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Can Lack Of Sleep Lead To Diabetes?

Lack Of Sleep And Its Effect On Blood Sugar Levels

Lack Of Sleep And Its Effect On Blood Sugar Levels

More than 29 million Americans suffer from diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with millions more falling into the “prediabetes” range. Keeping blood glucose levels under control is essential to good health, both for people with diabetes and those who do not have the disease. Although most people know that dietary choices and exercise affect blood sugar levels, many do not realize that sleep can also have a dramatic effect on glycemic control. Failing to get enough sleep or getting poor quality sleep can have serious effects on your blood sugar. This is unhealthy for all individuals but particularly dangerous for those with diabetes or prediabetes. How the Body Regulates Blood Sugar Levels Glucose, a type of sugar, is the body’s primary energy source. Cells throughout your body depend on glucose to continue operating. When you eat a meal, your stomach breaks carbohydrates down into glucose molecules. This glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream, where it circulates throughout your body. The body prefers for blood sugar levels to be kept within a tight range. To achieve this, a hormone called insulin is released by the pancreas into the bloodstream. Insulin tells your body’s cells to increase their uptake of glucose from the blood, resulting in lower blood sugar levels. If blood sugar levels dip too low -- such as after an intense bout of exercise -- another hormone signals the liver to release its excess glucose stores to restore balance. People with diabetes have a difficult time responding properly to insulin. Those with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce insulin, making them unable to keep their glucose levels under control. Individuals with type 2 diabetes gradually become insensitive to insulin over time, making it dif Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Importance Of Sleep

Diabetes And The Importance Of Sleep

To paraphrase the old Cole Porter love song: Birds do it, bees do it, even educated fleas do it. Let's do it, let's . . . sleep? "Sleep is a biological imperative," says Stuart Quan, M.D., a Harvard Medical School professor of sleep medicine and editor of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. "You can't not sleep," he says. Virtually all animals sleep. Fruit flies have been shown to have sleep cycles, and even sea sponges have sleeplike periods, Quan says. While experts have different theories on why we sleep, it's well proven that getting too little has serious consequences for your health and diabetes. Shorting yourself on shut-eye can worsen diabetes and, for some people, even serve as the trigger that causes it. People who don't sleep enough may: -- impair the body's use of insulin. -- have higher levels of hormones that cause hunger. -- crave junk food. No snooze, you lose People who don't get enough sleep often have higher levels of chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Lack of sleep also can increase production of cortisol (the body's primary stress hormone), impair memory and reflex time, elevate blood sugar, and increase appetite -- ultimately promoting weight gain, says Carol Touma, M.D., an endocrinologist at the University of Chicago who focuses on sleep research and metabolism. And the more you weigh, the worse you sleep. Research by Madhu H. Rao, M.D., an endocrinologist at the University of California, San Francisco, found that a person's body mass index (BMI) affects slow-wave sleep, the deep sleep cycles needed for maximum rest. Very preliminary results of Rao's current research on the effects of sleep restriction in healthy volunteers show an increase in insulin resistance in the range of 10 to 15 percent. But mysteries remain. Will sleeping m Continue reading >>

Why Lack Of Sleep Is Bad For Your Health

Why Lack Of Sleep Is Bad For Your Health

Many effects of a lack of sleep, such as feeling grumpy and not working at your best, are well known. But did you know that sleep deprivation can also have profound consequences on your physical health? One in three of us suffers from poor sleep, with stress, computers and taking work home often blamed. However, the cost of all those sleepless nights is more than just bad moods and a lack of focus. Regular poor sleep puts you at risk of serious medical conditions, including obesity, heart disease and diabetes – and it shortens your life expectancy. It’s now clear that a solid night’s sleep is essential for a long and healthy life. How much sleep do we need? Most of us need around eight hours of good-quality sleep a night to function properly – but some need more and some less. What matters is that you find out how much sleep you need and then try to achieve it. As a general rule, if you wake up tired and spend the day longing for a chance to have a nap, it’s likely that you’re not getting enough sleep. A variety of factors can cause poor sleep, including health conditions such as sleep apnoea. But in most cases, it’s due to bad sleeping habits. Everyone’s experienced the fatigue, short temper and lack of focus that often follow a poor night’s sleep. An occasional night without sleep makes you feel tired and irritable the next day, but it won’t harm your health. After several sleepless nights, the mental effects become more serious. Your brain will fog, making it difficult to concentrate and make decisions. You’ll start to feel down, and may fall asleep during the day. Your risk of injury and accidents at home, work and on the road also increases. If it continues, lack of sleep can affect your overall health and make you prone to serious medical con Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sleep

