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Can Memory Loss From Diabetes Be Reversed

8 Steps To Reverse Memory Loss

8 Steps To Reverse Memory Loss

Q: “My parents are getting older and I want to do everything I can to help them prevent Alzheimer’s, considering both my grandmothers had this disease, and I am worried about getting it too.” writes this week’s house call. “What can we do to prevent dementia?” A: The truth is, dementia is a very big problem that’s becoming bigger every day. Statistics are grim. 10 percent of 65-year-olds, 25 percent of 75-year-olds, and 50 percent of 85-year-olds will develop dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. And the fastest growing segment of our population is the 85-year-olds. Researchers predict Alzheimer’s will affect 106 million people by 2050. It’s now the seventh leading cause of death. Scientists now call Alzheimer’s disease “Type 3 diabetes.” What’s the link between Alzheimer’s and diabetes? Well, new research shows insulin resistance, or what I call diabesity (from eating too many carbs and sugar and not enough fat) is one of the major factors that starts the brain-damage cascade, which robs the memory of over half the people in their 80s, leading to a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. But don’t think too much insulin affects only older folks’ memories. It doesn’t just suddenly occur once you’re older. Dementia actually begins when you’re younger and takes decades to develop and worsen. Here’s the bad news/good news. Eating sugar and refined carbs can cause pre-dementia and dementia. But cutting out the sugar and refined carbs and adding lots of fat can prevent, and even reverse, pre-dementia and early dementia. More recent studies show people with diabetes have a four-fold risk for developing Alzheimer’s. People with pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome have an increased risk for having pre-dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Memory Loss

Type 2 Diabetes And Memory Loss

Researchers have long known that inflammation plays a role in the development of type 2 diabetes. This inflammation comes from substances that are produced by the body’s immune and fat cells. The result: impaired blood flow and blood vessel function— which impacts the health of the heart, kidneys and other organs and body systems. A study published in a July 2015 journal Neurology found that this reduced blood flow and blood vessel capability also affects the brain by speeding up cognitive decline and memory loss in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Measuring the Impact The researchers studied 65 men and women between the ages of 57 and 75. Thirty-five of the study participants had been treated for type 2 diabetes for more than five years at the beginning of the study. The initial assessment of all participants included testing of memory and cognitive function skills, as well as MRI scans and blood tests to determine baseline blood flow, blood pressure, markers of inflammation, and brain volume. None of the participants had any type of cognitive impairment at the time of the initial assessment. At a two-year follow-up, those with type 2 diabetes showed a significant decline in thinking and memory scores. None of the non-diabetic participants showed any decline. Blood vessel health and blood flow regulation were also seriously impaired in those with diabetes. “We ultimately concluded that diabetes-related inflammation of the small blood vessels in the brain may accelerate decline in those with type 2 diabetes,” says study author Vera Novak, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology and director of Syncope and Falls in the Elderly (SAFE) laboratory at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. “This, in turn, affects not only their overall health but also their day- Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Or Reverse Dementia (part 1)

How To Prevent Or Reverse Dementia (part 1)

Is Alzheimer’s related to diabetes? Alzheimer’s disease has been nicknamed “Type 3 diabetes.” Diabetes is linked to Alzheimer’s through insulin resistance, and is one of the major factors that starts the brain-damage cascade. This damage impacts the memory of over half of people in their 80s. “More recent studies show people with diabetes have a four-fold risk for developing Alzheimer’s. People with pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome have an increased risk for having pre-dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI).” Eating sugar and refined carbs can cause pre-dementia and dementia. Removing sugar and refined carbs from the diet and adding significant quantities of healthy fat can prevent, and even reverse, pre-dementia and early dementia. Dr. Mark Hyman has observed improved memory, mood and well-being in people following The Blood Sugar Solution, The 10-Day Detox Diet, or Eat Fat, Get Thin. How to Reverse Memory Loss According to Dr. Mark Hyman, the underlying causes of Alzheimer’s disease begin with high blood sugar. The cycle starts when we over-consume sugar and under-consume fat, which leads to diabesity. Diabesity leads to inflammation, and inflammation damages the brain (1). Dementia and cognitive decline can be reversed. Balancing insulin and blood sugar levels allow you to overcome diabesity, balance your mood, help your focus, help boost your energy level, and prevent all of the age-related brain diseases including Alzheimer’s (1). Remove the following from the diet: refined carbs, sugar, alcohol, caffeine, processed foods, dairy, and inflammatory, omega-6 rich oils such as vegetable and seed oils. Balance your blood sugar with a whole-foods, low-glycemic diet including healthy fats like avocados, walnuts, almonds and cashews, grass-fed me Continue reading >>

