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Can Metformin Cause Uti

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: The Case Against A Pre-emptive Strike

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: The Case Against A Pre-emptive Strike

One of the most frustrating things about diabetes is the myriad of ways it can hurt you. Regular readers of this Viewpoint know that patients with diabetes are more prone to heart attacks, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease, as well as damage to the eyes, nerves, and kidney. As if this wasn’t enough, there is another common complication of diabetes that gets less attention, yet which affects thousands of patients every year. I’m talking about infections. Infections can be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or other pathogens, and patients with diabetes are more prone to a whole slew of them. Some of these infections are rare and potentially lethal, like mucormycosis, which almost never affects people without diabetes. Others are more common, like athlete’s foot, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. While anyone can come down with these conditions, folks with diabetes are more likely than those with normal blood sugar to be affected. Furthermore, the complications of those infections can be much more severe in people with diabetes, and can be more difficult to treat. Take urinary tract infections, for example. Women with diabetes are about two to three times more likely to have bacteria in their bladders than women without diabetes (interestingly, the same does not appear to be true for men). There also seems to be an increased risk of the infection spreading upwards into the kidneys in diabetic patients, and diabetic women with urinary tract infections are also more likely to require hospitalization than non-diabetic women. Why is this the case? Well, diabetes affects many systems that protect against infection in general, and against urinary tract infections specifically. Poor circulation in diabetes reduces the ability of infection-fighting white blood Continue reading >>

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

What sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The condition includes the total inability to have an erection and the inability to sustain an erection. Estimates of the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes vary widely, ranging from 20 to 75 percent. Men who have diabetes are two to three times more likely to have erectile dysfunction than men who do not have diabetes. Among men with erectile dysfunction, those with diabetes may experience the problem as much as 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. Research suggests that erectile dysfunction may be an early marker of diabetes, particularly in men ages 45 and younger. In addition to diabetes, other major causes of erectile dysfunction include high blood pressure, kidney disease, alcohol abuse, and blood vessel disease. Erectile dysfunction may also occur because of the side effects of medications, psychological factors, smoking, and hormonal deficiencies. Men who experience erectile dysfunction should consider talking with a health care provider. The health care provider may ask about the patient's medical history, the type and frequency of sexual problems, medications, smoking and drinking habits, and other health conditions. A physical exam and laboratory tests may help pinpoint causes of sexual problems. The health care provider will check blood glucose control and hormone levels and may ask the patient to do a test at home that checks for erections that occur during sleep. The health care provider may also ask whether the patient is depressed or has recently experienced upsetting changes in his life. Treatments for erectile dysfunction caused by nerve damage, Continue reading >>

Will You Have Urinary Tract Infection With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Urinary Tract Infection With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Drug comparison of Avastin, Maxalt-mlt for a 46 year old man NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

When You Have Diabetes And Urinary Problems

When You Have Diabetes And Urinary Problems

When You Have Diabetes and Urinary Problems By Elizabeth Woolley | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD Diabetes and urination problems often go hand in hand which can be stressful. Dealing with these issues can affect your daily living and quality of life. According to the National Institutes of Health, more than half of people with diabetes have bladder dysfunction. Difficulties with urination can happen as you get older, but when you have diabetes, bladder problems, and urinary tract infections can start earlier in life and occur more often. This is because diabetes can cause damage to the nerves that are responsible for urinary system health and function. In general, women are more likely to experience leakage or urinary incontinence than men because of different anatomical structures and bodily changes from pregnancy and delivery. Men may experience dribbling, weak stream, intermittent flow and urethral obstruction. Bladder problems can be caused by diabetes nerve damage, nerve damage from other causes, injuries, infections and other diseases. High blood sugar levels can cause frequent urination. The risk is increased with poor diabetes management, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, excess weight, advanced age, smoking and a sedentary lifestyle. Insulin use increases the risk for urinary incontinence. Overactive bladder : Bladder spasms or contractions cause an urgent strong need to urinate more than eight times a day or more than two times at night. Urine leakage or urinary incontinence can be a problem. Treatment options for overactive bladder include medication, bladder training methods such as timed voiding, electrical stimulation, Kegel exercises and surgery. Poor sphincter muscle control: The sphincter muscles are internal muscles that control the opening Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

