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Can Pcos Cause Prediabetes?

Pcos And Diabetes, Heart Disease, Stroke...

Pcos And Diabetes, Heart Disease, Stroke...

Ever heard of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? If you’re a woman who has had trouble getting pregnant, you might have. Just about everyone else? Probably not. PCOS is the most common cause of female infertility, affecting 6% to 12% (as many as 5 million) of US women of reproductive age. But it’s a lot more than that. Women with PCOS are often insulin resistant, meaning they don’t respond effectively to insulin so their bodies keep making more. Excess insulin is thought to increase the level of androgens (male hormones that females also have) produced by the ovaries (egg-producing organs), which can stop eggs from being released (ovulation) and cause irregular periods, acne, thinning scalp hair, and excess hair growth on the face and body. What’s more troubling, high insulin levels from PCOS can lead to serious health problems, especially for women who are obese: Gestational diabetes (diabetes when pregnant)—which puts the pregnancy and baby at risk and can lead to type 2 diabetes later in life Stroke—plaque (cholesterol and white blood cells) clogging blood vessels can lead to blood clots that in turn can cause a stroke PCOS is also linked to depression and anxiety, though the connection is unclear. What Causes PCOS? The exact causes of PCOS aren’t known at this time, but both weight and family history—which are in turn related to insulin resistance—appear to play a part. Weight… Does being overweight cause PCOS? Does PCOS make you overweight? The relationship is complicated and not well understood. Being overweight is associated with PCOS, but many women of normal weight have PCOS, and many overweight women don’t. Family History… PCOS tends to run in families. Women whose mother or sister has PCOS or type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop P Continue reading >>

Pcos And Pre- And Type 2 Diabetes

Pcos And Pre- And Type 2 Diabetes

Please Add Photos to your Gallery A root cause of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is obesity-linked Insulin Resistance, which can also increase the risk of developing Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. All are disorders that may result in Cardiovascular Disease leading to a heart attack or stroke. Pre-Diabetes affects people with blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet in the Type 2 Diabetes range. Doctors sometimes call this condition impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), depending on the blood test used to diagnose it. The good news is that Pre-Diabetes doesn’t have to lead to Type 2 Diabetes because it can be reversed. But if neglected, Pre-Diabetes may become Type 2 Diabetes, which, in the vast majority of cases, must be managed for the rest of a Diabetic’s life and often requires daily injections of insulin. Type 2 Diabetes, itself, is also a significantly increased risk factor for blindness, amputation and kidney disease. So it is critical that you understand the interaction of Insulin Resistance-linked PCOS and the various forms of Diabetes in order to avoid the onset of other serious health complications. The human body processes food into energy by converting it into glucose, which is then passed via insulin through the cell walls. Insulin is a vital hormone produced in the pancreas. Insulin Resistance de-sensitizes the cell walls to insulin and impairs the vital conversion of glucose into energy. Pre- and Type 2 Diabetes are signs that this conversion process is not working properly. People with one form or another of Diabetes either cannot use the insulin that is produced or they have a pancreas that produces little or no insulin. As the pancreas struggles to keep up with the body’s need for more insu Continue reading >>

Women And Diabetes

Women And Diabetes

The Menstrual Cycle And Diabetes Fluctuations in hormone levels occur through the menstrual cycle and these fluctuations can affect blood sugar control. When estrogen levels are naturally high, your body may be resistant to its own insulin or injected insulin. Many women find their blood sugar tends to be high 3-5 days before, during or after their periods. Since everyone is different, the only way to manage blood sugars in a setting where sensitivity to insulin changes is to test and record blood sugars four or more times a day the week before, during and after your period for at least 2 or 3 months to find your own pattern. This allows you to adjust your insulin doses and carb intake both before and during this time to better control your blood sugar. Premenstrual symptoms (PMS) can be worsened by poor blood sugar control. It helps to chart your feelings such as tenderness, bloating, grouchiness for a week before, during and after your period. Charting will help you know when your PMS reach their peak during your period so that before your PMS is most severe, you can check your blood sugar more often and take extra insulin or exercise to bring high blood sugars down. Food cravings during PMS are triggered by an increase in progesterone and can make it more difficult to control your blood sugar. Usually the craving is for chocolate or sweet foods. Give in to your cravings by trying sugar-free and fat-free versions, such as chocolate pudding. Take extra insulin or increase your exercise to compensate. You may feel less like exercising during your period. If so, extra insulin may be a good choice for keeping your blood sugar from rising. The extra insulin needed to overcome insulin resistance during this time will not cause weight gain. Treat yourself well during this ti Continue reading >>

