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Can Low Blood Sugar Cause You To Be Dizzy?

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like

In this article, we will explore what low blood sugar feels like for different people with diabetes. We will look at the symptoms, how they can change over time, and how they are often different from person to person. We will look at planning ahead, and the treatment of hypoglycemia, hereafter referred to as “low blood sugar.” To get started, patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes were interviewed and asked the question: What is it like and what do you do when life hands you the low blood sugar agenda for the day? Describe your experience. Melissa’s story Melissa is usually gung-ho and ready to go for the day, but when she is handed the low blood sugar agenda, it takes all the wind out of her “cells.” They feel wrinkled up and emaciate. Here is how Melissa describes her low blood sugars: I imagine you, (you wrinkly old emaciated cell with no food in you), as a grumpy old man. I scream at you, though I can’t move. No, I won’t take your stifling agenda! I have to work after all. My kids need me to take them to dance class after school. I’m reluctant to take your agenda, packed with the helplessness that is my poison pill of the day. If I believe those positive self-help type blogs, then I would know that to decide you are happy determines your destination for the day. If you have diabetes, that’s a crock. With diabetes, your low blood sugar determines your agenda, and ultimately what you will be able to do for the day. When it gets below 70, or dips severely low- it begs and screams to be addressed! Especially if it dips fast, then I’m in trouble. Every cell in my body screams out. If it’s too low, I can’t move to do anything about it! Often I get a little dizzy feeling, and then I know I have to treat. I will get the shakes so bad that I can’t Continue reading >>

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood glucose (sugar) levels are too low. It happens to people with diabetes when they have a mismatch of medicine, food, and/or exercise. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. There are two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia: Reactive hypoglycemia, which happens within a few hours of eating a meal Fasting hypoglycemia, which may be related to a disease Glucose is the main source of energy for your body and brain. It comes from what we eat and drink. Insulin, a hormone, helps keep blood glucose at normal levels so your body can work properly. Insulin’s job is to help glucose enter your cells where it’s used for energy. If your glucose level is too low, you might not feel well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? The two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia have different causes. Researchers are still studying the causes of reactive hypoglycemia. They know, however, that it comes from having too much insulin in the blood, leading to low blood glucose levels. Types of nondiabetic hypoglycemia Reactive hypoglycemia Having pre-diabetes or being at risk for diabetes, which can lead to trouble making the right amount of insulin Stomach surgery, which can make food pass too quickly into your small intestine Rare enzyme deficiencies that make it hard for your body to break down food Fasting hypoglycemia Medicines, such as salicylates (such as aspirin), sulfa drugs (an antibiotic), pentamidine (to treat a serious kind of pneumonia), quinine (to treat malaria) Alcohol, especially with binge drinking Serious illnesses, such as those affecting the liver, heart, or kidneys Low levels of certain hormones, such as cortisol, growth hormone, glu Continue reading >>

Dizziness

Dizziness

Tweet Because diabetes is such a diverse disease with many complications, it can cause dizziness in many ways by affecting different parts of the body. Dizziness is an episode of unsteadiness and unbalance as a result of something affecting the brain or ears. However, dizziness can also be a symptom of many things other than diabetes. So if you are experiencing recurrent dizzy spells, you should contact your doctor who will be able to diagnose the cause. Causes of dizziness A dizzy spell can be brought on by many things, but in cases of diabetes the most common causes are: Low blood pressure Dizziness can be cause by the heart's inability to pump blood up to the brain sufficiently, especially when suddenly standing up from a sitting or a lying position. As the blood momentarily fails to reach the brain, a spinning sensation, unsteadiness or even fainting can occur. Dehydration High blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) can cause polyuria, which in turn can lead to dehydration by passing too much fluid out of the body in an attempt to remove excess glucose. With low levels of water in the body, the brain may struggle to function correctly and cause light headedness. Hypoglycemia Having a low amount of sugar in your blood (hypoglycemia) can lead to dizziness by causing the brain cells to malfunction. Certain medications Some medications, including those used to treat people with diabetes, can cause dizzy spells. The instruction leaflet that comes with a medicine will list any possible side effects of the drug. When to see your doctor If you are suffering from bouts of dizziness that are recurrent or persistent you should go and see a doctor. They will likely ask questions to gauge whether there is a pattern to the feelings of dizziness, so keeping a record of dizzy spells pr Continue reading >>

