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Can Januvia Raise Blood Sugar

"januvia Raising Blood Sugar Levels": Diabetes Community - Support Group

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Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Many people using Januvia do not have serious side effects. Side effects that may occur with Januvia include: headache, joint or muscle pain, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, or constipation. Although Januvia by itself usually does not cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), low blood sugar may occur if Januvia is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Januvia including pancreatitis (severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate), urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, shortness of breath, or severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads [especially in the face or upper body] and causes blistering and peeling). The recommended dose of Januvia is 100 mg once daily. Januvia may interact with digoxin, probenecid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or beta-blockers. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. During pregnancy Januvia should be used only when prescribed. Pregnancy may cause or worsen diabetes. Your doctor may change your diabetes treatment during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Cons Continue reading >>

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Wait Times: How Long Until Your Med Begins Working

Photography by Mike Watson Images/Thinkstock There are many type 2 medications, and each drug class works in the body in a different way. Here’s a quick guide to help you understand how long each drug will generally take to work: These short-acting oral medications, taken with meals, block the breakdown of complex sugars into simple sugars in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. “Simple sugars are more easily absorbed and cause the blood sugar to ultimately go up,” Sam Ellis, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, associate professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy at the University of Colorado says. These drugs are minimally absorbed into the blood, so a certain blood level concentration is not necessary for them to work. You will see the effect immediately with the first dose. “You take it before a meal, and with that meal you see the effect,” says George Grunberger, MD, FACP, FACE, President of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. While researchers aren’t exactly sure how these oral medications work, it’s likely that the meds block some absorption of glucose in the GI tract. “You’ll see most of the effect in the first week with these drugs,” says Ellis. alogliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin These drugs work to block the enzyme responsible for the breakdown of a specific gut hormone that helps the body produce more insulin when blood glucose is high and reduces the amount of glucose produced by the liver. Take a DPP-4 inhibitor (they come in pill form) and it’ll work pretty fast—you’ll see the full effect in about a week. “It’s blocking that enzyme after the first dose a little bit, but by the time you get out to dose five, you’re blocking the majority of that enzyme,” Ellis says. albiglutide, dulaglutide, exenatide, exe Continue reading >>

Januvia - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Medbroadcast.com

Januvia - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions - Medbroadcast.com

Although most of these side effects listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention. Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur: symptoms of low blood sugar (e.g., headache, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, confusion, irritability, hunger, fast heartbeat, sweating, and feeling jittery) symptoms of kidney problems (e.g., nausea, loss of appetite, weakness, shortness of breath, passing little or no urine) Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur: severe skin rash (blistering, peeling, spreading) symptoms of pancreatitis (e.g., prolonged, severe abdominal pain with or without vomiting) symptoms of a serious allergic reaction (such as swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat; skin rash; hives; or difficulty breathing) Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication. Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication? Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication. Congestive heart failure: This medication is not recommended for people with congestive heart failure (CHF). If you have CHF, speak to your doctor. Immune system: Sitagliptin can reduce the number of cells that fight infection in the body (white blood cells). This side effect may be more of a concern for people who already have a weakened immune system. People who ha Continue reading >>

Januvia Smackdown

Januvia Smackdown

Get your ringside seats, Folks! A while back I posted about the Merck's new Type 2 oral drug Januvia (What It Doesn't Do), explaining how it apparently trumps competitors in terms of patient "tolerability." No other post has ever generated such ongoing reader energy, both positive and negative. Nearly every day, several new commentors weigh in, duking it out over the relative merits of Januvia. Most everyone seems to agree that Januvia reduces appetite, which is a good thing. But then again, Byetta is known for that effect as well. The key is question whether Januvia fulfills its core function of lowering blood glucose (BG) levels, and lives up to its no-side-effects promise. As of today, the score stands pretty much tied, as such: Total comments = 50 Positive = 10 Negative = 13 Mixed = 16 (liked some aspects of the drug but not others) Neutral = 11 (those asking or responding to questions only) Among the most vocal of the Pro Team: "I take Januvia and have for 6 months. I have no side effects. I have experienced a decrease in appetite. I have had no headaches or respiratory problems. My BG has gone down. It is a great drug." -- Mike "Januvia has been a positive thing for me. My sugar levels dropped from 240+ to 110 +/- 10 after fasting. I have taken 100 mg once per day for a month... I am not as hungry as before usage." -- Jim K. L. "I've been on Januvia for a little over three months and have lost over 15 pounds which I had put on with Actos. I've experienced no side effects, other than I am not hungry all of the time. For me it has been very effective..." -- Bill "I am substantially less hungry then I have felt in years ... and my BG hovers around 100 - 120 between meals/fasting, and 120 - 160 for a few hours after a heavy carb meal. The usual BG spikes of 180 - 200+ Continue reading >>

