diabetestalk.net

Can Metformin Be Cut In Half

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

I'm seeing quite a few posts on BBSes from people who are having problems with metformin because of side effects that could be eliminated if they were taking the extended release form of this drug. For some reason, many family doctors don't seem to be aware that there is a ER version of this drug that has such benefits. This is probably because metformin is a cheap generic and isn't promoted by herds of beautiful ex-cheerleaders turned drug company salespushers who "educate" doctors about far more expensive--and less effective--newer drugs. Here are the facts: Metformin (also sold under the brand name Glucophage) comes in a regular version which is taken at meal time, three times a day, and an extended release form (marketed as ER or XR) which is taken once a day. Almost always, when people report diarrhea or intense heartburn with metformin, they are taking regular version. I experienced the heartburn on the regular drug. It was very disturbing because the pain was localized over my heart and felt just like the description of a heart attack you read in articles. My doctor assured me it was coming from the metformin, but that didn't make it any easier to live with because I kept wondering how, if I were having a real heart attack, I'd know it wasn't a pain from the drug? The ER version releases the drug more slowly and this usually eliminates the gastrointestinal problems. The trade off with taking the ER form is that the amount of blood sugar lowering you see might be a bit less than with the regular form as the drug acts in a slower smoother fashion rather than hitting all at once. But if you can't take the regular at all drug because of the side effects, the slight weakening in effect is a reasonable trade off. Plus, you only have to remember to take one dose rather Continue reading >>

Metformin - Advanced Prostate Cancer | Healthunlocked

Metformin - Advanced Prostate Cancer | Healthunlocked

Has anyone been prescribed Metformin to treat advanced prostate cancer? I just met with a new Oncologist and they were surprised that my last Oncologist did not recommend it. Its typically used by folks with diabetes but has been shown to slow prostate cancer growth. I had gotten down to PSA of 0.7 from 840 and asked me MedOnc for Metformin. I do 500mg twice/day and PSA got down to 0.2 - 7 months later. There's sufficient data/research about it and it is pretty cheap and well tolerated. Good luck Are there any side effects? Does it affect blood sugar? Mine is normal and wonder if it would then go low? Patients may lose weight and hypoglycemia is possible, but that can be solved by eating a bit more lean protein that will slowly turn into blood glucose. The mechanism is unclear, but research is ongoing. It reduces insulin, which may be tied to cancer. I do not believe it impacts blood sugar. It can have GI related side effects for some. Some get loose bowels while others, ironically can become constipated. Some folks can become a bit "foggy." Make sure you take it after eating and with ample water. I take 2 500 mg tablets twice a day. I had some of the foggy side effects at first so I worked my way up slowly, even cutting the tabs in half going from 1000 to 2000mg a day. That worked. My comments are not intended to provide specific medical advice, just my own experience. (IMO) I take 1000 twice a day based on research Patrick O'Shea reported on this site. Have you read something supporting 2500 a day? Sorry, there is a space in there, it should read 2 --- 500 mg tables twice a day Yes. My husband's been taking it for years for advanced prostate cancer. My dad has been offered it on a clinical trial in the UK. Where are you based ewhite999? I'm hearing more and more abou Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Question About 'sustained Release' Medications [archive] - Straight Dope Message Board

Question About 'sustained Release' Medications [archive] - Straight Dope Message Board

If you split a 'sustained release' pill in half, do you get half the dosage for the same length of time, or the full dosage for half the length of time? Or something in between? How does sustained release work, in pills? I assume they do something like encapsulate the medication in material that dissolves at different rates, or something like that. I've always wondered about this. Anybody know? Now that I have asked, I will go Google, the better to come back here and cast my knowledge upon the waters. ...and here we are with Wikipedia's contribution: My guess as to how it's done was (more or less) right; so, I would postulate that the answer to my original question is that a sustained release tablet cut in half would release half the dosage over the same length of time, provided it was one of the solid-form pills. However, quoting from the Wikipedia article: "In some SR formulations, the drug dissolves into the matrix, and the matrix physically swells to form a gel, allowing the drug to exit through the gel's outer surface." If *this* is the case, it seems like the critical issue is the surface area exposed to stomach acid, in which case, it seems more likely that you'd get the full dosage for half the length of time. I understand that the method is encapsulating the active ingredient in some substrate that either has to dissolve, which can be divided into different substrates with different dissolution rates, or that slows release through diffusion. It's obvious that the total medication released after all is said and done will be the same whether you cut the tablet or not. I think cutting the tablet in half and consuming both will give you a dose that is somewhat stronger at first and tails off faster. It depends on the pill, it depends on the coating, it depends on Continue reading >>