Diabetes And Sleep

Tweet Sleep can affect your blood sugar levels and your blood glucose control can also affect your sleep, which results in trouble sleeping. Difficulty getting a good night's rest could be a result of a number of reasons, from hypos at night, to high blood sugars, sleep apnea, being overweight or signs of neuropathy. If you have blood sugar levels that are either too high or too low overnight, you may find yourself tired through the next day. Lethargy and insomnia can both have their roots in blood sugar control and can be a key in re-establishing a healthy sleep pattern.. Getting a good night’s sleep The following may help to promote better sleep: Keep your blood glucose under control Ensure your bed is large and comfortable enough – and pillows at a comfortable height Ensure your room is cool (around 18 degrees celcius) and well ventilated Ensure your room is dark and free from noise – if this is not possible, you may benefit from a sleeping blindfold or ear plugs Incorporating a period of exercise into each day Stick to a regular bed time Can a lack of sleep be a cause of diabetes? Research has shown that sleep deprivation and insulin resistance may be linked. People who regularly lack sleep are will feel more tired through the day and more likely to eat comfort foods. A good night’s sleep is important for our hormones to regulate a large number of the body’s processes, such as appetite, weight control and the immune system. Trouble sleeping from high sugar levels High blood sugar levels can impact upon your sleep. It could be that the high levels make it less comfortable for you to sleep – it may make you feel too warm or irritable and unsettled. Another factor is if you need to go the toilet during the night. For people with regularly high blood sugar l Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect Your Sleep Schedule?

Can Diabetes Affect Your Sleep Schedule?

Diabetes is a condition in which the body is unable to produce insulin properly. This causes excess levels of glucose in the blood. The most common types are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. If you have type 1, your pancreas doesn’t produce insulin, so you must take it on a daily basis. If you have type 2, your body can make some of its own insulin, but it’s often not enough. This means that your body can’t use the insulin correctly. Depending on how well you control your blood sugar, you may or may not experience symptoms. Short-term symptoms of high blood sugar can include frequent thirst or hunger, as well as frequent urination. It isn’t uncommon for these symptoms to have an impact on the way you sleep. Here’s what the research has to say. In one 2012 study, researchers examined the associations between sleep disturbance and diabetes. Sleep disturbance includes difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, or sleeping too much. The study found a clear relationship between sleep disturbance and diabetes. The researchers say that sleep deprivation is a significant risk factor for diabetes, which can sometimes be controlled. Having diabetes doesn’t necessarily mean that your sleep will be impacted. It’s more a matter of what symptoms of diabetes you experience and how you manage them. Certain symptoms are more likely to cause issues when you’re trying to rest: High blood sugar levels can cause frequent urination. If your blood sugar is high at night, you could end up getting up frequently to use the bathroom. When your body has extra glucose, it draws water from your tissues. This can make you feel dehydrated, prompting you to get up for regular glasses of water. The symptoms of low blood sugar, such as shakiness, dizziness, and sweating, can affect your slee Continue reading >>

Sleep Deprivation & Diabetes Risk In Teenagers

Sleep Deprivation & Diabetes Risk In Teenagers

Sleep Deprivation & Diabetes Risk in Teenagers In a recent study , researchers found that teenagers who sleep fewer than 8 hours a night are more likely to carry fat around their belly and to have some insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the key mechanism leading to type 2 diabetes . Insulin is a hormone which manages the amount of sugar in the blood. In the case of insulin resistance , the bodys cells are resisting the effects of insulin and thus glucose doesnt enter the bodys cells as efficiently and blood sugar concentration goes up. Principal author of the study, Dr. Bruno Geloneze from the Laboratory of Investigation on Metabolism and Diabetes at the University of Campinas in Sao Paolo, Brazil said according to Reuters Health , There are several studies in adults showing a close relationship between sleep deprivation and increased cardiovascular risk factors, including increased prevalence of obesity and diabetes, The researchers found a direct connection between insulin resistance in teens and a lack of sleep even without obesity being a factor. Dr. Geloneze added, In our study we can demonstrate an increase in insulin resistance independently of the presence of obesity suggesting an intrinsic mechanism connecting sleep deprivation and metabolic derangement, How Much Sleep Deprivation Causes Insulin Resistance in Teens? Researchers of this study utilized data that was collected between 2011-2014 from 615 youth between the ages of 10 and 19. Researchers measured different factors such as their weight, height and blood pressure. Teens self-reported how they slept each night and 81 teens took an extra two-hour insulin sensitivity test. The average sleeping time per night for the teens was 7.9 hours. The 257 teens who slept less than 8 hours a night were on ave Continue reading >>

