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Can Lack Of Vitamin D Cause Diabetes?

Vitamin D Deficiency And Diabetes.

Vitamin D Deficiency And Diabetes.

Biochem J. 2017 Mar 24;474(8):1321-1332. doi: 10.1042/BCJ20170042. The Babraham Institute, Babraham, Cambridge CB22 3AT, U.K. [email protected] Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to the onset of diabetes. This review summarizes the role of Vitamin D in maintaining the normal release of insulin by the pancreatic beta cells (-cells). Diabetes is initiated by the onset of insulin resistance. The -cells can overcome this resistance by releasing more insulin, thus preventing hyperglycaemia. However, as this hyperactivity increases, the -cells experience excessive Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species (ROS) signalling that results in cell death and the onset of diabetes. Vitamin D deficiency contributes to both the initial insulin resistance and the subsequent onset of diabetes caused by -cell death. Vitamin D acts to reduce inflammation, which is a major process in inducing insulin resistance. Vitamin D maintains the normal resting levels of both Ca2+ and ROS that are elevated in the -cells during diabetes. Vitamin D also has a very significant role in maintaining the epigenome. Epigenetic alterations are a feature of diabetes by which many diabetes-related genes are inactivated by hypermethylation. Vitamin D acts to prevent such hypermethylation by increasing the expression of the DNA demethylases that prevent hypermethylation of multiple gene promoter regions of many diabetes-related genes. What is remarkable is just how many cellular processes are maintained by Vitamin D. When Vitamin D is deficient, many of these processes begin to decline and this sets the stage for the onset of diseases such as diabetes. Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Status In Relation To Glucose Metabolism And Type 2 Diabetes In Septuagenarians

Vitamin D Status In Relation To Glucose Metabolism And Type 2 Diabetes In Septuagenarians

OBJECTIVE Vitamin D deficiency is thought to be a risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes, and elderly subjects at northern latitudes may therefore be at particular risk. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Vitamin D status was assessed from serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] in 668 Faroese residents aged 70–74 years (64% of eligible population). We determined type 2 diabetes prevalence from past medical histories, fasting plasma concentrations of glucose, and/or glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). RESULTS We observed 70 (11%) new type 2 diabetic subjects, whereas 88 (13%) were previously diagnosed. Having vitamin D status <50 nmol/L doubled the risk of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes after adjustment for BMI, sex, exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls, serum triacylglyceride concentration, serum HDL concentration, smoking status, and month of blood sampling. Furthermore, the HbA1c concentration decreased at higher serum 25(OH)D3 concentrations independent of covariates. CONCLUSIONS In elderly subjects, vitamin D sufficiency may provide protection against type 2 diabetes. Because the study is cross-sectional, intervention studies are needed to elucidate whether vitamin D could be used to prevent development of type 2 diabetes. Vitamin D plays a pivotal role in calcium metabolism, and vitamin D deficiency may be associated with a range of serious diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes (1). Although the underlying biological mechanisms are poorly understood, the association of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] concentrations with type 2 diabetes may be mediated through effects on glucose homeostasis and, in particular, a direct effect of vitamin D on the β-cell function, and thus insulin secretion (2). Several s Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Vitamin D On Insulin Resistance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

