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Can Iron Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Fasting Before A Blood Test: What You Need To Know

Fasting Before A Blood Test: What You Need To Know

By Lana Burgess Fasting before a blood test is when people are asked not to eat or drink anything other than water before some blood tests. But which blood tests require fasting and how can people fast safely? Fasting is not always necessary before a blood test, but when it is, it is only for a short time. Even so, the idea of not eating or drinking, even for a small amount of time, can seem daunting. Understanding when and how to fast before a blood test can help to reduce unnecessary worry. This article explores the types of blood tests that require fasting, why fasting is needed, and how a person can do it safely. Contents of this article: When should you fast before a blood test? Whether someone needs to fast or not before a blood test depends on the type of blood test they are having. Some blood tests require fasting to be effective, while others do not. The types of blood test that require fasting are as follows: Fasting blood glucose test Diabetes is a condition that can lead to there being too much sugar in the blood. A fasting blood glucose test measures levels of sugar in the blood to see if they are healthy. It is important that a person has not had anything to eat or drink other than water for 8 to 10 hours before a fasting blood glucose test. Fasting helps ensure that the blood test records an accurate measure of fasting blood sugar levels. The results help a doctor to diagnose or rule out diabetes. Blood cholesterol tests Cholesterol is a fatty substance in the blood. High cholesterol can lead to an increased risk of certain health conditions. Blood cholesterol tests, also known as lipid profiles, assess the quantities of fats in the blood. The different fats tested for include: HDL cholesterol, also known as "good cholesterol" LDL cholesterol, also known Continue reading >>

Does Iron Overload Cause Diabetes And Heart Disease?

Does Iron Overload Cause Diabetes And Heart Disease?

Iron plays an essential role in many physiological processes, including oxygen transport and mitochondrial energy production. However, more iron is not necessarily better! The overaccumulation of iron in the body, a condition referred to as iron overload, has been implicated in the development of several chronic diseases, including diabetes and heart disease. Read on to learn why iron overload promotes the development of diabetes and heart disease and how iron reduction strategies can be used to beneficially alter the course of these diseases. What is iron overload? Iron overload occurs when excess iron accumulates in the body. The most common cause of iron overload is hereditary hemochromatosis (HH), an autosomal recessive genetic disorder that affects between one in 200 and one in 400 individuals and is caused by mutations in the HFE C282Y and H63D genes. (1) HH is characterized by significantly enhanced intestinal iron absorption and the abnormal accumulation of iron in bodily organs. Excess iron oxidatively damages cells and tissues, essentially “rusting” the body. This generates organ toxicity and promotes chronic disease processes. However, a negative test result for the C282Y and H63D mutations does not mean a person is “off the hook” for iron overload. In fact, carriers of HFE mutations and people with moderately elevated iron levels also have an increased risk of health complications associated with iron overload. (2) Alarmingly, research indicates that iron overload may be a significant but greatly underappreciated cause of two widely prevalent chronic diseases, diabetes and heart disease. Iron overload is a risk factor for metabolic syndrome and diabetes The association between iron overload and diabetes was first noted in people with hereditary hemoc Continue reading >>

Mom’s Diabetes May Affect Child’s Brain

Mom’s Diabetes May Affect Child’s Brain

Blood sugar may influence a critical period in the development of the hippocampus The many pregnant women who have diabetes or develop it during pregnancy have another reason control their blood sugar: Abnormal glucose levels could affect their child’s memory, and damage might not be reversible. A continuing study based at the University of Minnesota has tested children of diabetic mothers from day one through age 8 (and counting) and found consistent problems with their memory; specifically, their ability to recognize their mother’s voice (at birth), face (at 6 months), and sequences of actions (ages 3 and up). Researchers suspect that the impairment is caused by damage to the hippocampus, which rapidly develops during the third trimester of pregnancy. “If the glucose levels in the mother fluctuate greatly … the fetus will also have high fluctuations in their glucose levels, which then leads to iron deficiency and oxygen deficiency” to the brain, says Tracy DeBoer of the University of California at Davis, one of the researchers. These deficiencies have been shown in animals to be especially damaging to hippocampus development, she says. Much of our ability to remember the events we experience (called episodic memory) depends on the hippocampus, a small, metabolically active structure tucked deep into each hemisphere of the brain. “Other research has shown that infants of diabetic mothers, when they do reach school age, have ‘poor cognitive outcomes,’ and that’s a very global term,” DeBoer says. “We’re really trying to be more neurally specific,” to pinpoint which aspects of memory might be affected. A Battery of Tests The study is part of a 20-year collaboration. Neonatologist Michael Georgieff at the University of Minnesota noticed that infan Continue reading >>