Low Blood Pressure (hypotension)

Low Blood Pressure (hypotension)

Print Overview Low blood pressure might seem desirable, and for some people, it causes no problems. However, for many people, abnormally low blood pressure (hypotension) can cause dizziness and fainting. In severe cases, low blood pressure can be life-threatening. A blood pressure reading lower than 90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) for the top number (systolic) or 60 mm Hg for the bottom number (diastolic) is generally considered low blood pressure. The causes of low blood pressure can range from dehydration to serious medical or surgical disorders. It's important to find out what's causing your low blood pressure so that it can be treated. Symptoms For some people, low blood pressure signals an underlying problem, especially when it drops suddenly or is accompanied by signs and symptoms such as: Dizziness or lightheadedness Fainting (syncope) Blurred vision Nausea Fatigue Lack of concentration Shock Extreme hypotension can result in this life-threatening condition. Signs and symptoms include: Confusion, especially in older people Cold, clammy, pale skin Rapid, shallow breathing Weak and rapid pulse When to see a doctor If you have indications of shock, seek emergency medical help. If you have consistently low blood pressure readings but feel fine, your doctor is likely just to monitor you during routine exams. Even occasional dizziness or lightheadedness may be a relatively minor problem — the result of mild dehydration from too much time in the sun or a hot tub, for example. Still, it's important to see your doctor if you have signs or symptoms of hypotension because they can point to more-serious problems. It can be helpful to keep a record of your symptoms, when they occur and what you're doing at the time. Causes Blood pressure is a measurement of the pressure i Continue reading >>

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness is a symptom that is often applies to a variety of sensations including lightheadedness and vertigo. Vertigo is the sensation of spinning, while lightheadedness is typically described as near fainting, and weakness. Some of the conditions that may cause lightheadedness in a patient include low blood pressure, high blood pressure, dehydration, medications, postural or orthostatic hypotension, diabetes, endocrine disorders, hyperventilation, heart conditions, and vasovagal syncope. Vertigo is most often caused by a problem in the balance centers of the inner ear called the vestibular system and causes the sensation of the room spinning. It may be associated with vomiting. Symptoms often are made worse with position changes. Those with significant symptoms and vomiting may need intravenous medication and hospitalization. Vertigo is also the presenting symptom in patients with Meniere's Disease and acoustic neuroma, conditions that often require referral to an ENT specialist. Vertigo may also be a symptom of stroke. Most often, dizziness or lightheadedness is a temporary situation that resolves spontaneously without a specific diagnosis being made. Introduction to dizziness (feeling dizzy) Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms that will prompt a person to seek medical care. The term dizziness is sometimes difficult to understand since it means different things to different people. It is either the sensation of feeling lightheaded as if the individual is weak and will pass out, or it describes vertigo or the sensation of spinning, as if the affected person just got off a merry-go-round. Lightheadedness is often caused by a decrease in blood supply to the brain, while vertigo may be caused by disturbances of the inner ear and the balance centers of the brain. Continue reading >>