Raised Blood Sugars And Januvia

Raised Blood Sugars And Januvia

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I'm new to this forum, but can anyone help me? I have been taking Januvia for nearly 2 months now. Everything seemed to be working fine as my readings were coming down, but just last week, I had diarrhoea for 5 days, and now my readings are high again, as high as 17mmol in the mornings, and sometimes before my evening meal. I have seen my GP, who said I must have caught a bug, but my blood sugars aren't coming down. I'm following a low GI diet, haven't touched alchohol since starting Januvia. Infact, I've been really behaving myself! So as you can imagine, I'm feeling stressed because it seems to have stopped working. Also, I've been feeling really depressed too. Has anyone had the same problem and if so, how did you manage to sort it out? There are just a few members on here who have taken/are taking Januvia and hopefully will see your post and help you with their experience. There may be a bit of a wait as the forum is quiet on this holiday weekend. I don't know how long ago you were diagnosed but the Forum Monitors have written some basic information for new members which I hope will be useful to you. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will know the answer. Here is the advice that Ken and I, as Forum Monitors, usually give to newly diagnosed Diabetics. We hope that these few ideas gained through experience help you to gain control and give you some understanding of Diabetes. This forum doesn't always follow the recommended dietary advice, you have to work out what works for you as we are all different. It's not just 'sugars' you need to avoid, diabetes is an inability to process glucose properly. Carbohydrate converts, in the body, to gl Continue reading >>

Januvia® May Help Lower Your Blood Sugar (a1c)

Januvia® May Help Lower Your Blood Sugar (a1c)

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right Continue reading >>

Januvia

Januvia

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Sitagliptin belongs to the group of diabetes medications called DPP-4 inhibitors. It works by increasing the amount of incretin released by the intestine. Incretin is a hormone that raises insulin levels when blood sugar is high and decreases the amount of sugar made by the body. Sitagliptin is used alone or in combination with other medications to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. This medication should be used as part of an overall diabetes management plan that includes a diet and exercise program. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? 25 mg Each pink, round, film-coated tablet, with "221" on one side, contains 25 mg sitagliptin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: microcrystalline cellulose, anhydrous dibasic calcium phosphate (calcium hydrogen phosphate, anhydrous), croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, and sodium stearyl fumarate; film coating: polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene gl Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia diabetes treatment to lower blood sugar levels, side effects by Merck company Ray Sahelian, M.D. Januvia (sitagliptin phosphate) tablets are the first diabetes treatment approved in a new class of drugs known as DPP-4 inhibitors that enhances the body's own ability to lower elevated blood sugar. Januvia is used daily to improve blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes, alone or in combination with two other commonly prescribed oral diabetes medications, metformin or a PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) agonist, when either of these drugs alone, along with diet and exercise, don't provide adequate blood sugar control. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disease, accounting for about 90 percent to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes (21 million in 2005). In type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. Insulin is necessary to take sugar, the basic fuel for cells, from the blood into the cells. Over time, high blood sugar levels can increase the risk for serious complications, including heart disease, blindness, nerve damage, and kidney damage. For a list of natural supplements used in blood sugar control, see diabetes. Mechanism of action Januvia is a prescription medication that prolongs the activity of proteins that increase the release of insulin after blood sugar rises, such as after a meal. Januvia does this by blocking an enzyme (dipeptidyl peptidase IV or DPP-IV) which breaks down these proteins, leading to better blood sugar control. Januvia won U.S. approval in October, 2006 to treat adults with type 2 diabetes. Januvia belongs to a new class of medicines called DPP-4 inhibitors that work by enhancing the body's own ability to lower blood sugar. It does not s Continue reading >>

Morning Highs? How To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

Morning Highs? How To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

Is Reversal Possible? You can't completely reverse the hormonal imbalance of type 2 diabetes, but a combination of actions can solve the high fasting blood glucose problem. "With your health care provider's guidance, experiment to find what works for you," says Arlene Monk, R.D., CDE, a dietitian and diabetes educator at the International Diabetes Center at Park Nicollet in Minneapolis. The following tips offer some actions that may improve morning numbers. Start, Change, or Add Medication As guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists suggest, "Most people need to start a blood glucose-lowering drug at diagnosis to fight the insulin resistance and resulting hormonal imbalance," says Marty Irons, R.Ph., CDE. The most common starting medication, metformin, cuts down on glucose overproduction overnight. Beth DeLauder, 46, PWD type 2, takes metformin, as does Pete Hyatt, 59, PWD type 2. Both say it's been one factor among many lifestyle changes to help lower their fasting blood sugar levels. Newer drugs are prescribed as starting or add-on medications when blood glucose goals aren't met. The oral dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors sitagliptin (Januvia) and saxagliptin (Onglyza) keep more of the GLP-1 hormone circulating. The more potent injectable GLP-1 agonists exenatide (Byetta) (twice daily) and liraglutide (Victoza) (once daily) increase the amount of GLP-1 available. They're in the class of incretin mimetics, also called GLP-1 analogs. Some people also experience weight loss while using GLP-1 analogs "As type 2 progresses, especially beyond 10 years, many people need to add insulin to control fasting and other blood glucose levels through the day," Irons says. "When starting insulin, most providers use Continue reading >>

Januvia

Januvia

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Sitagliptin (januvia)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Sitagliptin (januvia)?

