diabetestalk.net

Can Memory Loss From Diabetes Be Reversed

Reverse Memory Loss Right Away To Prevent Dementia

Reverse Memory Loss Right Away To Prevent Dementia

Although genetics play a role in memory loss, that doesn’t mean you have to be a helpless victim to the ravages of brain degeneration. By taking action right away if you notice memory loss, you can reverse your risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s before it’s too late. One study showed that nine out of 10 patients were able to reverse their memory loss. The study subjects also showed significant long-term improvement in memory function. So what was the magic bullet? No magic, just implementation of functional neurology basics. The subjects underwent a dietary and lifestyle overhaul that included changes in what they ate, regular exercise, supplementation, better sleep, and exercising their brain. The improvements were so profound that some of the subjects were able to work again, having quit before due to advancing memory loss. Of the 10 study subjects, the only one not to improve suffered from late-stage Alzheimer’s — showing how important it is to take action to reverse memory loss before it’s too late. Although plenty of functional neurology clinical cases show memory loss can be reversed, this was the first study of its kind. Functional neurology to reverse memory loss In the study, subjects reversed their memory loss through the following approaches also commonly used in functional neurology: Removing all simple carbohydrates (white rice, pasta, bread, sugar, etc.) from the diet Eliminating processed foods Gluten-free diet Eating more produce and wild fish Doing yoga and activities that reduce stress Increasing sleep from 4-5 hours a night to 7-8 Supplementing with methyl B12, vitamin D3, fish oil, CoQ10, curcumin, resveratrol, ashwagandha, and coconut oil Exercising a minimum of 30 minutes four to six times a week No snacking Use of hormone therapy in case Continue reading >>

Reversing Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Closer With Discovery Of New Protein Target

Reversing Memory Loss In Alzheimer's Closer With Discovery Of New Protein Target

An enzyme that interferes with key memory-forming processes in people with Alzheimer's can now be specifically targeted thanks to the discovery of a protein that helps it do its dirty work, according to new research out of MIT. This crucial finding is getting us one step closer to a new kind of treatment that could one day prevent and even reverse memory loss in people with Alzheimer's. Alzheimer's disease is a neurological condition associated with the build-up of beta-amyloid and tau proteins in the brain's cells. Most cutting edge treatments have focussed on analysing and reducing the formation of these protein plaques to help the brain regain its functioning. The exact role that these clumps play in giving rise to the symptoms of dementia in Alzheimer's patients has never been clear, and drugs that help clear out the clumps also don't seem to do much to return cognitive abilities. MIT researcher Li-Huei Tsai and her colleagues believe something else must also be responsible, something that switches off the genes involved in for memory formation. For over a decade Tsai and her team have sought to understand the processes behind this genetic block. "We think that once this epigenetic blockade of gene expression is in place, clearing beta amyloid may not be sufficient to restore the active configuration of the chromatin," Tsui said back in 2012. A family of enzymes called histone deacetylases (HDAC) was suspected to be responsible, with earlier research showing it was possible to help transgenic mice recall tasks if those enzymes were blocked. One enzyme in particular called HDAC2 was found to be overexpressed in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease, giving researchers a target for treatment. The enzyme acts as a master switch for the functioning of genes requ Continue reading >>

Diabetes May Lead To Greater Risk Of Alzheimer's, Memory Loss | Miami Herald

Diabetes May Lead To Greater Risk Of Alzheimer's, Memory Loss | Miami Herald

For people with Type 2 diabetes, there is an additional incentive for keeping the disease under management. Research shows a possible link between diabetes and cognitive decline, including increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The scientific reason behind the link between diabetes and brain health is complex. Some scientists believe people with diabetes may also have insulin resistance or insulin deficiency that could damage brain cells enough to cause memory loss. Studies are underway to understand why 80 percent of people with Alzheimer’s disease also have some form of diabetes or disturbed glucose metabolism. However, so far, longitudinal research has not produced a consensus view regarding the link between blood glucose levels and cognitive impairment. Meanwhile, in South Florida, medical professionals are working with diabetic patients to minimize the risk of cognitive decline through a variety of methods that include lifestyle, medical and mental-health components. “Our message to diabetics is that the better people can control their diabetes, the more they can reduce risk of other conditions,” said Dr. Marc Agronin, director of the memory center and clinical research program at Miami Jewish Health. “Of course, that requires a lot of education and close attention.” Never miss a local story. Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access. SUBSCRIBE NOW On the lifestyle front, Agronin urges diabetics to exercise, maintain a healthy diet, lose weight if necessary and avoid being sedentary. “They need to adopt a brain-healthy lifestyle.” On the medical front, medical professionals are considering how early detection and glycemic control can prevent cognitive decline (memory loss). They also are considerin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Damage Reversed With Green Tea