The Effect Of Vitamin D On Insulin Resistance In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract Over the past decade, numerous non-skeletal diseases have been reported to be associated with vitamin D deficiency including type2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Different studies provide evidence that vitamin D may play a functional role in glucose tolerance through its effects on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. This study evaluates the effects of vitamin D supplementation on insulin resistance in T2DM. Through a before-after study, 100 patients with T2DM, 30–70 years old, were recruited from an Arak diabetes clinic as consecutive attenders. Participants were assessed for clinical and biochemistry. Serum insulin and, 25(OH)D concentration, and HOMA-IR was calculated. All measurements were performed at the beginning and the end of the study. Patients received 50,000 unit of vitamin D 3 orally per week for eight weeks, Statistical analysis was made using SPSS17. The results were analyzed by descriptive tests, and a comparison between variables were made using paired T-tests or Wilcoxon tests, as appropriate. 100 participants including 70 women (70%) and 30 men (30%) took part in the study. All results were presented as Mean±SD, or medians of non-normally distributed. 24% of the participants were Vitamin D deficient {serum 25(OH)D ≤ 20 ng/ml(50 nmol/l)}. Mean serum 25 (OH) D concentration was 43.03± 19.28 ng/ml (107.5±48.2 nmol/l). The results at baseline and at the end, for FPG were 138.48±36.74 and 131.02±39 mg/dl (P=0.05), for insulin, 10.76±9.46 and 8.6±8.25 μIu/ml (P=0.028) and for HOMA-IR, 3.57±3.18 and 2.89±3.28 (P=0.008) respectively. Our data showed significant improvements in serum FPG, insulin and in HOMA-IR after treatment with vitamin D, suggested that vitamin D supplementation could reduce insulin resistance in T2DM. Introduction Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes? Low Levels Of Vitamin D, Not Obesity, Predict Glucose Metabolism Disorders

What Causes Diabetes? Low Levels Of Vitamin D, Not Obesity, Predict Glucose Metabolism Disorders

What Causes Diabetes? Low Levels Of Vitamin D, Not Obesity, Predict Glucose Metabolism Disorders The message from our doctors is loud and clear: Being overweight is linked to diabetes, a disease in which blood sugar levels range much too high for our own good health. A new study finds this picture is not nearly so simple, but quite a bit more complex. Researchers at Universidad de Mlaga in Spain found people with low levels of vitamin D, regardless of whether they are overweight or thin, are more likely to have diabetes. Vitamin D is known as the "sunshine vitamin" because it is produced by our bodies through simple exposure to sunlight. Vitamin D, despite its name, is actually not a vitamin but a pro-hormone, a substance that amplifies the effects of hormones; it is important to maintaining healthy bones and teeth, while also aiding cell growth and assisting our immune system. Although sunlight is the easiest way to acquire a little necessary D, it can also be absorbed while eating common foods, including eggs, fish, and dairy products. Seemingly, nothing could be easier than getting enough vitamin D; however, up to half of all adults and children worldwide are deficient more than one billion people around the globe! How the Sunshine Vitamin Impacts Diabetes Risk For the current study, a group of researchers investigated the relationships between vitamin D, body mass index (BMI), and diabetes in 118 participants at a hospital associated with University of Mlaga and 30 additional participants at a second hospital in Girona, Spain. To start, the team classified all the participants according to BMI and also noted whether they had diabetes, prediabetes, or no glycemic disorders. Next, the researchers made two separate measurements for all the participants: levels of vita Continue reading >>