5 Simple Ways To Lower Your A1c This Week

5 Simple Ways To Lower Your A1c This Week

The A1C blood test is a simple test that analyzes your glucose (blood sugar) levels by measuring the amount of glycated hemoglobin in your blood. Hemoglobin is a protein in your red blood cells; when glucose enters the blood, it attaches to the hemoglobin. The result is glycated hemoglobin. The more glucose in your blood, the higher your glycated hemoglobin. The A1C is a valuable indicator of how well your diabetes management plan is working. While your individual A1C goal will depend on factors including your age and your personal medical profile, most people with diabetes aim to keep their A1C below 7 percent. By keeping your A1C number within your target range, you can reduce the risk of diabetes complications. While it is important to develop a long-term diabetes management plan with your physician, there are several steps you can take right away to help reduce your A1C. Small changes add up, so consider trying some of these strategies to lower your A1C this week. 1. Try Short Sessions of High Intensity Exercise According to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2015, type 2 diabetes patients who did 10 minutes of exercise three times a day, five days a week at 85 percent of their target heart rate had a twofold improvement in A1C levels compared to patients who exercised for 30 minutes a day at 65 percent of their target heart rate. Be sure to check with your doctor before trying high intensity exercise, and wear a heart rate monitor so you don’t overdo it. 2. Shrink Your Dinner Plate Instead of a large dinner plate for your meals, use a smaller salad plate. This simple swap can trick your eyes and brain into thinking you’re eating more than you really are, and you’ll feel satisfied with less food. It’s especially helpfu Continue reading >>

I Am Currently Anemic And Was Wondering If That Affects Blood Sugar Readings?

I Am Currently Anemic And Was Wondering If That Affects Blood Sugar Readings?

A: Anemia can affect the blood glucose numbers and your A1C levels, making them both inaccurate. For anemia to make your blood glucose readings inaccurate, the hematocrit has to be fairly low, and some meters have a lower threshold than others. Check the specification guidelines found on the paper insert that comes in your box of strips to see what the anemia threshold is for your meter. If you are having a hard time finding this information, ask your pharmacist, as he or she can look it up. Some meters are better than others at providing accurate readings, even in the presence of anemia. If you are prone to anemia, it is best to get a meter that reads blood glucose levels at lower hematocrit levels. Also, it’s important for you to realize that anemia can affect the accuracy of your A1C. Some studies have found that iron-deficiency anemia can underestimate A1C levels, while other studies indicate anemia can overestimate the A1C. In either case, treating the anemia is the best way for you to ensure that your A1C will reflect your true blood glucose numbers. Continue reading >>

Understanding Markers Of Blood Sugar Control | Empoweryourhealth.org

Understanding Markers Of Blood Sugar Control | Empoweryourhealth.org

IS THIS FOR YOU? You’re doing everything right. You’ve decided to finally take control and to pay more attention to your diabetes. You’re checking your blood sugar often at home and at different times of the day. You’re paying close attention to your food choices and being careful on portion sizes. In fact, you’ve been doing so well you can’t wait to see your doctor to prove that your efforts have paid off! Your glucose levels are way down but, when you do see your doctor, you’re surprised (and a little shocked) to discover that your average control is not as good as you thought it was. Your doctor checked your hemoglobin A1c and is concerned that your average blood sugar may be running too high (or too low). How can that be? Your blood sugars at home have been on target for the last several months. You and your doctor confirm your glucose meter is working properly. What can be a possible explanation for this? It’s time to learn about some markers of blood sugar control! HEMOGLOBIN A1C When sugar (glucose) is higher than it should be in blood, it attaches to proteins in the body. This is used as a marker or indicator of blood sugar control. HERES' HOW IT WORKS : Many different types of cells are found in blood, among them are the red blood cells. They are named “red” blood cells because they contain a protein named hemoglobin [HEE-mo-glo-bin], which gives them the color red. Hemoglobin is the protein responsible for getting oxygen to the body’s tissues. Because glucose/sugar can easily enter the red blood cells, when blood sugar levels increase, sugar molecules enter the red blood cells and attach to hemoglobin. The higher your blood sugar, the more sugar will enter the red blood cells and will attach to the hemoglobin. Glucose attaches to hemoglob Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Anemic A1cs, And Swollen Limbs

