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Can Ibs Affect Diabetes?

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are common among all people, including those affected by diabetes. At some point in any patient's life, the chances that he or she will develop a GI tract problem, be it peptic ulcer disease, gallstones, irritable bowel syndrome, food poisoning, or some other malady, are extremely high. As many as 75% of patients visiting diabetes clinics will report significant GI symptoms. The entire GI tract can be affected by diabetes from the oral cavity and esophagus to the large bowel and anorectal region. Thus, the symptom complex that may be experienced can vary widely. Common complaints may include dysphagia, early satiety, reflux, constipation, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Many patients go undiagnosed and under-treated because the GI tract has not been traditionally associated with diabetes and its complications. Both acute and chronic hyperglycemia can lead to specific GI complications. Diabetes is a systemic disease that may affect many organ systems, and the GI tract is no exception. As with other complications of diabetes, the duration of the disorder and poor glycemic control seem to be associated with more severe GI problems. Patients with a history of retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy should be presumed to have GI abnormalities until proven otherwise, and this is best determined by asking a few simple questions. (See "Patient Information".) Many GI complications of diabetes seem to be related to dysfunction of the neurons supplying the enteric nervous system. Just as the nerves in the feet may be affected in peripheral neuropathy, involvement of the intestinal nerves may lead to enteric neuropathy. This is a type of autonomic or "involuntary" neuropathy and may lead to abnormalities in intestinal motility, sensat Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Affect Your Stomach

Diabetes Can Affect Your Stomach

Diabetes can affect the way your gastrointestinal (GI) tract works. Your GI tract is the group of organs responsible for the ingestion, digestion, and absorption of food as well as the elimination of unwanted waste products. Your GI tract includes your mouth and throat, stomach, and intestines (the long tube connecting the stomach with the rectum). Your liver and pancreas are also considered part of your GI tract and can be affected by diabetes. Because diabetes can affect many parts of your GI tract in many different ways, symptoms may vary greatly, which often leads to difficulty in diagnosing and treating the specific problem(s). The symptoms that you may experience when diabetes affects your GI tract include pain on swallowing, soar throat, heartburn, fullness, bloating, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation. In addition to these symptoms, GI problems can definitely cause your blood glucose levels to fluctuate even when your diet, exercise, and therapeutic regimens are followed consistently. Although there are many different types of therapies for treating GI-related problems, it is extremely important to get your blood glucose under good control. Poor blood glucose control can worsen all of the problems associated with diabetes and make your GI symptoms worse. If you answer "yes" to any of the following questions, you should discuss possible GI problems with your health care provider. 1. Do you have persistent problems with constipation or diarrhea? 2. Have you lost weight unexpectedly? 3. Do you feel full when you have not eaten very much or soon after you start eating a meal? 4. Do you frequently feel bloated after eating? 5. Do you frequently have heartburn pains? 6. Is it painful to swallow food at any time? 7. Do you have unusual pain in your throat and Continue reading >>

Pain Point For People With Ibs And Diabetes

Pain Point For People With Ibs And Diabetes

10-20 percent of people in the U.S. have IBS and about 10 percent have diabetes. So its a good bet that some of you have both! And even those without a diagnosis of diabetes or pre-diabetes may be concerned about managing blood sugar levels to help with mood or fatigue. Diets for these conditions both revolve around the types and amounts of carbohydrates you consume. The pain point? Some of the best strategies for managing diabetes increase symptoms for people with IBS. Sometimes people who work very hard at improving their diets for diabetes run into big trouble with abdominal and bowel symptoms when they do so. But all is not lost. You can learn to manage both conditions, thanks to other strategies for the two that mesh very nicely. Meat, fish, seafood, poultry, eggs, and oils dont contain any carbs at all, so they arent really part of this discussion. All other foods do contain carbs. Some of them occur naturally in foods, such as lactose in milk, or starch in potatoes. Fibers in foods such as nuts, whole grains and vegetables are technically considered carbs too. Sweeteners that may be added to prepared foods are sources of carbs. Some of these carbs are FODMAPS. Others are not. Here are some important pointers for people with diabetes or pre-diabetes, and things to consider for those who are also limiting their FODMAP intake. There are many good low-FODMAP sources of fiber that people with diabetes can eat. Delicious lower-FODMAP hummus starts with canned, drained chick peas, which are lower in FODMAPs than those used to make commercial hummus. Scroll down to try this recipe yourself! 1.Eat carb-containing foods with low impact on blood sugar. People, this translates to eat more fiber in the form of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and beans. Great advice for dia Continue reading >>

Have Ibs? Try Fodmaps.

