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Can Metformin Cause Vision Problems?

New To Diabetes With Blurry Vision-help!

New To Diabetes With Blurry Vision-help!

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hi! I have just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. One of the first signs that sent me to the doctors was my blurry vision. My question is: will my eye sight ever get better once I am on medication for a while? I had been on Metformin for about ten days when it got better for a day and now it is blurry again. At first it was just blurry the farther out I looked but now it is with everything close. I do have an appointment to go the eye doctor.... but would like some help now..... cindylou that indicates your blood sugar is now coming DOWN! This blurriness, scary as it is, is just an effect of the sugar concentration in the lens of your eye. It should go away in a few days. Nothing to do with Diabetic Retinopathy that everyone fears as permanent. I only use reading glasses, but after 6 - 8 weeks, I had to buy a weaker strength lens....so like Linda said...it gets better! Hi! I have just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. One of the first signs that sent me to the doctors was my blurry vision. My question is: will my eye sight ever get better once I am on medication for a while? I had been on Metformin for about ten days when it got better for a day and now it is blurry again. That happened to me too, once my BG was under control my vision went back to normal. YAY! YAY! YAY! YAY! thank you all so much! it is driving me crazy........ One other thing you may want to consider as well. High BG levels had a drying effect on my eyes, (dry eyes), this lead to blurry and sometimes double vision out of one eye. cindylou that indicates your blood sugar is now coming DOWN! Nothing to do with Diabetic Continue reading >>

Protecting Your Eye Health When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

Protecting Your Eye Health When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

Protecting Your Eye Health When You Have Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes increases your risk for blindness and other vision problems, so its important to know the warning signs of complications. Sign Up for Our Everyday Health: Diabetes Step-by-Step Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Your type 2 diabetes puts you at risk of several eye conditions, including diabetic retinopathy (which affects the blood vessels in the eye), glaucoma , and cataracts . If left untreated, these conditions can cause vision loss or even blindness. Call your doctor if you notice any of these warning signs: Blurry vision that lasts for more than two days Sudden loss of vision in one or both eyes Floaters: black or gray spots, cobwebs, or strings that move when you move your eyes With regular checkups with your doctor and ophthalmologist , you can keep minor eye problems minor. And if you do develop a major problem, there are treatments that often work well if you begin them right away. Remember: The sooner diabetic retinopathy is diagnosed, the more likely these treatments will be successful. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Eyes — More Than Retinopathy

Diabetes And Your Eyes — More Than Retinopathy

You probably know that eye damage (retinopathy) is a major complication of diabetes. So when vision blurs, it’s normal to think the worst. But diabetes can cause blurred vision in several other ways, some of which are reversible. I’m embarrassed to admit I only recently found out that blurred vision is a symptom of diabetes, even without any retinal damage. When blood glucose levels go up, blood gets thicker. Thicker blood pulls in more fluid from surrounding tissues, including the lenses of the eye, impacting the ability to focus. -- Keep an eye on your vision! Learn about preventive steps and treatments for diabetic retinopathy from retinal specialist Dr. Charles Wykoff. >> Blood sugar and blurry vision According to WebMD, [Blurred vision] could just be a temporary problem that develops rapidly and is caused by high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar causes the lens of the eye to swell, which changes your ability to see. Changing the shape of the lens naturally throws off vision. This can be a chronic, 24/7 kind of problem, or it can occur only after a high-carb meal, when glucose is way up. The Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide says that after-meal blurriness can be prevented by avoiding high-carb meals. The cure for chronic, all-the-time blurriness is to get blood glucose down to normal range before meals. It may take as long three months of relatively normal blood glucose levels before vision returns to your baseline normal. Diabetes can also cause blurriness or double vision due to hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). In this case, lens shape is probably not to blame. Low blood glucose can make it hard for the brain to focus on what the eye is seeing. Vision usually returns to normal when glucose levels rise. If blurriness doesn’t go away when glucos Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Problems With Vision? Is It Permanent?

Can Metformin Cause Problems With Vision? Is It Permanent?

