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Can Metformin Constipate You

How Can You Overcome Gas From Metformin?

How Can You Overcome Gas From Metformin?

Sometimes even helpful medications have side effects that are difficult to tolerate. For example, metformin is a first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes. It even has benefits beyond blood sugar. In addition to diabetes, some studies suggest that metformin may be helpful against prostate, kidney and bladder cancer. But what can a patient do about the uncomfortable and embarrassing gas from metformin? Do You Get Gas from Metformin? Q. I take metformin to control blood sugar because I have type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, it produces an alarming amount of gas, bloating and bellyaches. Sometimes I have diarrhea and other times severe constipation. I am at my wits’ end. Do you have any remedies that might work? Remedies for Digestive Distress: A. People often attribute their flatulence to dietary factors, but many medications can also lead to unpleasant problems with gas. Metformin is one of these. We are sending you our Guide to Digestive Disorders in which we discuss remedies for flatulence, constipation and diarrhea. Many people report that taking fennel seed in tea or as seeds can help quiet gas. Moreover, probiotics like Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG can sometimes be beneficial in reducing troublesome flatulence (Pace, Pace & Quartarone, Minerva Gastroenterologica e Dietologica, Dec. 2015). Herbs That May Ease Gas from Metformin: Ginger is a traditional treatment for a wide range of digestive maladies, including flatulence. Additionally, recent research shows that ginger may also help protect against digestive tract cancers (Prasad & Tyagi, Gastroenterology Research and Practice, online March 8, 2015). Finally, peppermint seems to limit flatulence and diarrhea as well as abdominal pain in people with irritable bowel syndrome (Prescrire International, June 2008). As a res Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Glipizide And Metformin (metaglip)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Glipizide And Metformin (metaglip)?

A A A Medications and Drugs Brand Names: Metaglip Generic Name: glipizide and metformin (Pronunciation: GLIP ih zyd and met FOR min) What is glipizide and metformin (Metaglip)? Glipizide and metformin is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Glipizide and metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Glipizide and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion, swelling or rapid weight gain; pain or burning with urination; nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or dangerously high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears, anxiety, confusion, chest pain, shortness of breath, uneven heartbeats, seizure). Less serious side effects may include: cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat; headache, dizziness; mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, st Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs. Tune in on August 21 for the next installment. Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza) is a member of a class of medicines known as biguanides. This type of medicine was first introduced into clinical practice in the 1950’s with a drug called phenformin. Unfortunately, phenformin was found to be associated with lactic acidosis, a serious and often fatal condition, and was removed from the U.S. market in 1977. This situation most likely slowed the approval of metformin, which was not used in the U.S. until 1995. (By comparison, metformin has been used in Europe since the 1960’s.) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required large safety studies of metformin, the results of which demonstrated that the development of lactic acidosis as a result of metformin therapy is very rare. (A finding that has been confirmed in many other clinical trials to date.) Of note, the FDA officer involved in removing phenformin from the market recently wrote an article highlighting the safety of metformin. Metformin works primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. It does this by activating a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK. This protein acts much like an “energy sensor,” setting off cellular activities that result in glucose storage, enhanced entry of glucose into cells, and decreased creation of fatty acids and cholesterol. A secondary effect of the enhanced entry of glucose into cells is improved glucose uptake and increased storage of glycogen (a form of glucose) by the muscles. Additionally, the decrease in fatty acid levels brought about by metformin may indirectly improve insulin resistance and beta cell func Continue reading >>

I Am Suffering Bad ! Metformin = Constipation

I Am Suffering Bad ! Metformin = Constipation

I am suffering bad ! Metformin = constipation Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I am suffering bad ! Metformin = constipation Oh goodness, just when everything was turning for the better, now back to feeling horrible. I have been badly constipated and bloated for 2 weeks straight, I can hardly breathe, move, and just feel awful. I've tried stomach massage, eating less, more veggies, prune juice, more water, touch toe exercises, and no bowel movement. I was taken off met for bad constipation in the past, then doctor tries extended metformin. Prior to med, if I became constipated or bloated, I would have relief in a matter of hours, from methods above, especially prune juice. I need instant relief !!! Even a small glass of water bloats me beyond belief, first thing in the morning. Met has helped decrease my sugar levels, but constipation/bloating discomfort, is going to have me quit again. Even when I drank 6-12 pack soda a day, I never felt this horribly constipated/bloated. Please help, before I give up and go back to my soda diet, eating meals once a day. Everything was going so well with routine low carb diet. Reason, I know it's metformin. One time, I had minor bowel movement, my digestive system swelled right back up. Feels like my intestines are swollen. But, I am not producing any gas. None, zip, zero !! If anyone has a solution, please chime in. If, as you say you were doing well with low-carbing, why did you add the Metformin? If its side-effects are as horrible as you describe perhaps you better consider either different medication or insulin or attempt to "finish the job" with diet. Thanks for feedback. I want to sl Continue reading >>