In this article we will cover everything you need to know about diabetes and your risk for Urinary Tract Infections. Do you have an increased risk of Urinary Tract Infections now that you have diabetes? We will cover what a Urinary Tract Infection is, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment guidelines, as well as why they are more common in people with diabetes. More importantly, we will discuss steps you can take to prevent them! What Is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)? A urinary tract infection or UTI is an infection anywhere in your bladder, kidneys or in the urinary system. An infection of the upper urinary tract or the bladder is called a bladder infection or cystitis. An infection in the urethra is called urethritis. Women tend to be more at risk of these types of infections due to their anatomy; they have a much shorter area between the urethra and the opening to the urethra to the bladder. Urinary tract infections are rare in men under 50 due to their anatomy. A more serious infection of the lower urinary tract is an infection of the kidney and the ureters and is called pyelonephritis. This is a complication and occurs when the bladder infection progresses to the kidneys. I highly advise reading the following articles: According to the Stanford Medicine’s Michael Hsieh Lab, half of women and men will have experienced a urinary tract infection (UTI) during our lifetime at least once. They are the most common infection, and can lead to death in patients who are experiencing it severely. Antibiotics are the most effective therapy.The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases account 8.1 million visits to the clinic, hospitals for UTI purposes. For women, the risk of getting a UTI is 50 percent greater than a man. What Are The Symptoms of a UTI? L Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Utis

What You Need To Know About Utis

Burning when you urinate. A frequent urge to urinate. Pain in your back or abdomen. Do any of these symptoms sound familiar? These are all symptoms of a urinary tract infection, or UTI, for short. Studies show that people with Type 2 diabetes have a greater risk of getting a UTI than people without diabetes. Despite the fact that UTIs are all too common and downright annoying, they can also lead to more serious situations if they’re not caught and treated. What is a UTI, anyway? A UTI is an infection in your urinary tract. Your urinary tract includes your kidneys, bladder, ureters, urethra, and, in men, prostate. Most UTIs occur in your bladder, the organ that stores your urine. What causes a UTI? A UTI is caused by bacteria, usually from the bowels. Normally, the urinary tract system has safeguards to protect against infection. For example, the ureters, which are the tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder, have one-way valves to prevent urine from backing up into the kidneys. The process of emptying your bladder (called urination) also helps to flush out bacteria and other microbes. And a healthy immune system helps protect against infection, as well. Why are UTIs more common in people with diabetes? UTIs are the second most common type of infection. Women are 10 times more likely to get a UTI than men because of their anatomy. In fact, more than 50% of women will have a UTI at some point in their lives. If you’re a woman with Type 2 diabetes, your risk may be even higher, according to two recent studies. In one study, 9% of the subjects with diabetes had UTIs compared with 6% of those without diabetes. And the second study showed that people with diabetes had a 60% higher risk of getting a UTI compared to those without diabetes. Why are people with Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Uti?

Can Metformin Cause Uti?

Clorazepam Rigevidon Weight Gain Belviq vs Phentermine Brintellix and Alcohol Nexplanon Weight Loss Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) in Diabetes Mellitus Author: John L Brusch, MD, FACP; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD more... Predisposition to urinary tract infections (UTIs) in diabetes mellitus results from several factors. Susceptibility increases with longer duration and greater severity of diabetes. [ 1 ] High urine glucose content and defective host immune factors predispose to infection. Hyperglycemia causes neutrophil dysfunction by increasing intracellular calcium levels and interfering with actin and, thus, diapedesis and phagocytosis. Vaginal candidiasis and vascular disease also play a role in recurrent infections. Recently, the use of SGLT2 inhibitors, such as dapagliflozin, has produced concern about an increased risk of urinary tract infections in recipients of these medications. Levels of urinary glucose increased with greater doses of the medication; however, the incidence of urinary tract infections did not. Nonetheless, such patients do appear to be at a 3- to 5-fold increased risk of genital infections. [ 2 , 3 ] Over time, patients with diabetes may develop cystopathy, nephropathy, and renal papillary necrosis, complications that predispose them to UTIs. Long-term effects of diabetic cystopathy include vesicourethral reflux and recurrent UTIs. In addition, as many as 30% of women with diabetes have some degree of cystocele, cystourethrocele, or rectocele. All of these may contribute to the frequency and severity of UTIs in female diabetics. Complicated UTIs in patients who have diabetes include renal and perirenal abscess, emphysematous pyelonephritis, emphysematous cystitis, fungal infections, xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis, and papillary necrosis. The current article focuses on emphysematous UTIs, with which diabetes is closely associ Continue reading >>