Diabetes Damage Reversed With Green Tea

Miracle drink can fight diabetes damage It’s the GREEN solution to diabetes and anyone at risk for the disease — and no, I’m not talking about some new “Save the Planet” scheme. Healthy green TEA is already known as one of nature’s most miraculous cures for everything from heart troubles to cancer. Now, the latest research on mice reveals even bigger benefits for people facing diabetes. And if the same holds true in humans — as I suspect it will — that means this GREEN cure could help you to fight off some of the biggest health problems facing Americans today, including obesity and memory loss in addition to diabetes. The key is a powerful natural substance locked inside every delicate little leaf. It’s called epigallocatechin-3-gallate, better known as EGCG — and to test its effects on diabetes symptoms, researchers put mice on the rodent equivalent of the diet of doom. That’s exactly what it sounds like: A lifestyle almost guaranteed to doom you to diabetes, heart disease, and an early death. Unfortunately, this diet also has another much more common name. It’s the Western diet that’s followed by tens of millions of Americans… and it’s the key driver in the epidemic of obesity and diabetes facing the nation. In the study, the mice fed this disastrous diet saw the same results as humans. They got fat — real fast — and experienced all the health problems that follow, including insulin resistance and cognitive struggles. In the case of mice, that means they had a hard time finding their way out of a maze. But one set of mice were given a little something extra with that Western diet: a daily dose of that all-powerful EGCG. And the results were bordering on the miraculous. These mice not only weighed less… but they also had less cogniti Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug May Reverse Brain Damage Seen In Late Alzheimer's

Diabetes Drug May Reverse Brain Damage Seen In Late Alzheimer's

A drug commonly used by diabetes sufferers could reverse memory loss and treat Alzheimer’s patients, research reveals today. Experts at Lancaster University have discovered that liraglutide might be able to reverse some of the damage caused by the disease in the later stages of the condition. Mice with Alzheimer’s who were given the diabetes drug performed much better on an object recognition test and their brains showed a 30% reduction in the build-up of toxic plaques. Liraglutide is a drug used to stimulate insulin production, but research shows it can also pass through the blood brain barrier and offer a protective effect on brain cells. Researchers at Imperial College London will shortly begin recruiting patients to take part in a major clinical trial to test the effectiveness of the drug in Alzheimer’s sufferers. Around 800,000 people in the UK have dementia, more than half of whom have Alzheimer’s. Dr Doug Brown, director of research and development at Alzheimer’s Society, said: “Our focus on re-purposing existing drugs as dementia treatments is an incredibly exciting way of bringing new treatments closer. “This exciting study suggests that one of these drugs can reverse the biological causes of Alzheimer’s even in the late stages and demonstrates we’re on the right track. "We’re now funding a major new trial to bring it closer to a position where it can be improving the lives of people with dementia. “Developing new drugs from scratch can take 20 years and hundreds of millions of pounds. "We owe it to the 800,000 people with dementia in the UK to do everything we can to accelerate the process.” Continue reading >>

Diet And Lifestyle Changes Reverse Memory Loss And Alzheimer’s

Diet And Lifestyle Changes Reverse Memory Loss And Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s and memory loss can seem like a sort of death sentence that strikes out of the blue and has no cure. Although genetics play a role, so does your diet and lifestyle, which means you can do something about Alzheimer’s and memory loss before the damage is too great. In the first study of its kind, nine out of 10 patients reversed their memory loss and showed considerable long-term improvement following a program that included dietary changes, exercise, supplementation, sleep improvements, and brain stimulation. Some were able to return to jobs they had to quit due to declining memory. Only the patient with late-stage Alzheimer’s did not improve. It’s the first study to suggest that memory loss can be reversed and the improvement sustained. The research was inspired by studies that looked at the effect of diet and lifestyle changes on other diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and HIV. In the study, subjects reversed their memory loss through approaches that included: Eliminating all simple carbohydrates, which led to weight loss Eliminating gluten and processed foods Increasing consumption of produce and non-farmed fish Yoga and other stress-reducing activities Increasing sleep from 4-5 hours to 7-8 Taking methyl B12, vitamin D3, fish oil, CoQ10, curcumin, resveratrol, ashwagandha, and coconut oil A minimum of 30 minutes of exercise 4-6 times a week Cut out snacking Hormone therapy when necessary The biggest obstacle in the program was the study subjects’ complaints about making so many changes. However, all but one experienced notable improvement without the side effects that drugs bring. Factors that affect memory It’s important to note the reduced consumption of carbohydrates in the study –- some researchers have called Alzheimer� Continue reading >>