Constipation And Diarrhea From Diabetes

Constipation And Diarrhea From Diabetes

Many people know diabetes can raise their odds of having heart disease and stroke. But it can affect your digestive tract, too. Digestion begins the minute you take a bite of food and ends a day or two later with a trip to the bathroom. The whole process is handled by the same part of your nervous system that controls other body functions that happen automatically, like your heartbeat and breathing. But over time, high blood sugar can damage the tiny blood vessels and nerves in your body, including your digestive system. A speed-up or slow-down of the process in your intestines could result in diarrhea or constipation. Diabetes medications, certain foods, and related illnesses can cause diarrhea, too. Nerve Damage About 60% to 70% of people with diabetes have some form of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy. It can develop at any time, but the longer you have diabetes, the more likely it is. When diabetes damages the nerves in your stomach and intestines, they may not be able to move food through normally. Most often, this causes constipation, but you can also get alternating bouts of constipation and diarrhea, especially at night. Misfiring nerves may not contract the muscles that mix and move the stuff in your intestines, so everything slows down. Your colon absorbs more moisture from the waste, which makes your poop harder -- and harder to pass. Constipation that lasts a long time can cause other health problems, such as fecal impaction, a hard lump of poop that blocks your rectum so nothing can get out. Fluid that lingers in your small intestine too long can allow too much bacteria to grow. This could lead to bloating, belly pain, and diarrhea. Nerve damage in your large intestine may let fluids move through too fast, or cause problems with absorbing and releasing Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos: 6 Things You Need To Know

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos: 6 Things You Need To Know

Insulin resistance is seen in the majority of women with PCOS. Doctors prescribe metformin for PCOS because it is an effective insulin sensitizer. However, the drug comes with its share of side effects. Let’s look at Metformin side effects for PCOS in detail. Metformin Side Effects For PCOS 1. Malaise Or Physical Discomfort As many as 1 in every 4 women on metformin just does not feel well. There is a feeling of fatigue even without much physical exertion. Sometimes, this fatigue is accompanied with aches that can last for a varying degree of time. While this may not sound too severe, it is one of the most common Metformin side effect for PCOS. 2. Gastrointestinal Distress Gastrointestinal problems is another common Metformin side effect for PCOS (experienced by nearly a third of women taking the drug.) These problems include abdominal pain, nausea, occasional vomiting, loose motions, irregular bowel movements or diarrhea. Bloating and flatulence can be a major source of embarrassment. Anorexia and a sharp metallic taste can play havoc with appetite, especially because eating a healthy diet at the right times is critical for PCOS patients. Heartburn and headaches add to the suffering caused by PCOS symptoms. 3. Anemia Another Metformin side effect for PCOS is a decrease in Vitamin B12 levels because the drug affects the absorption of this vitamin. Vitamin B12 is vital for red blood cell formation. When levels of vitamin B12 go down, you can suffer from anemia. Common symptoms of anemia include tiredness, lightheadedness, and dizziness. Vitamin B12 also plays an important role in many bodily processes. For example, there is evidence of a relationship between low levels of vitamin B12 and an increased risk of heart diseases. 4. Accumulation Of Homocysteine Long-term use Continue reading >>

Told To Stop Metformin For Ten Days As Having Bowel Problems. Concerned Bg Will Increase?

Told To Stop Metformin For Ten Days As Having Bowel Problems. Concerned Bg Will Increase?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Told to stop metformin for ten days as having bowel problems. Concerned BG will increase? I was prediabetic on 1500 normal metformin a day. Turned diabetic had metformin increased to 2G per day and put on slow release. Was working well with LC diet as well went from Hba1c of 53 to 40 in 3 months. Always had constipation problems, but just recently changed to 5 days constipation then stools normal and then 2 days roughly of diarrhea then constipated again. Gp thought diarrhea was overflow and I was told to take cosmocol which is basically like fibergel. But it didn't improve Gp has now advised to stop metformin for ten days to see if diarrhea stops. I presume if so he will stop it all together, if not then he will investigate further. My concern is if I stop metformin will my blood sugars go up again? Does anyone have any experience of any of it? Or can anyone advise whats liable to happen? Feel rather in the dark and scarred of stopping it to be honest. Any advise would be appreciated. I was prediabetic on 1500 normal metformin a day. Turned diabetic had metformin increased to 2G per day and put on slow release. Was working well with LC diet as well went from Hba1c of 53 to 40 in 3 months. Always had constipation problems, but just recently changed to 5 days constipation then stools normal and then 2 days roughly of diarrhea then constipated again. Gp thought diarrhea was overflow and I was told to take cosmocol which is basically like fibergel. But it didn't improve Gp has now advised to stop metformin for ten days to see if diarrhea stops. I presume if so he will stop it all together, if not then he will investigate further. My concern is if I stop Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Cause Constipation

