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Can Memory Loss From Diabetes Be Reversed

9 Steps To Reverse Dementia And Memory Loss As You Age

9 Steps To Reverse Dementia And Memory Loss As You Age

Recently, I spoke on a panel for PBS TV at the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) convention in Boston. The topic was dementia. There was a woman with mild cognitive impairment on the panel. Her condition is sort of like pre-Alzheimer’s disease. Everyone on the panel — including the Harvard neurologist — agreed that memory loss is NOT a normal part of aging. The sad part was that the panel didn’t have much to offer people in the way of prevention. Their only solution was just a very bad and pretty ineffective selection of drugs with lots of side effects. But there is another way to think about brain aging. The brain responds to all the same insults as the rest of the body — stress, poor diet, toxins, lack of exercise or sleep, nutritional deficiencies, and more. All we have to do is give the brain a tune-up and we can see miracles. In today’s blog I will give you nine tips that will allow you to do that. But first, let’s look a little more closely at the magnitude of this problem. Dementia on the Rise Dementia is a big problem and growing every day. Ten percent of 65-year olds, 25 percent of 75-year olds, and 50 percent of 85-year olds will get Alzheimer’s disease — at a cost of $60 billion a year to society. Worse, the number of people with Alzheimer’s is predicted to triple in the next few decades. It is now the seventh leading cause of death.(i) I believe this preventable, that we can slow this trend and even reverse it. In a moment, I will tell you how. But first I want to explain why just naming a disease — whether it is dementia or anything else — is becoming increasingly unhelpful (unless you just want to match the drug to the disease which is the only thing doctors are trained to do). We have to think about individuals, not di Continue reading >>

Memory Loss: Can It Be Cured? -- Majid Fotuhi, Md -- 6/26/03

Memory Loss: Can It Be Cured? -- Majid Fotuhi, Md -- 6/26/03

WebMD Live Events Transcript Memory loss is a frightening occurrence for anyone who finds the records of their lives fading away, whether it's minor forgetfulness or the devastating effects of Alzheimer's disease. We had a memorable discussion about preventing and treating memory loss with Majid Fotuhi, MD. The opinions expressed herein are the guest's alone and have not been reviewed by a WebMD physician. If you have questions about your health, you should consult your personal physician. This event is meant for informational purposes only. Moderator: Welcome to WebMD Live, Dr. Fotuhi. Is memory loss an inevitable part of aging? Fotuhi: No. People may have slower rate of learning and memorizing things, but they should not lose their memory. Some degree of forgetfulness is normal with aging, but people should maintain the ability to function in their jobs and remember names of their spouses, children, friends, and so on. The only thing they should not forget is the names of their close relatives and their friends. That would be abnormal. Moderator: How can one determine what is causing short-term memory loss? Fotuhi: The most common cause of memory loss is stress and anxiety. The second most common cause is depression. The third most common cause is medical issues. Only the 10th or 11th on the list would be Alzheimer's disease. Ninety percent of older adults who complain about memory loss do not have Alzheimer's disease. Most of them have depression, stress, anxiety, fatigue, and lack of sufficient amount of sleep or medical issues. Member question: What, if any, is the difference between dementia and Alzheimer's disease? Fotuhi: That is a very good question. Dementia means memory loss plus deficit in one or more area of cognition, such as getting lost, confusion of tim Continue reading >>

