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Can Metformin Cause Long Periods

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

How Metformin Is Used for Polycystic Ovaries Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a common cause of anovulation and infertility in women. These women do not ovulate (release eggs) regularly and therefore have irregular menstrual periods. The ovaries have many small cysts (2-7 mm diameter) called antral follicles, giving the ovaries a characteristic "polycystic" (many cysts) appearance on ultrasound. A relatively new method of treating ovulation problems in women with polycystic ovarian disease is to use an oral medication called metformin (brand name is Glucophage). Metformin has traditionally been used as an oral drug to help control diabetes. Then, some smart doctor figured out that polycystic ovarian syndrome treatment with metformin can be very effective. If Glucophage alone does not result in ovulation and pregnancy, we often use: If the combination therapy is not effective, we can try: Metformin Use with IVF Treatment We also use Glucophage in women going through in vitro fertilization for PCOS, and for those with very high antral follicle counts - if their ovaries are "polycystic" by ultrasound. We find that some women with polycystic ovaries respond with a "smoother" response to the injectable FSH medication if they have been taking Glucophage. Risks and Side Effects of Metformin / Glucophage In about 25% of women Glucophage causes side effects which may include abdominal discomfort, cramping, diarrhea and nausea. The side effects may be severe enough to make the woman stop the Glucophage medication. We are not aware of any serious complications resulting from Glucophage treatment. Another oral medication used for diabetes called Troglitazone has been associated with liver failure and death in rare cases. This has been publicized on television shows, in newspapers, et Continue reading >>

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

Metformin Question. Can Anyone Help?

Metformin Question. Can Anyone Help?

I have been having fairly abnormal bleeding pretty much since my first period. I have just begun taking 1500 MG of Metformin after not taking it for about 6 months. I have been on the Metformin again for about a week. Before I started taking the Metformin, I had just gotten off a week and a half period that came on its own even though I'm not sure if I even ovulated. I'm however noticing that I am spotting again on and off. It's starting to get a little heavier, but then it disappears again. (TMI Alert) When I just wiped, a few small blod clots came out, and I thought all of this stuff was supposed to come out with my period? Has any of this happened to you when you started to take Metformin? I have PCOS, but is it normal to bleed in between your period or does the Metformin eventually regulate everything? The reason why I'm asking is because I'm supposed to be taking Clomid for the first time after my next period begins, but I'm so confused with all of this bleeding! Any advice or personal experience would greatly help! Thanks guys =) i too am on metformin, and have PCOS. i am on 2000mg a day, when i first started it (2 yrs ago) i had this too, random spotting and passing clots. but eventually it settles down and then you get your normal period. although i am still irregular, i am just getting the usual af symptoms after 6 months with nothing. it helps to balance your hormones, but sometimes it's just the way your body want's to do things. but if you are concerned then i would suggest that you go and see your doc and get some reassurance. I have experienced the same problem. I have PCOS, am on 2000mg of metformin, and am trying to conceive. I have ireglar bleeding for approx. two to three weeks out of a month. Ti spoke with my doctors office just days ago and they sai Continue reading >>

Metformin, Constant Period - When Will It Stop?!

Metformin, Constant Period - When Will It Stop?!

Metformin, Constant Period - WHEN WILL IT STOP?! If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Metformin, Constant Period - WHEN WILL IT STOP?! Well after going through many hoops, dealing with ignorant doctors and waiting for eons for an appointment, I finally got in to see an endocrinologist about my PCOS. Naturally he gave me Metformin as a medication for treatment. I was so happy about this I started taking it the same day of my appointment. Here's my issue: I was already on my period when I saw the doctor. I had been on it off and on for about a week and a half (you know how us PCOS'ers have periods for more than the norm sometimes). Well, since taking the Metformin my period HASN'T STOPPED! Does this normally happen with a good amount of women that are on Metformin for PCOS? I'm worried because I don't want to stop the medication, I want to give it a chance. The doc is giving it 3 months to see how it's affecting me. I can understand this happening if my Metformin is just balancing my hormones, but I wanted to see if this happened to any one of you, how long did it take for the constant bleeding to stop? Did it take weeks, MONTHS?! I know there's already been a similar question on this topic, but I'm just really worried that I'll bleed forever! Please help. My period did the same when my dosage was increased to 1500 mg. He gave me the 100 mg (I think-it was a lower dose) of prometrium, and it stopped the period and then gave me a short one after I stopped the medicine. I hope it gets better for you. My only problem now with the increased dosage is g Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects - Prolonged Period.

