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Can I Take Lactulose With Diabetes?

Lactulose Disease Interactions

Lactulose Disease Interactions

There are 2 disease interactions with lactulose: Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility Since lactulose solution contains galactose, use is contraindicated in patients who require a low galactose diet. "Product Information. Cephulac (lactulose)." Hoechst Marion-Roussel Inc, Kansas City, MO. "Product Information. Chronulac (lactulose)." Hoechst Marion-Roussel Inc, Kansas City, MO. "Product Information. Duphalac (lactulose)." Solvay Pharmaceuticals Inc, Marietta, GA. Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility Since lactulose solution contains galactose and lactose, it should be used cautiously in patients with diabetes. The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables. Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit. Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances. Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan. Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, kn Continue reading >>

Verdict On Lactulose And Blood Sugar Correlation?

Verdict On Lactulose And Blood Sugar Correlation?

Verdict on lactulose and blood sugar correlation? Okay friends, I have a question I can't find a comprehensive answer on. My research tells me that lactulose should not and does not raise your blood sugar levels. However, my paperwork that comes with my fill has a diabetes precaution warning or whatever on it, and both my GP and my gastro's office made a point to ask me how my BSLs were doing since I started taking it. Answer: they aren't good. I've seen a daily rise of 50-100pts in my daily meter readings since starting lactulose, but I suppose this may just be a bizarre coincidence. However, if it's truly affecting it, I need to make some emergency adjustments within my reach - but I am getting mixed messages here. VIP Member | 5 years on site | 1959 posts Supposedly Lactulose is made from synthetic sugars(it has a sickening sweet taste like syrup it is difficult for me to believe that it is synthetic but guess that I have to for want of a better answer). It works by exerting an osmotic pull, ie,pulling the toxins from the blood stream into the colon where it is broken down and eliminated. It isn't supposed to have much affect on blood sugar levels,but I guess everyone tolerates it differently. I wouldn't stop taking it unless the doctor tells you to, it is a vital part in fighting the many complications of cirrhosis. You have never lived until you have a big ol' lactulose enema , with that sticky stuff all over your rear. I don't plan to stop taking it, but I have control over how much I take up to a point. If it's contributing to the sudden dramatic rise in my blood sugar I do need to curtail it some this weekend. My blood sugar is so high my oncologist has said my surgery Monday may need to be canceled. Rescheduling is about two months out. Of course, my gastro's Continue reading >>

Lactose Vs. Lactulose

Lactose Vs. Lactulose

I recently got a call at my office from a home healthcare nurse who was visiting one of my patients who was suffering from cirrhosis of the liver and experiencing high ammonia levels. The patient was on basal insulin with mealtime rapid insulin and had been fairly well controlled. Over the past 2 weeks the patient had been experiencing low glucose levels before lunch and bedtime. The patient had gone to the gastroenterologist due to the high ammonia levels and was started on lactulose 30ml with breakfast and dinner. The home health nurse was calling me to adjust the insulin due to the low readings. I asked the nurse to check the patient’s dosing log to see if anything had changed. Upon reviewing the logs I was able to figure out that the patient was giving extra insulin due to the lactulose dosing. I immediately had the patient return to their old dosing regimen and the low glucose levels disappeared. Lesson Learned: Most patients think that lactulose is like lactose and that it is a sugar that will raise glucose readings. However, lactulose is a synthetic sugar that is broken down in the colon into products that pull water out from the body and into the colon. It works by drawing ammonia from the blood into the colon where it is removed from the body. Because it is broken down in the colon it is not absorbed in the intestines and therefore has little if any effect on glucose levels. Jon Murray, MD Ruskin, FL Report Medication Errors to ISMP: Diabetes in Control is partnered with the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) to help ensure errors and near-miss events get reported and shared with millions of health care practitioners. The ISMP is a Patient Safety Organization obligated by law to maintain the anonymity of anyone involved, as well as omitting or cha Continue reading >>

Lactulose Oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Lactulose Oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