The Sleep-diabetes Connection

The Sleep-diabetes Connection

Whenever diabetes patients enter Lynn Maarouf’s office with out-of-control blood sugar levels, she immediately asks them how they are sleeping at night. All too often, the answer is the same: not well. “Any time your blood sugar is really high, your kidneys try to get rid of it by urinating,” says Maarouf, RD, the diabetes education director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. “So you are probably getting up and going to bathroom all night long -- and not sleeping well.” Diabetes and sleep problems often go hand in hand. Diabetes can cause sleep loss, and there’s evidence that not sleeping well can increase your risk of developing diabetes. Maarouf says high blood sugar is a red flag for sleep problems among people with diabetes for another reason. “People who are tired will eat more because they want to get energy from somewhere,” she says. “That can mean consuming sugar or other foods that can spike blood sugar levels.” “I really push people to eat properly throughout the day and get their blood sugars under control so they sleep better at night,” Maarouf says. “If you get your blood sugar under control, you will get a good night sleep and wake up feeling fabulous with lots of energy.” “There is some evidence that sleep deprivation could lead to pre-diabetic state,” says Mark Mahowald, MD, director of the Minnesota Regional Sleep Disorders Center in Hennepin County. According to Mahowald, the body's reaction to sleep loss can resemble insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes. Insulin’s job is to help the body use glucose for energy. In insulin resistance, cells fail to use the hormone efficiently, resulting in high blood sugar. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough in Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Troubles

Type 2 Diabetes And Sleep Troubles

Sleep is important for everyone, but it’s especially important when your body experiences changing blood sugar levels and other symptoms of type 2 diabetes. “Sleep deprivation causes changes in the effectiveness of the body's control of appetite, which can lead to weight gain, higher blood sugar, and increased resistance to insulin,” says Richard Castriotta, MD, director of the division of pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Although sleep is very important when you have type 2 diabetes, you may find you can’t sleep when you need it most. One explanation for the problem seems to be the connection between diabetes and sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a condition that’s characterized by periods of halted breathing while you’re asleep, which wakes you up repeatedly throughout the night, leaving you fatigued and not well rested in the morning. Both type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea are health concerns that are linked to obesity, so experts have long recognized a connection between the two. However, only recently has it been realized how closely these conditions are tied to one another. “There’s much more interrelation between the two conditions than we thought,” says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, a physician in the Cleveland Clinic’s department of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism. “In fact, one may actually contribute to causing the other, and vice versa. Recent studies have shown that sleep apnea actually increases insulin resistance, hunger, and other type 2 diabetes symptoms,” Dr. Hatipoglu says. “Other studies have shown that treating sleep apnea also improves the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.” Other Sleep Issues You Might Face Another problem that disrupts sleep is frequent urinatio Continue reading >>

Lack Of Sleep Can Cause Diabetes As Insulin Becomes Less Able To Regulate Blood Sugars

Lack Of Sleep Can Cause Diabetes As Insulin Becomes Less Able To Regulate Blood Sugars

Lack of sleep can cause diabetes as insulin becomes less able to regulate blood sugars University of Chicago researchers found after three nights of four hours' sleep, blood levels of fatty acids remained elevated when they would usually recede Worry: But getting enough kip can reverse trend (Image: Getty) Could not subscribe, try again laterInvalid Email A lack of sleep can causes diabetes, a new study warned. Having too few hours rest may disrupt fat metabolism and reduce the ability of insulin to regulate blood sugars. But reversing this may be down to just getting a good nights kip of around eight hours. The study by the University of Chicago found a lack of sleep can elevate levels of free fatty acids in the blood, accompanied by temporary pre-diabetic conditions in healthy young men. It was the first to examine the impact of sleep loss on 24-hour fatty acid levels in the blood. Researchers found after three nights of getting only four hours of sleep, blood levels of fatty acids, which usually peak and then recede overnight, remained elevated from about 4am to 9am. As long as fatty acid levels remained high, the ability of insulin to regulate blood sugars was reduced. Assistant professor of medicine Dr Esra Tasali said: At the population level, multiple studies have reported connections between restricted sleep, weight gain, and type 2 diabetes . Experimental laboratory studies, like ours, help us unravel the mechanisms that may be responsible. The study published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, provide new insights into the connections, first described by University of Chicago researchers 15 years ago, between sleep loss, insulin resistance and heightened risk of type 2 diabetes. Read more: Unable to sleep? 11 w Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

