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Can Intermittent Fasting Cure Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting And Its Beneficial Effects On The Body

Intermittent Fasting And Its Beneficial Effects On The Body

Dr. Mark Mattson intermittent fasting research: old tradition potentially benefits body’s organs, providing possible cure and treatment. Research and a sit down with Dr. Mark Mattson at the NIH shows intermittent fasting is resurfacing as a medical treatment used in certain comorbidities, rather than medication. So often individuals consume food throughout the day without much energy expenditure, which over time becomes a problem due to the types of unhealthy food consumed, and the amount of food consumed. Hypertension, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and even diabetes become the end result of those behaviors. Fasting could be the new savior to these conditions, with the benefits going through the roof. — Click here to access Dr. Mark Mattson intermittent fasting video series & downloadable transcript – exclusive discussion with Diabetes in Control — Fasting means to eat only small meals, or none at all, for long periods of time. This can be done every day or even one day a month. Different types of intermittent fasting consist of alternate day fasting or ingesting less than 600 calories a day, eating a regular diet five days a week and only 600 calories the remaining two days, and lastly eating all of one’s calories during a 4-8 hour window. These different types of fasting can be tailored to fit each individuals needs and schedules, with the addition of not needing to eat breakfast. Dr. Mattson also debunked the rule of eating three meals a day with a valid point comparing earlier times to now. “There is evidence that the 3 meals/day routine began during the early period of the agricultural revolution when people were working hard on the farms every day. They undoubtedly had a high calorie requirement to support their high energy expenditure (e.g., 4000 Continue reading >>

Effects Of Intermittent Fasting On Health Markers In Those With Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

Effects Of Intermittent Fasting On Health Markers In Those With Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

Go to: Abstract To determine the short-term biochemical effects and clinical tolerability of intermittent fasting (IF) in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We describe a three-phase observational study (baseline 2 wk, intervention 2 wk, follow-up 2 wk) designed to determine the clinical, biochemical, and tolerability of IF in community-dwelling volunteer adults with T2DM. Biochemical, anthropometric, and physical activity measurements (using the Yale Physical Activity Survey) were taken at the end of each phase. Participants reported morning, afternoon and evening self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) and fasting duration on a daily basis throughout all study stages, in addition to completing a remote food photography diary three times within each study phase. Fasting blood samples were collected on the final days of each study phase. At baseline, the ten participants had a confirmed diagnosis of T2DM and were all taking metformin, and on average were obese [mean body mass index (BMI) 36.90 kg/m2]. We report here that a short-term period of IF in a small group of individuals with T2DM led to significant group decreases in weight (-1.395 kg, P = 0.009), BMI (-0.517, P = 0.013), and at-target morning glucose (SMBG). Although not a study requirement, all participants preferentially chose eating hours starting in the midafternoon. There was a significant increase (P < 0.001) in daily hours fasted in the IF phase (+5.22 h), although few attained the 18-20 h fasting goal (mean 16.82 ± 1.18). The increased fasting duration improved at-goal (< 7.0 mmol/L) morning SMBG to 34.1%, from a baseline of 13.8%. Ordinal Logistic Regression models revealed a positive relationship between the increase in hours fasted and fasting glucose reaching target values (χ2 likelihood rat Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – Regular Meals Or Fasting?

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – Regular Meals Or Fasting?

Reversing Symptoms Via A Type 2 Diabetes Meal Plan? One of the most notable principles of the American Diabetes Association protocols on How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, is that of “spacing meals evenly throughout the day and not skipping meals.” They promote the theory that spreading out foods, especially carbohydrate-containing foods, over three meals each day (and snacks if you want them) can help maintain steady blood sugar levels. The idea behind these protocols is to avoid a drop-off of blood glucose (hypoglycemia), however, given that this disease is a condition of a lack of blood sugar regulation, keeping the sugars in the diet elevated and regular, seems contrary to what needs to occur. While these guidelines make it easy for practitioners with patients on medication to more easily monitor dosages and timing, they also keep blood sugar relatively high and do little to cure the disease or combat the underlying cause – an inability of the body to adequately process sugars. Can We Regain Sugar Control Without Medication What If We Could Retrain Our Body to Take Back Control of Our Blood Sugar, Avoid The Highs And Lows Without Medication And Settle Back Into Balance? Is reversing type 2 diabetes without medication possible? Without a doubt, the key to balancing blood glucose is through lifestyle factors: the “Diabetic Diet Plan,” exercise, sleep, good nutrient levels and manageable levels of stress. Type 2 Diabetes is a lifestyle disorder and if we can let go of the unhealthy lifestyle habits that we have become accustomed to – bad dietary choices, sedentary habits, unimaginable levels of stress – and go on a “back to basics diet,” active lifestyle and a happy, positive disposition, we can reverse diabetes. While diet is key in reversing type-2 dia Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And The Diet That Cured Me

