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Can Insulin Cause Jaundice

Insulin Metabolism After Relief Of Obstructive Jaundice: Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test With Portal Blood Sampling.

Insulin Metabolism After Relief Of Obstructive Jaundice: Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test With Portal Blood Sampling.

Insulin metabolism after relief of obstructive jaundice: intravenous glucose tolerance test with portal blood sampling. First Department of Surgery, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Japan. Glucose intolerance and impaired insulin secretion are often associated with obstructive jaundice. Our objective was to determine whether such abnormalities would be ameliorated after jaundice was relieved by biliary drainage. Twenty-four patients with hepatobiliary malignancy prospectively underwent intravenous glucose tolerance test with femoral and portal blood sampling, and the kinetics of insulin release were determined. Sixteen patients had obstructive jaundice (group A) that had been completely relieved by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage by the time of intravenous glucose tolerance testing, and eight patients exhibited no jaundice (group B). Integrated immunoreactive insulin (sigmaIRI, 10 muU min/ml; mean +/- SD) and integrated C-peptide (sigmaCPR, 10 ng min/ml) in the portal blood in group A were significantly lower than those values in group B (sigmaIRI: group A, 436.0 +/- 260.6; group B, 714.3 +/-287.2; p< 0.01; sigmaCPR; group A, 26 +/- 10.1; group B 49.5 +/- 18.8; p<0.005). The hepatic insulin extraction ratio (portal-femoral difference of sigmaIRI divided by portal sigmaIRI) in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (group A, 0.75 +/- 0.06; group B, 0.55 +/- 0.05; p<0.001), whereas the hepatic CPR extraction ratio did not differ significantly between the two groups (group A, 0.37 +/- 0.10; group B, 0.39 +/- 0.05). The impaired insulin secretion caused by obstructive jaundice is not fully reversed after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. The high hepatic extraction ratio of insulin in patients who had been treated with percutaneous Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Exocrine Pancreatic Cancer

Signs And Symptoms Of Exocrine Pancreatic Cancer

The symptoms of exocrine pancreatic cancers and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are often different, so they are described separately. Having one or more of the symptoms below does not mean you have pancreatic cancer. In fact, many of these symptoms are more likely to be caused by other conditions. Still, if you have any of these symptoms, it’s important to have them checked by a doctor so that the cause can be found and treated, if needed. Early pancreatic cancers often do not cause any signs or symptoms. By the time they do cause symptoms, they have often already spread outside the pancreas. Jaundice and related symptoms Jaundice is yellowing of the eyes and skin. Most people with pancreatic cancer (and nearly all people with ampullary cancer) will have jaundice as one of their first symptoms. Jaundice is caused by the buildup of bilirubin, a dark yellow-brown substance made in the liver. Normally, the liver excretes bilirubin as part of a liquid called bile. Bile goes through the common bile duct into the intestines, where it helps break down fats. It eventually leaves the body in the stool. When the common bile duct becomes blocked, bile can’t reach the intestines, and the level of bilirubin in the body builds up. Cancers that start in the head of the pancreas are near the common bile duct. These cancers can press on the duct and cause jaundice while they are still fairly small, which can sometimes lead to these tumors being found at an early stage. But cancers that start in the body or tail of the pancreas don’t press on the duct until they have spread through the pancreas. By this time, the cancer has often spread beyond the pancreas as well. When pancreatic cancer spreads, it often goes to the liver. This can also lead to jaundice. Dark urine: Somet Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Your Baby's Health