Dapagliflozin And Metformin (oral Route)

Dapagliflozin And Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. It is very important to follow carefully any instructions from your doctor about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your doctor. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur because of lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise and diet. Furthermore, counseling on contraception and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in patients with diabetes during pregnancy. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would normally. Make allowances for changing time zones and keep your meal times as close as possible to your usual meal times. In case of emergency—There may be a time when you need emergency help for a problem caused by your diabetes. You need to be prepared for these emergencies. It is a good idea to wear a medical identification (ID) bracelet or neck chain at all times. Also, carry an ID card in your wallet or purse that says that you have diabetes and a list of all of your medicines. Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause a Continue reading >>

Jardiance Side Effects Center

Jardiance Side Effects Center

Jardiance (empagliflozin) is an inhibitor of the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) used as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Jardiance is also indicated to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death in adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Common side effects of Jardiance include: dehydration, dizziness, low blood sugar, nausea, increased urination, The recommended dose of Jardiance is 10 mg once daily in the morning, taken with or without food. Jardiance may interact with diuretics, insulin or insulin secretagogues. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. During pregnancy, Jardiance should be taken only if prescribed. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Our Jardiance (empagliflozin) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Diabetes Treated With Dapagliflozin.

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Diabetes Treated With Dapagliflozin.

Urinary tract infections in patients with diabetes treated with dapagliflozin. Johnsson KM, et al. J Diabetes Complications. 2013 Sep-Oct. AstraZeneca, Mlndal, Sweden. Electronic address: [email protected] J Diabetes Complications. 2013 Sep-Oct;27(5):473-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2013.05.004. Epub 2013 Jul 10. AIMS: Urinary tract infection is common in patients with type 2 diabetes. Possible causative factors include glucosuria, which is a result of treatment with sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Dapagliflozin is an investigative SGLT2 inhibitor with demonstrated glycemic benefits in patients with diabetes. Data from dapagliflozin multi-trial safety data were analyzed to clarify the association between glucosuria and urinary tract infection. METHODS: Safety data from 12 randomized, placebo-controlled trials were pooled to evaluate the relationship between glucosuria and urinary tract infection in patients with inadequately controlled diabetes (HbA1c >6.5%-12%). Patients were treated with dapagliflozin (2.5, 5, or 10mg) or placebo once daily, either as monotherapy or add-on to metformin, insulin, sulfonylurea, or thiazolidinedione for 12-24weeks. The incidence of clinical diagnoses and events suggestive of urinary tract infection were quantified. RESULTS: This analysis included 3152 patients who received once-daily dapagliflozin (2.5mg [n=814], 5mg [n=1145], or 10mg [n=1193]) as monotherapy or add-on treatment, and 1393 placebo-treated patients. For dapagliflozin 2.5mg, 5mg, 10mg, and placebo, diagnosed infections were reported in 3.6%, 5.7%, 4.3%, and 3.7%, respectively. Urinary glucose levels, but not the incidence of urinary tract infection, increased progressively with dapagliflozin dosage. Most identified infections were those Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: What You Need To Know

The urgent need to go. The burning pain when you do. The cloudy, foul-smelling urine. If you've experienced a urinary tract or bladder infection, you'd probably prefer to avoid another one. Unfortunately, if you have diabetes, you are up to twice as likely as those without the disease to develop these often painful infections. They’re especially common among women. But there’s a lot you can do to avoid them and to ease your discomfort when they do strike. Making healthy lifestyle choices is key to managing type 2 diabetes, but it can be hard to stay on track. Dr. Anthony Cardillo explains that focusing on diet, exercise and stress reduction can help you maintain control of your diabetes. 2017 Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or reprinted without permission from Healthgrades Operating Company, Inc. Use of this information is governed by the Healthgrades User Agreement. Why Diabetes Poses a Risk Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, occur when bacteria or other bugs invade your body’s drainage system. Normally, your immune defenses banish these bugs before they can grow and multiply. But if you have diabetes, the following factors interfere: Diabetes impairs some parts of your immune response. You have fewer white blood cells and T cells to fight off invading bacteria, viruses, and fungi. For the same reason, diabetics often develop UTIs caused by less commonly encountered germs. Routine antibiotics may be ineffective. Nerve damage can keep your bladder from emptying, either by weakening muscles or scrambling the signals between your brain and urinary system. Urine that remains in your body too long poses a greater infection risk. Sugar in your blood and urine can also contribute to a greater risk for UTI. Besides pain and Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Review Of Prevalence, Diagnosis, And Management