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory loss can be caused by a number of factors, from short term causes such as low blood sugar or medication side effects to long term health issues such as dementia. Treatment for long term memory loss will depend on what is causing it. Evidence from research suggests that good control of diabetes can help prevent memory problems developing over the longer term. Memory loss tends to become more prevalent as we get older. The NHS notes that around four in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. The NHS notes that around 4 in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. How can diabetes affect memory loss? Memory loss in diabetes can be a short term problem brought on by too low or high blood glucose levels. During hypoglycemia, for example, you may struggle to remember words. This is not necessarily a sign of a long term problem. In most cases, raising sugar levels over 4 mmol/l should get your memory back to normal. If memory problems happen at other times and this significantly affects your life, speak to your GP. Diabetes can increase the risk of developing long-term memory problems if blood glucose levels are less well controlled. High blood glucose levels, over a number of years, can damage the nerves, including those of the brain, which can increase the risk of dementia. Research shows that good diabetes management can help prevent memory problems from developing or advancing. Symptoms of memory loss Symptoms of memory loss could include: Not being able to recall an important event in your life Forgetting what you have just done Forgetting where things in your home are Forgetting the names of people close to you Some of these can happen to all of us from ti Continue reading >>

Memory Loss In Alzheimer’s Patients Could Soon Be Reversed, Thanks To New Research

Memory Loss In Alzheimer’s Patients Could Soon Be Reversed, Thanks To New Research

Atthapon Raksthaput/Shutterstock Experts say that the number of people living with Alzheimer’s disease is growing—and fast. While more than five million Americans live with this form of dementia today, that number could more than triple by the year 2050. But here’s some good news: Thanks to the most revolutionary research yet, doctors could soon restore memory loss in Alzheimer’s patients for good. MIT researchers have successfully reversed memory loss in mice, according to a study published in the journal Cell Reports. They did so by blocking the enzyme HDAC2, which interferes with the genes associated with memory. Memory loss in Alzheimer’s patients takes place when HCAC2 creates a blockade that shuts down the brain’s memory genes, causing forgetfulness and making memory formation more difficult. Since past research has failed to block the enzyme without toxic side effects, these results are groundbreaking. “This is exciting because for the first time we have found a specific mechanism by which HDAC2 regulates synaptic gene expression,” lead author Li-Huei Tsai said. “If we can remove the blockade by inhibiting HDAC2 activity or reducing HDAC2 levels, then we can restore expression of all these genes necessary for learning and memory.” Other researchers find Tsai’s research encouraging, as well. “As Alzheimer’s is now the biggest killer for women and the third for men, it is important that we think about putting as much emphasis on prevention as we do on treatment,” Dr Marilyn Glenville, one of the UK’s leading nutritionists and author of Natural Solutions for Dementia and Alzheimer’s, told The Independent. Maintaining these daily habits can keep your brain sharp and prevent Alzheimer’s disease. Although the procedure has only been te Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Shows Promising Results For All Dementia Stages

Ketogenic Diet Shows Promising Results For All Dementia Stages

Studies show a ketogenic diet can slow and even reverse symptoms of memory loss and cognitive impairment throughout all the dementia stages. You might be asking, “What is a ketogenic diet?” A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet that produces ketones—compounds the body can use to produce energy. Ketones have been shown in studies to be neuroprotective, meaning they “defend” your brain from degenerating. In short, a ketogenic diet is a great way to reverse dementia naturally. Dementia Prevention with a Ketogenic Diet Why does a ketogenic diet show promise? Research clearly establishes a strong link between blood sugar disorders and the various dementia stages, including memory loss, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer’s. The most predominate blood sugar disorders are insulin resistance and diabetes. In fact, the link is so obvious some researchers have labeled Alzheimer’s disease as “type 3 diabetes.” For the majority of Americans, the blood sugar handling system functions poorly thanks to diets heavy on breads, pastas, pastries, cereals, grains, potatoes, sweet coffee drinks, sodas and energy drinks, and desserts of all kinds. The human body simply wasn’t designed to eat sweets and starchy foods in the quantities most people consume today, and the consequences are obvious in the form of overweight and obesity. However, underlying the accumulation of excess body fat is something far more insidious: the swift degeneration and abnormal function of the brain, which leads to the dementia stages of memory loss, MCI, and Alzheimer’s disease. Because glucose and insulin mechanisms in the brain are so impaired by the time one enters into the dementia stages, a ketogenic diet may be a great natural cure for Alz Continue reading >>