This drug is used by mouth or rectally to treat or prevent complications of liver disease ( hepatic encephalopathy ). It does not cure the problem, but may help to improve mental status. Lactulose is a colonic acidifier that works by decreasing the amount of ammonia in the blood . It is a man-made sugar solution. If you are taking this medication by mouth for liver disease, take it usually 3-4 times a day or as directed by your doctor. To improve the taste, you may mix it into fruit juice, water, milk, or a soft dessert. The goal is to have 2-3 soft stools each day. Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy (i.e., the number of soft stools each day). If you are taking this medication by mouth for constipation , take it usually once daily or as directed by your doctor. This medication can also be given rectally as an enema for liver disease. Mix the recommended amount of lactulose with 700 milliliters (24 ounces) of water or normal saline. Give the solution into the rectum and keep the liquid inside for 30-60 minutes as directed by your doctor. If you keep the enema inside for less than 30 minutes, repeat the dose unless directed otherwise. Use this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Remember to use it at the same time each day. When this drug is given rectally for liver disease, an improvement in your mental status may occur in as little as 2 hours, but if you are taking this medication by mouth , it may take up to 24 to 48 hours. If you are using this medication for constipation , it may take up to 48 hours to have a bowel movement . Inform your doctor if your condition persists or worsens. Gas, bloating , burping, stomach rumbling/pain, nausea , and cramps may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify Continue reading >>

Lactulose (generlac And Enulose) - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs

Lactulose (generlac And Enulose) - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs

Drugs A-Z provides drug information from Everyday Health and our partners, as well as ratings from our members, all in one place. Cerner Multum provides the data within some of the Basics, Side Effects, Interactions, and Dosage tabs. The information within the Reviews and FAQ tabs is proprietary to Everyday Health. You can browse Drugs A-Z for a specific prescription or over-the-counter drug or look up drugs based on your specific condition. This information is for educational purposes only, and not meant to provide medical advice, treatment, or diagnosis. Remember to always consult your physician or health care provider before starting, stopping, or altering a treatment or health care regimen. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by on this page is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. The information on this page has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore neither Everyday Health or its licensor warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Neither Everyday Health nor its licensors endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. The drug information above is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Neithe Continue reading >>

Constipation And Pregnancy

Constipation And Pregnancy

Unfortunately constipation can be a common problem during pregnancy and so how can you remedy this problem when you have gestational diabetes? Remedies to try that should not raise blood sugar levels Ensure you are drinking plenty Increase the amount of green leafy vegetables in your diet Add flaxseed into your diet - add it on top of Greek yoghurt One cup of hot water and lemon One cup of coffee in the mornings - filter coffee is great, but stay within your caffeine amounts for the day Raise your feet onto a stool when going to the toilet Laxatives - if natural remedies are not working then make an appointment with your GP to get a prescription for laxatives which are suitable for use during pregnancy. Commonly prescribed laxatives are Fybogel, Movicol and lastly Lactulose. Lactulose contains glucose but many mothers have used this with success and without it impacting their blood sugar levels Things to avoid - all these things will cause high blood sugar levels Prunes or prune juice Dried fruits; figs, apricots, dates, raisins e.t.c Fruit juices Weetabix, All bran e.t.c Molasses or sugared water Get Free Email Updates! Signup now and receive an email once I publish new content. I will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time. Continue reading >>

About Lactulose

About Lactulose

Lactulose is a laxative taken to treat constipation (difficulty pooing). It is also taken to help a severe liver disease called hepatic encephalopathy. Lactulose comes as a sweet syrup that you swallow. It's available on prescription and to buy from pharmacies. Do not give lactulose to children under 6 unless recommended by a doctor. Key facts Lactulose relieves constipation by drawing water into the bowel to make poo softer. The most common side effects are diarrhoea, bloating and wind. These are usually mild and short-lived. Lactulose takes at least 48 hours to work. If you find the taste of lactulose too sweet, you can dilute it with fruit juice or water. Lactulose is also called by the brand names Duphalac and Lactugal. Who can and can't take lactulose Lactulose can be taken by adults including pregnant and breastfeeding women. Lactulose can be taken by children aged 6 and older. Don't give lactulose to a child under 6 unless your doctor has said so. Lactulose isn't suitable for some people. To make sure lactulose is safe for you, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you: have ever had an allergic reaction to lactulose or any other medicine in the past have lactose intolerance (where your body can't digest the sugar, lactose) have galactosaemia (a rare health problem where the body cannot process a sugar called galactose) have diabetes (as lactulose may affect your blood sugar levels) How and when to take it Take lactulose once or twice a day. You can take it with or without food. How much to take The normal dose for constipation in: adults and children aged 14 and over is between 15mls and 45mls once or twice a day - this dose can be reduced to between 15mls and 30mls once or twice a day after it starts working children aged 7 to 14 is 15mls once or twice a day - this Continue reading >>