Diabetic Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome When Pcos And Diabetes Combine

Diabetic Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome When Pcos And Diabetes Combine

Diabetic polycystic ovarian syndrome is a combination of two hormonal disorders, and they will make a woman's life miserable. It is much worse if you have no clue what is causing your misery. Diabetes is a disease, and PCOS is a syndrome. What is the difference? If you have all of the symptoms you have a disease. If you have some symptoms but not all, you have the syndrome. You may only have two out of three of the markers for polycystic ovarian syndrome, but it means you have the hormone disorder that causes it. And diabetic polycystic ovarian syndrome is a combination of two problems with an inflammatory root. If you have PCOS you may also be prediabetic. PCOS was discovered in 1935 and its discoverers gave it their names. It was called Stein-Leventhal syndrome for a while, but today we know it as polycystic ovarian syndrome. When it joins with prediabetes it becomes diabetic polycystic ovarian syndrome. The name is misleading, giving you the idea that this is a gynecological disorder. But it is not. Just like type 1 and type 2 diabetes, PCOS is a hormone or endocrine disorder that needs to be treated by an endocrinologist. Doctors know the name confuses us, and they tried to think of something else to call it, but the name PCOS has stuck. It also confuses women that many of them are diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome when they have normal ovaries on ultrasound. But this is a syndrome and abnormal ovaries are only one symptom. The cause of polycystic ovaries seems to be that hormones are not letting the eggs go when it is time. The cysts are cavities in the ovary where an egg is stuck. Those eggs were supposed to be released, but in PCOS the hormones are not doing their job. So more and more of these cysts form around the outside of the ovary, giving it a bump Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes

Referring Physicians What is Pre-Diabetes? About 75 million Americans have Pre-Diabetes, so it is a very common clinical issue. Pre-Diabetes is defined as a fasting blood sugar between 100-125 or an A1c greater than 5.8 and less than 6.5. It’s when your blood glucose level is higher than normal (>100), but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes (>125 on two occasions). There are other typical characteristics of pre-diabetes we call the Metabolic Syndrome; (1.) Obesity defined by a Body Mass Index (BMI) >30, a belt size in a woman >35 inches or in a man >40 inches. (2.) Hypertension or high blood pressure. (3.) Low HDL cholesterol (“Good Cholesterol”) < 40 in men and <50 in women. (4.) High triglycerides, >150. If you have three of these factors, you have the metabolic syndrome, as well. Pre-diabetes is an indication that you may develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. About 30 % of people with pre-diabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes and we know that it is treatable. The good news is that it is possible to prevent pre-diabetes from developing into type 2 diabetes. Eating healthy food, losing weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. By this treatment, many people can prevent the development and complications of diabetes. Symptoms Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the pre-diabetes stage, you may have no symptoms at all. You may however notice symptoms of diabetes: • You are hungrier than normal • You are losing weight, despite eating more • You are thirstier than normal • You have to go to the bathroom more frequently • You are more tired than usual All of these are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you are in the Continue reading >>