Have Ibs? Try Fodmaps.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a fairly common ailment among people with diabetes. More than 50 percent of people with diabetes complain of some type of gastrointestinal symptoms. IBS isn’t dangerous, but it is often difficult to control and its symptoms can be life altering. Severe IBS may limit your ability to engage in regular socializing. Never knowing if/when you may need to run to a bathroom can put a real damper on your social life. Since diabetes can affect the organs of the gastrointestinal tract, people with diabetes can be troubled by IBS. Lifestyle measures to treat IBS include an increase in fiber, a decrease in fat content in the diet and the use of stress reduction techniques. In the last few years a new dietary treatment called FODMAPs has come to the forefront. FODMAPs is a strange sounding word. Actually it is an acronym for the following: fermentable carbohydrates oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharide, and polyols . These are sugars that some people have difficulty digesting. People who cannot tolerate the foods containing FODMAPs may experience diarrhea, gas, bloating, constipation and the abdominal discomfort common in IBS. Clinical studies have shown that in a majority of people, following a plan that significantly reduces the amount of FODMAPs in the diet has been effective in reducing gastrointestinal symptoms . The diet isn’t easy, but with the help of a dietitian familiar with the guidelines you can eat a nutritionally balanced meal plan that takes into account your food preferences and your diabetes control. Below are some of the foods containing FODMAPs which should be limited if you have IBS. Free Fructose: apples, pears, mango, watermelon, fruit juice, sugar snap peas, honey, high fructose corn syrup Lactose: milk (goat, co Continue reading >>

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Tweet Irritable bowel syndrome, commonly abbreviated to IBS, is a common condition and so having both diabetes and IBS is also relatively common. Both IBS and diabetes can be managed through diet and medication. Irritable bowel syndrome, commonly abbreviated to IBS, can cause uncomfortable and unpleasant symptoms. The good news is that the symptoms are not a result of damage to the gut but it is a condition that needs managing either through dietary choices, medication or other therapies. People following more restrictive diets for their diabetes may need to make some compromises between choosing a diet suitable for their IBS and one that’s appropriate for their diabetes. Symptoms Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome include: Stomach pain or cramps, which tend to subside after passing stools or wind Bloating Flatulence Diarrhoea Constipation An urgent need to visit the toilet to open your bowels Feeling your bowels have not been fully emptied after having visited the toilet Mucus in your stools Passing blood or experiencing unexplained weight loss or anaemia are not associated with IBS. Tell your doctor if you notice any of these symptoms. Causes People with IBS tend to find that particular foods will trigger their symptoms. These food triggers typically vary from person to person but the following list are more common food triggers. Greasy foods such as chips Snacks such as biscuits and crisps Carbonated drinks such as cola and lemonade Foods containing the sweetener sorbitol Whole grain foods Dairy foods Certain raw fruits and vegetables Drinks with caffeine including tea, coffee and caffeinated cola IBS has been linked with stress, with patients reporting worse symptoms during periods of stress. Usage of antibiotics may also lead to a worsening of symptoms as the a Continue reading >>

Eating, Diet, & Nutrition For Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Eating, Diet, & Nutrition For Irritable Bowel Syndrome

