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Can I Take Metformin Be Taken On An Empty Stomach?

Not Eating And Metformin

Not Eating And Metformin

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I'm a College student so I don't always get to eat. Should I still take my metformin on a empty stomach? I always take my metformin on an empty stomach. I never take it with meals. Since Metformin works in the liver not the pancreas there is no way your bg will go too low, because of the metformin ( usually). Metformin takes time to build up in your system and it is the accumulated amount that lowers your bg. But I do think as a diabetic it is important to eat on a somewhat schedule to get the best bgs. Often if you go long amounts of time in between meals or snacks your liver can dump glucose which raises your bgs. When I am very busy I will carry nuts, cheese and low carb protein bars with me to munch on. I generally take my metformin on an empty stomach, before eating in the morning (which I often don't do first thing) and then before bed at night. So long as you don't experience the side effects some people find with Metformin, you are likely to be ok. I always take my metformin on an empty stomach. I never take it with meals. Since Metformin works in the liver not the pancreas there is no way your bg will go too low, because of the metformin ( usually). Metformin takes time to build up in your system and it is the accumulated amount that lowers your bg. But I do think as a diabetic it is important to eat on a somewhat schedule to get the best bgs. Often if you go long amounts of time in between meals or snacks your liver can dump glucose which raises your bgs. When I am very busy I will carry nuts, cheese and low carb protein bars with me to munch on. It all depends on what you mean Continue reading >>

Metformin To Be Taken Before Or After Meals

Metformin To Be Taken Before Or After Meals

Metformin To Be Taken Before Or After Meals Metformin To Be Taken Before Or After Meals Should You Take Metformin Before Or After Your Meal ... Should You Take Metformin Before Or After Your Meal? Advertisement. Q: ... they can be minimized by taking the metformin with food, rather than on an empty stomach. Metformin (Oral Route) Proper Use - Mayo Clinic Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or ... two times a day taken with the morning and evening meals, or 850 mg a day taken with ... Before ... Which is the right time of taking Metformin, before or after ... Which is the right time of taking Metformin, before or after the ... you can experiment with the timing to see if taking it in the beginning of the meal or at the end ... Best time to take Metformin before or after? - Type 2 Diabetes Best time to take Metformin before or after? Started by Bettebee , Oct 02 2007 11:39 AM. ... First, When should we take metformin before a meal or after a meal? Metformin to be taken before food or after food, pls assist ... Metformin to be taken before food or after food, pls assist thank you? Asked 17 Sep 2012 by francisteo Active 17 Sep 2012 ... Take metformin with a meal, ... Are we supposed to take metformin before or after meal? - Quora Are we supposed to take metformin before or ... from stopping to take metformin in a non ... your eating. Not necessarily before or after but take a few ... may you take metformin after a meal with food - Pills - Diabetes may you take metformin after a meal with food ... what is the best way to take metformin before, during or after meals? Achiness, trouble sleeping, pains in stomach. Diabetes Medicine - Learning to Live Well with Diabetes ... What You Should Know about Diabetes Medicine . ... Take 30 minutes before meal. M Continue reading >>

Should You Take Diabetes Medications Metformin And Glipizide With Food?

Should You Take Diabetes Medications Metformin And Glipizide With Food?

Dear Pharmacist, I have been taking metformin for years now. I was already told to take it with food, but after taking it for a while I quit eating with it and seem to have no problems. My doctor recently added a medication called glipizide, which also says take with food. Can I eventually quit eating with this medication, too since I’m just not really a breakfast eater? Dear Most Important Part of your Day, This is a great question, as I can see how the two medications can seem like very similar situations. The directions to take these medications with food are for different reasons, and therefore should be followed differently. Metformin is advised to take with food because it can cause nausea when you first start taking it. For many people, however the nausea can subside as your body adjusts to it. With glipizide, the medication actually works to directly lower your blood sugar more than metformin. For this reason, it is important to always and forever eat with your glipizide dose. Unlike metformin, glipizide can cause low blood sugar episodes, especially when you don’t eat with it. If you absolutely never eat breakfast, then you may consider just waiting to take your glipizide with your first meal of the day. Even if that’s at lunch, it would be safer than taking this medication on an empty stomach. If you do experience a low blood sugar episode (clammy, sweaty palms, heat/cold intolerance, mental confusion) the best treatments can involve drinking orange juice or milk, a non-diet soda, or placing a piece of hard candy (that is not sugar free) in your mouth. If the episode is severe, it can also be a good idea to follow up with a bite of peanut butter, or some longer source of protein. Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