Pcos (polycystic Ovary Syndrome) And Diabetes

Pcos (polycystic Ovary Syndrome) And Diabetes

PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome) afflicts millions of women. It has been called a form of prediabetes, because the conditions have much in common. What can we learn from the story of polycystic ovary syndrome? What is PCOS? Polycystic ovary syndrome is a disease of hormones. Depending on how PCOS is defined, somewhere from 5% to 20% of American and European women have it. It is the most common reproductive hormone disorder of women of childbearing age and the number one cause of female infertility. PCOS is usually diagnosed when a woman has: • Very irregular or absent periods. • Elevated male sex hormones, which can lead to male pattern hair growth on face and body, along with acne and hair loss on the head. • Ovaries with large numbers of “cysts,” which are actually groups of follicles that are supposed to produce eggs. In PCOS, the eggs aren’t released and the follicles keep growing and clump into cysts. Other symptoms include skin discolorations, painful periods, depression, mood swings, lack of sex drive, and fatness around the waist. It’s a really unpleasant condition, affecting appearance, fertility, mood, and general health. It’s also linked to diabetes and heart disease. PCOS and diabetes very similar Like Type 2 diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome often starts with insulin resistance. In studies, 50% to 90% of women with PCOS are insulin resistant. According to the American Diabetes Association, insulin resistance leads the body to produce high levels of insulin, just as in early stage Type 2 diabetes. In some women, insulin stimulates the production of male hormones such as testosterone. The male hormones cause facial hair, baldness, and acne and may suppress the female hormones that produce eggs in the ovaries. Other hormones seem disturbed al Continue reading >>

Five Things To Know About Diabetes And Pcos

Five Things To Know About Diabetes And Pcos

September is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Awareness Month, an opportunity to raise awareness of a health problem that you may not be familiar with. For example: Did you know that PCOS is the most common cause of female infertility? Or that about 5 million women in the United States are affected by it? Wait, what!? Let’s start from the beginning… A woman’s ovaries have follicles (tiny, fluid-filled sacs that hold the eggs). When an egg is mature, the follicle releases the egg so it can travel to the uterus for fertilization. In women with PCOS, immature follicles group together to form large cysts or lumps. The eggs mature within the bunched follicles, but the follicles don’t break open to release them. Because of this, women with PCOS often don’t have menstrual periods or only have them on occasion. And because the eggs are not released, most women with PCOS have trouble getting pregnant. We’re sure you still have plenty of questions about PCOS—and what it means for women with diabetes. Keep reading! ____________________________ 1) What are the causes and symptoms of PCOS? Unfortunately, we don’t yet know the cause of PCOS, but based on studies of twins, scientists believe there’s a good chance genetics could play a role. But not everyone with PCOS genes develops the condition, so researchers are looking for lifestyle factors that affect a woman’s risk for PCOS. Though the cause is fuzzy, researchers know one thing for sure: There’s a link between PCOS and diabetes. How so? Women with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk for PCOS, which suggests that insulin may play a part. Ovaries see more insulin from people with type 1 diabetes than they would from those without diabetes. This extra insulin has a direct effect on ovaries by enhancing the p Continue reading >>

Conversations

Conversations

MattZ90 via Getty Images Q: I was recently diagnosed with PCOS and heard that some people manage it through a low-carb diet. Is that true, and should I try it? A: The short answer: not necessarily. But first, let’s take a step back. Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS, is a hormone disorder that’s estimated to affect between one in 10 and one in 20 women of childbearing age, depending on how the disorder is diagnosed and what country’s data is analyzed. When hormone levels become disordered, the hormone insulin rises beyond healthy levels. This then stimulates the production of male sex hormones, which occur naturally in all women but rise too high in women with PCOS. This can interfere with other hormones in the body that regulate everything from ovulation and conception to hunger and weight gain. These irregular hormone levels manifest themselves in symptoms that range from irregular periods to acne to excess hair on the face, chest, and back, insulin resistance and little cysts on the ovaries (hence, the name), although you don’t have to have all the symptoms to be diagnosed with the condition. PCOS is the most common cause of infertility in women, because it interrupts ovulation or makes it so erratic that couples can’t accurately time intercourse to a woman’s most fertile week. Because of its association with elevated insulin levels, PCOS is associated with increased risk of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Researchers aren’t sure which order of events happens first: For example, higher fat stores in an obese person lead to elevated levels of insulin and insulin resistance, so perhaps weight gain leads to PCOS. On the other hand, wacky hormone levels could be messing with hunger cues, which lead women to eat more and gain weight, so perh Continue reading >>