Ask D'mine: Anemic A1cs, And Swollen Limbs

Got questions about navigating life with diabetes? Well, this is your chance to Ask D'Mine! Our weekly advice column, that is — hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and educator Wil Dubois. This week, Wil takes on two questions about how other conditions play into diabetes and what our D-Community might need to know when factoring those other health hassles in... {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Ruth, type 1 from Florida, writes: DKA coma and blood sugar of 1,739 at diagnosis 40 years ago was a rough way to find out I was diabetic. I now have anemia and no longer make good red blood cells. Does this skew my A1C number and blood glucose results with my meter? [email protected] D'Mine answers: Yep, anemia can mess up A1Cs and home testing, as both are engineered under the assumption that everyone has the "normal" number of red blood cells. Generally speaking, folks with most kinds of anemia can expect false lows on the A1C, meaning the score will give you a false sense of security. This is because anemia is generally associated with either shortened red blood cell life, or high turnover of red blood cells due to blood loss. In either case, if the blood cells aren't around for the normal period of time, they don't have the chance to get exposed to as much sugar as the test assumes they have been. Think of it like kitchen sponges. If you left one sponge in the dishwater for five minutes to fully saturate, and then dipped a second one in the water for a moment and wrung them both out to measure their water content, the sponge that was just dipped would hold less water. Interestingly, however, if you happened to have iron-deficiency anemia, it would be the other way around: The A1C would give you a false high and scare the pants off of you for no g Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Anemia: Are They Related?

Diabetes And Anemia: Are They Related?

Someone’s anemic if they have an abnormally low amount of red blood cells – and when there are too few red blood cells, body organs don’t get the oxygen they need. This not only strains and damages organs, but it also decreases a person’s quality of life by causing fatigue, weakness, and headaches. Red blood cells can transport oxygen because they’re full of a complex molecule called hemoglobin, which can grab, hold, and release oxygen as needed in different part of the body. A doctor may an anemic person as having “too little hemoglobin” or “a low hematocrit”. The first statement refers to the amount of concentration of hemoglobin molecules in your blood, and the second refers to the concentration of red blood cells in your blood. If that sounds redundant, you’re right! They’re both describing the same thing. That’s why it’s best to pay attention to one or the other (not both) to avoid confusion. Types of anemia There are quite a few different types of anemia (over 400 to be exact!). The most common ones are summarized below. It is very important to know the type of anemia and the cause. Without knowing the cause, you cannot treat the disease! Iron Deficiency. This is the most common type. It is caused by lack of absorption, intake, or by blood loss. Aplastic. This occurs when the body stops making new red blood cells. It is rare, but very serious. Hemolytic. This type happens when red blood cells are destroyed faster than they can be produced. Vitamin Deficiency. Poor nutrition, or impaired vitamin absorption causes this type. Pernicious. With this, the B-12 intake is okay, but the body cannot process it correctly. Fragile Red Cell. Some people inherit abnormal red blood cells that die earlier than normal, like in sickle cell or thalassemia. Continue reading >>

Anemia & Glucose

Anemia & Glucose

Anemia refers to a range of problems with your red blood cells. You may have heard it called "tired" blood because one of the major symptoms of anemia is fatigue. Your glucose, or blood sugar, can indirectly contribute to anemia in a few ways. One of the most common pathways is through your kidneys. Excessive glucose can clamp down on the production of a kidney hormone that triggers the production of red blood cells. If you're worried that you are anemic, talk with your health care provider about ways to treat and prevent the recurrence of the problem. Video of the Day Although there are about 400 different types of anemia, the condition generally means you have a lower than normal number of healthy red blood cells, or you have a lower than normal amount of hemoglobin inside your red blood cells. Hemoglobin is a protein that helps deliver oxygen to the tissues within your body. About two-thirds of all the iron in your body is found in hemoglobin, making iron deficiency one of the major causes of anemia, according to the Cleveland Clinic. About one-third of the global population suffers from iron-deficiency anemia. Glucose is more commonly known as blood sugar. It is a major source of energy and fuel for your cells. Your body creates blood sugar after breaking down nutrients from some of your digested food. In blood tests, it's normal to get a reading up to 100 mg/dL of glucose, says MedlinePlus. Serious illnesses, including prediabetes and diabetes, are diagnosed when you have too much glucose in your blood. Too much glucose in your blood means not enough energy is being supplied to your cells. Complications of excessive glucose can impair the functioning of your heart and kidneys, nerves and eyes. Problems with glucose do not cause anemia, but diabetics tend to have a Continue reading >>

Can Elevated Iron Levels Increase Your Risk For Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Elevated Iron Levels Increase Your Risk For Type 2 Diabetes?