7 Signs You Have Low Blood Sugar

7 Signs You Have Low Blood Sugar

“Low blood sugar” is one of those terms we’ve all heard thrown around a bunch but probably don’t know much about. It’s understandable that you’d feel a little cranky when a last-minute work meeting or general busyness forces you to push back a meal. But how do you know if you're annoyed due to low blood sugar or if your irritability is due to regular old hanger? “This is a topic that actually comes up quite a bit for me with patients and clients,” Jessica Cording, a New York-based R.D., tells SELF. Low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia, happens when levels of your blood glucose—an important energy source for your body—drop below normal, according to the National Institutes of Health. “Because our bodies require glucose for fuel, maintaining a steady stream of blood glucose is critical to keep your body functioning,” Karen Ansel, R.D.N., co-author of The Calendar Diet: A Month by Month Guide to Losing Weight While Living Your Life, tells SELF. We get our glucose from food, which explains why someone may complain that they have low blood sugar when they haven’t eaten recently. But along with not having enough to eat, certain medications or overdoing it with alcohol can cause low blood sugar in otherwise healthy people, Ansel says. Those people may experience symptoms like feeling shaky, irritable, or weak, says Cording, who notes that people can also feel anxious, start sweating, or become confused. And people with medical conditions like diabetes or hepatitis are more likely to experience complications from low blood sugar, which can be dangerous for them, Ansel says. “If it gets really severe, you pass out because your body has no energy to do what it needs to do,” says Cording. But chances are that you don't have to worry about low b Continue reading >>

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is common among people with diabetes and can occur even when you're carefully managing the condition. "Hypoglycemia happens when the amount of blood glucose (sugar in the blood) drops to a level that's too low to sustain normal functioning," says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, author of 2 Day Diabetes Diet. "In most people, this is defined as a blood-sugar level below 70 milligrams per deciliter." A review published in June 2015 in the journal PLoS One found that among people with type 2 diabetes, this is a far too common occurrence. Individuals with the condition had an average of 19 mild episodes of hypoglycemia per year, and nearly one severe episode per year on average. Low blood sugar was particularly common among those taking insulin. This decrease in blood sugar levels can cause both short-term complications, like confusion and dizziness, as well as more serious, long-term complications. Left untreated, it can lead to a coma and even death. To prevent hypoglycemia and its dangerous side effects, it's crucial to monitor your glucose levels and treat low blood sugar as soon as you become aware of it. Pay attention to these telltale signs of dipping blood sugar levels to make sure yours stays under control: 1. Ravenous Hunger If you've already eaten but still aren't satisfied, or if you suddenly, inexplicably feel as if you're starving, your body is signaling that it needs more glucose. Work with your healthcare team to determine the exact amount of sugar your body needs. A good starting point is the American Diabetes Association's recommendation to eat between 15 and 20 grams (g) of sugar or carbohydrates with each snack, and between 40 and 65 g at each meal. Some good options include 2 tablespoons of raisins, 4 ounces of fruit juice Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar? 8 Warning Signs If You Have Diabetes

Low Blood Sugar? 8 Warning Signs If You Have Diabetes

Do you know the No. 1 cause of blood sugar dips? Changes in food intake. You may go too long without eating carbohydrates, or step up your activity without adding extra food. Certain diabetes medications, such as insulin, can cause low blood sugar as well.  Either way, these situations can cause hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy And it’s sometimes difficult to tell for sure when you’re experiencing problems. Symptoms may vary from person to person; not everyone has the same warning signs. The problems are sometimes mild, but if they’re severe and left untreated, they could lead to seizures or unconsciousness. Here’s what you need to know to recognize hypoglycemia when it happens — as well as steps you can take to help avoid the problem. What are the most common signs of trouble? Health professionals typically define hypoglycemia as blood sugar in a non-pregnant adult that is lower than 70mg/dl. However, experts don’t define the severity by the number, but rather by the symptoms: Mild. In this case, low blood sugar can be treated by the person with diabetes alone. Moderate. The person experiencing low blood sugar is alert enough to ask for help, but he or she does require assistance. Severe. This person is completely unable to self-treat and may be awake or unconscious.  Talk to your doctor to see what target levels are safe for you. If you suspect you’re dealing with hypoglycemia, here are the most common symptoms to watch for: Sweating– One of the first signs of hypoglycemia is sweating or clammy skin. It often occurs regardless of the temperature outside. Hunger – Continue reading >>