Insights Into Veterinary Endocrinology: Q & A: Will Lactulose Affect Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetic Cats?

Insights Into Veterinary Endocrinology: Q & A: Will Lactulose Affect Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetic Cats?

Q & A: Will Lactulose Affect Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetic Cats? My problem case is an 14-year old, male-neutered DLH cat that has been on a relatively high dose of lactulose (6 ml, bid) for chronic constipation for many years. One month ago, he developed weight loss, an increase in appetite, and polydipsia. We diagnosed diabetes mellitus (he had severe hyperglycemia with glucosuria) and started him on insulin glargine ( Lantus, Sanofi-Aventis ). The owner has kept the cat on Hill'sdry Science Diet, which the cat loves. So far, the cat's glargine insulin dose is up to 4 U twice a day (0.9 units/kg), but he is not yet showing any improvement. His last blood glucose was still high at 381mg/dl, with marked glucosuria but negative ketonuria. A serum fructosamine was high at 630 mol/L (normal <450 mol/L). A blood glucose curve demonstrated persistent hyperglycemia throughout the day. Would lactulose have any bearing on this high of blood glucose? Should I try stopping it to see if hyperglycemia improves on insulin therapy? Should I change his insulin to PZI ( ProZinc; Boehringer Ingelheim ) or another insulin analogue? Lactulose is a synthetic, nondigestible sugar developed as a treatment for chronic constipation. It is a disaccharide formed from one molecule each of the monosaccharides fructose and galactose (see Figure 1). Because it is not digested, lactulose passes unchanged to reach the colon, where it exerts its osmotic laxative effect.Therefore, the lactulose did not contribute to your cats diabetes since the "sugar" in lactulose is not absorbed. Similarly, the drug would not be an issue contributing to the lack of response to insulin therapy in this cat. Recommended Steps in this Cat's Management: 1. Rule out urinary tract infection and other concurrent problems To Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Constipation: What’s The Connection?

Diabetes And Constipation: What’s The Connection?

Constipation is a common complication in people with diabetes. Living with diabetes means paying careful attention to all systems of your body. Some complications of diabetes are easily avoided or managed with proper blood sugar control. Depending on the type of diabetes, medication may be required to manage blood sugars and to protect the heart, kidney, brain, and other organs affected by diabetes. When it comes to managing constipation, though, diet and lifestyle changes may not be enough. Here’s what to know about why is occurs more often in people with diabetes and what you can do about it. Constipation can be defined as having fewer than three regular bowel movements each week. It can also be defined as unsatisfactory bowel movements with stools that are infrequent and difficult to pass. It can be unpleasant and even painful. A recent study found that constipation is more common in people with diabetes. It’s estimated that around 60 percent of people with long-standing diabetes deal with constipation. Damage to the nervous system is a known long-term complication of diabetes. High blood sugar levels from type 1 and type 2 diabetes can lead to diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage. Damage to the nerves controlling the digestive tract can lead to constipation, diarrhea, and incontinence. Poor blood sugar control over a long period of time may increase the likelihood and frequency of constipation. In addition to lifestyle choices and neuropathy, people with diabetes sometimes take medications that can slow gut mobility and cause constipation. Talk to your doctor about the side effects of any medications you take. Read more: 6 natural constipation remedies » If you feel stopped up from time to time, you’re not alone. Recent research indicates that constipation is Continue reading >>

Lactulose (constulose, Enulose, Generlac, Cholac, Constilac)

Lactulose (constulose, Enulose, Generlac, Cholac, Constilac)