How can my diet help treat the symptoms of IBS? Your doctor may recommend changes in your diet to help treat symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Your doctor may suggest that you Different changes may help different people with IBS. You may need to change what you eat for several weeks to see if your symptoms improve. Your doctor may also recommend talking with a dietitian. Eat more fiber Fiber may improve constipation in IBS because it makes stool soft and easier to pass. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that adults should get 22 to 34 grams of fiber a day.3 Two types of fiber are soluble fiber, which is found in beans, fruit, and oat products insoluble fiber, which is found in whole-grain products and vegetables Research suggests that soluble fiber is more helpful in relieving IBS symptoms. To help your body get used to more fiber, add foods with fiber to your diet a little at a time. Too much fiber at once can cause gas, which can trigger IBS symptoms. Adding fiber to your diet slowly, by 2 to 3 grams a day, may help prevent gas and bloating. Avoid gluten Your doctor may recommend avoiding foods that contain gluten—a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye—to see if your IBS symptoms improve. Foods that contain gluten include most cereal, grains, and pasta, and many processed foods. Some people with IBS have more symptoms after eating gluten, even though they do not have celiac disease. Low FODMAP diet Your doctor may recommend that you try a special diet—called the low FODMAP diet—to reduce or avoid certain foods that contain carbohydrates that are hard to digest. These carbohydrates are called FODMAPs. Examples of foods that contain FODMAPs include fruits such as apples, apricots, blackberries, cherries, mango, nectarines, pe Continue reading >>

Increased Frequency Of Prediabetes In Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Increased Frequency Of Prediabetes In Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the occurrence of prediabetes [impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance are considered to be precursors to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM)] in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) cases and matched controls. Ninety-two patients with IBS and 104 healthy matched controls were included in this study. Type 2 DM was considered an exclusion criterion in both groups. Fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were examined; after 1 night of fasting, an oral glucose tolerance test with 75 g glucose was administered, and the blood glucose levels after 2 hours were examined. Although there were no significant differences in the triglyceride levels, significant differences were found for total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (P < 0.001, 0.001, and <0.001, respectively). These measures were found to be elevated in the IBS group compared with the control group. The frequency of prediabetes, which is regarded as the first stage of type 2 DM, was also found to be significantly higher in the IBS group (P < 0.001). After adjusting for potential confounders, such as age, lipid levels, and anthropometric measures in the analysis of covariance models, prediabetes was significantly more frequent in the IBS group than in the control group (P < 0.001). Thus, given the higher prediabetes occurrence in IBS, IBS may indirectly indicate a higher risk of DM. Further investigations will be necessary to fully elucidate the mechanisms behind these observations. Continue reading >>

Diet And Ibs

Diet And Ibs

The effect of diet on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) varies from person to person. In some people, dietary factors may worsen symptoms. Increased intestinal muscle reactivity and/or heightened sensitivity in IBS can cause the bowel to over-respond to stimuli. Even the normal digestive process, and not a particular food, may bring on or worsen symptoms at times. Certain foods are known to stimulate gut reactions in general, and in those with IBS eating too much of these might worsen symptoms. Meals that are too large or high in fat, coffee, caffeine, or alcohol may provoke symptoms of abdominal cramps and diarrhea. Eating too much of some types of sugar that are poorly absorbed by the bowel can also cause cramping or diarrhea. Examples include: Sorbitol, commonly used as a sweetener in many dietetic foods, candies, and gums Fructose, also used as a sweetener and found naturally in honey as well as some fruits Learn more about foods that cause cramping and diarrhea. Eating too much of foods that are gas producing may cause increased gaseousness. This is particularly the case since IBS can be associated with bloating and retention of gas. Gas producing foods may include: Learn more about foods that cause gas and bloating A diet high in fiber can help some people with mainly constipation. Adding bulk to the diet, such as psyllium or methylcellulose preparation, may help regulate the bowel dysfunction. Psyllium, in particular, has been shown to be beneficial in relieving the constipation associated with IBS. However, a diet excessively high in fiber may itself cause diarrhea and gas particularly in people with IBS. Often, people with IBS report that some foods can be bothersome at certain times but not at other times. There is a sense of inconsistency and unpredictability. Continue reading >>

Irritating Irritable Bowel Syndrome (part 1)

Irritating Irritable Bowel Syndrome (part 1)