Gestational Diabetes And Your Baby's Health

Insulin, a hormone produced by your pancreas, is necessary to move glucose (or sugar) into your cells after your body breaks down food for energy. During pregnancy, your body becomes less sensitive to the effects of insulin, which can lead to what’s known as gestational diabetes. If you have gestational diabetes, your blood sugar can become too high, creating a number of health risks for your baby. Gestational Diabetes and Your Baby's Health If your blood sugar remains consistently elevated during pregnancy, the excess sugar can pass through your womb to your unborn baby. This can increase your child’s future risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Other health risks associated with gestational diabetes include: Macrosomia. This term simply means "big baby" and applies to any baby whose birth weight is above 8 pounds, 13 ounces. A baby with macrosomia can experience difficulties during the childbirth process. The most common problem that big babies encounter is damage to the nerves and muscles in their shoulders during vaginal delivery. Your doctor will monitor the size of your baby by performing ultrasound exams throughout your pregnancy. If your doctor is concerned about the size of your baby, a Caesarean section may be recommended. Hypoglycemia. If your unborn baby is exposed to high blood sugar levels while in the womb, the baby will eventually make extra insulin on its own to deal with the excess sugar. This surge in insulin can cause the baby's glucose to drop sharply right after birth, a condition called "hypoglycemia." Low blood sugar is dangerous because your baby depends almost exclusively on glucose for energy at the time of birth. Signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia include seizures, sluggishness, and difficulty breathing. For this reason, doctors will check Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance, Jaundice, Testicular Atrophy: Causes & Diagnoses | Symptoma.com

Insulin Resistance, Jaundice, Testicular Atrophy: Causes & Diagnoses | Symptoma.com

The patient's last admission was necessitated by the development of symptoms and signs of hepatic failure (hepatic coma) characterized by jaundice Jaundice (or icterus) is [peir.path.uab.edu] Some HH patients have type 2 diabetes with insulin resistance and high serum insulin. [rarediseases.org] Pituitary failure is common and may be the cause of testicular atrophy (shrinkage of the testicles) and loss of sex drive, which occurs frequently. [chealth.canoe.com] When symptoms such as jaundice become apparent, the disorder will have already reached an advanced stage. [otsuka.co.jp] When you have cirrhosis, your body does not use insulin properly (insulin resistance). [hopkinsmedicine.org] atrophy (shrinking) and impotence in males or amenorrhoea (no periods) in women cognitive problems such as memory loss, confusion or concentration difficulties. [betterhealth.vic.gov.au] Pruritus is reported when significant jaundice is present. [medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com] Metabolic risk factors like obesity, insulin resistance diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension are risk factors linked to non-alcohol fatty liver disease. [kenhub.com] Males can have testicular atrophy and excessive breast tissue (gynecomastia), while women may experience an absence of menstruation (amenorrhea). [innerbody.com] Jaundice lessens as liver function improves. [dermnetnz.org] Insulin resistance may play a key role in the development of renal cancer because people with diabetes, which is characterized by insulin resistance, have an increased risk [pubs.niaaa.nih.gov] In men, chronic alcoholism causes signs of hypogonadism and feminization (eg, smooth skin, lack of male-pattern baldness, gynecomastia, testicular atrophy, changes in pubic [merckmanuals.com] To our knowledge this is the first re Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that develops only during pregnancy. Diabetes means your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Your body uses glucose for energy. Too much glucose in your blood is not good for you or your baby. Gestational diabetes is usually diagnosed during late pregnancy. If you are diagnosed with diabetes earlier in your pregnancy, you may have had diabetes before you became pregnant. Treating gestational diabetes can help both you and your baby stay healthy. You can protect your baby and yourself by taking action right away to control your blood glucose levels. If you have gestational diabetes, a health care team will likely be part of your care. In addition to your obstetrician-gynecologist, or OB/GYN—the doctor who will deliver your baby—your team might include a doctor who treats diabetes, a diabetes educator, and a dietitian to help you plan meals. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes happens when your body can't make enough insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is a hormone made in your pancreas, an organ located behind your stomach. Insulin helps your body use glucose for energy and helps control your blood glucose levels. During pregnancy, your body makes more hormones and goes through other changes, such as weight gain. These changes cause your body's cells to use insulin less effectively, a condition called insulin resistance. Insulin resistance increases your body's need for insulin. If your pancreas can't make enough insulin, you will have gestational diabetes. All pregnant women have some insulin resistance during late pregnancy. However, some women have insulin resistance even before they get pregnant, usually because they are overweight. These women start pregnan Continue reading >>