Vascular Dementia

Vascular Dementia

A diagnosis of dementia does not always mean an unavoidable decline. Copyright © 2000 Memory Loss and the Brain One of the most feared consequences of aging is dementia, a set of symptoms marked by profound memory loss and impaired thinking. Thanks to a lot of research and public education, most people are aware that dementia is not an inevitable part of growing older. In fact, it is most often the result of a specific illness, Alzheimer's disease, that strikes many-but by no means all-people in their senior years. The bottom line is that aging does not necessarily lead to "senility," unless Alzheimer's or some other disease is present. One of those "other" diseases is vascular dementia. It is probably the second leading cause of dementia, but has been somewhat overshadowed by the more well-known Alzheimer's disease. Caused by blockages and breaches in the brain's blood supply that damage the brain, vascular dementia can be prevented and, in some cases, even reversed. Graphic: © Grant Jerding Vascular Dementia and Alzheimer's The cardinal sign of dementia is a decline in a person's normal intellectual functions--most notably, a decline in memory. Problems with short-term memory typically show up first. There may be general forgetfulness, or a tendency to misplace household items. But over time, the memory lapses become more severe, and the dementia begins to take a debilitating toll on thinking, judgment, communication, and emotional stability. In people 65 or older, the most common cause of these crippling symptoms is Alzheimer's disease. But they are not the only causes. Dementia can also be a symptom, sometimes temporary, of dozens of diseases and disorders. These include poisoning, viral infections, malfunctioning glands, benign brain tumors, and severe nutritiona Continue reading >>

Could Memory Loss Be Reversed With A Common Painkiller?

Could Memory Loss Be Reversed With A Common Painkiller?

Researchers have spent decades trying to find new, effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease, but new research suggests the answer may reside in an existing painkiller commonly used to treat menstrual cramps. In a study published the journal Nature Communications, researchers reveal how the drug mefenamic acid reversed memory loss in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease by reducing brain inflammation. Study leader Dr. David Brough, of the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, and his team say their results open the door to trials in humans with the disease. Around 5.2 million Americans aged 65 and older are living with Alzheimer's disease. By 2050, it is expected that around 13.8 million people in the United States will have the condition, unless new, more effective treatments are identified. Of course, developing a new drug from the ground up takes time; according to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), it can take at least a decade for a new medication to reach the market, with clinical trials alone taking an average of 6-7 years. As such, researchers are increasingly focusing on identifying other possible uses for existing medications, which can dramatically shorten the approval process. Now, Dr. Brough and colleagues believe they may be on the way to achieving such a feat, after finding the drug mefenamic acid may hold potential for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Mefenamic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat mild to moderate pain, and it is most commonly prescribed for the treatment of menstrual pain. Mefenamic acid targets detrimental inflammatory pathway in the brain For their study, the researchers used 20 mice that were genetically modified to develop Alzheimer's disease. Once the mi Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Cognitive Decline And Dementia

How To Reverse Cognitive Decline And Dementia

You may be doubtful that reversing cognitive decline and dementia is even possible. I used to be too. But I want to point you to an amazing study published in the Aging Journal. It’s called “Reversal of cognitive decline: A novel therapeutic program” by Dr. Dale Bredesen, MD, professor at the Easton Laboratories for Neurodegenerative Disease Research at UCLA, and author of the book The End of Alzheimer's: The First Program to Prevent and Reverse Cognitive Decline. I recently stumbled upon it, and the results show that reversing cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease is definitely possible, despite what most doctors and experts may tell you. Based on the underlying pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, Dr. Bredesen used a comprehensive therapeutic program to reverse cognitive decline in nine patients. The program involves multiple modalities, which I will be exploring in this post. The study included 10 participants with Alzheimer's disease, amnestic mild cognitive impairment, or subjective cognitive impairment. Within 3 to 6 months, nine of the 10 patients showed a significant improvement in memory and cognition. Only one patient with very advanced Alzheimer's disease did not improve. Before the study, six of the patients had to discontinue work or were struggling with their jobs. After the study, all six of them returned to work or continued working successfully. The improvements also continued long after the study ended. Why This Research Is So Important Cognitive decline is obviously a major concern today. Alzheimer's disease is the major cause of age-related cognitive decline, with over 5 million Americans and 30 million people globally struggling with the disorder. I pulled these numbers from the study and they are probably even higher now. Dementia is t Continue reading >>