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Thought the only sign of being diabetic is being overweight? Think again... Around 3.7 million people in the UK have diabetes, yet according to Diabetes UK, around 590,000 suffer - but they don't even know about it. And while diabetes - a lifelong condition - can be successfully managed once it’s diagnosed, delaying that diagnosis puts people at risk of serious complications, including amputation and blindness. This is a key concern for Type 2 diabetes, the type associated with weight which accounts for around 90% of all cases. Type 2 occurs when the body can no longer make enough insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas which enables us to use sugar/glucose), or the insulin being produced isn’t doing its job properly. Type 1, on the other hand, has absolutely nothing to do with weight or lifestyle and tends to develop during childhood when a fault in the body causes insulin-producing cells to be destroyed. “The symptoms of Type 1 and Type 2 are very similar, however they tend to come on a lot quicker in Type 1, and you can end up very poorly and in hospital if not diagnosed straight away,” says Diabetes UK clinical advisor Libby Dowling. “Type 2 is a little different. A lot of people put the symptoms of Type 2 down to getting older, and the condition can sometimes go undiagnosed for up to 10 years, by which time complications could have started to develop.” [Read more: Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 - Do you know the difference?] But, aside from increased thirst, needing to be more and tiredness, what are those symptoms? Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Continue reading >>

13 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar & How To Fix It

13 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar & How To Fix It

Extreme changes in blood sugar levels are more common than you might think, and can lead on to serious problems if left unchecked. A 2015 review found that, among those with type 2 diabetes, mild episodes of low blood sugar occur an average of 19 times a year, with almost one severe episode on average annually. This was particularly common among those taking insulin. Thankfully, there are several warning signs that all is not well. Learn to identify when you hit a blood sugar dip and take action to stabilize glucose levels for the good of your health. Blood Sugar Highs & Lows Our blood sugar levels can affect so many aspects of our wellbeing – both mental and physical. But what exactly is blood sugar? Well, after eating, our food is broken down into various parts – one of which is glucose (sugar), which is either used right away for energy or stored for later use. For our bodily cells to be able to use glucose, we must be producing enough insulin, and our body must be able to use this insulin correctly. (Diabetics either cannot produce insulin or cannot use it properly.) If our bodies cannot do this, we experience fluctuations in blood sugar. We can also experience these fluctuations if we skip meals, drink alcohol on an empty stomach, eat a lot of junk food or simple carbohydrates, engage in more physical activity than we are used to, or as a side effect of various medications. If blood sugar levels dip below 70 mg/dL, they are considered too low – a condition known as hypoglycemia – and can cause a variety of symptoms, including the following 13: 13 Warning Signs of Low Blood Sugar 1. Shakiness, Lightheadedness or Dizziness Feeling shaky, lightheaded or dizzy are very common symptoms of low blood sugar as brain cells tend to malfunction when blood glucose drop Continue reading >>

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Safety First! Recognizing And Preventing Low Blood Sugar

DIABETES SAFETY FIRST! Recognizing and Preventing Low Blood Sugar Blood glucose (sugar) goes up and down in a small range throughout the day. In people with diabetes, the range can be much wider. It is important to understand the fine balance between treating the high sugars and avoiding the low sugars. If you have diabetes and take certain diabetes drugs or insulin, you may experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia [hy-po-gly-SEE-me-uh]) from time to time. Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar of less than 70 mg/dL. However, some people have symptoms of low blood sugar even at higher blood sugar levels. This can happen when blood sugar is dropping too quickly or if the person has had very high blood sugars for a long time. Severe hypoglycemia means the person needs someone to treat them, which is a very serious condition! Even mild hypoglycemia symptoms are hard on your body and on your emotions. By learning more about the signs and causes of low blood sugar, you can take steps to keep it from happening again. Frequent low blood sugars are serious because the body becomes less able to show the warning signals of a low blood sugar. The blood sugar can then fall to dangerously low levels. What causes low blood sugar and what are the symptoms? Low blood sugar is usually caused by eating less or later than usual, changing your physical activity or taking a diabetes medicine that is not right for your needs. Even mistakes in dosing can lead to hypoglycemia. For example, you could mistake one insulin for another or forget that you had already taken your diabetes pills! A recent large study showed that the most common causes of hypoglycemia were smaller than usual food intake, delay in eating, or skipping a meal. Low blood sugar feels different to different people, so learn to know y Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