Type 2 Diabetes And The Diet That Cured Me

Why me? At 59 I was 10st 7lb, 5ft 7in, and had never been overweight. I ran and played cricket regularly and didn't drink alcohol excessively. Yet at a routine check-up I was told that I had type 2 diabetes. In 10 years I could be dependent on insulin, it could affect my sight, feet, ears, heart and I had a 36% greater chance of dying early. In type 1 diabetes, the body produces none of the insulin that regulates our blood sugar levels. Very high glucose levels can damage the body's organs. Patients with type 2 diabetes, however, do produce insulin - just not enough to keep their glucose levels normal. Because I was fit and not overweight (obesity is a major risk factor in type 2 diabetes; however, a number of non-obese people, particularly members of south Asian communities, are also prone to it), my doctor told me I could control my condition with diet alone. Desperate for information, I headed to the web, where I found a report about a research trial at Newcastle University led by Professor Roy Taylor. His research suggested type 2 diabetes could be reversed by following a daily 800-calorie diet for eight weeks. When our bodies are deprived of normal amounts of food they consume their own fat reserves, with the fat inside organs used up first. The idea of Taylor's diet is to use up the fat that is clogging up the pancreas and preventing it from creating insulin, until normal glucose levels return. With my GP's blessing and a home glucose-testing kit, I began my experiment. The diet was strict: three litres of water a day, three 200-calorie food supplements (soups and shakes) and 200 calories of green vegetables. Thanks to my doctor's dietary guidance, and running three times a week, I had already lost a stone. Yet my glucose levels were still above 6mmol/L (millimols Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting Could Help Tackle Diabetes – Here’s The Science

Intermittent Fasting Could Help Tackle Diabetes – Here’s The Science

Intermittent fasting is currently all the rage. But don’t be fooled: it’s much more than just the latest fad. Recent studies of this kind of fasting – with restricted eating part of the time, but not all of the time – have produced a number of successes, but the latest involving diabetes might be the most impressive yet. The idea of intermittent fasting arose after scientists were wowed by the effects of constant calorie restriction. A number of studies in many different animals have shown that restricted eating throughout adulthood leads to dramatic improvements in lifespan and general health. The reasons for these improvements aren’t yet clear. Part of it seems to be that going without food gives cells in the body a much needed break to perform maintenance and repair. But the lack of food also forces cells to resort to alternative sources of energy. Some of these, such as ketones – molecules created in the liver from recycled fat – appear to be beneficial. ‘Fasting’ without fasting The problem is that constant calorie restriction isn’t practical: it’s easy for scientists to impose upon lab animals, but hard for humans to impose upon themselves in the real world. Fortunately, we’ve learned that constant calorie restriction isn’t really necessary. Intermittent fasting seems to have many of the same benefits. There are two main types of intermittent fasting. One type, known as “time restricted feeding”, requires eating only during a few hours of the day – say between 10am and 6pm. This approach gives the body a long break from food each night, and also reinforces beneficial circadian rhythms. The other type of intermittent fasting – made popular by the 5:2 diet – is known as “periodic fasting”. This approach involves alternating be Continue reading >>

Can A Special Diet Cure Diabetes?

Can A Special Diet Cure Diabetes?

Weekly fasting can have positive effects on the health of diabetics. At least that's been proven for diabetic mice. Some scientists say intermittent fasting can also be beneficial for type 2 diabetics. Continue reading >>

Ok, For All You

Ok, For All You "geniuses" Out There...diabetes Can Not Be Cured!!!