Age-related Memory Loss

Age-related Memory Loss

What's Normal, What's Not, and When to Seek Help We've all misplaced keys, blanked on an acquaintance's name, or forgotten a phone number. When we’re young, we don’t tend to pay much mind to these lapses, but as we grow older, sometimes we worry about what they mean. While it’s true that certain brain changes are inevitable when it comes to aging, major memory problems are not one of them. That’s why it’s important to know the difference between normal age-related forgetfulness and the symptoms that may indicate a developing cognitive problem. Memory and aging Forgetfulness is a common complaint among older adults. You start to talk about a movie you saw recently when you realize you can’t remember the title. You’re giving directions to your house when you suddenly blank on a familiar street name. You find yourself standing in the middle of the kitchen wondering what you went in there for. Memory lapses can be frustrating, but most of the time they aren’t cause for concern. Age-related memory changes are not the same thing as dementia. As we grow older, we experience physiological changes that can cause glitches in brain functions we’ve always taken for granted. It takes longer to learn and recall information. We’re not as quick as we used to be. In fact, we often mistake this slowing of our mental processes for true memory loss. But in most cases, if we give ourselves time, the information will come to mind. Memory loss is not an inevitable part of the aging process The brain is capable of producing new brain cells at any age, so significant memory loss is not an inevitable result of aging. But just as it is with muscle strength, you have to use it or lose it. Your lifestyle, health habits, and daily activities have a huge impact on the health of yo Continue reading >>

We May Be Able To Reverse Signs Of Early Alzheimer's Disease

We May Be Able To Reverse Signs Of Early Alzheimer's Disease

Scientists know the stress hormone cortisol can damage the hippocampus, a memory center in the brain. Bredesen says hormone replacement therapy may help women who have an imbalance that affects their brain function. 7 ways to fight Alzheimer's disease – Gastrointestinal health has been linked with brain health. Incorporating fermented foods, probiotics and prebiotics into your diet could reduce your risk of dementia. Dr. Dale Bredesen of UCLA recommends having your doctor test for a "leaky" GI tract, as that can also cause inflammation. 7 ways to fight Alzheimer's disease – Allow three hours between dinner and bedtime, and 12 hours between dinner and breakfast. The idea behind this type of fasting, says Bredesen, is that the body begins a process during the break that may help to destroy amyloid-beta, a problematic protein that builds up in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. 7 ways to fight Alzheimer's disease – If you consume tuna frequently, check your mercury level, since exposure to heavy metals has been associated with dementia. Patients in Dr. Dale Bredesen's pilot study, "Reversal of cognitive decline: A novel therapeutic program," also ditched aluminum-containing deodorants -- but studies are far from conclusive about any harm conferred by anti-perspirants. 7 ways to fight Alzheimer's disease – Overeating grains, starchy vegetables and sugar can generate harmful inflammation in the body and brain. Patients in Bredesen's pilot study who responded most quickly cut out simple carbohydrates. 7 ways to fight Alzheimer's disease – Seven to eight hours a night is ideal for the body to restore itself. Patients in Bredesen's study who had trouble staying asleep got help from melatonin supplements or tryptophan, a chemical you likely know is found in turkey. 7 Continue reading >>

Reversing Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Closer With Discovery Of New Protein Target

Reversing Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Closer With Discovery Of New Protein Target

