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Can I Take 2500 Mg Of Metformin A Day?

Metformin ? - March 2015 Babies | Forums | What To Expect

Metformin ? - March 2015 Babies | Forums | What To Expect

See active discussions on March 2015 Babies Is anyone on metformin because of pcos pregnancy? How much dose? What did your doctor say about whether to continue or stop midway? I am on 850 mg and have a history of high testosterone and DHT because of pcos. I want to continue it throughout my pregnancy. Is it safe? This is my second pregnancy on Metformin for PCOS. I took it my entire pregnancy last time & will this time. I take 2000mgs a day. Last time it was fine until the last 3 weeks when I needed to switch to glyburide do to increasing blood sugar. I've always been told it's safer to take it throughout pregnancy than it is not to. I actually conceived via fertility treatments and I have PCOS. My last pregnancy I was on 850mg until I hit 12 weeks and then my doctor told me to stop. This pregnancy I'm doing the same thing. So far everything is fine. Just ask your doctor and see what he thinks. I've read a lot of PCOS women stay on it. Talk to your doctor about it. With my first pregnancy, I was told to stop at 12w (was on 1500mg). And I weaned myself off until 14w when I stopped completely. Everything was fine after that. I did get gestational diabetes but I think I would've gotten that anyway. This time, my doctor didn't mention anything at my 12w appointment so I've continued taking it. I think she may have just overlooked it though *shrugs* I'm currently on 2000mg a day. I'm sure I'll be told to stop it at my next appointment though next week. My dr stops metformin at 12 weeks. I was on 2000 mg a day and dr said it was fine to stop, there was no need to wean off of it. Both my reproductive endocrinologist and ob/gyn agreed with stopping it at 12 weeks after I conceived through ivf My doctor wants me to continue taking 1500mg throughout my pregnancy which is fine by Continue reading >>

Whats The Most Metformin You Can Take?

Whats The Most Metformin You Can Take?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Been type 2 for about a year now. First a1c results were ove 11 and now down around 6.1. Last six months I was having morning fasting numbers between 100-125. However the last month my fasting numbers in the morning are averaging around 150.. There has been no major changes in my diet or excercise progam. I take metformin (1000) twice a day. Exercise regulary and am not overweight. Do you think it may be time to go with more metformin? I see my MD again next month. What is the highest amount of metformin you can take? I did a search, and on medicinenet.com as well as some others, the maximum dosage for metformin is 2550 mg/day, generally divided into 3 doses. I don't think i've ever typed any dication on anyone taking over 1000 mg twice a day (at least in the 3 years i've been on it...probably didn't pay attention before then). Have you experimented with taking your dinner dose at bedtime to see if it will help the a.m. numbers? I take my metformin around 10 pm....just not on an empty stomach. I take 3 mets a day breakfast lunch Dinner. for a total of 1500 I tried moving my dinner metformin to when i go to bed seemed to help me this morning. might have been a fluke I take 1000 met in the morning and 1500 with dinner in the evening I took 850MG 3 x day for a year before I switched to ER version. I was told ER version is only 750MG. I have taken 750mg 3 x day for over a year. I take 1000mg 3 times a day and have done so for about 15 years with no problems. Have you experimented with taking your dinner dose at bedtime to see if it will help the a.m. numbers? I take my metformin around 10 pm....j Continue reading >>

Metformin 2,500mg/day In The Treatment Of Obese Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome And Its Effect On Weight, Hormones, And Lipid Profile.

Metformin 2,500mg/day In The Treatment Of Obese Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome And Its Effect On Weight, Hormones, And Lipid Profile.

Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2010 Dec;282(6):691-4. doi: 10.1007/s00404-010-1579-x. Epub 2010 Jul 2. Metformin 2,500mg/day in the treatment of obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome and its effect on weight, hormones, and lipid profile. Infertility Ward, Dr. Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of metformin at the dosage of 2,500 mg/day in the treatment of obese women with PCOS and also to evaluate its effect on weight, hormones, and lipid profile. This study was a 4-month open-label clinical trial. Sixty-nine PCOS patients aged 20-35 were recruited in the study. Testosterone, free testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), fasting insulin, dehydroepiandrostenedione-sulphate (DHEAS), FBS, LDH, HDL, TG, total cholesterol, body mass index (BMI), and waist-to-hip ratio were measured before treatment and after 4 months of treatment. Significant reductions in serum insulin, BMI, waist/hip ratio, and LDL were observed. In addition, a significant increase in SHBG was obtained. Over the 4 months of the trial, 12 patients faced nausea, six patients had bloating, five patients had diarrhea and two had headache; none of these symptoms were severe except for two cases that dropped out due to severe vomiting. The results of this study show that 2,500 mg daily dose of metformin in obese patients with PCOS is effective in the reduction of BMI, waist hip/ratio, LDL, serum insulin and increases SHBG. In general this dose was relatively safe and well tolerated. Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin?

What Is Metformin?