The other day, on Facebook, someone managed to find that particular button in me, and didn’t just press it...but started HAMMERING ON THE FUCKER!! My major pet peeve, my major PISS OFF...is people who act like they know jack shit about diabetes...WHEN THEY DO NOT LIVE WITH THIS BEAST!! The militant Vegans are about the absolute worst in this regard...they seem to believe that a Vegan diet cures everything. It does not. And a Vegan/vegetarian diet is probably not a very good idea for a diabetic. And sorry, but it is NOT a natural human diet. We are omnivores. But that is another topic, and I do not wish to go off on that tangent here, so I digress. Before I continue, I should point out a few things...a few things about diabetes, a few things about me...and a few things about what I am discussing in this Diary. First, I AM NOT A DOCTOR!! Nothing I say here should be taken as any kind of medical advice, official or otherwise. Second, as I am a Type 2 diabetic...as 85-90 percent of all diabetics are...a lot of what I am discussing pertains to Type 2 diabetes specifically. Some of the things we do, as Type 2’s, to manage our condition, also work for Type 1’s...but the mechanics of Type 2 are very different from Type 1, which is actually an autoimmune disorder. So when I am speaking about the process of diabetes in one’s body, I am referring to Type 2. In the simplest terms, Type 2 diabetes is a deficiency in carbohydrate metabolism. We do not process carbohydrates in the way normal, non-diabetic people do. We must limit our intake of carbohydrates. Some moreso than others, diabetes is NOT a one-size-fits-all condition...and neither should our treatment be. Certainly, a diet high in carbohydrate is not very good for anyone; this goes triple for diabetics. Some carbohy Continue reading >>

The Complete Guide To Fasting & Reversing Type 2 Diabetes: A Special Interview With Dr. Jason Fung

The Complete Guide To Fasting & Reversing Type 2 Diabetes: A Special Interview With Dr. Jason Fung

“Everyone has a physician inside him or her; we just have to help it in its work. The natural healing force within each one of us is the greatest force in getting well. Our food should be our medicine. Our medicine should be our food. But to eat when you are sick is to feed your sickness.” – Hippocrates Fasting has not received as much attention as it should when it comes to the world of health and medicine. That’s because you can’t really make any money off of it. The ‘pharmaceutical science’ studies used in medical schools to teach doctors about human health simply don’t focus enough on fasting for doctors to be knowledgable in the subject. Doctors also learn very little about nutrition and are trained to prescribe drugs as a result. Dr. Jason Fung is trying to change all that. A Toronto based nephrologist, he completed medical school and internal medicine at the University of Toronto before finishing his nephrology fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles at the Cedars-Sinai hospital. He joined Scarborough General Hospital in 2001 where he continues to practice and change peoples lives. He is one of a growing number of scientists and doctors to create awareness about the tremendous health benefits that can be achieved from fasting. It’s one of the oldest dietary interventions in the world and has been practiced for thousands of years. If properly practiced fasting was bad or harmful in any way, as some doctors suggest, it would have been known by now, and studies would not be emerging showing the health benefits that can be achieved from fasting regularly. The Research For example, a recent study published in the journal cell shows how a fasting diet can trigger the pancreas to regenerate itself, which works to control blood sugar lev Continue reading >>

12 Steps To Beat Diabetes Naturally

12 Steps To Beat Diabetes Naturally

12 Steps to Beat Diabetes Naturally: Diabetes is a modern day epidemic with the American Diabetes Association claiming 29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) have diabetes and another 86 million people (18.8%) have insulin-resistant pre-diabetes (1). The vast majority of diabetes is the type II variety known as degenerative diabetes. Research has shown that degenerative diabetes is an inflammatory disorder and is completely preventable & reversible through an anti-inflammatory lifestyle. When we eat sugar or carbohydrates our digestive system converts these larger molecules into glucose which is then absorbed into the bloodstream and taken to every cell of the body. Blood sugar fuels the cells keeping them healthy. For healthy function it is critical to maintain stable blood sugar levels. In this article, you will discover 12 steps to beat diabetes naturally. Diabetes and Your Blood Sugar: Diabetes is classically diagnosed by one of three different mechanisms. Hemoglobin A1C (Hg A1C): This is a form of hemoglobin (Hg) or red blood cell that is measured to identify the average plasma glucose concentration over a 3 month period of time. When Hg is exposed to plasma glucose there is a glycation reaction that takes place. As blood sugar increases the fraction of glycated Hg increases. Healthy HgA1C levels are considered below 5.7 although most functional medicine doctors like to see them below 5.4. Hg A1C levels above 6.5 are clinically diagnosed as diabetes mellitus. From 5.7-6.5 it is considered pre-diabetic. Fasting Plasma Glucose Test (FPG): This test measures fasting morning blood sugar levels. The individual is instructed not to eat any food within 12 hours of the test. So the individual typically told to skip breakfast and the test is usually performed in th Continue reading >>