When To Take Diabetes Medicines: Diabetes Questions & Answers

When To Take Diabetes Medicines: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Q. I have Type 2 diabetes, and I currently take 1,000 milligrams (mg) of metformin twice a day, 5 mg of Onglyza (saxagliptin) once a day, and 5 mg of glipizide once a day. Does it matter when I take the Onglyza and the glipizide? I used to take them both at breakfast, but I thought I might get better blood-glucose-lowering coverage if I took one of them with lunch and one with dinner. A. A couple of factors determine the optimal timing of medicine doses. Some drugs, such as rapid-acting insulin, are usually taken just before meals, and others must be taken on an empty stomach or with food. The way a drug works in the body, as well as the time it takes to start working and the duration of its action, may also determine the best time to take a medicine. Glipizide begins working in approximately 30 minutes to an hour. Since this drug increases insulin secretion, it is recommended that you take it before meals to reduce the risk of hypoglycemic episodes. If you take it only once a day, it’s best to do so prior to the largest meal of the day, or with breakfast. Saxagliptin starts working within hours and only achieves peak concentrations in the body after several hours. Saxagliptin, and other agents in the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor class, prevent the breakdown of a hormone called glucagon-like peptide (GLP) in response to the extra glucose in your blood after you eat, which increases the body’s insulin production. Although concentrations of GLP and other similar hormones are higher after eating, they are also released throughout the day under normal circumstances. So saxagliptin and other DPP-4 inhibitors can be taken without regard to meals. Another factor to consider when determining when to take your diabetes medicines is how well you can follow the reg Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

Metformin helps control blood sugar and increase your body's sensitivity to insulin. The drug is available only by prescription and sold under several different brand names, including Fortamet, Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage and Glucophage XR. Your dosage will depend on your normal diet and exercise habits -- too much metformin can lead to low blood sugar and hypoglycemia. Always follow your doctor's directions for taking your medication. Video of the Day Metformin works by limiting your liver's production of glucose and stopping your body from absorbing some of the glucose in your bloodstream. Additionally, metformin increases your body's sensitivity to insulin, allowing your pancreas to produce less insulin. Keeping blood sugar levels stable can decrease hunger and food cravings, leading to weight loss. Metformin is not an appetite suppressant, nor does it boost metabolism; to lose weight, you'll still need to pay close attention to your diet and increase your physical activity. Standard vs. Extended Release Options The amount of metformin you'll take depends on why you are using the medication, how often you take the medicine, other medications you might be taking and the time between doses. The National Institutes of Health explains that metformin is available as a tablet or a liquid solution. Tablets come in an extended release dose -- Glucophage XR -- or in a standard release option. Extended release pills are designed to be taken once daily, with your evening meal. Standard tablet and liquid solutions may be taken once or multiple times daily -- with meals. Metformin should be taken with food. Always follow your doctor's orders. It's typical to start with a 500 milligram dose once daily, then increase both the amount of medication and the frequency. If you're using Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Medicines

Diabetes: Medicines

Diabetes Pills Some people with Type 2 diabetes can control their blood glucose (sugar) with diet and exercise alone. Others will need to take diabetes pills. Diabetes pills help keep your blood glucose level within a good range. Some people with Type 2 diabetes may need to take insulin shots. Other people may need both pills and shots. It is important to know what medications you are taking, how they work, and possible side effects. You should ask your doctor and pharmacist for more detailed information. Several kinds of pills may help people who have Type 2 diabetes. The groups of drugs listed below work in different ways. Some people with Type 2 diabetes may need 2 or 3 kinds of pills to control blood glucose. Note that the list below gives examples of the most common current medicines used but that there are often new medications made available that may not be listed here. Every medicine has 2 names; a generic (jun-AIR-ik) name and a brand name. The generic name is the basic name of the drug. The brand name is the name that a specific company uses when it makes that drug. For an example, look at a common headache medicine. Many people use acetaminophen (uh-SEET-uh-MINN-uh-fin) for a headache. Acetaminophen is the generic name of the drug. The brand names include Anacin Aspirin Free, Bayer Select Headache, and Tylenol. Sulfonylurea drugs Sulfonylurea (SULL-fon-il-your-EE-uh) drugs help the pancreas produce more insulin (sustained insulin release). The table below lists examples of this type of drug. Brand Name Generic Name Glucotrol Glucotrol XL* Glipizide Amaryl Glimepiride Micronase DiaBeta Glynase Glyburide Follow your doctor’s instructions on how often to take your sulfonylurea drugs. These drugs work best if taken on an empty stomach (30 minutes before a meal) Continue reading >>

What Time Of Day Is Best To Take Diabetic Medication?