Does Metformin Cause Constipation

Question Originally asked by Community Member roanokebill Does Metformin Cause Constipation I have been taking 1000 mg Metformin with supper for diabetes. The last refill the dr changed the instructions to bedtime. I have tried taking the Met at that time but without food. About the same time I started having some loose bowels then constipation. I noticed today the label said take with food. Does this make a difference? Answer Make sure you take it with food. Whether taken with food or not Metformin can cause constipation. You might try drinking more water, eating more fiber (vegetables, whole grains), taking psyllium seed fiber and walking regularly. Each of those can help. Of course, there is always the laxative option but it’s best to try the others first. Good luck. You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Cort Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin?

What Is Metformin?

MORE Metformin is a prescription drug used primarily in the treatment of Type II diabetes. It can be used on its own or combined with other medications. In the United States, it is sold under the brand names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza and Riomet. "Metformin is very often prescribed as the first step in a diabetic's regime," said Ken Sternfeld, a New York-based pharmacist. How it works "When you're diabetic you lose the ability to use the insulin you need to offset the food," Sternfeld explained. "If you eat a carb or sugar that can't be metabolized or offset by the insulin you produce, your sugar levels will be higher. Metformin and drugs in that category will help your body better metabolize that food so that insulin levels will be able to stay more in line." Metformin aims to decrease glucose production in the liver, consequently lowering the levels of glucose in the bloodstream. It also changes the way that your blood cells react to insulin. "It makes them more sensitive to insulin," said Dr. Stephen Neabore, a primary care doctor at the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C. "It makes the same amount of insulin work better. It transports the insulin to the cells in a more effective way." Metformin may have a preventive health role, as well. New research presented at the American Diabetes Association 2017 Scientific Sessions showed that long-term use of metformin is particularly useful in preventing the onset of type II diabetes in women who have suffered from gestational diabetes. Because metformin changes the way the body uses insulin, it is not used to treat Type I diabetes, a condition in which the body does not produce insulin at all. Metformin & PCOS Metformin is sometimes prescribed to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), according to Neabore. "I Continue reading >>

Saxagliptin And Metformin (oral Route)

Saxagliptin And Metformin (oral Route)

Your doctor will want to check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. Let your doctor or dentist know you are taking this medicine. Your doctor may advise you to temporarily stop taking this medicine before you have major surgery or diagnostic tests, including procedures that use contrast dye. Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause a condition called lactic acidosis. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are severe, appear quickly, and usually occur when other health problems are present, such as a heart attack or kidney failure. Symptoms of lactic acidosis include abdominal or stomach discomfort, decreased appetite, diarrhea, fast or shallow breathing, a general feeling of discomfort, muscle pain or cramping, and unusual sleepiness, tiredness, or weakness. If symptoms of lactic acidosis occur, you should get immediate emergency medical help. Pancreatitis (swelling and inflammation of the pancreas) may occur while you are using this medicine. Check with your doctor right away if you have sudden and severe stomach pain, chills, constipation, nausea, vomiting, fever, or lightheadedness. If you are rapidly gaining weight, having shortness of breath, chest pain, extreme tiredness or weakness, irregular breathing, irregular heartbeat, or excessive swelling of the hands, wrist, ankles, or feet, check with your doctor immediately. These may be symptoms of a heart problem. This medicine may cause serious types of allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis and angioedema. These conditions may be life-threatening and require immediate medical attention. Check with your doctor right away if you have a rash, itching, a large, hive-like swelling o Continue reading >>

Constipation, Hard Stools, Fecal Urgency, And Incomplete Evacuation, But Not Diarrhea Is Associated With Diabetes And Its Related Factors

Constipation, Hard Stools, Fecal Urgency, And Incomplete Evacuation, But Not Diarrhea Is Associated With Diabetes And Its Related Factors