What is lactulose-oral, and how does it work (mechanism of action)? Lactulose is a man-made sugar that contains two naturally occurring sugars, galactose and fructose. It is not digested in the intestine like other sugars so that it reaches the colon where bacteria digest it and thereby alter the composition of the stool. Lactulose is used as a laxative to treat constipation. In the colon, lactulose is broken down by bacteria into products that help to draw water into the colon, which softens the stool. Additionally, lactulose is used to treat hepatic encephalopathy, a loss of brain function and change in mentation that occurs when the liver is unable to remove toxins from the blood. Bacteria in the colon digest lactulose into chemicals that bind ammonia that is believed to be the toxin that causes hepatic encephalopathy. The binding of ammonia prevents ammonia from moving from the colon into the blood and also draws ammonia from the blood and into the colon. The bound ammonia then is removed from the body in the stool. The FDA approved lactulose in March, 1976. What are the side effects of lactulose-oral? WARNING Diarrhea (loose stool) may occur if the dose of lactulose is too high. Problems associated with diarrhea are fluid and potassium loss in the diarrheal stool leading to dehydration and low blood levels of potassium (hypokalemia). An additional side effect is the elevation of blood levels of sodium (hypernatremia) as a result of the loss of fluid. Lactulose contains sugars (galactose and lactose) and should be used cautiously in people with diabetes; however, since lactulose is not digested, and little of the sugar is absorbed, the effects in people with diabetes usually are minimal. Continue reading >>

Lactulose (oral) | Michigan Medicine

Lactulose (oral) | Michigan Medicine

What is the most important information I should know about lactulose? You should not use this medication if you are on a special diet low in galactose (milk sugar). Before taking lactulose, tell your doctor if you have diabetes or if you need to have any type of intestinal test using a scope (such as a colonoscopy). It may take up to 48 hours before you have a bowel movement after taking lactulose. Stop using lactulose and call your doctor at once if you have severe or ongoing diarrhea. The liquid form of lactulose may become slightly darker in color, but this is a harmless effect. However, do not use the medicine if it becomes very dark, or if it gets thicker or thinner in texture. If you use lactulose over a long period of time, your doctor may want you to have occasional blood tests. Do not miss any scheduled appointments. Lactulose is a type of sugar. It is broken down in the large intestine into mild acids that draw water into the colon, which helps soften the stools. Lactulose is used to treat chronic constipation. Lactulose is sometimes used to treat or prevent certain conditions of the brain that are caused by liver failure, which can lead to confusion, problems with memory or thinking, behavior changes, tremors, feeling irritable, sleep problems, loss of coordination, and loss of consciousness. Lactulose may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking lactulose? You should not use this medication if you are on a special diet low in galactose (milk sugar). To make sure you can safely take lactulose, tell your doctor if you have other medical conditions, especially: if you need to have any type of intestinal test using a scope (such as a colonoscopy). FDA pregnancy category B. Thi Continue reading >>

Lactulose Oral Solution

Lactulose Oral Solution

It is used to treat hard stools ( constipation ). It may be given to you for other reasons. Talk with the doctor. What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Lactulose Oral Solution? If you have an allergy to lactulose or any other part of lactulose oral solution. If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives ; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs. If you are on a low-galactose or lactose-free diet. This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with lactulose oral solution. Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins ) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take lactulose oral solution with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor. What are some things I need to know or do while I take Lactulose Oral Solution? Tell all of your health care providers that you take lactulose oral solution. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists. Have your blood work checked if you are on lactulose oral solution for a long time. Talk with your doctor. If you have high blood sugar (diabetes), talk with the doctor. Some of these products have sugar. If you will be having a certain type of exam (proctoscopy or colonoscopy ), talk with your doctor. If you are 65 or older, use lactulose oral solution with care. You could have more side effects. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of using lactulose ora Continue reading >>

Effect Of Lactulose On Carbohydrate Metabolism And Diabetes Mellitus.

Effect Of Lactulose On Carbohydrate Metabolism And Diabetes Mellitus.