Shhh…irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, isn’t exactly a topic that one brings up at the dinner table or during a business meeting. It might even be a topic that, if you have IBS, you don’t talk about with anyone except maybe your physician. But if you’re part of the 20% of Americans who live with IBS (and yes, some of them also have diabetes), chances are you welcome any information that may just help relieve some of your symptoms. Let’s take a closer look at this condition and find out what’s being done to help those who have it. What is IBS? IBS isn’t a disease. It’s not the same thing as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or Crohn disease. And while some who have IBS would liken it to a disease, it’s actually a condition or disorder that can cause extreme discomfort, inconvenience, and even embarrassment. One in five Americans has IBS, and women are more likely than men to have it. IBS can start early: About 50% of those who have it are diagnosed before the age of 35. In the past, this condition was called colitis, mucous colitis, spastic colon, or spastic bowel, but the proper name is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). By the way, gastroparesis, a type of neuropathy that can occur in people with diabetes, isn’t the same as irritable bowel syndrome. Gastroparesis may cause diarrhea and/or constipation in some, but it’s primarily a disorder of the stomach, whereas IBS mostly affects the large intestine. Ask anyone who has IBS to name some of the symptoms and you’ll likely hear a common thread: Abdominal cramping or pain Bloating Gas Diarrhea and/or constipation (they can often alternate with each other) Many people report difficulty having a bowel movement, with an ability to pass only a small amount of stool or else pass a lot of mucus. Those who ar Continue reading >>

How To Treat Diabetic Diarrhea?

How To Treat Diabetic Diarrhea?

I have a problem that I never see addressed. I've had type 1 diabetes for 36 years and been diagnosed as having diabetic diarrhea. Numerous tests have ruled out all other gastrointestinal problems. Is there any treatment for this problem? Continue reading >>

What's The Connection Between Diabetes And Diarrhea?

What's The Connection Between Diabetes And Diarrhea?

No one wants to talk about diarrhea. More so, no one wants to experience it. Unfortunately, diarrhea is often the body's natural way of expelling waste in liquid form when a bacterial or viral infection, or parasite is present. However, there are other things that can cause diarrhea for everyone, and some things that can cause diarrhea specifically in those with diabetes. Diabetes and diarrhea There are various things that can cause diarrhea. These include: Large amounts of sugar alcohols, such as sorbitol, that are often used in sugar-free products Some medications, such as metformin, a common medication used to treat diabetes In some cases, such as with illness or the use of sugar alcohols, diarrhea does not last for long. It tends to stop once the illness is over or the person stops using sugar alcohols. With metformin, the symptoms can go away with time. Some people in whom the diarrhea does not resolve may need to stop taking the medication, however. Bowel diseases may cause lasting problems for people with these conditions. Diarrhea and other symptoms can be managed or controlled with lifestyle changes such as stress reduction, and medications as needed. People with type 1 diabetes are at higher risk of celiac disease, and should check for this if long-term diarrhea is a problem for them. A long-term complication associated with diabetes that can lead to long-term diarrhea (and constipation) is called autonomic neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy occurs when there is damage to the nerves that control how the body works. Autonomic neuropathy can affect the nerves that control all automatic bodily functions such as heart rate, sweating, and bowel function. Since diabetes is the most common cause of autonomic neuropathy, people with long-term diabetes complications stru Continue reading >>

Connection Between Ibs And Diabetes

Connection Between Ibs And Diabetes

Irritable Bowel Syndrome is a condition characterized by several digestive or gut-related symptoms occurring together, including pain in the abdomen , bloating , and changes in bowel habits. These can include diarrhea, constipation, or a combination of both. IBS is known as a functional disorder, in that the normal functioning of the gut is affected.1 With IBS, these symptoms occur without any underlying damage to the gut. Other digestive difficulties that manifest with similar symptoms, for example Crohns Disease or ulcerative colitis , feature notable inflammation of the intestines or other parts of the digestive tract.2,3 Studies show that IBS affects about 12% of the population of the United States. Women are twice as likely to develop the disease as men, and more people experience symptoms before age 50 than after age 50.1 There is a strong connection between IBS and certain mental conditions such as depression, anxiety, and panic attacks. In total, about 50% of IBS sufferers also experience symptoms of mental distress.4 Researchers believe that these connections suggest a disruption in communication between the gut and the brain. They also believe that these underlying conditions might play a role in causing IBS. One recent study found that IBS is associated with central nervous system activation and pre-inflammatory processes.5 People with IBS often have other health problems, as well, including fibromyalgia , chronic pain, or chronic fatigue syndrome.1 IBS and these conditions are known as functional somatic syndromes. Data shows that more people with diabetes than without, self-report gastrointestinal problems, including ulcers, diverticulitis, and IBS. However, the way these data are collected can be prone to bias. By contrast, reviews of clinical and epidemi Continue reading >>