What Time Of Day Is Best To Take Diabetic Medication?

The best time to take your diabetic medication will vary depending on the medicine you're taking. For example, among pills for diabetes, some are meant to be taken before a meal, some at the first bite of a meal and some with food. Some are taken twice a day while others might be taken three times daily. Insulin may be taken as injections a few times a day or given by pump as a steady dose throughout the day. You and your doctor need to choose not only the best medications for controlling your diabetes, but also the best times to take those medications. If your doctor didn’t give you any specific instructions, or if you are confused, look at the bottle and the info sheet from the pharmacy. There are a few meds that need to be taken at certain times for maximum effectiveness or for comfort. For instance, the diabetes drug metformin gives some people nausea when taken on an empty stomach, but rarely causes trouble when taken with meals; while the diabetes medication Starlix needs to be taken right before a meal to work right. For the most part, however, most diabetes drugs have no special timing, so the best time to take them is whenever it will be easiest for you, or when you will be most likely to remember them. Two other non-diabetes drugs that are common to those of us with diabetes are statins for lowering cholesterol and thyroid meds. Statins should be taken in the evening, as most cholesterol is produced by the liver when we sleep and taking the med at bedtime maximizes its effect. Thyroid meds should be taken on an empty stomach, first thing in the morning, without any other pills. Questions Videos Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used fo Continue reading >>

Explainer: Why Must Some Medications Be Taken With Food?

Explainer: Why Must Some Medications Be Taken With Food?

Have you ever been advised to take a medicine with food? How about taking a medicine with cola or avoiding grapefruit? Hundreds of medicines have food-related dosing instructions. With four out of five Australians aged above 50 taking daily medication, most people will encounter instructions about medicines and food at some point in their lives – some of which may seem rather strange. If a medicine isn’t taken as recommended with respect to food, the medicine may not have an effect. Worse, it could lead to side effects. The timing of the meal, the size of the meal, and the types of food and drinks consumed can all affect the body’s response to a medicine. Absorption of medicines from the gut Eating food triggers multiple physiological changes, including increased blood flow to the gut, the release of bile, and changes in the pH (acidity) and motility of the gut. These physiological changes can affect the amount of medicine absorbed from the gut into the bloodstream, which can then impact on the body’s response to a medicine. Certain medicines are recommended to be given with food because the physiological changes after eating can increase the amount of medicine absorbed by the body. Itraconazole capsules (used to treat certain fungal infections), for instance, should be taken with food, and in some cases acidic drinks such as cola, because this product needs an acidic environment to be absorbed. In other cases, changes in gut secretions and the digestive process can reduce the effectiveness of a medicine. Certain antibiotics, such as phenoxymethylpenicillin (also known as penicillin V), are best taken on an empty stomach as they can be less effective after prolonged exposure to acidic conditions. Food can act as a physical barrier to the surface of the gut wall Continue reading >>

5 Things Everyone Taking Diabetes Medications Should Do

5 Things Everyone Taking Diabetes Medications Should Do

Diabetes can definitely be a challenging condition to manage, especially when it comes to medications. If you are diabetic, there are five key things you need to do to get the most health benefits from your prescriptions. Guest post by: Mike Shelley Fourth Year Pharmacy Student Northeast Ohio Medical University As I approach the start of my career as a pharmacist at a community pharmacy, I look forward to the opportunity to help people understand and use their medications as wisely as possible. If you or someone you love is diabetic, I’d like to offer these tips, guidelines and recommendations for managing this condition. #1 — Keep a list of your medications with you. Keeping track of your medications can be a difficult task. Making a list is a great way to help you remember which medications you are taking and how you take them. Here are some things you should include for each medication on your list: Medication name (brand and/or generic) Medication strength Directions Prescriber For example, you might write down: Metformin (Glucophage) 500 mg, 1 tablet twice a day, Dr. Smith; or Lantus insulin, inject 30 units daily at bedtime, Dr. Wheeler. You may also want to add your emergency contact information, as well as the pharmacies you go to in case of an emergency. Also, make sure you update your list as changes are made to your medications! #2 — Be familiar with the medications you take. There are many medication options available to help lower your blood sugar; your doctor decides which medications are best for you based on your lifestyle, physical condition, how you respond to medications, and insurance coverage. Below are examples of each class of oral anti-diabetes medications and generic and brand names of each. Medication Class Medications Sulfonylureas Chlor Continue reading >>