Liver Disease And Diabetes Mellitus

Liver Disease And Diabetes Mellitus

CLINICAL DIABETES VOL. 17 NO. 2 1999 These pages are best viewed with Netscape version 3.0 or higher or Internet Explorer version 3.0 or higher. When viewed with other browsers, some characters or attributes may not be rendered correctly. FEATURE ARTICLE Gavin N. Levinthal, MD, and Anthony S. Tavill, MD, FRCP, FACP IN BRIEF Liver disease may cause or contribute to, be coincident with, or occur as a result of diabetes mellitus. This article addresses these associations. This article addresses the role of the liver in normal glucose homeostasis and discusses a variety of liver conditions associated with abnormal glucose homeostasis. This association may explain the pathogenesis of the liver disease or of the abnormal glucose homeostasis, or may be purely coincidental (Table 1). Table 1. Liver Disease and Diabetes Mellitus 1. Liver disease occurring as a consequence of diabetes mellitus Glycogen deposition Steatosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) Fibrosis and cirrhosis Biliary disease, cholelithiasis, cholecystitis Complications of therapy of diabetes (cholestatic and necroinflammatory) 2 . Diabetes mellitus and abnormalities of glucose homeostasis occurring as a complication of liver disease Hepatitis Cirrhosis Hepatocellular carcinoma Fulminant hepatic failure Postorthotopic liver transplantation 3 . Liver disease occurring coincidentally with diabetes mellitus and abnormalities of glucose homeostasis Hemochromatosis Glycogen storage diseases Autoimmunebiliary disease The prevalence of type 1 diabetes in the United States is ~0.26%. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is far higher, ~1–2% in Caucasian Americans and up to 40% in Pima Indians. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, hepatitis C alone chronically infects more than 1.8% of the A Continue reading >>

Link Between Serum Bilirubin And Diabetic Retinopathy In Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Link Between Serum Bilirubin And Diabetic Retinopathy In Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Home / Conditions / Type 2 Diabetes / Link Between Serum Bilirubin and Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes Patients Link Between Serum Bilirubin and Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes Patients Serum bilirubin is inversely correlated with diabetic retinopathy predicting progression of retinopathy over time. Bilirubin is a breakdown of hemoglobin resulting in a yellowish pigment found in bile. When older red blood cells are replaced by newer red blood cells, bilirubin remains. The liver breaks down bilirubin by allowing it to be excreted in the feces. High levels of bilirubin can lead to jaundice, which is a yellow tinge in ones skin or eyes. Jaundice can indicate liver or gallbladder problems. However, serum bilirubin has a distinct role in anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunological properties, and protects against microvascular and cardiovascular complications associated with diabetes. Among many microvascular complications caused by diabetes, diabetic retinopathy remains the leading cause of blindness in the world. Past studies have shown that individuals with higher levels of bilirubin are at a decreased risk of developing diabetes mellitus. Moreover, markers of inflammation and insulin resistance were also low among patients with high serum bilirubin levels. This article will focus on studies observing the effects of bilirubin on diabetic microvascular complications, particularly diabetic retinopathy. In a recent study titled Association of Serum Total Bilirubin Level With Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, researchers aimed to discover a link between total serum bilirubin concentrations and diabetic retinopathy. in this case control study conducted at the Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Disease at Hayatabad Medical Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic Cancer

Tweet Pancreatic cancer, or cancer of the pancreas, is one of the more dangerous forms of cancer. Diabetes is listed as a risk factor and also a potential consequence of pancreatic cancer. Famous people that have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer include Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Inc. What is pancreatic cancer? The pancreas is an organ that sits close behind the stomach and plays an important part in digestion as well as in keeping our blood sugar levels at safe levels. Pancreatic cancer is when cells start being produced in the pancreas in an uncontrolled fashion by the body. This can lead to a number of health risks which can include diabetes in some cases. How common is pancreatic cancer? Cancer research reports that pancreatic cancer accounts for about 3% of all cancer cases. In 2010, around 8,500 people in the UK were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Survival rates from pancreatic cancer are low. In 2005-2009, only 4% of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer survived for 5 years or more. Pancreatic cancer is relatively rare in younger people. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer Type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer have been shown to be linked but researchers have found it difficult to work out which may have the biggest influence on the other. Higher than normal levels of circulating insulin and increased pressure on the pancreas to produce insulin have been suggested as possible reasons for diabetes leading to a higher risk of pancreatic cancer. Looking at the other side of the coin, pancreatic cancer may lead to insulin resistance by increasing the amount of insulin produced by the pancreas and pancreatic cancer can also lead to a loss of insulin producing capacity. Both of these situations can therefore lead to increased risk of diabetes. If the pancrea Continue reading >>