Metformin Wonder Drug

Metformin Wonder Drug

A while back I wrote about why metformin is the number one treatment for Type 2 diabetes. Now new research finds metformin prevents cancer and heart disease and may actually slow aging! Where can I get this stuff? A study from Scotland found that people on metformin had only roughly half the cancer rate of people with diabetes who weren’t on the drug. This is important, because diabetes is associated with higher risks of liver, pancreas, endometrial, colon and rectum, breast, and bladder cancer. Nobody could explain how metformin helped, but then Canadian researchers showed that metformin reduces cell mutations and DNA damage. Since mutations and DNA damage promote both cancer and aging, this is striking news. No one thought we could limit mutations before, but perhaps metformin can do it. A study on mice exposed to cigarette smoke showed that those given metformin had 70% less tumor growth. A small study of humans in Japan showed similar improvements in colorectal cancer outcomes. Metformin is now being studied in clinical trials for breast cancer. The researchers write, “Women with early-stage breast cancer taking metformin for diabetes have higher response rates to [presurgical cancer therapies] than diabetic patients not taking metformin.” They also had better results than people without diabetes. How Does It Work? According to Michael Pollak, MD, professor in McGill’s Medicine and Oncology Departments, metformin is a powerful antioxidant. It slows DNA damage by reducing levels of “reactive oxygen species” (ROS). ROS are produced as byproducts when cells burn glucose. Just as oxygen helps fires burn or metals rust, ROS will oxidize (“burn” or “rust”) the nuclei or other parts of cells. ROS are what the antioxidant vitamins are supposed to block. Continue reading >>

Selected Risk Information About Janumet And Janumet Xr

Selected Risk Information About Janumet And Janumet Xr

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Be Cut?

Can Metformin Be Cut?

I have seen a variety of opposite answers for this on a google search. I have metformin tablets 500mg. I do not believe that they are extended release as the doctor did not write the prescription that way. I would like to split one in half to take half at lunch and half at dinner times. Can these be cut? I think you can cut them if they are not the extended version. The extended version should say EX on the prescription bottle. Why do you want to cut them? If taking it once a day doesn't seem to work you may want to ask doctor to increase your dose. It took me 3 changes before it gave me the numbers I wanted. I now take it 3 times a day. I have seen a variety of opposite answers for this on a google search. I have metformin tablets 500mg. I do not believe that they are extended release as the doctor did not write the prescription that way. I would like to split one in half to take half at lunch and half at dinner times. Can these be cut? There's nothing to stop you from cutting them in half, however Metformins action is such that taking one 500mg pill per day has the same effect as cutting it in half and taking both halfs in the same day. Metformin takes some time to build up in the body to have an effect and depending on your specific needs the doctor may be increasing the dosage in the future. I do ask tho, why the desire to split the dose? 500 mg did nothing for me. I now take 2550 mg. My doctor told me the same thing that it is the total amount you take a day. I asked to be switched to the ER version because I heard the delivery may be better but he said the max for the extended would be 2000 and I take 2550 so it would be a reduction in dose. So I didn't switch. The extended release version CANNOT be cut. MEDS... 1000 mg ER met, 2000IU vitamin D3, multi vitamins, Continue reading >>

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

As a type 2 diabetic, you've probably heard of Metformin, or you might even be taking it yourself. Metformin (brand name “Glucophage” aka “glucose-eater”) is the most commonly prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes worldwide…and for good reason. It is one of the safest, most effective, least costly medication available with minimal, if any, side effects. There are always lots of questions around Metformin – how does metformin lower blood sugar, does metformin promote weight loss or weight gain, will it give me side effects – and lots more. Today we'll hopefully answer some of those questions. How Metformin Works Metformin belongs to a class of medications known as “Biguanides,” which lower blood glucose by decreasing the amount of sugar put out by the liver. The liver normally produces glucose throughout the day in conjunction with the pancreas’ production of insulin to maintain stable blood sugar. In many people with diabetes, both mechanisms are altered in that the pancreas puts out less insulin while the liver is unable to shut down production of excess glucose. This means your body is putting out as much as 3 times as much sugar than that of nondiabetic individuals, resulting in high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. Metformin effectively shuts down this excess production resulting in less insulin required. As a result, less sugar is available for absorption by the muscles and conversion to fat. Additionally, a lower need for insulin slows the progression of insulin resistance and keeps cells sensitive to endogenous insulin (that made by the body). Since metformin doesn’t cause the body to generate more insulin, it does not cause hypoglycemia unless combined with a sulfonylurea or insulin injection. Metformin is one of the few oral diabe Continue reading >>

