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Can Metformin Be Used To Treat Type 1 Diabetes?

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

Insulin Vs. Metformin Treatment

Insulin Vs. Metformin Treatment

Diabetes affected 7.8 percent of the American population in 2007. Diabetes has several causes. Type 1 diabetes, previously called juvenile diabetes, caused by failure of the pancreas to produce insulin, affects 5 percent to 10 percent of people with diabetes, while Type 2 diabetes, previously called adult-onset diabetes, accounts for most of the rest, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders. Different drugs are used to treat diabetes, depending on the cause and severity of the disease. Insulin, an injectable medication, and metformin, an oral medication, have different actions. Video of the Day The purpose of both insulin and metformin is to lower blood glucose levels. Insulin injections replace the insulin your body can no longer make when the cells in the pancreas cease to function. Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic, which lowers blood glucose levels by decreasing the liver’s output of glucose. Metformin also increases insulin sensitivity, and improves not only blood glucose levels but also lipid levels and often results in weight loss. Of all diabetics, 14 percent take insulin only, 57 percent take oral medications only and 14 percent take a combination of both, the NIDDK reports. Oral hypoglycemics are used only in Type 2 diabetes, because Type 1 diabetics make little or no insulin, so reducing the glucose levels produced by the liver won’t reduce blood glucose levels. Without insulin, glucose can’t enter cells and remains in the bloodstream. While all Type 1 diabetics take insulin, some Type 2 diabetics also need insulin in addition or instead of oral hypoglycemics such as metformin. Insulin, which must be injected, comes in several forms and doses, and can have rapid or slow onset. Diarrhea, the most common side eff Continue reading >>

Metformin Could Improve Heart Health In Type 1 Diabetes Treatment

Metformin Could Improve Heart Health In Type 1 Diabetes Treatment

Metformin could improve heart health in type 1 diabetes treatment Metformin could improve heart health in type 1 diabetes treatment Metformin , the commonly used diabetes drug , could be effective in slowing down heart disease in people with type 1 diabetes , research has shown. The inexpensive medication is frequently used to lower blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes patients, but Newcastle University researchers now think it could also have other benefits. Dr Jolanta Weaver, senior lecturer in diabetes medicine at Newcastle University and honorary consultant diabetologist at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Gateshead, led the research. She said: "As the outcomes of heart disease are worse in diabetic versus non-diabetic patients, there is a need to identify additional treatment options. Metformin could be routinely used by patients with type 1 diabetes to help lower their chances of developing heart disease , by increasing a repair mechanism created by vascular stem cells released from the bone marrow ." Heart disease is the leading cause of illness in people with diabetes and accounts for more than half of all fatalities. The findings of this clinical trial , which have been published in the Cardiovascular Diabetology journal, are a major development in understanding the best way to improve type 1 diabetes treatment , the researchers said. The trial involved a group of 23 people aged between 19 and 64 who had lived with type 1 diabetes for up to 23 years and had no evidence of heart disease. Each participant was given up to three tablets of metformin for eight weeks. Their stem cells were measured directly in the blood and researchers grew test tube stem cells, to observe how they behaved. Within the same age bracket of the other participants, nine further people were Continue reading >>

Type 1 Lifer Being Put On Metformin

Type 1 Lifer Being Put On Metformin

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi there, it's been a long time since I've visited the forum but i have a question that I'm hoping somebody may be able to help me with. I've been a Type 1 diabetic for 40 years now (I'm 45) and recently suffered a heart attack (mid March) which required a stent. Ironically I'd already been working with my wonderful DSN for the previous year to lower my high HbA1c, lose weight with an LCHF diet and exercise but unbeknown to me I already had coronary heart disease. After my heart attack I've been very motivated to bring my levels down and stabilise them (I'm on a pump) and be as healthy as i can. I went to see my consultant on 17th May and although my levels are stabilising, my HbA1c has reduced greatly and I've had no c-peptide tests he has decided that I've developed Type 2 on top of my Type 1 and has prescribed Metformin to be started 3 months on from the heart attack (so mid June). I feel really worried about this as I've never heard of a T1 having to go on this drug and i can find only limited info on it and it seems to be all doom and gloom (people dying of lactic acidosis, horrid side effects, etc). There's plenty of info on T2's on Metformin having to go on insulin but not the other way around and i can't seem to get an appointment to discuss it. I'm really thinking of not taking it. My May HbA1c was 67 which I've got down from 83 and I'm still working on getting it in range and although I'm around 20lbs overweight it is slowly coming off! I can't understand the need???? Is there anybody out there with a similar experience? I'm Type 1 on MDI (Novorapid and Levemir) and also take one 500mg Metformin twice a day. I love it. My BS is predictable ( Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Treatments