People with diabetes get hypoglycemia () when their bodies don't have enough sugar to use as fuel. It can happen for several reasons, including diet, some medications and conditions, and exercise. If you get hypoglycemia, write down the date and time when it happened and what you did. Share your record with your doctor, so she can look for a pattern and adjust your medications. Call your doctor if you have more than one unexplained low blood sugar reaction in a week. Most people feel symptoms of hypoglycemia when their blood sugar is 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or lower. Each person with diabetes may have different symptoms of hypoglycemia. You'll learn to spot yours. Early symptoms include: Confusion Dizziness Feeling shaky Hunger Headaches Irritability Pounding heart; racing pulse Pale skin Sweating Trembling Weakness Anxiety Without treatment, you might get more severe symptoms, including: Poor coordination Poor concentration Numbness in mouth and tongue Passing out Ask your doctor if any of your medicines can cause low blood sugar. Insulin treatment can cause low blood sugar, and so can a type of diabetes medications called "sulfonylureas." Commonly used sulfonylureas include: Glibenclamide (Glyburide, Micronase) Gliclazide Older, less common sulfonlyureas tend to cause low blood sugar more often than some of the newer ones. Examples of older drugs include: You can also get low blood sugar if you drink alcohol or take allopurinol (Zyloprim), aspirin, Benemid, probenecid (Probalan), or warfarin (Coumadin) with diabetes medications. You shouldn't get hypoglycemia if you take alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides (such as metformin), and thiazolidinediones alone, but it can happen when you take them with sulfonylureas or insulin. You can get low blood sugar Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2: Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar Include Feeling Dizzy | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes Type 2: Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar Include Feeling Dizzy | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes type 2 is caused by the pancreas not producing enough insulin, or the body not reacting to the hormone, according to the NHS . Without enough insulin, the body cant convert sugar in the blood into useable energy. If you take insulin to treat your diabetes, you could be at risk of low blood sugar - or hypocalcaemia - if you take too much of diabetes medicine. Symptoms of low blood sugar can include feeling dizzy, and is usually treated by eating a sugar snack. Diabetes type 2: This spice could prevent high blood sugar Diabetes type 2: Symptoms of low blood sugar include feeling dizzy Hypoglycaemia is a condition characterised by abnormally low bloodglucose[bloodsugar] levels, usually less than 70mg/dl, said the American Diabetes Association. However, it is important to talk to your health care provider about your individualblood glucosetargets, and what level is too low for you. Hypoglycaemic symptoms are important clues that you have low blood glucose. Each person's reaction tohypoglycaemiais different, so it's important that you learn your own signs and symptoms when your blood glucose is low. Continue reading >>

How Can Low Blood Sugar Cause Dizziness?

How Can Low Blood Sugar Cause Dizziness?

People with diabetes need to check the amount of sugar (glucose) in their blood often. You can get dizzy if it drops too low. That also can cause hunger, shakiness, sweating, and confusion. Some people without diabetes also have trouble with low blood sugar, but that's rare. A quick fix is to eat or drink something with sugar, like juice or a hard candy. Lewis, J. 2016. Merck Manual, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Meniere's Disease." National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease: "Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)." National Health Service: "Dizziness (lightheadedness)." Vestibular Disorders Association: "Causes of Dizziness." Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on August 15, 2016 Lewis, J. 2016. Merck Manual, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders: "Meniere's Disease." National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease: "Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)." National Health Service: "Dizziness (lightheadedness)." Vestibular Disorders Association: "Causes of Dizziness." Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on August 15, 2016 THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911. This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information. Continue reading >>

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