Should We Prescribe Vitamin D To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Should We Prescribe Vitamin D To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Should We Prescribe Vitamin D to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? Ronan Roussel, MD, PhD; Chantal Mathieu, MD, PhD The following is an edited, translated transcript of a conversation taped in June 2015 between Ronan Roussel, MD, PhD, professor of endocrinology at Bichat Hospital, Paris, France, and Chantal Mathieu, MD, PhD, chair of the Division of Clinical Endocrinology at the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium. Prof Roussel: Hello and welcome to Medscape. Today we're going to look at the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and diabetes risk. For this, I am joined by Prof Chantal Mathieu from the University of Leuven, in Belgium. Hello, Chantal. Prof Roussel: This relationship between vitamin D deficiency and diabetes risk is no doubt quite common. How close is this link? Prof Mathieu: There are epidemiologic studies showing, in fact, that vitamin D deficiency or even vitamin D insufficiencythat is, fairly low levels but short of an actual deficiencycauses an increased risk of developing diabetes, especially type 2. Prof Roussel: In the case of vitamin D deficiency, is the risk increased by 10%? Is it doubled? Prof Mathieu: There are studies showing that, in certain populations, the risk is doubled. However, it is very difficult to interpret these epidemiologic studies. This is because vitamin D deficiency is always accompanied by a specific profile. Most of these vitamin Ddeficient people are also obese, older, and very often of non-European origin. Therefore, several risk factors accompany vitamin D deficiency in type 2 diabetes. Prof Roussel: So you're suggesting that there are confounding factors and that, in the end, this relationship is not one of causality. Prof Mathieu: There are definitely some confounding factors, but when they are adjusted for (obesity, a Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Renewed interest in vitamin D, the so-called “sunshine vitamin,” has occurred recently because it has been linked to everything from cancer and heart disease to diabetes.1 Research studies continue to pour into the literature stating that vitamin D is a superstar when it comes to health. However, most of the research is based on observational, epidemiological studies, which are important for generating hypotheses but do not prove causality. A PubMed search in 2011 using the term “vitamin D” and selecting articles published in the past 2 years resulted in more than 2,864 hits. The following diseases and conditions have been researched to assess their relationship with vitamin D status: osteomalacia/osteoporosis,2–5 muscle function and falls,6–8 cancer,9–14 multiple sclerosis,15 hypertension,16 type 1 diabetes,17 rheumatoid arthritis,18 tuberculosis,19,20 mental health,21 cardiovascular events,22,23 infection,24,25 seasonal affective disorder,26 obesity,27 aging,28 and overall mortality.23 The challenge for health care providers and nutrition researchers is to determine whether vitamin D deficiency actually causes or increases the incidence of certain diseases or whether, instead, low levels of vitamin D are simply coincidental given that the majority of the general population, regardless of disease, is likely to have insufficient levels of vitamin D. In other words, do people who develop disease states just happen to be deficient in vitamin D, or do low levels of vitamin D cause the disease? Will supplementation with vitamin D prevent diseases, and can it be used to treat diseases such as diabetes? The purpose of this article is to summarize the latest information related to diabetes and vitamin D. For readers who desire further information, Holick29 has wr Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Levels Linked To Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Vitamin D Levels Linked To Type 2 Diabetes Risk

HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with low levels of vitamin D appear to have an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, even if they aren't overweight or obese, a new study suggests. The study included almost 150 people in Spain. Their vitamin D levels were checked, as was their body mass index (BMI -- an estimate of body fat based on height and weight). They also had tests for diabetes, prediabetes or other blood sugar (glucose) metabolism disorders. Obese people who didn't have diabetes or related disorders had higher vitamin D levels than those with diabetes. Lean people with diabetes or related disorders were more likely to have low vitamin D levels than those without such disorders. The results show that vitamin D levels were more closely linked to blood sugar levels than BMI, according to the study. What the study wasn't able to tease out, however, was whether or not vitamin D played a role in causing diabetes or other disorders that affect the metabolism of glucose. The study was only designed to find an association between these factors. The findings were published recently in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. "Our findings indicate that vitamin D is associated more closely with glucose metabolism than obesity," study author Manuel Macias-Gonzalez, of the University of Malaga in Spain, said in a society news release. He said the study suggests that vitamin D deficiency and obesity may work together to heighten the risk of diabetes. "The average person may be able to reduce their risk by maintaining a healthy diet and getting enough outdoor activity," he said. Previous research has found that people with low vitamin D levels are more likely to be obese and to have diabetes, prediabetes and relat Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Can Save You From Diabetes And Dementia