Metformin Side Effects - Prolonged Period.

Metformin Side Effects - Prolonged Period. Ive been diagnosed with PCOS since I was 17 and was put onto Dianette which was ok till hit 20 and then pilled on 3 stone of weight. I then started taking Metformin which helped me lose 2 stone and get pregnant. This was back in 2006 and my son was born in 2007. I was told that after the pregnancy my PCOS systems would not return Unfortunately they have but are worse this time. I have been put back on Metformin and other than the regular side effect (stomach upset) everything was ok, till 2nd May when I came on my period and have not come off since. It is very painfull and there are lots of clots. I have been to the GP who has said that this is nothing to do with the Metformin Has anyone else has this side effect? Previously to taking the Metformin, my periods were very irregular. the heavy period sounds like PCOS thing. Some women with PCOS will have long an heavy periods. Have you seen a gyno yet for this? It has only happened the once but the GP has tried to give me FSH to stop the bleeding but I\'m worried as they can stop your periods all together. I've never heard of the excess bleeding being a side effect of the metroformin, but I have heard of it being a side effect of the PCOS and since your symptoms are stronger this could be what's going on. Good luck with getting the period to end. it't not a side effect of Metformin. Check with your doctor maybe you have something else going on or your body just has alot of "missed" periods to make up for. good luck The heavy AF use to happen to me after months of no-af. They lasted so long, I was put in the hospital and tested for everything... then told, as long as I don't feel dizzy, it's ok. Be careful with your iron (I use to inevitably become "temporarily anem Continue reading >>

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Here at Flo Living headquarters I speak with many women suffering with PCOS who have either been offered Metformin and decided against it or have tried Metformin and it’s not worked for them. If you have a diagnosis of PCOS it’s very likely that at some point your doctor has suggested Metformin. I personally was what would be considered the “perfect” candidate for this treatment when I was in my 20s and suffering with PCOS – overweight, struggling with acne and a complete lack of periods. However, I never tried it myself – instead I created a protocol for myself that became Flo Living. I’ve since helped many women manage their PCOS successfully with this protocol, just as I did my own diagnosis. That said, I speak with women so often about the Metformin option that I want to share my perspective with you. Although I do not dismiss the option completely, I do have some caveats and concerns. What is Metformin? Metformin is a first-line medication for those suffering with type 2 diabetes. It is also presented as a treatment for PCOS sufferers who are also overweight or obese. Not all PCOS sufferers have weight gain as a symptom, it depends on the kind of PCOS. Women with the kind of PCOS that causes weight gain are usually insulin resistant. Metformin reduces overall insulin levels. Insulin resistance is when the cells of your body become resistant to the hormone insulin, preventing glucose from entering your cells to be used for energy, and instead causing soaring levels of sugar blood stream bringing about diabetes, pre-diabetes or insulin-resistant PCOS. The connection between insulin and PCOS is blood sugar regulation. We hear about this most commonly with diabetes, but it’s also very important with PCOS. An unstable, constantly spiking and crashing, bl Continue reading >>