Lahey Hospital & Medical Center

Lahey Hospital & Medical Center

Insulin detemir is used to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). It is also used to treat people with type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) who need insulin to control their diabetes. In patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin detemir may be used with another type of insulin (a short-acting insulin). In patients with type 2 diabetes, insulin detemir also may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin detemir is a long-acting, man-made version of human insulin. Insulin detemir works by replacing the insulin that is normally produced by the body and by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin detemir comes as a solution (liquid) to inject subcutaneously (under the s Continue reading >>

Jaundice In Newborns Associated With Type 1 Diabetes

Jaundice In Newborns Associated With Type 1 Diabetes

Nov. 11, 1999 (Los Angeles) -- It is not unusual for a child in the womb to develop blood proteins that are incompatible with the corresponding proteins in its mother's blood. Often these infants are born with jaundice, a yellowish discoloration of the skin due to an abnormal breakdown of blood products. A new study has found an association between this form of jaundice in newborns and a higher occurrence of diabetes that starts in childhood, also known as type 1 diabetes. However, "we are nowhere near saying that if you have a particular [type of blood protein], your risk is increased," one of the investigators tells WebMD. In the paper, published in the October issue of the journal Diabetes Care, lead researcher Gisela G. Dahlquist, MD, PhD, of Umeå University Hospital in Sweden, and co-authors from Ireland and Hungary, found a strong association between jaundice caused by incompatibility of the ABO blood protein between mother and infant and the child's subsequent risk of developing type 1 diabetes. ABO blood proteins determine the type of blood the child will have, such as A, B, or O. Certain situations can arise where the blood type of the child will cause a reaction or be incompatible with the mother's blood type, and thus cause problems. If a severe reaction develops, the child may die. Incompatibility to Rh factor, another blood protein, had no effect. The Rh factor determines whether your blood type is positive or negative, as in B+ or O-. Other important diabetes risk factors included a mother older than 25, a high blood pressure disorder during pregnancy known as preeclampsia, and lung disease in the newborn. The authors looked at approximately 900 cases of children who developed diabetes before age 15 from seven countries throughout Europe, and compared the Continue reading >>

How To Control Sugar Levels If A Diabetic Gets Jaundice?

How To Control Sugar Levels If A Diabetic Gets Jaundice?

Home Frequently asked Questions on Health How to control sugar levels if a diabetic gets jaundice? How to control sugar levels if a diabetic gets jaundice? Answered by: Prof Dinesh Dhanwal | Prof of Medicine and Head of Endocrinology, Q:My father is suffering from jaundice. He is diabetic too. Now with the jaundice, his diabetic control has gone haywire and the sugar has gone up to 400 mg/dl. He is currently on medication and feels very weak. I have a small baby, 10 months old. I want to know the diet for my father and if there is any risk of my baby being infected? A:Whether your baby at home can get infected with jaundice depends upon the cause of jaundice. In case it is due to Hepatitis virus A or E then answer is yes. Get the tests to know the cause of hepatitis. Visit to a good physician will help. During jaundice most of the oral medications are not advisable and its better to give insulin so get him switched over to insulin till his jaundice lasts.Regarding diet you have to give him complex carbohydrate diet with low fat. Best is to contact a dietician for detailed menu planning. Continue reading >>