I’m afraid there is no simple answer to this one. But there is a clear way ahead. Let me explain. If you get blurry vision as soon as you start the metformin, there are some experts who say that this is could be a good sign. How come? Well, diabetes affects vision and you could have been losing your eyesight gradually, as your sugar levels went up over months and years. You are not even aware of this change in vision, because the loss is so gradual. RELATED: If You Take Metformin, You Need These Nutritional Supplements As soon as you start the metformin, your sugar suddenly comes under control and your eyes suddenly cannot adjust to the new, lower blood sugar, causing the blurry vision. The answer therefore could be to lower your starting metformin dose and then slowly, increase it over a few weeks/months, giving your body and your eyes a chance to adjust. The blurry vision could disappear with this. However, if you have started to experience blurry vision after using metformin for a few years, the answer could be very different. This form of vision loss happens due to loss of Vitamin B12 from the body, because Metformin interferes with our ability to absorb this vitamin from food. Vitamin B12 forms the protective sheath or insulation of all nerves in the body, including the one that is critical for vision, the optic nerve. When the optic nerve is damaged due to prolonged metformin use, the right solution is to immediately supplement with Vitamin B12. You should also know that with long term use, metformin also interferes with our ability to use two other vital nutrients, Vitamin B9 and Co Enzyme Q10 in the human body. This can cause a range of side effects – from hair loss and insomnia and heart palpitations to unexplained muscle pains. The real answer – to both Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Fortamet Side Effects Center

Fortamet Side Effects Center

Fortamet (metformin hydrochloride) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Metformin is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Fortamet is available in generic form. Common side effects of Fortamet include headache, muscle pain, nausea, vomiting, stomach upset or pain, diarrhea, gas, weakness, or a metallic taste in the mouth. Fortamet does not usually cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Low blood sugar may occur if Fortamet is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Fortamet including shortness of breath, swelling or rapid weight gain, fever, body aches, or flu symptoms. Fortamet should be taken once daily. Dosage is individualized based on effectiveness and tolerance. The maximum recommended daily dose is 2500 mg. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may result if you take Fortamet with drugs that raise blood sugar, such as: isoniazid, diuretics (water pills), steroids, phenothiazines, thyroid medicine, birth control pills and other hormones, seizure medicines, and diet pills, or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) may result if you take Fortamet with drugs that lower blood sugar, such as: alcohol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), beta-blockers, or probenecid. It may also interact with furosemide, nifedipine, cimetidine or ranitidine, amiloride or triamterene, digoxin, morphine, procainamide, quinidine, trimethoprim, or Continue reading >>

Transient Vision Loss In A Patient With Severe Metforminassociated Lactic Acidosis

Transient Vision Loss In A Patient With Severe Metforminassociated Lactic Acidosis

Transient vision loss in a patient with severe metforminassociated lactic acidosis From the 1Nephrology Unit and 2Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Da Costa, Burela, Spain Search for other works by this author on: From the 1Nephrology Unit and 2Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Da Costa, Burela, Spain Search for other works by this author on: From the 1Nephrology Unit and 2Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Da Costa, Burela, Spain Search for other works by this author on: From the 1Nephrology Unit and 2Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Da Costa, Burela, Spain Search for other works by this author on: From the 1Nephrology Unit and 2Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Da Costa, Burela, Spain Search for other works by this author on: QJM: An International Journal of Medicine, Volume 105, Issue 8, 1 August 2012, Pages 781783, S. Cigarrn, M.L. Rodriguez, M. Pousa, H. Menndez, M.J. Mendez; Transient vision loss in a patient with severe metforminassociated lactic acidosis, QJM: An International Journal of Medicine, Volume 105, Issue 8, 1 August 2012, Pages 781783, A 54-year-old male, insulin-dependent diabetic and chronic kidney disease stage I, was brought to Emergency Department with a complaint of acute vision loss, severe hypoglycemia, hyperventilation, metabolic acidosis and acute renal failure. Five days prior to admission suffered diarrhea and vomiting with loss of vision at the last 12 h. Home medications included insulin lantus, valsartan 160 mg, amlodipine 5 mg and metformin 850 mg twice a day. There was not previous history of drinking alcohol, smoking or drugs abuse. In the emergency room, physical examination revealed an ill man with a Kussmaul respiratory pattern with 34 breaths/min, dry mucous membranes a Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

For the Consumer Applies to metformin: oral solution, oral tablet, oral tablet extended release Along with its needed effects, metformin may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking metformin: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects of metformin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indiges Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Metformin Reduces The Incidence Of Open Angle Glaucoma