Vitamin D Can Save You From Diabetes And Dementia

By Dr. Mercola Do you know your vitamin D level? If not, a simple blood test called 25(OH)D, or 25-hydroxyvitamin D, can reveal your levels and give you incredible insight into your potential future risk of disease. Low vitamin D levels are widely known to harm your bones, leading them to become thin, brittle, soft, or misshapen. But a lack of vitamin D does not only impact your bones. Far from it. You see, vitamin D isn’t a vitamin at all. It’s a steroid hormone that influences virtually every cell in your body. From your heart to your brain to your immune system, maintaining optimal vitamin D levels is incredibly important. It’s also incredibly easy, because the best way to get vitamin D is to have regular exposure to the sun or a high-quality tanning bed. If those aren’t options, you can take vitamin D3 orally (along with some synergistic nutrients, which I’ll discuss below). It’s one of the least expensive vitamin supplements… The point is, there’s no reason to put your health at risk from low vitamin D levels… yet researchers such Dr. Michael Holick estimate that 50 percent of the general population is at risk of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency. If you’re among them, new research shows your risk of diabetes and other metabolic disorders may be significantly increased. Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Diabetes You’re probably aware that obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes, but a new study found low vitamin D levels may be an even more significant factor. In a study of more than 100 people, those with low vitamin D levels were more likely to have type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes, or metabolic syndrome, regardless of their weight. Among obese people, those without metabolic disorders had higher levels of vitamin D than those with such di Continue reading >>

Is Vitamin D Deficiency Linked With Diabetes? | Everyday Health

Is Vitamin D Deficiency Linked With Diabetes? | Everyday Health

Some research suggests avoiding vitamin D deficiency may help reduce your risk for heart disease, which people with diabetes are more likely to develop. Youve likely heard of the power of vitamin D, also known as the sunshine vitamin. You can either get vitamin D through the suns rays, which signal your body to make vitamin D, or through certain foods or supplements. Vitamin D is a fat-soluble, rather than water-soluble, vitamin so when you get it through your diet, youll best absorb it alongside a fat-containing food, such as almonds, peanut butter, or avocado. The vitamin is important for your health: Research suggests that it may help with everything from athletic performance to heart disease, and may even help protect against type 2 diabetes . What Does Vitamin D Do for Our Bodies and Our Health? Vitamin D plays many important roles in the body, and helps you maintain healthy bones, joints, and teeth, as well as a well-functioning immune system. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium in the body to promote bone growth, notes Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE , author of The 2-Day Diabetes Diet: Just 2 Days a Week and Dodge Type 2 Diabetes , who is in private practice in Franklin, New Jersey. Some observational studies suggest vitamin D may also play a role in the prevention of certain diseases and disorders, such as diabetes. The sunshine vitamin may also help keep your ticker healthy: A review published in January 2014 in the journalCirculation Research suggested that vitamin D deficiency is detrimental for heart health. This is important to note because people with type 2 diabetes are at a greater risk for heart problems. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes people with diabetes are two times more likely to die from heart disease tha Continue reading >>

Vitamin Deficiencies In People With Diabetes: The Supplements You Need

Vitamin Deficiencies In People With Diabetes: The Supplements You Need

As an orthopedic surgeon, I have many patients with diabetes who tell me, “I can’t have surgery because I won’t heal.” That is certainly not the case, however. Diabetes does affect the small blood vessels and the function of immune cells when blood sugar is high, but with proper nutrition and blood sugar management, people with diabetes are very safe to undergo knee replacements, abdominal surgery, and many elective procedures. It is critical, of course, that people with diabetes who undergo elective or traumatic surgery work closely with their doctor to manage their blood sugar, but supplementation is also a vital part of recovery. Diabetes frequently causes nutritional deficiencies, often initiated by changes in diet or medications. As a result, people with diabetes must use supplements. Helping my patients identify their nutritional deficiencies and educating them on the importance of essential vitamins has made an overwhelming difference in their recovery from surgery and their overall daily health. The following essential vitamins are often deficient in people with diabetes. Vitamin B12 Vitamin B12 is bound to protein in food. The activity of hydrochloric acid and gastric protease in the stomach releases vitamin B12 from its protein. Once it is released, vitamin B12 begins to work quickly. It is important for the formation of red blood cells, neurological function, and DNA synthesis. It also supports the digestive system in keeping glucose levels stable. A simple blood test can determine the level of B12 in the body. Adults who have a value below 170 to 250 pg/mL are considered deficient in the vitamin. An elevated blood homocysteine level or elevated methylmalconic acid level may also suggest a B12 deficiency. Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency are megalob Continue reading >>