Type 1 Diabetes Treatments

People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) can live long, happy lives with proper care and disease management. Advancements in medication types and delivery methods give people the freedom to choose which treatment options work best with their particular circumstance. T1D prognoses can be greatly improved with a combination of treatments and lifestyle choices. Insulin and other medications Insulin Type 1 diabetes is managed through use of a variety of insulins. People with T1D must work closely with their medical team to find the right insulin treatment for their condition. Further information about the types of insulin and their effects are available on our insulin page. Insulin can be delivered via syringes or pens, pumps or new artificial pancreas systems. Though the administration method, frequency and type of insulin dosage vary on a case-by-case basis, injections may be needed multiple times per day. Metformin and other medications Metformin: Combined with insulin, diet and exercise, type 2 diabetes (T2D) drug metformin is sometimes prescribed to people with T1D to help treat their diabetes. Metformin helps control the body’s blood-sugar levels and how the liver processes sugar. Pramlintide (Symlin): Used in conjunction with insulin, pramlintide is often prescribed after other medications prove not as effective as needed. It acts as a hormone to help the body better control blood sugar. Blood pressure drugs, cholesterol medications and aspirin: Medications for high blood pressure and high cholesterol as well as aspirin can be prescribed with insulin to help the overall health and treatment of diabetes. Since people with diabetes have an increased chance of cardiovascular disease, these drugs are used in combination with other diabetes medications. Side effects of medicat Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Metformin

Type 1 And Metformin

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I am just wondering what your views are on metformin for type 1 diabetics, my consultant wants to put me on it so I can lower my insulin and loose weight ? x I'm Type 1 and on Metformin - I think it's a great idea. It's a generally well tolerated drug albeit with a reputation for causing gas, but I've never had any problems with it. It will mean that you can reduce the amount of insulin you are on slightly and will have a beneficial effect on the dawn phenomenon as it inhibits your liver dumping glycogen. If you take it and reduce your carbs then you will certainly lose weight. I am very interested in taking this drug. I don't see a hospital consultant I only see the Diabetic Nurse at my GP's, would she be able to prescribe this? I am seeing her shortly to have my HBA1c checked again as the last one was rather high, 7.9, due to me waking up very high. Ialso need to lose a LOT of weight Don't really have any views to be honest, if your consultant thinks it well help with your weight and insulin usage then I would be tempted to take it. I am not sure if the diabetic nurse can prescribe this, it may be worth having a word with her good luck xx It has helped my pcos more than anything and I went on it before insulin as needle phobic not done any harm didn't lower my levels but has helped weight loss. Questions for you all, when exactly are you supposed to take the Metformin? My doctor has suggested me taking it but I haven't found a benefit from it when I've tried it in the past. I am hoping it will help increase weight loss. I also have pcos which is actually in control. Also when should you take it if you wanted to reduce the the dawn affect. Thanks all Continue reading >>

Metformin For Type 1 Diabetes - Really? Why?

Metformin For Type 1 Diabetes - Really? Why?