Sleep Apnea And Polycystic Ovary Syndrome May Increase Prediabetes Risk In Women

Sleep Apnea And Polycystic Ovary Syndrome May Increase Prediabetes Risk In Women

(RxWiki News) Your body is complex. One problematic organ can affect an entirely different organ or system. If you let one disease run its course, you may be faced with another health problem, then another. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), sleep apnea, or both conditions may be more likely to develop prediabetes - a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. "Get tested for diabetes if you have sleep apnea or PCOS." In many cases, prediabetes develops into type 2 diabetes, which puts people at risk for health problems like heart disease and kidney disease. As such, it is important to know who is at risk so that diabetes can be prevented. In their recent study, David Ehrmann, MD, of the University of Chicago and senior author, and colleagues found that women with PCOS and sleep apnea are at least three times more likely to have prediabetes, compared to women without PCOS. "In the last few years, sleep apnea has been found to be a frequent comorbidity [coexisting condition] with PCOS, and our study shows that women who have both conditions are at greatest risk of metabolic disturbances such as prediabetes," says Dr. Ehrmann. PCOS is a hormonal disorder in women. It causes the ovaries to make excessive male hormones. PCOS is the primary cause of female infertility and can lead to obesity, acne, hair thinning and excess body hair. Obstructive sleep apnea is a disorder in which a person repeatedly stops and starts breathing throughout the night. It occurs when muscles in the throat relax. According to Dr. Ehrmann, "Patients who have one or both of these conditions should be screened early for type 2 diabetes and should be monitored regularly. The study's results show that 44 percent of women with Continue reading >>

7 Natural Treatments Of Prediabetes Symptoms

7 Natural Treatments Of Prediabetes Symptoms

We know that diabetes is a major problem in the U.S., and prediabetes is not less of an issue — but it’s also a wakeup call that can jolt someone into action. Prediabetes symptoms may go unnoticed, but the first sign is that you no longer have normal blood sugar levels. A prediabetes diagnosis is a warning sign to people who will develop diabetes if they don’t make serious lifestyle changes. The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention National Diabetes Statistics Report says that 37 percent of United States adults older than 20 years and 51 percent of those older than 65 exhibit prediabetes symptoms. When applied to the entire population in 2012, these estimates suggest that there are nearly 86 million adults with prediabetes in the United States alone. Furthermore, the International Diabetes Federation projects an increase in prevalence of prediabetes to 471 million globally by 2035. (1) Luckily, research shows that lifestyle intervention may decrease the percentage of prediabetic patients who develop diabetes from 37 percent to 20 percent. (2) What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a condition defined as having blood glucose levels above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. It’s considered to be an at-risk state, with high chances of developing diabetes. Without intervention, people with prediabetes are likely to become type 2 diabetics within 10 years. For people with prediabetes, the long-term damage to the heart and circulatory system that is associated with diabetes may have started already. (3) There are several ways to diagnose prediabetes. The A1C test measures your average blood glucose for the past two to three months. Diabetes is diagnosed at an A1C of greater than or equal to 6.5 percent; for prediabetes, the A1C is between 5.7 percent Continue reading >>

Pcos And Prediabetes Risk

Pcos And Prediabetes Risk

PCOS is one of those conditions that can be frustrating; not only does it impact fertility, it can have other health implications, as well. You might not realize it, but PCOS can actually contribute to an increased risk of prediabetes. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), sleep apnea, or both conditions may be more likely to develop prediabetes – a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. In many cases, prediabetes develops into type 2 diabetes, which puts people at risk for health problems like heart disease and kidney disease. As such, it is important to know who is at risk so that diabetes can be prevented. In their recent study, David Ehrmann, M.D., of the University of Chicago and senior author, and colleagues found that women with PCOS and sleep apnea are at least three times more likely to have prediabetes, compared to women without PCOS. “In the last few years, sleep apnea has been found to be a frequentcomorbidity [coexisting condition] with PCOS, and our study shows that women who have both conditions are at greatest risk of metabolic disturbances such as prediabetes,” says Dr. Ehrmann. PCOS is a hormonal disorder in women. It causes the ovaries to make too much male hormones. PCOS is the primary cause of female infertility and can lead to obesity, acne, hair thinning, and excess body hair. Obstructive sleep apnea is a disorder in which a person repeatedly stops and starts breathing throughout the night. It occurs when muscles in the throat relax. According to Dr. Ehrmann, “Patients who have one or both of these conditions should be screened early for type 2 diabetes and should be monitored regularly. The study’s results show that 44 percent of women with PCOS developedpredi Continue reading >>