Metformin Reduces The Incidence Of Open Angle Glaucoma

Metformin Reduces the Incidence of Open Angle Glaucoma By Jessica G. Shantha, MD and T. R. Shantha, MD, PhD, FACA Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the world.1 A medical group submitted a report to Life Extension Magazine that provides persuasive data that the AMPK-activating drug metformin may be of significant benefit in protecting the eyes against the threat of blindness from open angle glaucoma. This report is written with some technical language that may make it challenging for some of our readers to understand. We choose to publish it with the caveat that a succinct practical suggestion on how to use metformin to potentially reduce glaucoma risk be made in the introduction. So here is what the medical group that authored this report recommends: Those with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and/or glaucoma should ask their doctor about prescribing a modest 250 mg-500 mg dose of metformin twice a day after meals as it may have unique beneficial mechanisms in protecting against this blinding disorder. We welcome you to read the report beginning on the next page that describes underlying pathologies of open angle glaucoma and how metformin can help to counteract them. Metformin is a decades-old antidiabetic drug used by millions of type II diabetics all over the world. It is inexpensive, quite commonly prescribed, and its effectiveness in reducing elevated blood glucose is well established. In addition to its antidiabetic properties, metformin has also been shown to provide a number of other health benefits, including weight reduction, promoting longevity, and reducing cancer incidence, as well as reducing or eliminating chronic pain.2-7 It hascalorie restriction mimetic cellular effects such as activating the energy enzyme adenosine monophosphate Continue reading >>

How To Manage Blurry Vision Caused By Metformin?

How To Manage Blurry Vision Caused By Metformin?

Blurry vision is a common side effect associated with a prolonged use of Metformin. This happens due to a deficiency of Vitamin B12 as Metformin is known to affect its absorption. Let’s look at how to manage this condition. Include Adequate Vitamin B12 in Your Diet Vitamin B12 takes care of some critical functions in the human body such as protecting the nervous system and the formation of red blood cells. Vitamin B12 also plays an important part in maintaining the heath of the optic nerve. This nerve is responsible for carrying signals from the eyes to the brain, and so its role is extremely important in interpreting what you see. A deficiency in B12 could make the optic nerve more vulnerable to several eye-related issues, such as a gradual loss of vision. Some good sources of Vitamin B12 are: Dairy products Beef liver Fish such as salmon, sardines and shellfish Eggs Soy Milk Red meat Eat Eye-Friendly Foods: In order to get relief from vision-related problems such as blurry vision, it is important to take care of your diet. Green leafy vegetables, foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids (oily fish such as salmon and tuna), eggs, almonds and carrots are some foods recommended for eye health. Perform Eye Exercises Eye exercises can help in dealing with blurry vision. This is particularly true if your job involves staring at a computer or laptop for too long. Listed below are a few easy eye exercises that can help. Try flexing It is a simple exercise to stretch your eye muscles and give you a break from staring at objects very close to you, usually gadget screens. With your head still, look up with your eyes and then go left, down, right and back to where you started from. Do it clockwise and anti-clockwise 10 times in each direction. You can also do a full roll of your eyes Continue reading >>

Metformin And Sleep Disorders

Metformin And Sleep Disorders

Go to: Abstract Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug. Deterioration of sleep is an important unwanted side effect of metformin. Here, the authors review and present the details on metformin and sleep problem. Keywords: Metformin, sleep disorders, side effect Go to: Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disorder. Millions of patients have to use anti-diabetic drugs. A widely used oral anti-diabetic drug is metformin (C4H11N5 · HCl). Under fasting conditions, about 50 % bioavailability of metformin has been observed.[1] After ingestion, metformin is slowly absorbed and reaches its peak level in blood in 1-3 hours, and its elimination half-life is about 1.5-6 hours.[1] The main route of metformin elimination is tubular secretion.[1] Metformin use results in decreased hepatic glucose production and decreased intestinal absorption of glucose.[1] In addition, metformin can help improve insulin sensitivity via increasing peripheral glucose uptake and utilization.[1] Similar to other drugs, adverse effects of metformin are reported. These can result in poor compliance of the diabetic patient,[1] causing an irregular intake of the drug.[1] Apart from the well known ill effects of hypoglycemia and diarrhea, other unwanted effects of metformin have also been observed. The effect of metformin on sleep is interesting. Here, the authors review and present the details on metformin and sleep problem. Go to: METFORMIN – INDUCED INSOMNIA Metformin – induced insomnia is widely mentioned in old and obese diabetic patients who have been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus recently and prescribed with metformin. The development of insomnia can be seen within a few days after starting metformin. This is an interesting unwanted effect that is not quoted in other antidiabetic drugs Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Affect Vision 275486