You've heard it before: someone with type 2 diabetes goes on insulin. That's no surprise. But how often have you heard the reverse — someone with type 1 going on Metformin? Since the launch of Symlin in 2005, it's not uncommon for people to treat their type 1 diabetes with a supplemental injectable medication. But hang around long enough, and you too might get to know someone with type 1 who takes insulin and oral meds, those formerly known as "type 2 only" drugs. Really? Type 1's taking oral meds alongside insulin? To clarify this, I just had to query some experts. Just like in type 2 diabetes, people with type 1 diabetes can sometimes suffer from insulin resistance (when the insulin that's present can't perform it's work properly), and Metformin can lower your insulin requirements by helping the body make better use of the stuff — in this case coming from an injection or insulin pump. Gary Scheiner, CDE, author, and head of Integrated Diabetes Services in Wynnewood, PA, explained it this way: "Some of the more creative and aggressive endos are prescribing Metformin for type 1's, particularly if they are overweight or requiring very large basal insulin doses. In addition to having some mild appetite-suppression effects, it will enhance insulin sensitivity by hepatic cells (in the liver) and limit the amount of glucose secreted by the liver. Personally, I think it can be helpful during adolescence as well. As long as the patient has good liver and kidney function, the side effects and risks are negligible." I also learned this: a couple of other uses of Metformin for women to consider are PCOS (ovary disease) and pregnancy. Kelley Champ Crumpler, RN, who is a diabetes nurse educator and a type 1 diabetic married to an endocrinologist with type 1 diabetes (how's that Continue reading >>

The Addition Of Metformin In Type 1 Diabetes Improves Insulin Sensitivity,diabetic Control, Body Composition And Patient Well-being.

The Addition Of Metformin In Type 1 Diabetes Improves Insulin Sensitivity,diabetic Control, Body Composition And Patient Well-being.

1. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2007 Jan;9(1):143-5. The addition of metformin in type 1 diabetes improves insulin sensitivity,diabetic control, body composition and patient well-being. AIM: As many overweight people with T1DM are insulin resistant, adjuvant therapy with insulin sensitising agents, such as metformin, may be beneficial. This studyevaluated the effect of adjuvant metformin in T1DM on insulin sensitivity,diabetic control, body composition, quality of life (QOL) and treatmentsatisfaction.MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 3-month prospective open-labelled pilot study of 16patients aged 18-40 with T1DM and body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m(2) wasperformed. The patients received 500-850 mg metformin twice daily. Insulinsensitivity, assessed by a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test [n=5], body composition, HbA(1c) and quality of life (QOL) were measured beforeand after treatment. A retrospective review of 30 patients with T1DM treated withmetformin for at least 4 months was also performed. BMI, HbA(1c) and insulinrequirements during metformin treatment was compared to pre-metformin data, andto patients treated with insulin only.RESULTS: In the pilot study, insulin sensitivity increased significantly from0.86 +/- 0.33 x 10(-4)/min/(microU/ml) to 1.17 +/- 0.48 x 10(-4)/min/(microU/ml) after 3 months adjuvant therapy (p = 0.043). This was associated with a decreasedinsulin requirement and mean daily blood glucose. There were no significantchanges in HbA(1c) or body composition. QOL significantly improved (p < 0.002).The retrospective review revealed an initial reduction in HbA(1c) (0.8 +/- 1.4%, p = 0.001). This effect diminished with prolonged treatment. BMI decreased inpatients remaining on metformin for a 2-year period (0.5 +/- 0.5kg/m(2), p =0.042).CONCLUSION: Continue reading >>

Additional Treatments For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Additional Treatments For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Medical treatments abound for the insulin-dependent By Gary Scheiner MS, CDE I never really cared for the saying, “There’s more than one way to skin a cat.” I’d really like to know… who is out there taking the skin off of cats? And what are they doing with the hides, not to mention the carcass? And then there’s the grisly thought of multiple ways to accomplish the actual skinning. Ick. For those with insulin-dependent diabetes, there truly is more than one way to skin the proverbial cat. While insulin remains necessary in the treatment of all cases of type-1 diabetes and many cases of type-2 diabetes, it is no longer the only medication for managing blood sugar. A number of other medical treatments can be used safely and effectively along with insulin. Some are oral medications (pills) while others are injected. Some have been used for decades as treatments for type-2 diabetes, with benefits for people with type-1 only recently discovered. And some have just entered the market recently. These non-insulin treatments may hold a great deal of potential for helping you to improve your diabetes control quality of life.Not all are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use by those who take insulin. However, they may still be prescribed by your physician if he/she feels that the benefits outweigh any potential risks. This is called “off label” prescribing. Some physicians are more comfortable with off-label prescribing than others. The whole idea is to know your options so that you and your physician can have an intelligent conversation and make an educated decision together. Getting your health insurance to cover an off-label medication is another story altogether. However, many health plans will cover off-label medications if your physician su Continue reading >>

Is Metformin Effective For Type 1 Diabetes?