Metformin Er 500 Mg Tablet,extended Release 24 Hr

Metformin Er 500 Mg Tablet,extended Release 24 Hr

Rarely, too much metformin can build up in the body and cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is more likely if you are an older adult, if you have kidney or liver disease, dehydration, heart failure, heavy alcohol use, if you have surgery, if you have X-ray or scanning procedures that use iodinated contrast, or if you are using certain drugs. For some conditions, your doctor may tell you to stop taking this medication for a short time. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.Stop taking this medication and get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, or stomach pain with nausea/vomiting/diarrhea. Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.Metformin may be used with lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise to prevent d Continue reading >>

What Is In This Leaflet

What Is In This Leaflet

This leaflet answers some common questions about Jardiamet. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking Jardiamet against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. This leaflet was last updated on the date at the end of this leaflet. More recent information may be available. The latest Consumer Medicine Information is available from your pharmacist, doctor, or from www.medicines.org.au (Australia) and www.medsafe.govt.nz/ Consumers/cmi/CMIForm.asp (New Zealand) and may contain important information about the medicine and its use of which you should be aware. What Jardiamet is used for Jardiamet is used to lower blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It may be used when diet plus exercise do not provide adequate blood sugar level control either: If you have type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, empagliflozin (one of the active ingredients in Jardiamet) can be used to reduce your risk of dying from your cardiovascular disease. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is also called non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or NIDDM. Type 2 diabetes develops if the body does not make enough insulin, or if the insulin that your body makes does not work as well as it should. Insulin is a substance which helps to lower the level of sugar in your blood, especially after meals. When the level of sugar builds up in your blood, this can cause damage to the body's cells and lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, circulation or kidneys. How Jardiamet works Jardiamet contains two different active ingredients Continue reading >>

Metformin 850mg Tablets

Metformin 850mg Tablets

1. WHAT METFORMIN IS AND WHAT IT IS USED FOR The name of this medicine is Metformin 500mg or 850mg Tablets (called metformin in this leaflet). It belongs to a group of medicines called biguanides (a type of oral hypoglycaemic). Metformin is used for the sort of diabetes called Type 2 diabetes or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In type 2 diabetes, there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood. This is because your body does not make enough insulin or because it makes insulin that does not work properly. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body tissue to take glucose from the blood and use it for energy or for storage for future use. Metformin works by improving the sensitivity of your body to insulin. It helps your body to use glucose in the normal way again This medicine is given when diet and exercise alone has not been able to control your blood sugar levels. Metformin can be given on its own. However, sometimes it is given with other medicines for diabetes or with insulin. In patients who are overweight, long-term use of metformin also helps to lower the risk of any problems related to diabetes you are allergic (hypersensitive) to metformin or any of the other ingredients in this liquid (see section 6: Further information). An allergic reaction can include a rash, itching or shortness of breath. you have recently had a heart attack or any other heart problems you have severe circulation problems or difficulty in breathing you have had serious problems with your diabetes in the past called diabetic ketoacidosis. When you have this you lose weight quickly, feel sick (nausea) or are sick (vomiting). See also in Section 4: Possible side effects you have recently had a severe infection, injury or trauma (shock) you are going to have an X-ray where you will b Continue reading >>

Splitting Tablets May Affect Dosage

Splitting Tablets May Affect Dosage

Splitting pills could lead to patients taking the wrong doses, according to the Daily Express. The newspaper said that research into the practice showed it could be risky for drugs where the difference between a recommended and toxic dose is small. The small study looked at typical drugs prescribed for diseases such as Parkinsons disease, congestive heart failure, thrombosis and arthritis. Five academic volunteers split tablets into halves or quarters using three routinely used, accepted methods. The researchers found that the dose potentially given to patients when tablets were split could deviate from the recommended dose by at least 15%, and sometimes by more than 25%. The researchers call for action to change the practice in nursing homes, where splitting drugs is routinely used. They also want drug firms to produce a range of options, including smaller or bigger dose tablets, so that splitting becomes unnecessary. Patients currently sometimes require a dose of medication that can only be provided through splitting a tablet. Increasing choice in tablet size sounds like a sensible proposal, and this research highlights the importance of taking pills according to the instructions. The study was carried out by researchers from the faculty of pharmaceutical sciences at Ghent University in Belgium. The study did not receive specific grants from any funding source. It was published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Advanced Nursing. The BBC and Daily Express reported this research fairly. In this comparative study, the researchers aimed to report deviations from the expected weight of tablets following usual methods of splitting them into smaller pieces. They looked at whether the overall weight of the split tablet decreased compared to the unsplit weight. In other words, Continue reading >>