We May Be Able To Reverse Signs Of Early Alzheimer's Disease

We May Be Able To Reverse Signs Of Early Alzheimer's Disease

Scientists know the stress hormone cortisol can damage the hippocampus, a memory center in the brain. Bredesen says hormone replacement therapy may help women who have an imbalance that affects their brain function. 7 ways to fight Alzheimer's disease – Gastrointestinal health has been linked with brain health. Incorporating fermented foods, probiotics and prebiotics into your diet could reduce your risk of dementia. Dr. Dale Bredesen of UCLA recommends having your doctor test for a "leaky" GI tract, as that can also cause inflammation. 7 ways to fight Alzheimer's disease – Allow three hours between dinner and bedtime, and 12 hours between dinner and breakfast. The idea behind this type of fasting, says Bredesen, is that the body begins a process during the break that may help to destroy amyloid-beta, a problematic protein that builds up in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. 7 ways to fight Alzheimer's disease – If you consume tuna frequently, check your mercury level, since exposure to heavy metals has been associated with dementia. Patients in Dr. Dale Bredesen's pilot study, "Reversal of cognitive decline: A novel therapeutic program," also ditched aluminum-containing deodorants -- but studies are far from conclusive about any harm conferred by anti-perspirants. 7 ways to fight Alzheimer's disease – Overeating grains, starchy vegetables and sugar can generate harmful inflammation in the body and brain. Patients in Bredesen's pilot study who responded most quickly cut out simple carbohydrates. 7 ways to fight Alzheimer's disease – Seven to eight hours a night is ideal for the body to restore itself. Patients in Bredesen's study who had trouble staying asleep got help from melatonin supplements or tryptophan, a chemical you likely know is found in turkey. 7 Continue reading >>

How To Prevent And Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How To Prevent And Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes rates are skyrocketing. This year, nearly 1 million people will be diagnosed with diabetes in the USA alone. Complications from diabetes lead to heart attacks, strokes, amputations, blindness, kidney failure, and memory loss. The #1 cause of death for people with diabetes is from cardiovascular disease. There are two types of diabetes, which are totally different issues. Type 1 diabetes occurs most commonly in children when an auto-immune disease destroys insulin producing cells in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes is a disease that requires insulin therapy, but fortunately, type 1 diabetes represents only about 5% of all diabetes cases. The good news is that 95% of diabetes is type 2 and is highly related to lifestyle choices. We used to call type 2 diabetes “adult onset diabetes”, but now we see it in children, young adults, and adults. Almost 20% of people over age 65 have type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle choices are so important in preventing and reversing type 2 diabetes that I hesitate to call it a disease at all. A better description is that if someone has type 2 diabetes, then they have a lifestyle that doesn’t match their genetic needs; change their lifestyle and their diabetes problem usually goes away. Since the early 1990s, I have offered programs that have helped thousands of patients bring their blood sugar levels back to normal. Even patients who started my program while on insulin with advanced diabetic complications have become medication-free and achieved normal blood sugar control. So What Changes Have Helped Reverse and Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? There is no single choice and no magic bullet to correct this problem. But the combination of three activities is remarkably helpful: Add activity daily Avoid refined carbs and sugars Eat more smart foods Continue reading >>

Memory Loss In Alzheimer’s Patients Could Soon Be Reversed, Thanks To New Research

Memory Loss In Alzheimer’s Patients Could Soon Be Reversed, Thanks To New Research

Atthapon Raksthaput/Shutterstock Experts say that the number of people living with Alzheimer’s disease is growing—and fast. While more than five million Americans live with this form of dementia today, that number could more than triple by the year 2050. But here’s some good news: Thanks to the most revolutionary research yet, doctors could soon restore memory loss in Alzheimer’s patients for good. MIT researchers have successfully reversed memory loss in mice, according to a study published in the journal Cell Reports. They did so by blocking the enzyme HDAC2, which interferes with the genes associated with memory. Memory loss in Alzheimer’s patients takes place when HCAC2 creates a blockade that shuts down the brain’s memory genes, causing forgetfulness and making memory formation more difficult. Since past research has failed to block the enzyme without toxic side effects, these results are groundbreaking. “This is exciting because for the first time we have found a specific mechanism by which HDAC2 regulates synaptic gene expression,” lead author Li-Huei Tsai said. “If we can remove the blockade by inhibiting HDAC2 activity or reducing HDAC2 levels, then we can restore expression of all these genes necessary for learning and memory.” Other researchers find Tsai’s research encouraging, as well. “As Alzheimer’s is now the biggest killer for women and the third for men, it is important that we think about putting as much emphasis on prevention as we do on treatment,” Dr Marilyn Glenville, one of the UK’s leading nutritionists and author of Natural Solutions for Dementia and Alzheimer’s, told The Independent. Maintaining these daily habits can keep your brain sharp and prevent Alzheimer’s disease. Although the procedure has only been te Continue reading >>