Is Metformin Effective For Type 1 Diabetes?

Is Metformin Effective for Type 1 Diabetes? At what point, if any, should one consider the addition of metformin to the regimen of an adherent patient with type 1 diabetes who is not well controlled on insulin? Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Presbyterian College School of Pharmacy; Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Good Shepherd Free Medical Clinic, Clinton, South Carolina The addition of off-label metformin to insulin therapy to improve insulin sensitivity, promote weight control, and reduce insulin dose requirements in patients with type 1 diabetes has been assessed in systematic reviews.[ 1 , 2 ] One review sought to assess the effects of metformin when added to insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes in adolescents.[ 1 ] The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, and EMBASE were searched, along with databases of ongoing clinical trials, for randomized controlled trials of at least 3 months' duration. Trials that were included compared metformin added to insulin vs insulin therapy alone. Two trials met inclusion criteria, representing 60 patients in total. Although a lack of heterogeneity made meta-analysis impossible, the authors did note that both studies found a reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c values when metformin was added to insulin. One of the studies also showed a 10% decrease in insulin dosage among those taking metformin. Hypoglycemia and gastrointestinal disturbances were among the most commonly occurring adverse effects of combination therapy. Another systematic review evaluated the addition of metformin to insulin in type 1 diabetes.[ 2 ] This review identified 9 studies, including both adolescents and adults, that involved randomization with informed consent. The studies compared metformin vs placebo or another comparator in parallel or cro Continue reading >>

Effect Of Metformin In Patients With Type-1 Diabetes With Inadequate Glycaemic Control By Insulin And Diet

Effect Of Metformin In Patients With Type-1 Diabetes With Inadequate Glycaemic Control By Insulin And Diet

Ninety percent of patients with type-1-diabetes will develop late-diabetic complications in the eyes, kidneys, nervous- or cardiovascular-system. Poor glycaemic control is an important risk-factor for development of these late-diabetic complications. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)-study showed, that improved glycaemic control can prevent the development and progression of these late-diabetic complications. Until now treatment with insulin- and diet-therapy has been the only treatment-modalities available to improve the glycaemic control in patients with type-1-diabetes. A substantial number of these patients still have long-standing poor glycaemic control despite intensive treatment with insulin- and diet-therapy. The antidiabetic drug metformin has shown to be able to improve the glycaemic control in combination with insulin and furthermore reduce both mortality and the risk of developing cardiovascular disease in patients with type-2-diabetes. Only few small studies have investigated the effect of treatment with metformin in patients with type-1-diabetes. These studies have suggested a positive effect of metformin in these patients too. Method: 100 patients with type-1-diabetes with persistent poor glycaemic control i.e. HbA1c > 8.5% during the last 12 months are eligible. Patients are treated for one month with placebo. Hereafter half of the patients will be treated with metformin and the other half continues with placebo for 12 months both as add-on therapy. All patients are continuing ongoing treatment with insulin throughout the study. Before and after the start of treatment with metformin the effect on glycaemic control and other known risk-factors for development of cardiovascular disease i. e. blood-pressure, fasting lipids, urine-albumine- Continue reading >>

Could Taking Metformin Prevent Type 1 Diabetes?

Could Taking Metformin Prevent Type 1 Diabetes?

The Scottish Universities of Exeter and Dundee are combining efforts for a trailblazing new study that aims to find out if lifestyle and environmental factors affect the development of type 1 diabetes and if the most common diabetes drug can be the solution. Metformin is a widely prescribed diabetes drug most often used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes because it increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin, decreases the amount of sugar excreted by the liver, and increases the amount of sugar absorbed by the muscles. Scientists want to find out if metformin can prevent type 1 diabetes by essentially taking some stress off of the body’s hypothetically overworked beta cells. The study is being conducted in Scotland because according to the press release, the country has the 3rd highest incidence of type 1 diabetes in the world, highly organized records of its type 1 diabetes citizens, and a unified group of pediatric diabetologists. JDRF, the charity dedicated to funding type 1 diabetes research is backing the study’s initial costs of $1.7 million. Can Metformin Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in At-Risk Individuals? Researchers plan on contacting every one of the 6,400 families in Scotland with a type 1 diabetes diagnosis and asking children between the ages of 5 and 16 who either have a sibling or a parent with type 1 diabetes diagnosed before the age of 25 to get a blood test. This test will be used to check for antibodies to find out if they are at high risk for developing type 1 diabetes. Those at high risk will be asked to participate in the study called the Accelerator Prevention Trial (adAPT) which will put the children into two groups. One of the groups will take metformin for four months and the other a placebo. The children will be checked three times during t Continue reading >>