Coping With Ibs And Diabetes

Coping With Ibs And Diabetes

I have both irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and diabetes, and coping with both can be frustrating. Some of the things that are bad for one condition are supposed to be what you need to do for the other — for example, using artificial sweeteners such as Splenda or sorbitol for diabetes, or eating high-carbohydrate foods for IBS. What can I do? — Carol, Oklahoma Both diabetes and IBS can affect the nerves supplying the gut and cause abdominal bloating and either diarrhea or constipation, making it a bit difficult to figure out which condition is causing your intestinal symptoms. If the main symptom of your IBS is episodes of diarrhea, then sorbitol or other alternative sweeteners may worsen your symptoms. However, if your IBS comes with constipation, these sweeteners may actually help. Also, medications used for abdominal pain and bloating, such as anti-spasmodics that relax the gut muscles (Levsin, Bentyl) and fiber products, would help both disorders. In terms of diet, foods that are high in carbohydrates have not been proven to help IBS. I would focus on adding complex carbohydrates and fiber to your diet. You may also want to consider working with a dietitian or nutritionist to find the many foods that would be well tolerated by someone with both diabetes and IBS. Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Both Ibs And Diabetes

What To Eat When You Have Both Ibs And Diabetes

What to Eat When You Have Both IBS and Diabetes What to Eat When You Have Both IBS and Diabetes Learn the Best Diet When You Have Both Disorders BSIP/UIG/Universal Images Group/Getty Images Some people have the misfortune of having to deal with IBS and diabetes at the same time. Little information is available as to how many people struggle with the two health problems together. What seems to be the case, however, is that IBS and diabetes are two distinct disorders, with no physiological overlap. Therefore, it appears to be just plain bad luck to be stuck with the two. IBS and diabetes do share one thing in commona complicated relationship with food. This can make the job of figuring out what to eat quite challenging. If you have both IBS and diabetes, it might be a good idea to work with a nutritionist who is knowledgeable about both disorders in order to come up with a balanced food plan that is optimal for stabilizing blood sugar, while avoiding foods that may trigger IBS symptoms . The following discussion covers some of the factors that you may want to consider as you seek a dietary plan that works for you. If you have been diagnosed with either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes , you have hopefully discussed diet with your doctor and perhaps have worked with a nutritionist. Type 1 diabetes requires that you take special care with meal planning, while type 2 diabetes requires more of a focus on weight loss and control. Information on optimal diets for type 1 and 2 diets can be found here: Unlike diabetes, the relationship between food and IBS symptoms is a somewhat controversial subject. For years, the medical establishment downplayed the role of food as a trigger or explanation for IBS distress. This approach was in direct contrast to the perception of many peop Continue reading >>

What’s Bugging Your Gut? Diabetes, Ibs Or Both?

What’s Bugging Your Gut? Diabetes, Ibs Or Both?

If you have “gut issues” – meaning diarrhea, constipation, cramping, abdominal pain or nausea – and you have diabetes, you are not alone. In fact, this relationship is more common than you – or your doctor – may realize. Up to 75% of people with diabetes have at least one gastrointestinal symptom. These GI problems can include diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, and vomiting. The most common GI problem that results in diarrhea is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and the links between gut problems, namely IBS and blood sugars are tightly woven and interconnected. Even the severity of symptoms is closely linked to the glycemic control of the individual. Meaning the worse the glycemic control, the worse the GI symptoms. High blood sugars make it hard for the stomach and small intestine to work normally. At the same time, IBS itself can make it harder for your body to control post-prandial (or “after meal”) blood sugars. A Missed Diagnosis and Continued Suffering Sadly, people with diabetes suffer from the effect of undiagnosed IBS or other digestive disruption every day. Some people with diabetes are told their abdominal pain and gastrointestinal discomfort is just a complication of their poorly controlled blood sugars—leaving Irritable Bowel Syndrome (or other digestive disorders) undiagnosed and, therefore, untreated. To complicate matters further, symptoms of both diabetes and IBS are greatly impacted by diet, stress, and general health. In diabetes, GI problems are often related to what’s referred to as autonomic gastrointestinal neuropathy resulting in abnormal motility. “Motility” refers to your body’s ability to move through the digestive system – including your stomach, small and large intestine at the right speed: not too fast, not to Continue reading >>

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