Bilirubin And Type 2 Diabetes: New Evidence For A Causal Relationship

Bilirubin And Type 2 Diabetes: New Evidence For A Causal Relationship

Bilirubin is a yellow pigment produced when red blood cells break down. It is known for causing jaundice, a condition in which the skin and eyes turn yellow because bilirubin builds up.1 Although high levels of bilirubin can be a problem, it is normal to find some amount of bilirubin in the blood. In fact, there is evidence that bilirubin may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).2 Bilirubin acts like an antioxidant. Antioxidants help to reduce tissue damage and inflammation. Initial studies have shown that mice and humans with higher levels of bilirubin are less likely to have T2DM. However, these studies had limitations, and they could not prove that high bilirubin prevents T2DM. Therefore, researchers in the Netherlands used a special study design called Mendelian randomization (Italics) to learn more about this relationship.2 Their goal was to see if people with a gene known to cause higher bilirubin levels (called rs6742078) were less likely to have T2DM. Mendelian randomization is a fairly new way of studying how an exposure is related to an outcome.3 An exposure is defined as the source of a disease. For example, a study could be done to answer the question: Does high blood pressure (the exposure) cause heart disease (the outcome)? In this case, the question is: Does high bilirubin (the exposure) prevent T2DM (the outcome)?2 This is a hard question to study. Traditional observational studies may tell us that people with high bilirubin are less likely to have T2DM, which is called an association. But these studies do not prove that one factor causes another. For example, could there be a third factor that causes high bilirubin and also prevents T2DM (called confounding). Alternatively, T2DM might cause lower bilirubin levels (called revers Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes—will My Baby Be Alright?

Gestational Diabetes—will My Baby Be Alright?

If diabetes is managed well, most problems can be prevented.The first trimester of your pregnancy, the first 12 weeks, is when your baby’s major organs develop. Because gestational diabetes usually happens after the second trimester, usually between 24 and 28 weeks, your baby is not at a higher risk for birth defects. However, your baby could have other problems if you don’t treat your diabetes condition as you should. The good news is that if you manage your diabetes well, most of the problems listed below can be prevented. Hypoglycemia is when the levels of sugar in the blood are too low. If you have too much sugar in your blood right before or during labor, your baby’s pancreas will make extra insulin to use up the extra sugar he is getting from you. When your baby is born, he will have too much insulin in his body because he is no longer getting extra sugar from you. Too much insulin in his body can cause low blood sugar. If untreated, low blood sugar can cause serious problems for your newborn. Jaundice is a yellowing of the skin caused from a waste product of red blood cells called bilirubin. While your baby is in your womb, he needs a large supply of red blood cells. Once born, your baby’s liver works to remove the old red blood cells. If your baby’s liver cannot remove the old blood cells, the bilirubin builds up, causing your baby’s skin to look yellow. A small amount of jaundice is common. Also, there are special lights that can be used to help your baby break down the bilirubin. However, in rare cases, too much bilirubin can be poisonous and may cause your baby to need a blood transfusion. Respiratory distress syndrome is a breathing problem caused when a baby’s lungs have not developed enough for the baby to breathe on his own. It is always a r Continue reading >>

Will You Have Jaundice With Insulin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Jaundice With Insulin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 36 year old man who takes Celexa NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Bilirubin Increases Insulin Sensitivity By Regulating Cholesterol Metabolism, Adipokines And Pparγ Levels

Bilirubin Increases Insulin Sensitivity By Regulating Cholesterol Metabolism, Adipokines And Pparγ Levels

Obesity can cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Moderate elevations in bilirubin levels have anti-diabetic effects. This study is aimed at determining the mechanisms by which bilirubin treatment reduces obesity and insulin resistance in a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. DIO mice were treated with bilirubin or vehicle for 14 days. Body weights, plasma glucose, and insulin tolerance tests were performed prior to, immediately, and 7 weeks post-treatment. Serum lipid, leptin, adiponectin, insulin, total and direct bilirubin levels were measured. Expression of factors involved in adipose metabolism including sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP-1), insulin receptor (IR), and PPARγ in liver were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot. Compared to controls, bilirubin-treated mice exhibited reductions in body weight, blood glucose levels, total cholesterol (TC), leptin, total and direct bilirubin, and increases in adiponectin and expression of SREBP-1, IR, and PPARγ mRNA. The improved metabolic control achieved by bilirubin-treated mice was persistent: at two months after treatment termination, bilirubin-treated DIO mice remained insulin sensitive with lower leptin and higher adiponectin levels, together with increased PPARγ expression. These results indicate that bilirubin regulates cholesterol metabolism, adipokines and PPARγ levels, which likely contribute to increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in DIO mice. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions globally, and at least 2.8 million people die each year as a result of being overweight or obese (WHO). Obesity also represents the most important risk factor for insulin resistance, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2 diabetes (T2D)1. Patients with T2D are commonly hyperglycemic, and Continue reading >>

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