My Experience With Intermittent Fasting For Type 1 Diabetes

My Experience With Intermittent Fasting For Type 1 Diabetes

In a nutshell, intermittent fasting means closing the window of time during which you eat. If you have breakfast at 7am and finish dinner at 7pm, you’d be eating during a 12 hour window and fasting for the other 12. Many of us don’t do that, though. Nighttime snacking is likely an epidemic and from what I hear/read, it is wise to give your body at least 12 hours of fasting time. Have you ever skipped a meal and felt lighter, recharged, and not hungry? I have often felt this way. I understand about a third of you will probably be about the opposite but such is my experience. Intermittent Fasting for Weight Loss I was interested in intermittent fasting years ago when I read what Tim Ferris had to say about it. He has access to exceptional people, is wildly curious, and respects science to as much as a degree as I can tell so I tend to consider what he has to say. I started trying it a year and a half ago in the hopes it would help me lose some stubborn weight. If I didn’t have type 1 I might have type 2 diabetes. In other words, I become resistant pretty easily and quickly to insulin. If I eat my disciplined way and exercise my basal insulin is about 11 units every 24 hours. If I eat the standard american diet and don’t exercise it goes up to about 30 units every 24 hours. Big difference. Anyway, I began by just not eating breakfast and having my first meal of the day at lunch (noon) and then having dinner at about 6pm and finishing up at 7pm for the night. I continued my walking most days, trying to walk at least 3 miles a day. This was easy for me because I have always regretted breakfast. Seriously, I eat it and feel too full for lunch and if I skip lunch I get hungry so it just complicates things and zaps my precious energy. For so long though, the commonly he Continue reading >>

Is Intermittent Fasting Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Intermittent Fasting Safe For People With Diabetes?

When the now 46-year-old Mary Roberts from Lockhart, Texas, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2008, her doctor immediately put her on Metformin (glucophage), a drug to help stabilize blood sugar. “When I got the diagnosis, I guess I wasn’t surprised,” says Roberts, explaining that not only was she overweight but her mom had been on insulin for type 2 diabetes. Not wanting to be on medication herself for her entire life, Roberts set out on a path to control the diabetes through diet, but a few years of nutrition classes proved unsuccessful in lowering her blood sugar level. It was after her doctor suggested insulin on top of the high dose of Metformin that Roberts switched gears. “I really wanted to find a way to get healthy,” she says. She found the solution in changing her approach to eating — just not the way she expected. Intermittent fasting (IF) combined with the popular ketogenic diet, which emphasizes dramatically reducing carbohydrate intake, helped her lose weight and lower her A1C. “I feel amazing,” Roberts says. What Is Intermittent Fasting and How Is It Done? Although IF has become more popular in recent years, the diet plan isn’t new. In fact, many religions (including Christianity, Judaism, and Islam) have followers who practice fasting of some variety throughout the year. Fasting is often required for blood tests, medical procedures, or surgery. The reason IF has gained so much attention recently is likely due to the release of new diet books plugging the plans and celebrity endorsements. “I think that it has gained popularity because anytime a person drastically cuts calories from their diet, they’re going to lose weight. And we’re so results driven that by seeing that happen we think, This is a great solution,” says Despina Continue reading >>

Ketosis… The Cure For Diabetes?

Ketosis… The Cure For Diabetes?

A reduced insulin load diet will lead to normalised blood sugars and improved insulin sensitivity. A reduced insulin load diet can be achieved by reducing carbohydrates, moderating protein and choosing higher fibre foods. Intermittent fasting also reduces insulin load. Measuring your blood sugars is a simple and cost effective way to check that your metabolic health is on track. A diet of nutrient dense, high fibre, high fat foods is the best way to optimise nutrition and minimise the risks associated with diabetes. how to become diabetic… In the “good old days” there were periods of feast and famine. Food was typically eaten with the fibrous packing that it came with. In today’s modern food environment we are encouraged by the food industry (and those sponsored by it) to eat breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, pre-workout meals, post workout stacks, sports gels during exercise, and maybe some Gatorade to speed recovery. Today’s food is plentiful, typically highly processed and low in fibre. Carbohydrate and sugar based foods have a long shelf life, can be transported long distances and therefore cheap. Win, win? Maybe not. As we keep loading our bodies with simple sugars and carbohydrates our pancreas has to work overtime to produce insulin to shuttle excess sugar from the blood to your fat stores. Over time we become insulin resistant and the pancreas can’t keep up. Once your blood sugars get high enough you will be diagnosed with “type 2 diabetes” and put on medication to improve your insulin sensitivity, for a time. If nothing changes in your food intake your insulin sensitivity will continue to deteriorate until you reach a point when you’ll need to inject insulin to keep your blood sugars down. Injecting excessive amounts of insulin will cause you Continue reading >>