Timing Your Metformin Dose

Timing Your Metformin Dose

The biggest problem many people have with Metformin is that it causes such misery when it hits their stomachs that they can't keep taking it even though they know it is the safest and most effective of all the oral diabetes drugs. In many cases all that is needed is some patience. After a rocky first few days many people's bodies calm down and metformin becomes quite tolerable. If you are taking the regular form of Metformin with meals and still having serious stomach issues after a week of taking metformin, ask your doctor to prescribe the extended release form--metformin ER or Glucophage XR. The extended release form is much gentler in its action. If that still doesn't solve your problem, there is one last strategy that quite a few of us have found helpful. It is to take your metformin later in the day, after you have eaten a meal or two. My experience with metformin--and this has been confirmed by other people--is that it can irritate an empty stomach, but if you take it when the stomach contains food it will behave. There are some drugs where it matters greatly what time of day you take the drug. Metformin in its extended release form is not one of them. As the name suggests, the ER version of the pill slowly releases the drug into your body over a period that, from my observations, appears to last 8 to 12 hours. Though it is supposed to release over a full 24 hours, this does not appear to be the case, at least not with the generic forms my insurer will pay for. Because there seems to be a span of hours when these extended release forms of metformin release the most drug into your blood stream, when you take your dose may affect how much impact the drug has on your blood sugars after meals or when you wake up. For example, the version I take, made by Teva, releases Continue reading >>

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Managing diabetes often brings changes in what we eat and the medications we take. You may also notice some changes in how your gut, or gastrointestinal (GI) tract, feels, sounds, and responds. Changes in eating You are likely making changes in eating habits, including more foods rich in fiber, such as fruits, vegetables, and beans. Fiber can be filling without adding unwanted calories, and it can help improve abnormal cholesterol levels. But there may be a few uh-ohs if you rapidly increase the amount you eat. "Gas and bloating are a side effect of fiber," says Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., R.D., professor of health promotion and nutrition research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York. "Increasing your intake gradually may help." She suggests adding legumes, such as beans and lentils, to increase dietary fiber. "Throwing out the water you soak them in and giving them an extra rinse before cooking may also help decrease the gas and bloating," she says. Glucose-lowering meds Several prescription medications used to lower blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes can stir up your gut. Experts tend to suggest that you start with a low dose and slowly increase it based on your provider's instructions. Metformin Metformin, the typical starting medication in type 2 diabetes to bring blood glucose levels in range, can lead to heartburn, nausea, or diarrhea. Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the diabetes division at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, says, "I try to use metformin in all of my patients who have type 2 diabetes. When there is a problem, it is diarrhea and abdominal discomfort. There are 5-10 percent of people who just can't tolerate it." Typically, metformin is started at a low dose and increased Continue reading >>

How To Take Glucophage

How To Take Glucophage

Edit Article Many people who have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus are able to manage the condition with simple diet and exercise changes. However, there is a significant number of diabetics who must be put on some form of oral medication. Glucophage, also known as metformin, is the most widely used medication for diabetics. Here are some things to remember if you have to take Glucophage. 1 Discuss this medication with your doctor. It can only be obtained with a prescription. Ask questions. Your doctor can inform you and help alleviate any concerns you might have. Make sure you understand any special instructions concerning Glucophage. 2 Consult with your pharmacist. This is especially important if this is the first time you will be taking Glucophage. Your pharmacist may recommend that you purchase metformin, which is the generic form of Glucophage and costs less. 3 Follow the directions on the prescription. Your doctor has reasons for the prescribed dosage. Do not deviate from the instructions provided before consulting with your doctor. Many times Glucophage is prescribed for type 2 diabetes in incremental dosages. This means you may start out on a low dose and, each time you visit your doctor, your dosage may be increased. 4 Take Glucophage at the same time every day. You may be required to take your medication from 1-to-3 times per day. Since Glucophage, or metformin, has a half-life of 6 to 17 hours, it will stay in your system and continue to be effective for this period of time. Metformin peaks in the system 1-3 hours after taking it. 5 6 Eat something prior to taking each dose. Glucophage can upset your stomach. taking the medication on an empty stomach can intensify the side effects. 7 Take blood sugar readings regularly. It is important to monitor Continue reading >>

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