Irregular Periods - Management & Treatment

Irregular Periods - Management & Treatment

Although some women with PCOS have regular periods, high levels of androgens ('male' hormones) and excess insulin can disrupt the monthly cycle of ovulation and menstruation. If you have PCOS, your periods may be 'irregular' or stop altogether. The average menstrual cycle is 28 days with one ovulation when eggs are released, but anywhere between 21 and 35 days is considered 'normal'. An 'irregular' period cycle is defined as either: Eight or less menstrual cycles per year Menstrual cycles longer than 35 days Some women with PCOS also experience heavier or lighter bleeding during their menstrual cycle. Regular periods help to prevent excess thickening of the lining of the uterus (womb). Long gaps between periods can lead to abnormal cells building up inside the womb. It is important you have at least four cycles per year to avoid a build up that may include abnormal cells. Treatment options Hormonal contraception Your doctor can prescribe hormonal contraception to help regulate your menstrual periods. The medication can also reduce menstrual cramps, acne and excess hair growth. These medications include: A low–dose oral contraceptive pill ('the pill') Progesterone which stimulates the uterus and induces bleeding Hormonal implants Vaginal contraceptive rings Intra-uterine devices containing progesterone How they work The oestrogen and progesterone in hormonal contraception act to override the body's normal hormonal control of the menstrual cycle and ovulation. The oral contraceptive pill works by "switching the ovaries off", which means that when a woman is taking the pill the production of hormones such as testosterone is greatly reduced. The pill also increases the body's production of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), which binds to the main androgen testosterone Continue reading >>

Why Does Taking Medication For Diabetes (metformin, Invokana) Cause Me To Have Very Long Periods Despite Birth Control? (cross-posted To Ask A Doctor) : Diabetes

Why Does Taking Medication For Diabetes (metformin, Invokana) Cause Me To Have Very Long Periods Despite Birth Control? (cross-posted To Ask A Doctor) : Diabetes

I'm having a really worrying medical problem that I hope you can help me with. I was diagnosed with type two diabetes about a year and a half ago. When was first diagnosed I took insulin and my menstrual cycle was normal-for me anyway, 8 to 9 days and very painful cramping. I was able to skip my period with pills or the Nuvaring, my preferred birth control. Some info about me: Caucasian, 34 years old, 30 pounds overweight but losing weight due to Invokana, experiencing prolonged menstruation for more than eight weeks, live in the US, have type 2 diabetes, had one ovary removed at age 19. Unfortunately my blood sugar was still out of control with insulin and it made me gain weight, so I tried Metformin (for about 9 months) which I quit due to severe nausea and exhaustion. I'm now taking Invokana and having good numbers with my blood sugar. The menstrual bleeding is my only side effect. My problem is, with both of these pills, I had/have extremely long, heavy periods. I would have periods of 9 to 14 days on Metformin while using a new Nuvaring every 21 days. I've currently been bleeding on and off for over two months(!)--basically, since I started the Invokana. I've seen my gynecologist twice about this as well as my GP and they both agree that my reproductive health is fine, it's just a reaction to the medications. The gynecologist gave me a prescription for the generic version of Seasonique, since I was bleeding so much on the Nuvaring with either Metformin or Invokana. Unfortunately, the bleeding still hasn't stopped after 4 weeks on the pill. This is a problem for more than the obvious reasons--the annoyance of a ridiculously long period and cramps. When I was 19, I developed two non-cancerous tumors on my left ovary and it had to be removed. I'm supposed to take bir Continue reading >>

Effect Of Dosage Of Metformin On Menstruation And Lipid Profile In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Effect Of Dosage Of Metformin On Menstruation And Lipid Profile In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Effect of Dosage of Metformin on Menstruation and Lipid Profile in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01474967 Information provided by (Responsible Party): Hamidreza Mahboobi, Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of anovulatory infertility and causes menstrual disruption in 6.6-6.8% of women in reproductive age and is characterized by insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, hyperandrogenism and anovulation. The gaol of this study was to assess the effects of metformin on menstrual disorders and lipid profile in women with PCOS in bandarabbas. Poly cystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a common hormonal disorder in women that affecting of 6.6-6.8% of women o f reproductive age. PCOS associated with a broad range of clinical, hormonal and metabolic disorders consist of hirsutism, Obesity, Acne and elevated male hormones, anovulatory cycles, dyslipidemia and infertility. Metformin is an oral hyperglycemic agent witch by decrease insulin resistance and improving serum glucose level in diabetic patients and anovulatory cyle in women with PCOS. The goal of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of different dosage of metformin on menstruation and lipid profile in women with PCOS in banda-abbas. Effect of Dosage of Met Continue reading >>

Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Following Pharmacist Prescribing Of Metformin Leads To The Detection Of Complex Endometrial Hyperplasia.

Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Following Pharmacist Prescribing Of Metformin Leads To The Detection Of Complex Endometrial Hyperplasia.

Ann Pharmacother. 2013 Nov;47(11):1581-3. doi: 10.1177/1060028013504385. Abnormal vaginal bleeding following pharmacist prescribing of metformin leads to the detection of complex endometrial hyperplasia. University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. To describe a case where pharmacist prescribing of metformin therapy resulted in unexplained vaginal bleeding in a patient later diagnosed with complex endometrial hyperplasia. A 57-year-old woman with diagnoses of hypertension and dyslipidemia was assessed by a pharmacist with prescribing authorization for hypertension management. Cardiovascular risk assessment performed by the pharmacist resulted in the detection of metabolic syndrome confirmed by the patient's physician. The pharmacist prescribed metformin 500 mg twice daily for prediabetes and metabolic syndrome, resulting in vaginal bleeding 1 week following initiation of therapy. Bleeding stopped following discontinuation of metformin, and recurred on retrial. The symptoms were dose dependent as bleeding did not occur at a dose of 500 mg once daily, but recurred at a total dose of 1000 mg/d. The patient was referred for physical examination and endometrial ultrasound and sampling, and was found to have complex endometrial hyperplasia. Metformin is widely used for the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome as it improves ovulation and menstrual cycle regularity. In this case, the patient was not known to have polycystic ovary syndrome but was instead provided metformin for metabolic syndrome and hyperinsulinemia. It is believed that metformin's endocrine effects resulted in the sloughing of this hyperplastic tissue, prompting the pharmacist to refer the patient for medical assessment. This case is unique as it is the first of our knowledge to report a scenario wher Continue reading >>

Heavy Or Prolonged Periods (menorrhagia) And Pcos | Pcos.com

Heavy Or Prolonged Periods (menorrhagia) And Pcos | Pcos.com

Are Heavy or Prolonged Periods Disrupting Your Natural Menstrual Cycle? Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome is thought to affect upward of 10 percent of all women, which means it is likely to be the root cause of menorrhagia in many cases. PCOS period issues are one of the leading reasons women consult their physicians to seek medical solutions, along with obesity and hypertension-related symptoms.7 It is crucial to correct PCOS-related menorrhagia because the lack of regular periods induced by low levels of progesterone can increase a theoretical risk of endometrial cancer.5 Seeking help is a good course of action for women with PCOS because an influencing factor, Insulin Resistance, is something that can be addressed and action can be taken to reverse its effects. The correct medical term for a heavy or prolonged period is menorrhagia. It is characterized by severe cyclical bleeding or periods that last longer than seven days. Although some women might think they suffer from this condition, most do not experience blood loss excessive enough to be truly defined as menorrhagia. There are many causes for this condition, and the treatments vary depending on the underlying problem. The average volume of blood loss during a normal period is usually 40-50 ml. The established definition of a heavy period is when a woman passes more than 80 ml of blood each period for several months.6 Obviously it is not realistic to actually measure the blood flow so most medical practitioners go by a detailed description of a womans period instead. Heavy bleeding and some clotting can be common issues for most women at some point in their lives. When this type of excessive flow occurs consecutively for several months it can indicate problems. A menstrual period that lasts longer than a week A perio Continue reading >>