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Review Of Prevalence, Diagnosis, And Management

Go to: Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by variable degrees of insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, and increased glucose production. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of infections, with the urinary tract being the most frequent infection site.1–4 Various impairments in the immune system,5,6 in addition to poor metabolic control of diabetes,7,8 and incomplete bladder emptying due to autonomic neuropathy9,10 may all contribute in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections (UTI) in diabetic patients. Factors that were found to enhance the risk for UTI in diabetics include age, metabolic control, and long term complications, primarily diabetic nephropathy and cystopathy.11 The spectrum of UTI in these patients ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) to lower UTI (cystitis), pyelonephritis, and severe urosepsis. Serious complications of UTI, such as emphysematous cystitis and pyelonephritis, renal abscesses and renal papillary necrosis, are all encountered more frequently in type 2 diabetes than in the general population.12,13 Type 2 diabetes is not only a risk factor for community-acquired UTI but also for health care-associated UTI,14 catheter-associated UTI,15 and post-renal transplant-recurrent UTI.16 In addition, these patients are more prone to have resistant pathogens as the cause of their UTI, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive Enterobacteriaceae,17 fluoroquinolone-resistant uropathogens,18 carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae,19 and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci.20 Type 2 diabetes is also a risk factor for fungal UTI, mostly caused by Candida.21 Diabetes is also associated with worse outcomes of UTI, including longer hospitalizations and incre Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Recurring Uti

Type 2 Diabetes And Recurring Uti

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Im a 55 year old male who was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes two years ago. Since then I have been on Metformin 500mg tablets which I take twice a day. Since the beginning of May, I have had a recurring Urinary Tract Infection (burning sensation when I urinate), a high temperature and a general feeling of being unwell. I wake up two or three times during the night, soaked with sweat. I went to see my GP and traces of blood and protein were found in my urine. The doctor prescribed a 7-day course of Amoxicillin 250mg and although these seemed to help bring my temperature down, I was still experiencing discomfort when passing water. My doctor prescribed a further 5-day course of Amoxicillin 250mg. By the end of the second course of antibiotics the burning sensation seemed to have subsided. The practice nurse tested my urine on and confirmed that my infection had gone. However I wasnt convinced that it had completely gone away because my urine still seemed to be very strong and smelly at certain times of the day. My blood pressure has also been high since the onset of these infections. My GP has put me on Ramipril 2.5mg. Another urine test two weeks later showed that my UTI had returned. This time, my GP prescribed a 7-day course of Trimethoprim 200mg. Initially these seemed to clear the infection but within three weeks of finishing the course, my UTI was back. The practice nurse suggested I ask my doctor to refer me to a Urologist. This I did but unfortunately had to wait two months for an appointment. In the meantime I was prescribed another 7-day course of Trimethoprim 200mg. When I eventually saw the Urologist, he examined my prostate, which he said s Continue reading >>

Metformin / Saxagliptin Side Effects

Metformin / Saxagliptin Side Effects

For the Consumer Applies to metformin / saxagliptin: oral tablet extended release Along with its needed effects, metformin / saxagliptin may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking metformin / saxagliptin: More common Anxiety bladder pain bloody or cloudy urine blurred vision body aches or pain chills cold sweats confusion cool, pale skin cough depression difficult, burning, or painful urination difficulty with breathing dizziness ear congestion fast heartbeat fever frequent urge to urinate headache increased hunger loss of voice lower back or side pain nasal congestion nausea nightmares runny nose seizures shakiness slurred speech sneezing sore throat unusual tiredness or weakness Rare Cough or hoarseness Incidence not known Black, tarry stools bleeding gums blood in the urine or stools constipation darkened urine difficulty with swallowing hives or skin rash indigestion large, hard skin blisters large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs loss of appetite pains in the stomach, side, or abdomen, possibly radiating to the back pinpoint red spots on the skin puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue tightness in the chest unusual bleeding or bruising vomiting yellow eyes or skin Some side effects of metformin / saxagliptin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health Continue reading >>

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