Everyone knows that your body needs iron, because without enough of it you can end up sick. Before we continue with this article, I wanted to let you know we have researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to your diet and reverse your diabetes. Want to check out our insights? Download our free PDF Guide Power Foods to Eat here. But too much iron can be fatal as well. As with everything in life, trying to get the proper amount of iron in your body is a balancing act. Iron is considered to be one of the most abundant minerals that is found on the earth. In the human body it has a couple big responsibilities. It is responsible for transporting oxygen to the cells and also for the regulation of cell growth. Around 2/3s of the iron in the human body is found within the hemoglobin in the blood. Hemoglobin is a protein that is responsible for carrying the oxygen into our bodys tissues. You may have heard the word hemoglobin before in hemoglobin a1c. This is a measure of the glucose that attaches to the hemoglobin in the blood. I suggest reading the following articles: What Are The Best Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar Levels? The remainder of the iron in our body is found within the myoglobin. Myoglobin is another protein that is responsible for delivering the oxygen needed into your muscle tissues, as well as to the proteins that can assist in storing iron for future need. Iron Deficiency is a problem that affects almost 80% of the population around the world. While many people are familiar with iron deficiency, elevated iron levels in another thing all together. This is because some evidence has suggested that those who have too much iron increase their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 28%. High iron levels can potentially damage muscle tissue which decr Continue reading >>

Iron: How This Supplement Could Impact Your A1c

Iron: How This Supplement Could Impact Your A1c

We need iron. Without enough iron, we’ll get sick. But too much iron can kill us. As with so many things relating to our health, it’s a balancing act. Most people who eat meat get sufficient iron. Some foods these days are also supplemented with iron. The chocolate syrup Bosco was designed to get children to consume more iron. Cooking in iron pots, especially cooking acid foods, adds iron to our diet. Multivitamins designed for younger people contain iron (especially those for pregnant women, as the fetus consumes a lot of iron). Hence nonpregnant Western people who aren’t vegetarians usually get enough iron from their diet. People in Third World countries who don’t get much meat, however, are often iron deficient. Heme iron, or the iron that is in hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying molecule in red blood cells, is absorbed even more efficiently than the nonheme iron that you get when you eat vegetables or take an iron-containing multivitamin pill. So eating meat, especially red meat and liver, should ensure that you get enough iron. Vitamin C will increase the absorption of iron, and large amounts of calcium or whole grains will decrease it. Those of us over 60 probably remember all those ads for “tired blood” in the 1950s and 1960s that implied that older people were tired because they didn’t have enough iron and needed to supplement with Geritol. So should we all try to get as much iron as possible? Nope. There is some evidence that high iron levels contribute to heart disease, and most “senior vitamins,” designed for people who are at an age at which heart disease is more likely, don’t have any added iron. Some people think that losing blood every month helps to protect younger women from heart disease. This protection is lost after menopause. Iron l Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Anemia:

Diabetes And Anemia:

There are lots of articles about diabetes, as well as all kinds of information about anemia. But what if you have both? About 25 percent of people with diabetes have some level of anemia. This article explains how the two conditions interact. What Is Anemia, and Why Is It Linked to Diabetes? In anemia, there are fewer red blood cells than normal, resulting in less oxygen being carried to the body’s cells. People with anemia often feel tired or weak and may have difficulty getting through activities of daily living. Other symptoms include paleness, poor appetite, dizziness, lightheadedness, rapid heartbeat, and shortness of breath. Because these symptoms can also be associated with diabetes, they are sometimes not recognized as evidence of anemia. Anemia may occur with diabetes because the hormone that regulates red blood cell production, erythropoietin (EPO), is produced by the kidneys. Kidney damage at several levels is a complication of diabetes, and one problem often leads to the other. Changes in the kidneys that occur with diabetes range from diabetic nephropathy all the way to chronic kidney disease. Early detection and treatment is essential to prevent or delay disease progression. Information in greater detail can be found at www.kidney.niddk.nih.gov. Other causes of anemia are low levels of iron or other vitamins, as well as prolonged illness. Diagnosing Anemia A simple blood test done during a doctor visit, called a complete blood count or CBC, is used to check for anemia. The two elements of the test that reveal anemia are hemoglobin and hematocrit. Hemoglobin is the part of red blood cells that carries oxygen to the cells. Hematocrit indicates the percentage of red blood cells in the blood. How Does Anemia Affect Your Diabetes Care? If you have anemia, you Continue reading >>

Implications Of Iron Deficiency/anemia On The Classification Of Diabetes Using Hba1c

Implications Of Iron Deficiency/anemia On The Classification Of Diabetes Using Hba1c