A A A Medications and Drugs Brand Names: Januvia Generic Name: sitagliptin (Pronunciation: SI ta glip tin) What is sitagliptin (Januvia)? Sitagliptin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. It works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. Sitagliptin is for people with type 2 diabetes. Sitagliptin is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Sitagliptin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of sitagliptin (Januvia)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking sitagliptin and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: pancreatitis - severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate; or urinating less than usual or not at all; swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath; or severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling. Less serious side effects may include: runny or stuffy nose, sore throat; headache, back pain, joint or muscle pain; or This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. What is the most important information I should know about sitagliptin (Januvia)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to sitagliptin or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoa Continue reading >>

Some Disturbing News About Januvia

Some Disturbing News About Januvia

UPDATE (April 2, 2013): Before you take Byetta, Victoza, Onglyza, or Januvia please read about the new research that shows that they, and probably all incretin drugs, cause severely abnormal cell growth in the pancreas and precancerous tumors. You'll find that information HERE. NEW Dec 19, 2008: If you want to better understand the health issues associated with Januvia, read the Dec 8, 2008 blog post citing the research that makes it clear that a "side effect" of how Januvia lowers blood sugar is that it turns off a tumor suppressor gene making it "a trigger for prostate cancer". This same mechanism has been linked with promoting melanoma, ovarian cancer and lung cancer. None of the approval testing for Januvia investigated this problem and there is evidence it is real and affecting people taking this drug. You can read about this important issue here: More Research Shows Januvia and Glinides Inhibit Tumor Suppressor Gene DPP-4 Here is the original post "Some Disturbing News About Januvia": Diabetes in Control reports last week that "According to a survey, prescriptions for the diabetes drug Januvia have grown nearly threefold between the first week of 2007 and the week ending July 20. ... It was reported that patients were switched from metformin 21%, Avandia 17% and Actos 13%." Once again we are being treated to the spectacle of doctors who do not understand a new drug's mode of action prescribing that new drug in a way that is guaranteed to damage the health of many of those patients. Januvia does NOT affect Insulin Resistance Januvia stimulates insulin production after meals and may inhibit the production of glucagon after meals. That's what it does folks, and that is ALL it does. The problem here is that for at least 21% of the Type 2s in this study, doctors were t Continue reading >>

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Janumet 100 mg-50 mg oblong, red, imprinted with 577 What is the most important information I should know about metformin and sitagliptin? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to metformin (Glucophage) or sitagliptin (Januvia), if you have liver or kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin and sitagliptin. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking metformin. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or irregular heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. What is metformin and sitagliptin? Metformin and sitagliptin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin works by decreasing glucose (sugar) production in the liver and decreasing absorption of glucose by the intestines. Sitagliptin works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. The combination of metformin and sitagliptin is used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin and sitagliptin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking metformin and sitagliptin? Some people develop a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis while taking metformin. You may be more likely to develop lactic acidosis if you have liver or kidney disease, congestive heart failure, a severe infection, if Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia and the similar drug Janumet are two medications made by Merck to treat type 2 diabetes along with diet and exercise changes. Merck got these two drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006 and 2007 and since then has made a huge amount of money. Drugs like these have been so popular because more and more people in the U.S. are struggling with Type 2 diabetes. Medications may be helpful for lowering blood sugar in patients with this chronic condition, but they come with risks. Januvia side effects range from infections to acute pancreatitis and even pancreatic cancer. As the risks and how serious they are become clearer, more people are blaming Merck for not warning them of the side effects that were possible with their drugs. These people are also suing the company seeking compensation for the damage they have suffered to their health. How Januvia and Janumet Work Januvia is the generic drug sitagliptin, while Janumet is a combination of sitagliptin and metformin. Merck developed sitagliptin to control high blood sugar in people with Type 2 diabetes. This is a chronic condition, typically caused by a poor diet and obesity. It is characterized by chronically high blood sugar levels. This happens when the body becomes less sensitive to insulin, the hormone that is supposed to lower blood sugar levels. Someone with Type 2 diabetes may also be producing less insulin from the pancreas. Having blood sugar levels that are too high for a long period of time leads to serious health consequences, and ultimately to death. This is why it is so crucial for people with Type 2 diabetes to get their blood sugar under control. Drug companies have produced a number of drugs to do this in recent years as cases of the condition rise in the population. Lik Continue reading >>

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