperglycemia but are well above the normal parameters. By WHO parameters, prediabetes is defined as a fasting plasma glucose of 6.1 to 6.9 mmol/L and impaired glucose tolerance as a 2-hour plasma glucose of 7.8 to 11.0 mmol/L after a 75g oral glucose load. These are more or less similar to other criteria such as the American Diabetes Association. However, the degree of clinical utility, to predict the future development of diabetes or even to capture the prediabetic state, is still undesirably low. Even the use of HbA1C as a screening indicator is flawed by the substantial genetic contribution to its serum levels. The importance of prediabetes lies in its high risk for full-blown diabetes, which develops in 5%-10% of cases each year. The prediabetic state is also associated with diabetic complications such as early development of nephropathy, retinopathy, small fiber neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease. Prevention of diabetic progression in prediabetes Lifestyle modifications are found to reduce the risk of diabetes in adults with prediabetes, by 40% to 70%. Other interventions include pharmacological management, such as metformin, for high-risk patients. There are several modifiable risk factors in prediabetes treatment, most of which target excessive energy intake by two key steps: reducing the ingestion of high-energy foods and increasing the expenditure of energy by physical activity. If practiced constantly and meticulously, such interventions can reduce the relative risk of diabetes (compared to other prediabetics who do not undergo this intervention) by almost 60%. They also result in long-term effects including maintenance of weight and lower food intake, improvement Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Reverse Diabetes?

How Long Does It Take To Reverse Diabetes?

“And by the third day, I got this burst of energy,” says Mr. Garlin. “I felt as good as I did when I was in high school. And all this without taking any medications… just eating healthy and exercising. That’s all it was!” Not everyone’s blood sugar (glucose) tumbles as quickly as Mr. Garlin’s, but there is plenty of research affirming that a healthy diet like the Pritikin Eating Plan combined with daily exercise can profoundly reduce blood sugar levels in just two to three week’s time. Prevention of Diabetes There is also strong science showing that a healthy lifestyle like Pritikin can prevent pre-diabetes from developing into full-blown diabetes. (Pre-diabetes is defined as having a fasting glucose between 100 and 125. Diabetes is a fasting glucose of 126 or higher.) Foods That Fight Diabetes Pritikin eating means focusing on whole foods that are naturally rich in fiber and naturally low in fats, sugars, and industrial refinement. Pritikin foods are vegetables, whole fruits (not juice), whole grains, legumes such as beans and peas, nonfat dairy foods, and moderate servings of lean meat such as fish, skinless chicken breast, and game meat like bison and venison. How Long Does It Take To Reverse Diabetes? | The Science About 20 years ago, scientists began discovering how quickly diabetes could be reversed. Researchers at UCLA tracked1 men and women with type 2 diabetes who had attended the Pritikin Longevity Center, where they learned and adopted healthy Pritikin food and fitness habits. Three Weeks Among the 652 people studied, 240 were “new diabetics,” that is, they had only recently been diagnosed with the disease; they were not yet taking any medications. Within an average of three weeks at Pritikin, the blood sugar (glucose) levels of these ne Continue reading >>

Do I Have Prediabetes?

Do I Have Prediabetes?

National Diabetes Prevention Program The CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program offers scientifically proven and effective lifestyle change programs that can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. The program can show you how to make better food choices, be more physically active, and find helpful ways to cope with problems and stress. You'll work with a trained lifestyle coach and a small group of people who are all working towards the same goal. It’ll last for 1 year (including meetings about once per week in the first 6 months). The hundreds of local community partners are required by CDC to meet high standards and prove results. You can do it in person, or online. This is a proven program to motivate and support people with prediabetes to make practical, real-life changes, and cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by more than half. That's kind of big news. The hundreds of organizations across the U.S. that offer these programs are focused on one thing only — positive results. So use our program locator to find one near you. Usually, your doctor can tell you if you qualify. It's generally based on your body mass index (which is based on your height and weight), your blood sugar levels (blood test), your age (must be 18 or older), and if you have a history of gestational diabetes (meaning you developed diabetes when you were pregnant). You may also qualify based on results from the online risk test. Just one more reason to take it! Costs for the program are often covered by insurance providers or employers. For some people, there may be a cost. Check with your employer or insurance provider to see if the program is a covered benefit for you. Watch how Mike joined the National Diabetes Prevention Program and found support to make healthy lifestyle Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal — The Quick Start Guide

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal — The Quick Start Guide

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal — The Quick Start Guide How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes — The Quick Start Guide Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides. Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual. Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way. Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I could write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, done too) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is your quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes. A Fully Reversible Disease Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing this truth is the crucial first step in reversing your diabetes or pre-diabetes. Actually, it something that most people a Continue reading >>

More in diabetes