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Vitamin D And Diabetes

Tweet Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a number of important roles in the body, including maintaining the health of your bones, teeth and joints, and assisting immune system function. This underrated vitamin is found in certain foods but is also produced by the body in response to exposure to the sun. When the sun’s ultraviolet-B (UVB) rays are exposed to bare skin, the body converts a cholesterol derivative into Vitamin D. In fact, it’s now known that every cell and tissue within the body has a Vitamin D protein receptor. However, most of us in the UK and other Western countries are deficient in Vitamin D, including many patients with Type 2 diabetes, due to limited sunlight exposure caused by a number of factors, including more time spent at home, in the office or the car, shorter days in winter, sunscreen use in summer and fears of skin cancer. Vitamin D deficiency The signs of Vitamin D deficiency can range from bone pain and muscle weakness to depression and weakened immune system, while longer-term deficiency can result in obesity, high blood pressure, psoriasis, osteoporosis, chronic fatigue, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes. Exposing your skin to the sun for 15-20 minutes each day can help increase your body’s own production of vitamin D and thus reduce your risk of diabetes and other serious medical conditions. Alternatively, you can get your daily intake of vitamin D through dietary supplements and foods such as nuts, oily fish, eggs, powdered milk and some fortified cereals. Effects on diabetes Vitamin D is believed to help improve the body’s sensitivity to insulin – the hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels – and thus reduce the risk of insulin resistance, which is often a precursor to type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes

Type Ii Diabetes

Summary Type II diabetes is a condition in which the body has a hard time managing sugar the right way. Usually you develop type II diabetes in adulthood, past the age of 40, but you can develop it earlier, too. Once you get type II diabetes, it lasts for the rest of your life. If your diabetes isn’t managed, you can develop diabetes symptoms, including eyesight issues, skin conditions, circulation problems, and high blood pressure. Type II diabetes (T2D) usually occurs gradually, meaning that the condition is mild to start but gets worse and worse as time goes by. Most people with the disease are overweight when they are diagnosed. Treatments for T2D require lifelong monitoring of sugar levels in your blood, healthy eating, regular exercising, and possibly diabetes medication. Some people with T2D can manage their condition with diet and exercise alone, but many need additional help with medications. Researchers are interested in whether vitamin D helps your body manage sugar in your blood. Additionally, they’re interested in vitamin D’s role in regulating calcium, which also helps manage sugar in your blood. There is some research showing that young people who have higher vitamin D levels decreased their chances of developing T2D later in life compared to people who had lower vitamin D levels. Studies have also shown that vitamin D supplements can help some symptoms of T2D. At this time, the research is conflicting on whether supplementing people at high risk of developing diabetes is helpful in reducing the risk of T2D. If you are at risk of T2D and want to take vitamin D, it is unlikely to harm you or make your symptoms worse. However, it may not prevent diabetes. There is some evidence that vitamin D will improve symptoms associated with T2D, if you have T2D. Continue reading >>