Blocking A Key Enzyme May Reverse Memory Loss

Blocking A Key Enzyme May Reverse Memory Loss

In the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, many of the genes required to form new memories are shut down by a genetic blockade, contributing to the cognitive decline seen in those patients. MIT researchers have now shown that they can reverse that memory loss in mice by interfering with the enzyme that forms the blockade. The enzyme, known as HDAC2, turns genes off by condensing them so tightly that they can’t be expressed. For several years, scientists and pharmaceutical companies have been trying to develop drugs that block this enzyme, but most of these drugs also block other members of the HDAC family, which can lead to toxic side effects. The MIT team has now found a way to precisely target HDAC2, by blocking its interaction with a binding partner called Sp3. “This is exciting because for the first time we have found a specific mechanism by which HDAC2 regulates synaptic gene expression,” says Li-Huei Tsai, director of MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and the study’s senior author. Blocking that mechanism could offer a new way to treat memory loss in Alzheimer’s patients. In this study, the researchers used a large protein fragment to interfere with HDAC-2, but they plan to seek smaller molecules that would be easier to deploy as drugs. Picower Institute postdocs Hidekuni Yamakawa, Jemmie Cheng, and Jay Penney are the lead authors of the study, which appears in the Aug. 8 edition of Cell Reports. Memorable interactions In 2007, Tsai first discovered that blocking HDAC activity could reverse memory loss in mice. There are several classes of HDACs, and their primary function is to modify histones — proteins around which DNA is spooled, forming a structure called chromatin. These modifications condense chromatin, making genes in that stretch Continue reading >>

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory Loss (amnesia)

Memory loss can be caused by a number of factors, from short term causes such as low blood sugar or medication side effects to long term health issues such as dementia. Treatment for long term memory loss will depend on what is causing it. Evidence from research suggests that good control of diabetes can help prevent memory problems developing over the longer term. Memory loss tends to become more prevalent as we get older. The NHS notes that around four in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. The NHS notes that around 4 in 10 people over the age of 65, in the general population, have some form of memory difficulties. How can diabetes affect memory loss? Memory loss in diabetes can be a short term problem brought on by too low or high blood glucose levels. During hypoglycemia, for example, you may struggle to remember words. This is not necessarily a sign of a long term problem. In most cases, raising sugar levels over 4 mmol/l should get your memory back to normal. If memory problems happen at other times and this significantly affects your life, speak to your GP. Diabetes can increase the risk of developing long-term memory problems if blood glucose levels are less well controlled. High blood glucose levels, over a number of years, can damage the nerves, including those of the brain, which can increase the risk of dementia. Research shows that good diabetes management can help prevent memory problems from developing or advancing. Symptoms of memory loss Symptoms of memory loss could include: Not being able to recall an important event in your life Forgetting what you have just done Forgetting where things in your home are Forgetting the names of people close to you Some of these can happen to all of us from ti Continue reading >>

Could A Diabetes Drug Help Beat Alzheimer's Disease?

Could A Diabetes Drug Help Beat Alzheimer's Disease?

Most of the 20 million people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the U.S. take metformin to help control their blood glucose. The drug is ultrasafe: millions of diabetics have taken it for decades with few side effects beyond gastrointestinal discomfort. And it is ultracheap: a month's supply costs $4 at Walmart. And now new studies hint that metformin might help protect the brain from developing diseases of aging, even in nondiabetics. Diabetes is a risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases, but using metformin is associated with a dramatic reduction in their incidence. In the most comprehensive study yet of metformin's cognitive effects, Qian Shi and her colleagues at Tulane University followed 6,000 diabetic veterans and showed that the longer a patient used metformin, the lower the individual's chances of developing Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and other types of dementia and cognitive impairment. In line with some of the previous, smaller studies of long-term metformin use, patients in the new study who used the drug longer than four years had one quarter the rate of disease as compared with patients who used only insulin or insulin plus other antidiabetic drugs—bringing diabetics' risk level to that of the general population. The findings were presented in June at the American Diabetes Association's Scientific Sessions meeting. Even in the absence of diabetes, Alzheimer's patients often have decreased insulin sensitivity in the brain, says Suzanne Craft, a neuroscientist who studies insulin resistance in neurodegenerative disease at the Wake Forest School of Medicine. The association has led some people to call Alzheimer's “type 3 diabetes.” Insulin plays many roles in the brain—it is involved in memory formation, and it helps to keep synapses Continue reading >>