Nice Guidance - Metformin In Type 1 Diabetes - General Practice Notebook

Nice Guidance - Metformin In Type 1 Diabetes - General Practice Notebook

NICE guidance - metformin in type 1 diabetes metformin should be considered as adding to insulin therapy if an adult with type 1 diabetes and a BMI of 25 kg/m2 (23 kg/m2 for people from South Asian and related minority ethnic groups) or above wants to improve their blood glucose control while minimising their effective insulin dose Home| About us| Facebook| Contact us| Authors| Help| FAQ This site is intended for the use of healthcare professionals only. A licensed medical practitioner should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Copyright 2016 Oxbridge Solutions Ltd. Any distribution or duplication of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited. Oxbridge Solutions Ltd receives funding from advertising but maintains editorial independence more... GPnotebook stores small data files on your computer called cookies so that we can recognise you and provide you with the best service. If you do not want to receive cookies please do not use GPnotebook. Continue reading >>

Six-month Clinical Trial Reveals Addition Of Metformin Fails To Improve Glycemic Control In Adolescents Living With Type 1 Diabetes

Six-month Clinical Trial Reveals Addition Of Metformin Fails To Improve Glycemic Control In Adolescents Living With Type 1 Diabetes

Six-Month Clinical Trial Reveals Addition of Metformin Fails to Improve Glycemic Control in Adolescents Living with Type 1 Diabetes Showed improvements to cardiovascular risks—reduced weight, BMI, total daily insulin usage BOSTON, December 1, 2015––Six months of adjunctive metformin therapy does not improve glycemic outcomes in obese adolescents with type 1 diabetes, according to new research from T1D Exchange and funded by the JDRF. However, it may have a beneficial effect on measures of obesity, including weight and BMI. The results, published in the current issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, are from the largest clinical trial to date examining the effect of metformin on overweight and obese adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Though the body mass composition of type 1 patients has traditionally been normal or underweight, recent data from the T1D Exchange shows that adolescents with type 1 diabetes have not escaped the global obesity epidemic. Metformin, an oral medication used primarily to treat type 2 diabetes by helping control blood sugar levels and improving insulin resistance, has shown significant potential benefits among adults. However, studies of adolescents have been small, of short duration, produced inconclusive results or did not focus on overweight and obese adolescents. Thus, the researchers sought to assess the efficacy and safety of metformin as an adjunct therapy in overweight adolescents with type 1 diabetes. They studied changes in HbA1c levels—a fundamental measure of diabetes management—as a primary outcome. They also explored changes in total daily insulin and fluctuations in blinded continuous glucose monitors, BMI/body composition, blood pressure, and lipids. “Being overweight or obese with type 1 diabetes h Continue reading >>

A New Perspective On Metformin Therapy In Type 1 Diabetes

A New Perspective On Metformin Therapy In Type 1 Diabetes

A new perspective on metformin therapy in type 1 diabetes 1 and on behalf of The REMOVAL Study Team 1Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, 126 University Place, Glasgow, G12 8TA UK 3School of Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK 1Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, 126 University Place, Glasgow, G12 8TA UK 1Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, 126 University Place, Glasgow, G12 8TA UK 3School of Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK John R. Petrie, Email: [email protected] . Received 2017 May 23; Accepted 2017 Jun 27. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Metformin is quite frequently used off-label in type 1 diabetes to limit insulin dose requirement. Guidelines recommend that it can improve glucose control in those who are overweight and obese but evidence in support of this is limited. Recently-published findings from the REducing with MetfOrmin Vascular Adverse Lesions (REMOVAL) trial suggest that metformin therapy in type 1 diabetes can reduce atherosclerosis progression, weight and LDL-cholesterol levels. This provides a new perspective on metformin therapy in type 1 diabetes and suggests a potential role for reducing the long-term risk Continue reading >>

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