Blood Sugar And Sleep Problems: How Blood Sugar Levels Impact Sleep

November is National Diabetes Month and Alaska Sleep Clinic is dedicating this month’s blog posts to raising awareness for diabetic complications and how they correlate with sleep disorders and overall tiredness. SLEEP PROBLEMS AND SNORING MAY PREDICT DIABETES Studies have shown that individuals who consistently have a bad night's sleep are more likely to develop conditions linked to diabetes and heart disease. Loud snoring sleepers (many of whom may have sleep apnea), compared to quiet sleepers, double (2x) their risks of developing certain types of metabolic syndrome(s); including diabetes, obesity, and high blood pressure. This likelihood also increased dramatically to 80% in those who found it difficult to fall asleep and to 70% for those who woke up feeling not as refreshed. Blood Sugar and Sleep Problems Sleep can affect your blood sugar levels, and your blood glucose control can also affect your sleep. It’s a vicious cycle. As the amount of sleep decreases, blood sugar increases, escalating the issue. Lack of sleep has been shown to increase blood sugar levels and the risk of diabetic issues. Higher blood sugar means less long-lasting fat metabolism in the night and even less sleep. Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine found that people who slept less than 6 hours a night had more blood sugar complications compared to those who received 8 hours of sleep. HIGH BLOOD SUGAR - HYPERGLYCEMIA Sleepless and restless nights hurt more than your mood and energy; it is a form of chronic stress on the body. When there is added stress on your body this results in having higher blood sugar levels. When researchers restricted people with type-1 diabetes to just 4 hours of sleep, their sensitivity to insulin was reduced by 20% compared to that after a full nig Continue reading >>

Can Lack Of Sleep Cause Diabetes?

Can Lack Of Sleep Cause Diabetes?

When we think about diabetes, we usually think about causes involving food, but did you know that sleep might also have an effect on it? Some evidence suggests that sleep deprivation can lead to pre-diabetic states. It’s important to note that when we talk about sleep deprivation, we don’t mean having had a few bad nights – it’s a long-term, serious issue. If you’re a bit sleepy after a late night, you’re probably fine. If you’re chronically tired, struggling to sleep for more than a few hours at a time, and losing focus on daily activities? Then you’re probably suffering from sleep deprivation. Mark Mahowald, director of the Minnesota Regional Sleep Disorders Center, notes that our bodies’ reaction to sleep deprivation can be similar to insulin resistance – a precursor to diabetes. Additionally, poor sleep can lead to weight gain, which also increases the risk of diabetes. Whilst there’s no guarantee that lack of sleep will give you diabetes, there is plenty of evidence to suggest that diabetes can cause sleep loss, so it’s always worth getting checked out if you’re concerned. Many diabetic people have the same issues sleeping – waking often to go to the bathroom. This is because when your blood sugar is too high; your kidneys try to lower it by urinating. If you find that you’re not sleeping well because of a constant need to use the bathroom, it’s definitely worth talking to your doctor about. Diabetes Care published a study in which 40 people with type 2 diabetes were assessed for 6 nights, as well as providing blood samples. Those who were found to sleep poorly had much higher levels of glucose and insulin in their blood (meaning that they had much higher insulin resistance – which increases the risk of complications). This study d Continue reading >>