Conversations

Conversations

It has been predicted that by 2050, one in three Americans will have type 2 diabetes. But the diagnosis doesn’t have to mean a life inundated with pills, which this diabetic learned after finding a way to stay off medication. Phyllisa Deroza joined HuffPost Live’s Ricky Camilleri to talk about being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes after her rising glucose levels sent her into a coma. However, for the past two-and-a-half years, Deroza has been completely off medication, which she attributes to three simple things. The first two elements of Deroza’s med-free life are a healthy diet and a rigorous exercise routine. The third involves going above and beyond the typical amount of glucose testing. “I do test my glucose about five times a day, which a lot of type 2 diabetics don’t do,” Deroza said. “Many people tell them that they can test once a day or twice a day, but I find if I’m testing frequently, I keep my numbers within a tight range, so that’s helpful for me.” Watch the full HuffPost Live conversation about diabetes below: Continue reading >>

Metformin Tastes Disgusing - How To Get Pony To Take It? [archive] - Horse And Hound Forums

Metformin Tastes Disgusing - How To Get Pony To Take It? [archive] - Horse And Hound Forums

Well all the following have been tried at my yard: Plain ole stick it in and hold his head up One of our liveries was the same, we tried cutting an apple/pear in half then digging out little notches to put the pills into and putting them in his feed....that worked for a while!! Think we also tried crushing them but they dont crush very well. In the end he did just eat them in his feed so persevere!! I assume you're getting them from a pharmacy? Some generic makes have coatings and some do not - avoid Milpharm and get Teva or Actavis as they are coated. Place them on the horses tongue, hold its mouth up higher than the throat and rub its neck so it swallows. The coating will stop it tasting the tablets and it should just swallow them. I gave my horse gabapentin in this way and never had any issues We have a pony on our yard on Metaformin and we ground the tablets up in an old coffee bean grinder and fed it in powder form and have had no problems with her eating it this way. We do dampen down the feed with some water too. If they are crushable, then crush and mix with hot chocolate powder and hot water, get an irrigation syringe, or an empty wormer syringe and squirt in the horses mouth. I did that with bute for 3 years with the old appy, worked a treat. :) Avoid using anything too sugarry to get them down him as this will somewhat defeat the point of giving them. I've had success with crushing them into a handful of chaff, with half a pot of apple flavoured baby food mixed in. I found mine from relon chem dissolve. It takes 2/3 hours but they dissolve completely in cold water. You can then syringe which saves crushing or I read a post somewhere that they were dissolved in wet speedibeet and fed that way. I can vouch for its taste - I got some on my fingers the first tim Continue reading >>

Belviq Patient & Doctor Testimonials...

Belviq Patient & Doctor Testimonials...

DOCTOR TESTIMONIALS DISCLAIMER: THIS IS NOT AN OFFICIAL WEBSITE. IT IS NOT OWNED, OPERATED, AUTHORIZED BY ARENA PHARMA (NASDAQ:ARNA) OR EISAI. SEE IMPORTANT PRESCRIBING AND SAFETY INFORMATION ON www.BELVIQ.com. CONTENTS OF THIS DOCUMENT ARE *NOT* MEDICAL ADVICE AND ARE *NOT* INVESTMENT ADVICE. CONSULT WITH YOUR DOCTOR FOR ANY AND ALL MEDICAL ADVICE. THESE ARE PUBLIC STATEMENTS SOMETIMES MADE BY ANONYMOUS PERSONS; OWNER OF THIS WEBSITE DOES NOT ASSUME ANY RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ACCURACY OF THE CONTENT HEREIN. This page is not affiliated in any way with any entities including About a week ago my belviq rep brought in a marketing lady from an independent group asking me about my opinion on belviq and belviq xr..... i told them that i have used it on over 1000 patients with generally good results.....have seen weight loss and few side effects..... i told them that i often combine belviq with 1/2 pill of phentermine each morning which gives faster and a larger amount of weight loss.... i told them that i have seen no problems with serotonin syndrome when combining belviq with citalopram or escitalopram ( belviq is a mild to moderate inhibitor of cytochrome p450 2d6 and i dont like to combine belviq with prozac or paxil or zoloft since the belviq will cause higher levels of prozac and paxil and zoloft)...(prozac and paxil and zoloft are metabolized by cytochrome p450 2d6)... (citalopram and escitalopram are not metabolized by cytochrome p450 2d6)..... i also told the marketing lady that i would like to see a lower price on belviq..... i think there would be more sales of belviq at a lower price point and they would make up in volume what they lose on price..... i also told her about one of my patients who lost 85 pounds in a year on belviq plus phentermine.... Not well known Continue reading >>

More in diabetes