An enzyme that interferes with key memory-forming processes in people with Alzheimer's can now be specifically targeted thanks to the discovery of a protein that helps it do its dirty work, according to new research out of MIT. This crucial finding is getting us one step closer to a new kind of treatment that could one day prevent and even reverse memory loss in people with Alzheimer's. Alzheimer's disease is a neurological condition associated with the build-up of beta-amyloid and tau proteins in the brain's cells. Most cutting edge treatments have focussed on analysing and reducing the formation of these protein plaques to help the brain regain its functioning. The exact role that these clumps play in giving rise to the symptoms of dementia in Alzheimer's patients has never been clear, and drugs that help clear out the clumps also don't seem to do much to return cognitive abilities. MIT researcher Li-Huei Tsai and her colleagues believe something else must also be responsible, something that switches off the genes involved in for memory formation. For over a decade Tsai and her team have sought to understand the processes behind this genetic block. "We think that once this epigenetic blockade of gene expression is in place, clearing beta amyloid may not be sufficient to restore the active configuration of the chromatin," Tsui said back in 2012. A family of enzymes called histone deacetylases (HDAC) was suspected to be responsible, with earlier research showing it was possible to help transgenic mice recall tasks if those enzymes were blocked. One enzyme in particular called HDAC2 was found to be overexpressed in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease, giving researchers a target for treatment. The enzyme acts as a master switch for the functioning of genes requ Continue reading >>

Case Study: Reversing 11 Years Of Pain And Frustration With Type 2 Diabetes In Less Than 6 Months

Case Study: Reversing 11 Years Of Pain And Frustration With Type 2 Diabetes In Less Than 6 Months

I’d like to take a moment to recognize the incredible 6-month transformation of Cynthia Bronte, one of my clients working diligently at reversing insulin resistance. This is another story that reflects the amazing mental, physical and emotional transformation that can occur with a strategic approach to plant-focused high-carbohydrate nutrition. Diagnosis with Type 2 Diabetes Cynthia was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2003, in the midst of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), an acute life-threatening condition that typically marks the onset of type 1 diabetes. Cynthia’s symptoms of DKA were unmistakable, and included urinating more than 14 times per day, insatiable thirst and low energy. Cynthia was unaware that her fasting blood sugar was 5 times higher than normal, at 550 mg/dL (normal blood sugars range from 70 – 130 mg/dL). Treatment Protocol When Cynthia was first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, she was instructed to consume a low carbohydrate diet in order to minimize blood sugar. She was instructed to eat foods that were high in protein and fat, while limiting her intake of fruits, artificial sweeteners, grains, pastas, rice, bread and cereal. As we’ve talked about in a previous article, she was initially instructed to minimize her intake of carbohydrates to minimize the amount of glucose that would eventually appear in her blood. Her diet plan followed what I refer to as “the linear diabetes nutrition model,” shown below. The problem with the linear model is that it does not address the underlying root cause of type 2 diabetes – insulin resistance. By eating a low carbohydrate diet, Cynthia was eating mainly fat and protein, resulting in increased lipid deposits in her liver and muscle tissue. In turn, increased fat storage in her liver and muscle resul Continue reading >>

Breaking: Diabetes Drugs Linked To Alzheimers And Dementia

Breaking: Diabetes Drugs Linked To Alzheimers And Dementia

If you’re diabetic and you’re taking medication, you’re probably putting your brain at great risk. Their calling the new study from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine a “Diabetes Game-Changer." It proves that prolonged use of diabetes drugs puts you at risk for a deficiency which can cause neurological problems, including dementia, and even brain shrinkage. This study used data that was funded by the National Institute of Diabetes. This was a 5-year study that ran from 1996 until 2001. It followed more than 3,000 people who were “at risk” for diabetes. Participants were divided into three groups. Group #1 was assigned a special lifestyle change method. They were put on a very specific diet and performed light exercises. Group #2 was given the diabetes drug metformin. Group #3 was given a placebo. The purpose of this study was to see which group had the lowest rates of diabetes and took the longest to develop it. Group #1 beat the others by a landslide. The study authors were so astounded by their findings that the program morphed into a follow-up study, in which the original participants were followed for several more years. The researchers found that Group #2 (those taking metformin) were twice as likely as to have a B12 deficiency, and more likely to become anemic. More shocking yet, it was discovered that they were also more likely to develop neurological problems like Alzheimer’s and Dementia. Yet, for unknown reasons, the Diabetes-Institute-funded research didn’t follow up on the special diet procedure completed by Group #1. It’s everywhere, dangerous, and under-diagnosed While we don’t hear much about it, it’s common knowledge that B12 deficiency causes dementia. And data from a large study by Tufts University* suggests that low B12 leve Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug May Reverse Alzheimer's Memory Loss