10 Facts About Metformin And Pcos

10 Facts About Metformin And Pcos

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a relatively common hormonal disorder that is one of the leading causes of infertility. Some women who have PCOS develop insulin resistance. This occurs when the cells of the body don’t respond well to a hormone known as insulin. Insulin allows the cells to take sugar (glucose) from the blood. If the cells don’t take in this sugar it leads to higher levels of glucose and insulin circulating through the body in the bloodstream. This, in turn, leads to increased levels of androgens (male hormones) which cause the classic symptoms of PCOS such as excess hair growth and more importantly in terms of fertility – lack of ovulation. Getting pregnant with PCOS can be possible with the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Here are the Top 10 facts about metformin use in PCOS patients: 1) Metformin is a medication that is primarily used to treat type 2 diabetes. It is marketed in the US under the names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza and Riomet. It is available as a tablet, extended-release tablet and a liquid. 2) With infertility patients, it is used not because the women with PCOS have diabetes (although they do have an increased risk of developing this disease), but because it acts on improving use of insulin by the cells of the body and therefore reducing the level of insulin in the blood. This can lead to improved ovulation, more regular menstrual cycles as well as a reduction in excessive hair growth, acne and weight gain. It may also slow down or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes later in life. 3) To determine if it would be helpful for a patient with PCOS to use Metformin, they are given a 2 Hour Glucose Tolerance Test. First, a fasting blood sample is drawn to determine a baseline glucose level. The patient t Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Affect Your Period 342853

Does Metformin Affect Your Period 342853

Best Diabetes Medication | DiabeticNewsNow.com Ad The most effective diabetes medication according to researchers how long after starting metformin did u get your period | Mom how long after starting metformin did u get your and shorter after starting Metformin. I had period Find out if having undergone an abortion could affect your Can metformin delay your period? | Metformin FAQ Can metformin delay your period? Talk to your doctor if this side effect is becoming a problem. Does taking metformin 500 mg lead to hurting the pancreas? metformin menstrual cycle MedHelp Common Questions and Answers about buy viagra usa Metformin menstrual cycle. it does affect your I know Provera should induce my period, but does this mean that I am Can metformin prevent or delay your period? | FertilityTies Expert fertility information on I have never missed a period before and my cycles are always between 27-34 days. I was perscribed metformin for PCOS and take 1 -500mg metformin and menstruation MedHelp Common Questions and Answers about Metformin and menstruation. hasn't as I have a few side affects that I now my period didn't come. Do you think Symptoms Of A Diabetic can.diabetes.affect.your.period CAN DIABETES AFFECT YOUR PERIOD ] The REAL cause of Diabetes (and the solution) An example is metformin a widely prescribed drug for diabetes treatments. Glucophage XR does the medication affect your female period 2 Answers (question resolved) Posted in: generic viagra glucophage, glucophage xr Answer: Yes it can affect your menstrual cycle learn more at: metformin cause period symptoms? other side effects -Doctors Doctors Lounge Endocrinology Answers just before i went to see her i had a period. As far as metformin causing you to bleed, it can cause you to start @ Can Diabetes Affect Your Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

Metformin And Almost Constant Bleeding

Metformin And Almost Constant Bleeding

I've been taking metformin for nearly three months to try to sort out very infrequent periods from PCOS, and have now hurtled to the other extreme and have been bleeding to one degree or another (but mostly mediumish spotting) for about 2/3 of the time. I am pretty certain I can discern a longish period, then a week off, then two weeks of this spotting. Obviously the thing to do is talk to my doctor about it, and I will, but would love some advance thoughts of what she might say. Has anyone experienced anything similar? Hi I've not had experience of this yet. I just got put on metformin a month ago, so far my first perido on it was the normal 5 week length I always get. That's got me worried now though. Have you found the metformin helped with other symptoms? I've been on metformin for ages for PCOS. I think I might have had similar issues at the start, but it did calm down. I found it pretty amazing tbh and I was able to regulate cycles enough to be able to pinpoint ovulation and concieve first time of trying (huge suprise when i was told that I'd probably not have kids ever!) I am a slim PCOS-er though- not sure if that makes a differece in how effective it is How are you finding the gastric side effects? I haven't even had the gastric side effects! I was perversely quite looking forward to them as a possible weightloss tactic. In that case I will ask about progesterone, but be prepared to wait a little longer to see if it calms down naturally if my doctor suggests it. pipistrello you do not want the gastric side effects. I've had them right from the first pill. They're horrendous. Agree with A. I was same. I recently reatarted after having dd and it was hellish. I have to build from 1/4 to 2 whole tabs over 6 months or it's like food poisoning nausea and stomach pai Continue reading >>

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