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome & Prediabetes: My Story

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome & Prediabetes: My Story

Sixteen years ago, I was a 20-year-old, living on brown sugar Pop-Tarts (68 carbs) and cranberry juice (28 carbs). I gained 30 lbs in my first three years of college, weighing 165 lbs on a 5’8” frame. With every shower and brush, my hair fell out. I had increasing amounts of facial acne, much worse than when I was 16. Most notably, I was ALWAYS hungry. I ate baby-sized bean burritos (84+ carbs) chased with a Cold Stone creations (46+ carbs) and could always eat more. The Diagnosis My PCP ran some tests, and sent me to an endocrinologist who ran more tests. Multiple tests and appointments later I had a diagnosis of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome or PCOS. The endo gave me five minutes of medical babble, two prescriptions, including Metformin, a xeroxed handout on What you need to know about PCOS, and sent me on my way. The following months transformed me. I learned anything and everything I could about PCOS. I learned PCOS affects 5-10% of women, is the leading cause of infertility and a whole host of physical symptoms (hair loss, acne). I also learned insulin resistance is a key contributor to developing PCOS. Up to 70% of women with PCOS have insulin resistance, resulting in pre-diabetes and a high-risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Living with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome When I was diagnosed, there was limited evidence on how to treat and manage PCOS. Some women were eating less carbs, exercising, and losing weight to minimize symptoms. I drank the Koolaid (low carb, that is), eating 30-40 carbs per day. I ate cauliflower mashed potatoes at Thanksgiving, deconstructed every burger, wrap, and pizza slice to make it low carb, and lost 45 lbs in the first six months of being diagnosed. My hair stopped falling out. The acne cleared. And, my blood tests normalized. In the Continue reading >>

After Years Of Being Undiagnosed, Is Diabetic Hair Loss Reversible? I Have Pcos. Diabetes And Pcos Run In My Family.

After Years Of Being Undiagnosed, Is Diabetic Hair Loss Reversible? I Have Pcos. Diabetes And Pcos Run In My Family.

I have had diffuse hair loss for 2.5 yrs. I have PCOS and take Desogen (bcp). I just saw another hair loss doctor, and he thinks I'm either prediabetic or diabetic. Is diabetic hair loss reversible? He said I have diffuse hair thinning. He examined a follicle under the microscope and found it to be miniature. He said there are areas of normal hair and areas of thin hair. Also, I've read that Metformin can cause hair loss. Would a better alternative be insulin injections? Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

Too Old For Acne? Difficult-to-diagnose Pcos May Be The Cause

Too Old For Acne? Difficult-to-diagnose Pcos May Be The Cause

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS, is a health condition resulting from a hormonal imbalance that affects approximately one in every 10 to 15 women in the United States. More than half of women with PCOS will have diabetes or prediabetes by age 40. Learn more about the link and how to treat these often-related conditions. Though the exact cause of PCOS is unknown, many scientists believe that a combination of environmental and genetic factors are involved. Your risk may be higher if you are overweight or if your mother, aunt, or sister has PCOS. As Andrea Dunaif, MD, Chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Bone Disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai points out, “The name can be confusing and misleading, because not all women with PCOS have cysts on their ovaries.” In fact, many experts and patient advocates are joining an international effort to change the name to something that is more reflective of what PCOS actually is – a metabolic issue. The hope is that having a more accurate name will help further research and improve treatment. Signs and Symptoms Most women are diagnosed in their twenties and thirties, but PCOS often starts in adolescents and can affect girls before they begin menstruating. The hormonal imbalance can interrupt the development and release of eggs from the ovaries. It often goes undiagnosed because many of the symptoms can be attributed to other causes. Common symptoms of PCOS include: Irregular or missed periods Weight gain Fatigue Unwanted hair growth on the face, arms, chest, back, abdomen, and extremities Thinning hair on the head Infertility Acne Mood changes, depression, and anxiety Pelvic pain Headaches Sleep problems such as insomnia, sleep apnea, or poor sleep These symptoms are caused by hormonal im Continue reading >>

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