Stress, Lack Of Sleep Can Increase Your Risk Of Developing Diabetes

Stress, Lack Of Sleep Can Increase Your Risk Of Developing Diabetes

Developing type 2 diabetes as an adult is notonly about eating habits. Several lifestyle factors including stress can put youat a greater risk of developing the disease. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy In type 2 diabetes , you have too much sugar, also called glucose, in your blood. People with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. After a meal, food is broken down into glucose, which is carried by your blood to cells throughout your body. Cells absorb glucose from your blood with the help of the hormone insulin and use it for energy. Type 2 diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition linked to excess weight in which your bodys cells do not use insulin properly. As a result, your body needs more insulin to help glucose enter cells. Stress is one of the more overlooked factors that can increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes , says endocrinologist Mary Vouyiouklis Kellis, MD . Stress puts your body into a flight or fight mode. As a result, your levels of hormonesuch as adrenaline and cortisol rise. This can impact your blood glucose levels, Dr. Kellis says. If you have pre-diabetes, these increases in blood glucose levels cant be effectively lowered because youre insulin-resistant, she says. As a result, over time, stresscan increase a personsrisk to develop type 2 diabetes. Another problem with stress is that the increase in cortisol can make youwant to eat more than youshould, Dr. Kellis says. People who stress-eat are more likely to gain weight. Carrying too much weight is one of the biggest risk factors for type 2 diabetes, she says. Another often-overlooked risk factor is sleep depriva Continue reading >>

Deprivation Nation: How Lack Of Sleep Can Lead To Diabetes

Deprivation Nation: How Lack Of Sleep Can Lead To Diabetes

1 of 2 The Dangers of Sleep Deprivation On the sofa, in front of the TV. On the train, surrounded by fellow commuters. In the movie theater, before the film begins. If you can't stay awake in any — or all — of these places, it's a good bet you're sleep-deprived. This lack of shut-eye does more than make you chronically grouchy; it elevates your risk of high blood pressure and obesity. And now there's a whole new reason to put an end to your sleep starvation: Skimping on rest could increase your chances of getting type 2 diabetes, a disease once believed to be caused primarily by being overweight. In fact, just three consecutive nights of inadequate sleep can elevate a person's risk to a degree roughly equivalent to gaining 20 to 30 pounds, according to a 2007 study at the University of Chicago. "Sleep may be as important as exercise or diet when it comes to developing diabetes," says Eve Van Cauter, MD, a professor of medicine and the senior author of the study. This revelation backs up previous research from Yale and the New England Research Institutes, which showed that people who clock six hours or less of sleep a night are twice as likely to develop diabetes in their lifetime as those who snooze seven hours. Translation? If you're not getting enough rest — even if you're slim and fit — you're putting your health in serious jeopardy. The Connection Between Sleep and Diabetes Here's what we know: Diabetes arises when the body can't properly break down blood sugar, aka glucose, leaving your cells starved for energy. One thing that greatly increases your chances of a blood-sugar malfunction is being overweight. Excess fat makes it harder for cells to properly use insulin, a hormone that helps keep glucose levels normal. So what does sleep have to do with any of Continue reading >>

Can A Lack Of Sleep Be A Cause Of Diabetes?

Can A Lack Of Sleep Be A Cause Of Diabetes?

Some of the recent studies have suggested that improving sleep quality in diabetics would have a similar beneficial effect as the most commonly used anti-diabetes drugs. Many of my friends who are academics with many deadlines get inadequate amount of sleep. They like to know whether insomnia and diabetes are related. Continue reading >>

Sleep Deprivation Could Lead To Diabetes, Study Finds

Sleep Deprivation Could Lead To Diabetes, Study Finds

Sleep deprivation could lead to diabetes, study finds More than four millionpeople in the UK now have diabetes Our sleep deprived lives could lead to a rise in getting diabetes, according to anew study. The study, published in Diabetes Care and conducted by the University of Chicago, found that not sleeping well can increase your risk of developing diabetes, particularly affecting people who work long hours. People who are tired will eat more because they want to get energy from somewhere. "This couldmean consuming sugar or other foods that can spike blood sugar levels, Dr Maarouf, the diabetes education director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, told WebMD. New iPhone OS brings special mode to help people sleep She explains: I really push people to eat properly throughout the day and get their blood sugars under control so they sleep better at night. If you get your blood sugar under control, you will get a good night sleep and wake up feeling fabulous with lots of energy. Author of the study, Dr Josiane Broussard, an assistant research professor at the department of Integrative Physiology at the University of Colorado, said:"In this short-term study, we found that two long nights spent catching up on lost sleep can reverse the negative metabolic effects of four consecutive nights of restricted sleep." Record 4m people have diabetes in the UK, charity reveals Diabetes occurs when your body doesnt produce enough insulin. A lack of sleep can lead to insulin resistance, which means your body finds it harder to break down sugars. As well as leading to weight gain, when youre tired, theres insulin resistance, which means the body cant break glucose down into energy.If youre tired and insulin cant do its job properly, then Continue reading >>

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