Episode #001 – Understanding How To Control Diabetes And The Link Between Diet And Memory Loss

Episode #001 – Understanding How To Control Diabetes And The Link Between Diet And Memory Loss

Many people suffer from diabetes. It’s a constant battle to maintain appropriate blood sugar levels through insulin medications in order to control diabetes. What’s considered a normal blood sugar level and what does knowing how to manage high insulin levels have to do with anything? Trista Polo and Dr. Raj Banerjee discuss the relationship between the blood sugar levels and how it is related to memory loss. Additionally they discuss an approach to help avoid age-related decline in memory.[content_block id=2625 slug=blog-post-box]So often, people group blood sugar levels and diabetes, even pre-diabetes together. Heightened blood sugar levels are also linked to memory loss and other complicated issues that hinder the brain. The correlation between the two will be expanded on during the podcast with Trista and Dr. Banerjee. What’s considered a normal blood sugar level and what does insulin have to do with anything? Blood Sugar levels and the Norm Blood sugar level is the concentrated amount of glucose or sugar that is in the blood. Normal blood sugar levels after not eating for about 8 hours should be between 85-100 mg/dl and lower than 140 mg/dl two hours after food consumption. Behind the scenes on insulin resistance Insulin resistance happens before being diagnosed with diabetes. Pre-diabetes is having too much insulin. Body produces more insulin in diabetes. The receptor site for insulin isn’t behaving properly, thus causing the pancreas to produce more insulin to unblock the receptor. Insulin medication and insulin shots are administered to attempt to overload the receptors and unblock then so that sugar can enter the tissue. This causes a person’s blood sugar levels to spike, due to sugar accumulation. Imagine that the walls of a classroom are muscle tissu Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Memory Loss

Type 2 Diabetes And Memory Loss

Researchers have long known that inflammation plays a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. This inflammation comes from substances that are produced by the body’s immune and fat cells. The result: impaired blood flow and blood vessel function— which impacts the health of the heart, kidneys and other organs and body systems. A study published in a July 2015 journal Neurology found that this reduced blood flow and blood vessel capability also affects the brain by speeding up cognitive decline and memory loss in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Measuring the Impact The researchers studied 65 men and women between the ages of 57 and 75. Thirty-five of the study participants had been treated for type 2 diabetes for more than five years at the beginning of the study. The initial assessment of all participants included testing of memory and cognitive function skills, as well as MRI scans and blood tests to determine baseline blood flow, blood pressure, markers of inflammation, and brain volume. None of the participants had any type of cognitive impairment at the time of the initial assessment. At a two-year follow-up, those with type 2 diabetes showed a significant decline in thinking and memory scores. None of the non-diabetic participants showed any decline. Blood vessel health and blood flow regulation were also seriously impaired in those with diabetes. “We ultimately concluded that diabetes-related inflammation of the small blood vessels in the brain may accelerate decline in those with type 2 diabetes,” says study author Vera Novak, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and director of Syncope and Falls in the Elderly (SAFE) laboratory at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. “This, in turn, affects not only their overall health but also their day- Continue reading >>

Blocking A Key Enzyme May Reverse Memory Loss, Mit Study Finds

Blocking A Key Enzyme May Reverse Memory Loss, Mit Study Finds

A better treatment for Alzheimer's patients may be on the horizon thanks to new research from MIT. Researchers at MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory have discovered that they can reverse memory loss in mice by blocking an enzyme called HDAC2. From the study: For several years, scientists and pharmaceutical companies have been trying to develop drugs that block this enzyme, but most of these drugs also block other members of the HDAC family, which can lead to toxic side effects. The MIT team has now found a way to precisely target HDAC2, by blocking its interaction with a binding partner called Sp3. "This is exciting because for the first time we have found a specific mechanism by which HDAC2 regulates synaptic gene expression," says Li-Huei Tsai, director of MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and the study's senior author. Blocking that mechanism could offer a new way to treat memory loss in Alzheimer's patients. In this study, the researchers used a large protein fragment to interfere with HDAC-2, but they plan to seek smaller molecules that would be easier to deploy as drugs. Picower Institute postdocs Hidekuni Yamakawa, Jemmie Cheng, and Jay Penney are the lead authors of the study, which appears in the Aug. 8 edition of Cell Reports. Continue reading >>