Diabetes Drug May Reverse Alzheimer's Memory Loss

Once again, diabetes and Alzheimer’s are sharing headlines. A study conducted by researchers from Lancaster University in the U.K. has shown that a commonly used diabetes drug, liraglutide, may reverse memory loss in the late stages of Alzheimer’s. The drug, from a class known as GLP-1 (Glucagon-like peptide-1) analogue, is prescribed to diabetes patients because it stimulates insulin production. The new study found that liraglutide passes through the blood-brain barrier where it could prevent the build-up of toxic plaques in the brain that contribute to Alzheimer’s disease. Liraglutide may also improve memory function that was previously lost. In the study, liraglutide was injected into mice that had late stage Alzheimer’s disease. During the two-month trial period, the mice performed significantly better on object recognition tests than before, and their brains showed a 30 percent reduction in the build-up of toxic plaques. According to an article on Medical News Today, Professor Christian Hölscher, of the University of Lancaster and lead study author said that liraglutide "“activates receptors on neurons that set a growth-factor type of signaling cascade in motion. Oxidative stress is reduced and growth and replacement of neurons is improved.” The study findings from the mouse model showed that the key biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease were significantly reduced. The markers affected were memory impairments, loss of synaptic activity, aggregation of beta-amyloid to form plaques in the brain, and chronic inflammation in the brain. Liragultide is now being tested in a major clinical trial the will be headed by Dr. Paul Edison of Imperial College London. The team will test how human clinical participants will progress when compared to a control group th Continue reading >>

The Top Supplements For People With Type 2 Diabetes

The Top Supplements For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Author's Perspective: Sometimes I hesitated to discuss nutritional supplements during our online classes or workshops because some people would assume that they should starting taking a bunch of vitamin pills without making the necessary dietary changes. The key word to remember here is "supplement". Vitamin and mineral supplements are just that -- they supplement your primary nutritional program. So, if you continue to eat poorly, the supplements will not provide the same benefits that you obtain from eating healthy meals. In addition, because of the insulin resistance, some of the cells may not be able to absorb certain nutrients such as Vitamin C. Another key point to remember about supplements is to find them as close to nature as possible. And, don't fall for the hype that the supplement is "natural". After all, coal tar is natural! The following list of supplements is based on the assumption that you are getting most of your vitamins, minerals and other phytonutrients from following a sound nutritional program such as the Death to Diabetes Diet. For example, Vitamin C is an obvious key supplement, but, it is not listed here because Vitamin C can easily be obtained from eating lots of vegetables and some fruits. Similarly, the B-Complex vitamins are critical to your health, but, they can be obtained from eating foods such as vegetables, beans, nuts and seeds. The top supplements include the following: Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) Alpha lipoic acid is a fatty acid that exists in the mitochondria and is involved in energy metabolism by helping to break down carbohydrates and to make energy for the other organs in the body. As a supplement, alpha lipoic acid (ALA, α-lipoic acid, C8H14O2S2) is a synthetic version of lipoic acid that has shown benefit against various forms Continue reading >>