Constipation, hard stools, fecal urgency, and incomplete evacuation, but not diarrhea is associated with diabetes and its related factors Noriko Ihana-Sugiyama , Naoyoshi Nagata , Ritsuko Yamamoto-Honda , Eiko Izawa , Hiroshi Kajio , Takuro Shimbo , Masafumi Kakei , Naomi Uemura , Junichi Akiyama , and Mitsuhiko Noda Noriko Ihana-Sugiyama, Ritsuko Yamamoto-Honda, Hiroshi Kajio, Mitsuhiko Noda, Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo 162-8655, Japan Noriko Ihana-Sugiyama, Masafumi Kakei, Division of General Medicine, Jichi Medical University Graduate School of Medicine, Tochigi 329-0498, Japan Naoyoshi Nagata, Eiko Izawa, Junichi Akiyama, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo 162-8655, Japan Ritsuko Yamamoto-Honda, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo 105-0001, Japan Eiko Izawa, Mitsuhiko Noda, Diabetes Research, Diabetes Research Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo 162-8655, Japan Takuro Shimbo, Center for Clinical Sciences, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo 162-8655, Japan Takuro Shimbo, Ohta Nishinouchi Hospital, Fukushima 963-8022, Japan Masafumi Kakei, First Department of Comprehensive Medicine, Saitama Medical Center, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Saitama 330-0834, Japan Naomi Uemura, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kohnodai Hospital, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Chiba 272-8516, Japan Mitsuhiko Noda, Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-0495, Japan Author contributions: Ihana-Sugiyama N and Nagata N wrote the manuscript; Nagata N is an equal first author; Nagata N a Continue reading >>

Taking Metformin? Here’s Everything You Need To Know

Taking Metformin? Here’s Everything You Need To Know

Metformin is often the first drug prescribed to people who have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Taken orally, metformin helps to control your blood sugar levels. Metformin is often used in combination with other drugs to treat diabetes. Without the proper long-term management of diabetes, it can cause serious health complications. One of the best ways to accomplish this is through the proper use of medications such as metformin and making appropriate lifestyle changes. If you’d like to learn about some of the other medications used to treat type 2 diabetes, please click here. How Metformin Works for Type 2 Diabetics Metformin is prescribed for type 2 diabetes because it can help control blood sugar spikes. So, how does this diabetes drug do this? . The drug reduces the amount of glucose (sugar) your liver produces and how much your body absorbs. Thus, metformin will increase the effect that insulin has on your body. In addition to increasing the body’s insulin sensitivity, patients often report a drop in their cholesterol levels. Metformin can impact your appetite, which results in fewer calories consumed and weight loss. Losing excess weight will also improve your body’s sensitivity to insulin. Please note that metformin should not be solely relied on to treat high blood sugar levels. Diet and exercise are crucial to proper management of your diabetes. This combined with a stable dosage of metformin can be very effective. What are the Side Effects Associated with Metformin? As with any drug, metformin does come with the risk of side effects. These can range from mild to severe. Less severe side effects usually subside within a few days to a couple weeks. If your side effects persist or get worse, alert your healthcare provider imediately. Metformin can cause Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Constipation: What’s The Connection?

Diabetes And Constipation: What’s The Connection?

Constipation is a common complication in people with diabetes. Living with diabetes means paying careful attention to all systems of your body. Some complications of diabetes are easily avoided or managed with proper blood sugar control. Depending on the type of diabetes, medication may be required to manage blood sugars and to protect the heart, kidney, brain, and other organs affected by diabetes. When it comes to managing constipation, though, diet and lifestyle changes may not be enough. Here’s what to know about why is occurs more often in people with diabetes and what you can do about it. Constipation can be defined as having fewer than three regular bowel movements each week. It can also be defined as unsatisfactory bowel movements with stools that are infrequent and difficult to pass. It can be unpleasant and even painful. A recent study found that constipation is more common in people with diabetes. It’s estimated that around 60 percent of people with long-standing diabetes deal with constipation. Damage to the nervous system is a known long-term complication of diabetes. High blood sugar levels from type 1 and type 2 diabetes can lead to diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage. Damage to the nerves controlling the digestive tract can lead to constipation, diarrhea, and incontinence. Poor blood sugar control over a long period of time may increase the likelihood and frequency of constipation. In addition to lifestyle choices and neuropathy, people with diabetes sometimes take medications that can slow gut mobility and cause constipation. Talk to your doctor about the side effects of any medications you take. Read more: 6 natural constipation remedies » If you feel stopped up from time to time, you’re not alone. Recent research indicates that constipation is Continue reading >>

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