Vascular Dementia

Vascular Dementia

A diagnosis of dementia does not always mean an unavoidable decline. Copyright © 2000 Memory Loss and the Brain One of the most feared consequences of aging is dementia, a set of symptoms marked by profound memory loss and impaired thinking. Thanks to a lot of research and public education, most people are aware that dementia is not an inevitable part of growing older. In fact, it is most often the result of a specific illness, Alzheimer's disease, that strikes many-but by no means all-people in their senior years. The bottom line is that aging does not necessarily lead to "senility," unless Alzheimer's or some other disease is present. One of those "other" diseases is vascular dementia. It is probably the second leading cause of dementia, but has been somewhat overshadowed by the more well-known Alzheimer's disease. Caused by blockages and breaches in the brain's blood supply that damage the brain, vascular dementia can be prevented and, in some cases, even reversed. Graphic: © Grant Jerding Vascular Dementia and Alzheimer's The cardinal sign of dementia is a decline in a person's normal intellectual functions--most notably, a decline in memory. Problems with short-term memory typically show up first. There may be general forgetfulness, or a tendency to misplace household items. But over time, the memory lapses become more severe, and the dementia begins to take a debilitating toll on thinking, judgment, communication, and emotional stability. In people 65 or older, the most common cause of these crippling symptoms is Alzheimer's disease. But they are not the only causes. Dementia can also be a symptom, sometimes temporary, of dozens of diseases and disorders. These include poisoning, viral infections, malfunctioning glands, benign brain tumors, and severe nutritiona Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug May Reverse Brain Damage Seen In Late Alzheimer's

Diabetes Drug May Reverse Brain Damage Seen In Late Alzheimer's

A drug commonly used by diabetes sufferers could reverse memory loss and treat Alzheimer’s patients, research reveals today. Experts at Lancaster University have discovered that liraglutide might be able to reverse some of the damage caused by the disease in the later stages of the condition. Mice with Alzheimer’s who were given the diabetes drug performed much better on an object recognition test and their brains showed a 30% reduction in the build-up of toxic plaques. Liraglutide is a drug used to stimulate insulin production, but research shows it can also pass through the blood brain barrier and offer a protective effect on brain cells. Researchers at Imperial College London will shortly begin recruiting patients to take part in a major clinical trial to test the effectiveness of the drug in Alzheimer’s sufferers. Around 800,000 people in the UK have dementia, more than half of whom have Alzheimer’s. Dr Doug Brown, director of research and development at Alzheimer’s Society, said: “Our focus on re-purposing existing drugs as dementia treatments is an incredibly exciting way of bringing new treatments closer. “This exciting study suggests that one of these drugs can reverse the biological causes of Alzheimer’s even in the late stages and demonstrates we’re on the right track. "We’re now funding a major new trial to bring it closer to a position where it can be improving the lives of people with dementia. “Developing new drugs from scratch can take 20 years and hundreds of millions of pounds. "We owe it to the 800,000 people with dementia in the UK to do everything we can to accelerate the process.” Continue reading >>

Memory Loss Caused By Dementia Could Be Reversed With This 24p Drug

Memory Loss Caused By Dementia Could Be Reversed With This 24p Drug

Scientists have revealed mefenamic acid - which is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug - (NSAID) sold in Britain as Ponstan Forte - also reduced brain inflammation when tested on mice. The drug is currently only available if it is prescribed by pharmacists and doctors and costs 24p a tablet. Experts often prescribe it for period pain or to relieve pain caused by dental surgery. However experts have warned people not to take the drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease because no studies have been done in people. Dr David Brough, who led a team of researchers at Manchester University, used mice which have had their genomes altered to have symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. One group of ten mice was treated with mefenamic acid, and 10 mice were treated in the same way with a placebo. The mice were treated at a time when they had developed memory problems and the drug was given to them for one month. The scientists found that memory loss in the animals had completely reversed. Researchers said this is the first time a drug has shown such drastic effects, however Dr Brough warned that more research is needed to identify its impact on humans. They also said tests would need to be done to assess the long-term implications of its use. Dr Brough, said: "There is experimental evidence now to strongly suggest that inflammation in the brain makes Alzheimer's disease worse. "Our research shows for the first time that mefenamic acid, a simple Non-Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drug can target an important inflammatory pathway called the NLRP3 inflammasome, which damages brain cells. "Until now, no drug has been available to target this pathway, so we are very excited by this result. "However, much more work needs to be done until we can say with certainty that it will tackle the disease in Continue reading >>