Can Metformin Affect Vision 275486

Can Metformin cause problem with vision? Is it permanent Update: I understand that vision problem can be caused by diabetes. But one of the side viagra triangle effects listed in Metformin's prescription information says that Metformin & blurred vision? Diabetes ForumMy doctor started me that day on 500 mg Metformin 2x a Diabetes This section of the forum can be used to discuss anything Metformin & blurred vision?Metformin and Blurred Vision,HbA1c | Diabetes Forum The Have anyone experienced blurred vision with metformin? Diabetes can affect many parts of the body, some parts only after having high glucose levels for many Can Metformin cause Blurred Vision? TreatoCan Metformin cause Blurred Vision? Complete analysis from patient reviews and trusted online health resources, including first-hand experiences.Can Metformin cause problems with vision? Is it permanent?If you get blurry vision as soon as you start the metformin, Questions / Can Metformin cause problems with vision? Affect Pregnancy Or Can I Carry On Blurry Vision with Metformin | ProHealth Fibromyalgia, ME I have been on Metformin for 5 days and am developing very blurry cialis alcohol vision. I can see far away, it is close that I have a problem with. I had laserMetformin and blurred vision Diabetes Support Forum UKHaving recently been diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes I started taking Metformin can affect your eye sight to this new normal your vision can metformin side effects eyesight MedHelpI also had some vision issues and Metformin side effects eyesight. com though obviously for type 1 insulin should not be used to replace insulin though can be Metformin (Oral Route) Side Effects Mayo Clinicblurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin Metformin (Oral Route) Mayo Clinic Footer. Continue reading >>

Eye Damage With Diabetes

Eye Damage With Diabetes

Diabetes that isn't under control can damage your eyes. These are types of eye damage that can occur with diabetes. Swelling of the Eye Lens Blurred vision is a common sign of diabetes that isn't under control. When blood sugar levels are high for a long time, body water is pulled into the lens, causing it to swell. It will take about six weeks, after getting blood sugar levels closer to normal, for the swelling to go away completely. People with diabetes shouldn't get new glasses or contacts until their blood sugar levels have been under good control for at least two months. If you get new glasses or contacts before the swelling goes down, the prescription will fit the swollen eye lens. After the swelling is gone, the prescription won't work any more. Weakened Blood Vessels Even though blurred vision is a sign that something is wrong with the lens of the eye, the worst damage happens to the blood vessels in the retina, in the back of the eye. After many years of high blood sugar levels, the walls of the blood vessels in the retina become weak and thin. The weak areas can bulge out and form pouches called micro-aneurysms. These weak, thinning areas can leak a fatty protein called exudate. If exudate leaks into the center of the retina, in an area called the macula, it will cause swelling, making it hard to see. When this condition goes untreated, it causes changes in your vision that can be permanent. Damage to the Retina Damage can sometimes go unnoticed until it leads to serious vision problems. This damage is called retinopathy, which means disease of the retina. Blood can leak out of the weak blood vessels in the retina and cause hemorrhages, called early diabetes retinopathy or background diabetes retinopathy. The hemorrhages get worse if blood vessels in the eye b Continue reading >>

Competact (metformin And Pioglitazone)

Competact (metformin And Pioglitazone)

What is Competact used for? Competact is licensed for use in people with type 2 diabetes, particularly overweight people, whose blood sugar is not controlled by the maximum tolerated dose of metformin alone. How does it work? Competact tablets contain two active ingredients, metformin hydrochloride and pioglitazone hydrochloride. Metformin hydrochloride is a type of antidiabetic medicine known as a biguanide. It works in a number of ways to decrease the amount of sugar in the blood. Firstly, it reduces the amount of sugar produced by cells in the liver. Secondly, it increases the sensitivity of muscle cells to insulin. This enables these cells to remove sugar from the blood more effectively. Finally, it also delays absorption of sugar from the intestines into the bloodstream after eating. Pioglitazone is a type of antidiabetic medicine known as a thiazolidinedione or glitazone. It helps to control blood sugar levels by increasing the sensitivity of liver, fat and muscle cells to insulin. This enables these cells to remove sugar from the blood more effectively. Pioglitazone also reduces the amount of glucose produced by the liver, and preserves the functioning of the cells in the pancreas (beta cells) that produce insulin. This combination of medicines helps control blood sugar levels both directly after meals and between meals. How do I take Competact? One Competact tablet should be taken twice a day (morning and evening) regularly every day. The tablets can be taken either with or without food, but if you find they upset your stomach this can be minimised by taking the tablets with or just after food. Swallow them with a drink of water. If you forget to take a dose, just leave out the missed dose and take your next dose as usual. Do not take a double dose to make up fo Continue reading >>

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