Fasting Cures Type 2 Diabetes – T2d 4

Fasting Cures Type 2 Diabetes – T2d 4

While many consider Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) irreversible, fasting has also been long known to cure diabetes. In our previous post, we considered bariatric surgery. While extreme, these surgeries have proven the point that the metabolic abnormalities that underlie T2D (hyper insulinemia, insulin resistance) can often be fully reversed after a short (weeks) period of intensive treatment with bariatrics. Many early studies were done with the heavy-duty Roux-en-Y surgery, which is the heavyweight champions of surgeries. The best weight loss. The most complications. This is the surgery that has ‘Go Big or Go Home’ tattooed on its massive bicep. But even milder forms of bariatric surgery show the same reversibility of T2D. A gastric band is essentially a belt implanted around your stomach. They keep tightening the belt so that you can’t eat. If you try to eat too much, you’ll puke it all back up. Loverly. It ain’t pretty, but it sure do work. Again, long term results are kind of iffy, but short term results are pretty good. You can see the results of gastric banding versus medical treatment from the graph above. Patients randomized to the gastric band showed a significant and pretty damn good drop in their fasting blood sugars. In other words, T2D was reversing in a b-i-g way. Those given medicines alone didn’t do very well at all. Basically they stayed the same. They were no better than before. So, yes, even gastric banding these 500 pound patients with 20 years of diabesity can reverse within weeks even before the weight comes off. One of the main questions is why? There are many hypotheses – which we will consider in a later post, but it is the sudden severe restriction of all calories that causes this beneficial effect. This is the same thing as the time teste Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting, Cortisol And Blood Sugar

Intermittent Fasting, Cortisol And Blood Sugar

There’s been a lot of discussion about the benefits of intermittent fasting (IF) in the paleo community lately. Paul Jaminet mentions it’s role in boosting the immune system in his book, The Perfect Health Diet, and IF can also be helpful for those trying to lose weight and tune their metabolism. From an evolutionary perspective, intermittent fasting was probably the normal state of affairs. There were no grocery stores, restaurants or convenience stores, and food was not nearly as readily available or easy to come by as it is today. Nor were there watches, schedules, lunch breaks or the kind of structure and routine we have in the modern world. This means it’s likely that our paleo ancestors often did go 12-16 hours between meals on a regular basis, and perhaps had full days when they ate lightly or didn’t eat at all. So, while I agree that IF is part of our heritage, and that it can be helpful in certain situations, I don’t believe it’s an appropriate strategy for everyone. Why? Because fasting can elevate cortisol levels. One of cortisol’s effects is that it raises blood sugar. So, in someone with blood sugar regulation issues, fasting can actually make them worse. I’ve seen this time and time again with my patients. Almost all of my patients have blood sugar imbalances. And it’s usually not as simple as “high blood sugar” or “low blood sugar”. They often have a combination of both (reactive hypoglycemia), or strange blood sugar patterns that, on the surface, don’t make much sense. These folks aren’t eating a Standard American Diet. Most of them are already on a paleo-type or low-carb diet. Yet they still have blood sugar issues. In these cases, cortisol dysregulation is almost always the culprit. When these patients try intermittent fas Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet Combined With Beta Cell Regeneration Might Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Fasting Diet Combined With Beta Cell Regeneration Might Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Periodic fasting has long been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on autoimmune disorders, cancer prevention and treatments, cardiovascular disease, and a myriad of other ailments. This most recent paper by Cheng et al. might add the treatment of Type 1 diabetes to that list[1]. If successful in humans, it has the potential to reverse some or most of the loss of insulin-producing cells within the pancreas. Just as remarkable, the treatment itself is relatively straightforward, consisting of a regimented protocol of periodic fasting-like conditions. Generally speaking, Type 1 diabetes results from an autoimmune mediated depletion of insulin-secreting pancreatic beta islet cells. In contrast, Type 2 results from lower cellular sensitivity to insulin. Type 2 is primarily caused by environmental factors such as poor diet. The current medical approach to treating Type 1 diabetes is the periodic administration of insulin, usually through self-administered injections. Most new therapies focused on curing Type 1 diabetes are looking to repopulating beta islet cells through the use of reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, these approaches are not as simple as the method demonstrated by Cheng et al in this recent study. The treatment consists of a “fasting mimicking diet” (FMD), which for mice corresponds to 3-4 day cycles of a high-fat and low-calorie diet, maintained for at least a month, followed by refeeding. This was performed on transgenic diabetic mice and also normal mice that had their beta cells depleted through the administration of high doses of a toxic drug. Results were also repeated using human diabetic primary beta cells in culture. In this case, the treatment consisted of the addition of human serum from individuals undergoing FMD. Continue reading >>

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