Breaking: Diabetes Drugs Linked To Alzheimers And Dementia

Breaking: Diabetes Drugs Linked To Alzheimers And Dementia

If you’re diabetic and you’re taking medication, you’re probably putting your brain at great risk. Their calling the new study from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine a “Diabetes Game-Changer." It proves that prolonged use of diabetes drugs puts you at risk for a deficiency which can cause neurological problems, including dementia, and even brain shrinkage. This study used data that was funded by the National Institute of Diabetes. This was a 5-year study that ran from 1996 until 2001. It followed more than 3,000 people who were “at risk” for diabetes. Participants were divided into three groups. Group #1 was assigned a special lifestyle change method. They were put on a very specific diet and performed light exercises. Group #2 was given the diabetes drug metformin. Group #3 was given a placebo. The purpose of this study was to see which group had the lowest rates of diabetes and took the longest to develop it. Group #1 beat the others by a landslide. The study authors were so astounded by their findings that the program morphed into a follow-up study, in which the original participants were followed for several more years. The researchers found that Group #2 (those taking metformin) were twice as likely as to have a B12 deficiency, and more likely to become anemic. More shocking yet, it was discovered that they were also more likely to develop neurological problems like Alzheimer’s and Dementia. Yet, for unknown reasons, the Diabetes-Institute-funded research didn’t follow up on the special diet procedure completed by Group #1. It’s everywhere, dangerous, and under-diagnosed While we don’t hear much about it, it’s common knowledge that B12 deficiency causes dementia. And data from a large study by Tufts University* suggests that low B12 leve Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Memory Loss

Diabetes And Memory Loss

Copyright © Mark Beselt Diabetes is an incurable disease characterized by high blood glucose levels. This is the result of the body's inability to produce or use insulin. One of the complications of diabetes is short term memory loss - and in this article we'll look at the different variations of the disease and how each type can be a cause of memory loss. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a group of diseases which affects nearly 24 million (8%) of the US population. The condition is is categorized into three different forms: Type 1 Diabetes is a genetic defect usually diagnosed in children and young adults. It arises from the inability to produce the hormone insulin, which is needed every time you eat to convert sugar and starches into energy. People with Type 1 diabetes usually need to inject insulin into their bodies and constantly be aware of their blood sugar levels. Fortunately, this most extreme form of diabetes only affects 5-10% of all sufferers but with no cure is does remain a lifelong condition. Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and millions of Americans have been diagnosed, although many more are at high risk. This condition is often diagnosed later in life when the body can no longer produce enough insulin, or the cells begin to ignore the insulin. Without intervention, this can lead to serious complications including heart disease, high blood pressure and stroke. Gestational Diabetes is a temporary form of the disease which affects around 4% of all pregnant women at 28 weeks or later. It begins when hormones from the placenta block the action of the mother's insulin. The condition corrects itself after the birth but it is very important to maintain healthy blood sugar levels during pregnancy to avoid serious complications for both mother an Continue reading >>

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory loss can be caused by a number of factors, from short term causes such as low blood sugar or medication side effects to long term health issues such as dementia. Treatment for long term memory loss will depend on what is causing it. Evidence from research suggests that good control of diabetes can help prevent memory problems developing over the longer term. Memory loss tends to become more prevalent as we get older. The NHS notes that around four in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. The NHS notes that around 4 in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. How can diabetes affect memory loss? Memory loss in diabetes can be a short term problem brought on by too low or high blood glucose levels. During hypoglycemia, for example, you may struggle to remember words. This is not necessarily a sign of a long term problem. In most cases, raising sugar levels over 4 mmol/l should get your memory back to normal. If memory problems happen at other times and this significantly affects your life, speak to your GP. Diabetes can increase the risk of developing long-term memory problems if blood glucose levels are less well controlled. High blood glucose levels, over a number of years, can damage the nerves, including those of the brain, which can increase the risk of dementia. Research shows that good diabetes management can help prevent memory problems from developing or advancing. Symptoms of memory loss Symptoms of memory loss could include: Not being able to recall an important event in your life Forgetting what you have just done Forgetting where things in your home are Forgetting the names of people close to you Some of these can happen to all of us from ti Continue reading >>

More in diabetes