Nonglycemic factors like iron deficiency (ID) or anemia may interfere with classification of diabetes and prediabetes using hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). However, few population-based studies of diabetes in areas with endemic ID/anemia have been conducted. We aimed to determine how mutually exclusive categories of ID alone, anemia alone and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) were each associated with prediabetes and diabetes prevalence using fasting blood glucose (FBG) versus HbA1c in a population-based study of adults with endemic ID/anemia. We used data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey, a longitudinal, population-based study across 228 communities within nine provinces of China. This analysis included 7308 adults seen in the 2009 survey aged 18–75 years. We used descriptive and covariate-adjusted models to examine relative risk of prediabetes and diabetes using FBG alone, HbA1c alone, HbA1c and FBG, or neither (normoglycemia) by anemia alone, ID alone, IDA or normal iron/hemoglobin. Approximately 65% of individuals with diabetes in our sample were concordantly classified with diabetes using both FBG and HbA1c, while 35% had a discordant diabetes classification: they were classified using either FBG or HbA1c, but not both. Fewer participants with ID alone versus normal iron/hemoglobin were classified with diabetes using HbA1c only. From covariate-adjusted, multinomial regression analyses, the adjusted prevalence of prediabetes using HbA1c only was 22% for men with anemia alone, but 13% for men with normal iron/hemoglobin. In contrast, the predicted prevalence of prediabetes using HbA1c only was 8% for women with ID alone, compared with 13% for women with normal iron/hemoglobin. These findings suggest potential misclassification of diabetes using HbA1c in areas of endem Continue reading >>

Why Hemoglobin A1c Is Not A Reliable Marker

Why Hemoglobin A1c Is Not A Reliable Marker

i was recently tested for Hemoglobin A1c because i presented to an endocrinologist with extremely low blood glucose on lab test and some scary symptoms, not the ordinary hypoglycemia symptoms. My A1c was 4.7 which registered as low (L) on the lab print out–it was only slightly low. Does a low score on this suggest a possibility of short-lived RBCs? Does it have any relationship with extremely low blood glucose? my result at the lab, fasting, was 32mg/dL. Not long after that i got a home glucometer and i get the same kind of results on that as the lab got, in the 20s and 30s first thing in the morning, every day. did not know i had hypoglycemia until i had that lab test, though i had had one episode where i woke up with ataxia, i fell while walking to the bathroom first thing in the morning, i got up and immediately fell again. I soon found that i had very impaired coordination. i did not know why and i was very worried. Eventually i wanted to have breakfast but had great difficulty holding the measuring cup under the faucet, to get some water to heat, to make instant oatmeal, i lacked the coordination to get the water into the cup. I persisted and did make the instant oatmeal (pour hot water onto flakes and it’s done), and i got my lap top and was eating the oatmeal and i suddenly was aware that the symptoms were going away. Previously i had been unable to type. While eating the small amount of oatmeal, i realized i could type. That was about a month before the lab test. Since it only happened that once, i put it out of my mind. About 5 days after the lab test, i had the second episode, worse than the first, i woke falling out of bed to the floor, couldn’t use my arm to break the fall, i didn’t have the coordination. i sat on the floor, i could not get up and wa Continue reading >>

Why Cells Starved Of Iron Burn More Glucose

Why Cells Starved Of Iron Burn More Glucose

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Why Cells Starved Of Iron Burn More Glucose Scientists have found a mechanism that allows cells starved of iron to shut down energy-making processes that depend on iron and use a less efficient pathway involving glucose. This metabolic reshuffling mechanism, found in yeast cells, helps explain how humans respond to iron deficiency, and may help with diabetes research as well. Duke University Medical Center scientists have found a mechanism that allows cells starved of iron to shut down energy-making processes that depend on iron and use a less efficient pathway involving glucose. This metabolic reshuffling mechanism, found in yeast cells, helps explain how humans respond to iron deficiency, and may help with diabetes research as well. "If we can understand what metabolic changes happen along a gradient of iron deficiency, then we might be able to identify signatures of a modest iron deficiency in humans," said lead researcher Dennis J. Thiele, Ph.D., who is the George Barth Geller Professor of the Duke Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, "We could head it off at the pass." "This basic science discovery in yeast sheds important new light on how humans may respond to iron deficiency, which is the most common nutritional disorder," said Duke School of Medicine Dean Nancy C. Andrews, an expert in human diseases of iron metabolism. The findings, published in the June issue of Cell Metabolism, are also potentially important for those studying diabetes. "Evidence is growing that if there is an iron imbalance in the beta cells of the pancreas, these cells won't produce insulin properly," Thiele said. "Now we know what happens in yeast in terms of glucose (sugar) utilization. We need to lea Continue reading >>

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