Diet And Lifestyle Changes Reverse Memory Loss And Alzheimer’s

Diet And Lifestyle Changes Reverse Memory Loss And Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s and memory loss can seem like a sort of death sentence that strikes out of the blue and has no cure. Although genetics play a role, so does your diet and lifestyle, which means you can do something about Alzheimer’s and memory loss before the damage is too great. In the first study of its kind, nine out of 10 patients reversed their memory loss and showed considerable long-term improvement following a program that included dietary changes, exercise, supplementation, sleep improvements, and brain stimulation. Some were able to return to jobs they had to quit due to declining memory. Only the patient with late-stage Alzheimer’s did not improve. It’s the first study to suggest that memory loss can be reversed and the improvement sustained. The research was inspired by studies that looked at the effect of diet and lifestyle changes on other diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and HIV. In the study, subjects reversed their memory loss through approaches that included: Eliminating all simple carbohydrates, which led to weight loss Eliminating gluten and processed foods Increasing consumption of produce and non-farmed fish Yoga and other stress-reducing activities Increasing sleep from 4-5 hours to 7-8 Taking methyl B12, vitamin D3, fish oil, CoQ10, curcumin, resveratrol, ashwagandha, and coconut oil A minimum of 30 minutes of exercise 4-6 times a week Cut out snacking Hormone therapy when necessary The biggest obstacle in the program was the study subjects’ complaints about making so many changes. However, all but one experienced notable improvement without the side effects that drugs bring. Factors that affect memory It’s important to note the reduced consumption of carbohydrates in the study –- some researchers have called Alzheimer Continue reading >>

Diabetes Damage Reversed With Green Tea

Diabetes Damage Reversed With Green Tea

Miracle drink can fight diabetes damage It’s the GREEN solution to diabetes and anyone at risk for the disease — and no, I’m not talking about some new “Save the Planet” scheme. Healthy green TEA is already known as one of nature’s most miraculous cures for everything from heart troubles to cancer. Now, the latest research on mice reveals even bigger benefits for people facing diabetes. And if the same holds true in humans — as I suspect it will — that means this GREEN cure could help you to fight off some of the biggest health problems facing Americans today, including obesity and memory loss in addition to diabetes. The key is a powerful natural substance locked inside every delicate little leaf. It’s called epigallocatechin-3-gallate, better known as EGCG — and to test its effects on diabetes symptoms, researchers put mice on the rodent equivalent of the diet of doom. That’s exactly what it sounds like: A lifestyle almost guaranteed to doom you to diabetes, heart disease, and an early death. Unfortunately, this diet also has another much more common name. It’s the Western diet that’s followed by tens of millions of Americans… and it’s the key driver in the epidemic of obesity and diabetes facing the nation. In the study, the mice fed this disastrous diet saw the same results as humans. They got fat — real fast — and experienced all the health problems that follow, including insulin resistance and cognitive struggles. In the case of mice, that means they had a hard time finding their way out of a maze. But one set of mice were given a little something extra with that Western diet: a daily dose of that all-powerful EGCG. And the results were bordering on the miraculous. These mice not only weighed less… but they also had less cogniti Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels Linked To Memory Loss

High Blood Sugar Levels Linked To Memory Loss

People with higher blood sugar levels scored lower on memory tests, even though their levels were technically still considered ‘normal’ Even if you haven’t been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes, higher blood sugar levels appear to have a negative influence on cognition As you over-indulge on sugar and grains, your brain may become overwhelmed by the consistently high levels of blood sugar and insulin and leptin. Eventually insulin and leptin signaling becomes compromised, leading to impairments in your thinking and memory, and eventually even causing permanent brain damage By Dr. Mercola Many people now associate elevated blood sugar levels with diabetes or even pre-diabetes, but new research has highlighted a little-known adverse effect of higher blood sugar levels that can impair your brain – even if your levels are technically still within a ‘normal’ range. The study – an extremely important one considering the epidemic of people with out-of-control blood sugar metabolism – showed that lower blood sugar levels are associated with better brain function and may even help you avoid age-related declines in memory. Higher ‘Normal’ Blood Sugar Levels Linked to Memory Loss It’s already known that people with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing cognitive impairment, including dementia. However, the new study involved people (with an average age of 63) who were free from diabetes and pre-diabetes (or impaired glucose intolerance). Still, even among this group, those with higher blood sugar levels scored lower on memory tests. For each 7-mmol/mol increase in HbA1c (a measure of damage caused by elevated blood glucose), participants recalled two fewer words on memory tests.1 Those with higher blood sugar levels also had lower Continue reading >>

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