Effect of lactulose on carbohydrate metabolism and diabetes mellitus. Institute of Internal Medicine, University of Bologna, Italy. Unabsorbable disaccharides, by reducing transit time and possibly glucose absorption, are expected to affect carbohydrate metabolism. To test the effects of a preparation containing fibre and lactulose in the form of biscuits on glucose and insulin levels in obesity. In 10 obese patients glucose and insulin were measured in the fasting state and in response to a meal during two consecutive days on a strictly controlled diet; on one day a total of 11 biscuits (10 g dietary fibre, 2 g raw fibre +8.2 g lactulose) were randomly substituted for an equicaloric part of a diet. Glucose and insulin in response to breakfast and to lunch were blunted by dietary fibre and lactulose, without any trend towards post-meal hypoglycaemia. Average day-time glucose decreased by 0.53 +/- SD 0.28 mmol/L, and insulin by 74.6 +/- 45.2 pmol/L. Plasma amino acids were higher during supplementation, ruling out malabsorption as a cause of glucose flattening. Because of the rationale of the preparation, good compliance of patients, and significant results in short-term experiments, the association of fibre and lactulose deserves more careful evaluation in long-term clinical studies. Continue reading >>

Lactulose And Blood Sugar Levels - Don't Read If You're Eating!!

Lactulose And Blood Sugar Levels - Don't Read If You're Eating!!

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Lactulose and Blood Sugar Levels - Don't Read if You're Eating!! Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) Moderator I've been on a low carb diet since type 2 diagnosis three months ago. Over the past 18 years since removal of my gall bladder I have had a tendency to have loose stools, so (once over the extra diarrhoea provided by Metformin!) I had a happy side effect of low carbing, normal poo! However the last few weeks I have become more and more constipated. Initially I cut down my egg consumption but that didn't help much and I've tried to eat more salad and veg but I don't have a bottomless pit of a stomach like I used to and am struggling not to feel uncomfortably full. So last week I resorted to taking Lactulose having read that although it's a sugar it was not absorbed so wouldn't affect my blood sugars. My sugars had been running in the 5s with the occasional 6, on waking always in the 5s. Since starting starting Lactulose 10mls twice a day, it has solved my constipation but my sugars are now in the 6s with the occasional 5, on waking always in the 6s. Last night I just took 5 mls as a compromise and bingo my waking sugar was 5.3! Do you think this is just coincidence? Has any one else found that Lactulose does in fact raise their levels? Haven't tried lactulose myself but I found drinking plenty of fluids helped with the constipation. Are you drinking at least 2 litres a day? Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) Moderator Haven't tried lactulose myself but I found drinking plenty Continue reading >>

Lactulose - Wikipedia

Lactulose - Wikipedia

Lactulose is a non-absorbable sugar used in the treatment of constipation and hepatic encephalopathy . [3] [4] It is used by mouth for constipation and either by mouth or in the rectum for hepatic encephalopathy . [3] It generally begins working after eight to twelve hours but may take up to two days to improve constipation. [1] [2] Cholac, Generlac, Consulose, Duphalac, others InChI=1S/C12H22O11/c13-1-4-6(16)7(17)8(18)11(21-4)22-9-5(2-14)23-12(20,3-15)10(9)19/h4-11,13-20H,1-3H2/t4-,5-,6+,7+,8-,9-,10+,11+,12-/m1/s1 Common side effects include abdominal bloating and cramps. [3] There is the potential for electrolyte problems to occur as a result of diarrhea it produces. [3] No evidence of harm to the baby has been found when used during pregnancy . [3] It is generally regarded as safe during breastfeeding. [5] It is classified as an osmotic laxative . [6] Lactulose was first made in 1929 and has been used medically since the 1950s. [7] [8] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines , the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system . [9] It is available as a generic and brand-name product. [4] In various countries it could be purchased for about US$0.16 per 15ml of syrup (10g of lactulose) in 2015. [10] [11] In the United States the cost of this amount is about US$0.63. [12] Lactulose is made from the milk sugar lactose , which is composed of two simple sugars , galactose and glucose . [13] [3] Lactulose is used in the treatment of chronic constipation in patients of all ages as a long-term treatment. [14] Lactulose is used for chronic idiopathic constipation , i.e. chronic constipation occurring without any identifiable cause. Lactulose may be used to counter the constipating effects of opioids , and in the symptomatic treatment Continue reading >>

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