Low Vitamin D And Type 2 Diabetes

Low Vitamin D And Type 2 Diabetes

How do vitamin D levels correlate with HbA1c?… Recent studies have demonstrated correlations between low vitamin D levels and the development of type 2 diabetes while others provide similar findings but on the opposite spectrum where higher levels of vitamin D are associated with decreased incidence of type 2 diabetes. Additionally, previous research identified vitamin D receptors in the β cells of the pancreas and linked vitamin D to insulin secretion regulation. A new study aimed to show a correlation between glycemic control and levels of vitamin D (25-hydroxy vitamin D3) in type 2 diabetic patients. This study looked at 25(OH) D3 and HbA1C levels of 120 persons with type 2 diabetes aged 25 – 82 years old and compared them to 120 similar aged control subjects without diabetes. A1C levels were higher in the diabetes group as expected (7.2 ± 0.18% versus 5.1 ± 0.05%) and the vitamin D3 levels were significantly lower in the diabetes group as compared to the control group (19.26 ± 0.94 ng/ml and 25.48 ± 1.02 ng/ml; p<0.001). The researchers further analyzed vitamin D levels in the diabetes vs. healthy control group and found that 17.5% (21/120) and 63.3% (76/120) of the persons in the diabetes group were vitamin D deficient and insufficient, respectively, as compared to 5.8% (7/120) and 23.3% (28/120) of the control group participants with a C2 p value=0.0089 and p < 0.0001, respectively. Linear regression analysis of HbA1C levels vs. vitamin D levels showed an inverse relationship. This study shows a fairly strong correlation between vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency and type 2 diabetes and also demonstrates a negative correlation between vitamin D levels and HbA1C. Findings from this study suggest we should be monitoring vitamin D levels in persons with type Continue reading >>

How Vitamin D Helps In Diabetes

How Vitamin D Helps In Diabetes

Vitamin D, or the “sunshine vitamin,” is actually made in our skin when it is exposed to sunlight. This vitamin is a vital cog in a machinery that performs a wide range of functions inside our body. More recently, scientists have uncovered the connection between vitamin D and diabetes. Studies suggest that vitamin D can have positive effects on people with type 2 diabetes. Apart from healthy bones, vitamin D is also helpful in the proper functioning of muscles as well as our immune system. Vitamin D also protects us from: Cancers (like that of breast, prostate, colon) Heart disease High blood pressure Multiple sclerosis What Does Research Say about Vitamin D Deficiency and Diabetes? For years, vitamin D was known for its role in bone health. New research is now concluding that this vitamin can actually have an important role in the overall health of a person. Doctors believe that there is an unmistakable link between vitamin D and diabetes. This is because studies have conclusively indicated that people with low levels of vitamin D are at a higher risk of developing diabetes, later in life. A study on 668 elderly individuals, who lived in the northern latitudes (where getting enough sunshine is a problem), found that these individuals were at a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes due to vitamin D deficiency. The researchers went on to say that vitamin D sufficiency provides protection against type 2 diabetes. A 2011 review looked at various studies that examined how much vitamin D people were getting, by conducting a blood test that assessed the amount of vitamin D in their blood. These people were then followed to see if they got type 2 diabetes later in life. It was found that people with higher amounts of vitamin D in the blood (> 25ng/ml) had a decreased Continue reading >>

Vitamin D

Vitamin D

What Is Its Role in Diabetes? What is your vitamin D level? Some day – maybe soon – having your vitamin D level measured may become as routine as having your cholesterol checked. According to some advocates of routine vitamin D testing, the results could prove to be a useful piece of medical information. The importance of adequate vitamin D levels in the body has been recognized for decades. In 1921, scientists proved that exposure to the sun hardens bones and prevents diseases of “rubbery,” weak bones called rickets (in children) and osteomalacia (in adults). It was later discovered that it is the vitamin D produced when the skin is exposed to sun that helps the body absorb calcium and strengthen the skeleton. Around the same time, cod liver oil was found to be a potent food source of vitamin D. Popular and scientific interest in vitamin D waned, however, once these diseases became relatively uncommon, particularly in the United States, where milk and some other foods have been routinely fortified with vitamin D since the 1930’s. Recently, however, new research on the so-called sunshine vitamin has shown that it plays a role in many more bodily systems than just the skeletal system. In fact, a deficiency of vitamin D is thought to possibly play a role in the development of numerous diseases, from cardiovascular disease to multiple sclerosis to complications of pregnancy. All of this new attention has made vitamin D a very popular supplement and the subject of renewed scientific inquiry. Vitamin D in the body The human body was designed to get most of its vitamin D through exposure to the ultraviolet (UVB) rays of the sun – the same rays that cause sunburn and skin damage. “Inactive” vitamin D is derived from cholesterol and “waits” in the skin tissu Continue reading >>

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