Blocking A Key Enzyme May Reverse Memory Loss, Mit Study Finds

Blocking A Key Enzyme May Reverse Memory Loss, Mit Study Finds

A better treatment for Alzheimer's patients may be on the horizon thanks to new research from MIT. Researchers at MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory have discovered that they can reverse memory loss in mice by blocking an enzyme called HDAC2. From the study: For several years, scientists and pharmaceutical companies have been trying to develop drugs that block this enzyme, but most of these drugs also block other members of the HDAC family, which can lead to toxic side effects. The MIT team has now found a way to precisely target HDAC2, by blocking its interaction with a binding partner called Sp3. "This is exciting because for the first time we have found a specific mechanism by which HDAC2 regulates synaptic gene expression," says Li-Huei Tsai, director of MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and the study's senior author. Blocking that mechanism could offer a new way to treat memory loss in Alzheimer's patients. In this study, the researchers used a large protein fragment to interfere with HDAC-2, but they plan to seek smaller molecules that would be easier to deploy as drugs. Picower Institute postdocs Hidekuni Yamakawa, Jemmie Cheng, and Jay Penney are the lead authors of the study, which appears in the Aug. 8 edition of Cell Reports. Continue reading >>

Memory Loss: Can It Be Cured? -- Majid Fotuhi, Md -- 6/26/03

Memory Loss: Can It Be Cured? -- Majid Fotuhi, Md -- 6/26/03

WebMD Live Events Transcript Memory loss is a frightening occurrence for anyone who finds the records of their lives fading away, whether it's minor forgetfulness or the devastating effects of Alzheimer's disease. We had a memorable discussion about preventing and treating memory loss with Majid Fotuhi, MD. The opinions expressed herein are the guest's alone and have not been reviewed by a WebMD physician. If you have questions about your health, you should consult your personal physician. This event is meant for informational purposes only. Moderator: Welcome to WebMD Live, Dr. Fotuhi. Is memory loss an inevitable part of aging? Fotuhi: No. People may have slower rate of learning and memorizing things, but they should not lose their memory. Some degree of forgetfulness is normal with aging, but people should maintain the ability to function in their jobs and remember names of their spouses, children, friends, and so on. The only thing they should not forget is the names of their close relatives and their friends. That would be abnormal. Moderator: How can one determine what is causing short-term memory loss? Fotuhi: The most common cause of memory loss is stress and anxiety. The second most common cause is depression. The third most common cause is medical issues. Only the 10th or 11th on the list would be Alzheimer's disease. Ninety percent of older adults who complain about memory loss do not have Alzheimer's disease. Most of them have depression, stress, anxiety, fatigue, and lack of sufficient amount of sleep or medical issues. Member question: What, if any, is the difference between dementia and Alzheimer's disease? Fotuhi: That is a very good question. Dementia means memory loss plus deficit in one or more area of cognition, such as getting lost, confusion of tim Continue reading >>

Age-related Memory Loss

Age-related Memory Loss

What's Normal, What's Not, and When to Seek Help We've all misplaced keys, blanked on an acquaintance's name, or forgotten a phone number. When we’re young, we don’t tend to pay much mind to these lapses, but as we grow older, sometimes we worry about what they mean. While it’s true that certain brain changes are inevitable when it comes to aging, major memory problems are not one of them. That’s why it’s important to know the difference between normal age-related forgetfulness and the symptoms that may indicate a developing cognitive problem. Memory and aging Forgetfulness is a common complaint among older adults. You start to talk about a movie you saw recently when you realize you can’t remember the title. You’re giving directions to your house when you suddenly blank on a familiar street name. You find yourself standing in the middle of the kitchen wondering what you went in there for. Memory lapses can be frustrating, but most of the time they aren’t cause for concern. Age-related memory changes are not the same thing as dementia. As we grow older, we experience physiological changes that can cause glitches in brain functions we’ve always taken for granted. It takes longer to learn and recall information. We’re not as quick as we used to be. In fact, we often mistake this slowing of our mental processes for true memory loss. But in most cases, if we give ourselves time, the information will come to mind. Memory loss is not an inevitable part of the aging process The brain is capable of producing new brain cells at any age, so significant memory loss is not an inevitable result of aging. But just as it is with muscle strength, you have to use it or lose it. Your lifestyle, health habits, and daily activities have a huge impact on the health of yo Continue reading >>

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