Commonly Used Brand Name(s)Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet Therapeutic ClassificationsHypoglycemic QUICK LINKS Oral route (Tablet;Tablet, Extended Release;Solution) Death, hypothermia, hypotension, and resistant bradyarrhythmias have been reported due to metformin-associated lactic acidosis. Onset may be subtle and include nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, myalgia, respiratory distress, somnolence, and abdominal distress; laboratory abnormalities include low pH, increased anion gap and elevated blood lactate. The risk of lactic acidosis increases with renal or hepatic impairment, aged 65 years or older, having a radiological study with contrast, surgery, or other procedures, hypoxic states, and excessive alcohol intake. If lactic acidosis is suspected, metformin hydrochloride should be discontinued, supportive measures started in a hospital setting. Prompt hemodialysis is recommended . Save up to 85% on Metformin Find big savings at pharmacies near you with GoodRx discount coupons Average Retail Price: $27.12 Lowest GoodRx Price $4.00 View All Prices Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. With this type of diabetes, insulin produced by the pancreas is not able to get sugar into the cells of the body where it can work properly. Using metformin alone, with a type of oral antidiabetic medicine called a sulfonylurea, or with insulin, will help to lower blood sugar when it is too high and help restore the way you use food to make energy. Many people can control type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise. Following a specially planned diet and exercise will always be important when you have diabetes, even when you are taking medicines. To work properly, t Continue reading >>

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

As a type 2 diabetic, you've probably heard of Metformin, or you might even be taking it yourself. Metformin (brand name “Glucophage” aka “glucose-eater”) is the most commonly prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes worldwide…and for good reason. It is one of the safest, most effective, least costly medication available with minimal, if any, side effects. There are always lots of questions around Metformin – how does metformin lower blood sugar, does metformin promote weight loss or weight gain, will it give me side effects – and lots more. Today we'll hopefully answer some of those questions. How Metformin Works Metformin belongs to a class of medications known as “Biguanides,” which lower blood glucose by decreasing the amount of sugar put out by the liver. The liver normally produces glucose throughout the day in conjunction with the pancreas’ production of insulin to maintain stable blood sugar. In many people with diabetes, both mechanisms are altered in that the pancreas puts out less insulin while the liver is unable to shut down production of excess glucose. This means your body is putting out as much as 3 times as much sugar than that of nondiabetic individuals, resulting in high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. Metformin effectively shuts down this excess production resulting in less insulin required. As a result, less sugar is available for absorption by the muscles and conversion to fat. Additionally, a lower need for insulin slows the progression of insulin resistance and keeps cells sensitive to endogenous insulin (that made by the body). Since metformin doesn’t cause the body to generate more insulin, it does not cause hypoglycemia unless combined with a sulfonylurea or insulin injection. Metformin is one of the few oral diabe Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Help With Weight Loss? (the Answer Is Yes & Here’s Why)

Does Metformin Help With Weight Loss? (the Answer Is Yes & Here’s Why)

Metformin may be one of the cheapest and most underused weight loss medications out there. Metformin is traditionally reserved for those with diabetes or insulin resistance, but many studies show that it can be effective in overweight or obese patients without diabetes. The only problem? You wouldn't know about it unless you do the research yourself! Use this post to learn everything you need to know about using metformin (both if you have diabetes or if you are simply just overweight): Metformin & How it May Help With Weight Loss Does metformin help with weight loss? The answer is more complex than just a standard "yes" or "no", instead the correct answer is more of a "maybe". What do I mean? Well metformin is a medication that falls into the class of biguanides. The most popular of these medications is metformin (and the topic of our discussion today) which is being used by at least 120 million people worldwide. Classically, metformin is used to treat blood sugar issues, insulin resistance and type II diabetes. It was found a long time ago, that if used for these conditions, metformin does indeed help some patients lose weight. Studies have shown that patients who take metformin with insulin resistance do tend to lose weight - most studies showing a "modest" amount to the tune of around 5-10 pounds. Because these studies have been favorable to some patients (especially those with the conditions listed above), it's normal to ask if it also works for patients who don't have type II diabetes. In order to understand that, we need to understand how metformin works. As it relates to weight loss metformin has powerful actions in 2 main areas: In the mitochondria respiratory chain complex: Activating the mitochondrial pathway is a powerful way to increase energy production an Continue reading >>

Metformin Dosage

Metformin Dosage

Usual Adult Dose for Diabetes Type 2 Immediate-release: Initial dose: 500 mg orally twice a day or 850 mg orally once a day Dose titration: Increase in 500 mg weekly increments or 850 mg every 2 weeks as tolerated Maintenance dose: 2000 mg daily in divided doses Maximum dose: 2550 mg/day Extended-release: Initial dose: 500 to 1000 mg orally once a day Dose titration: Increase in 500 mg weekly increments as tolerated Maintenance dose: 2000 mg daily Maximum dose: 2500 mg daily Comments: -Metformin, if not contraindicated, is the preferred initial pharmacologic agent for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. -Immediate-release: Take in divided doses 2 to 3 times a day with meals; titrate slowly to minimize gastrointestinal side effects. In general, significant responses are not observed with doses less than 1500 mg/day. -Extended-release: Take with the evening meal; if glycemic control is not achieved with 2000 mg once a day, may consider 1000 mg of extended-release product twice a day; if glycemic control is still not achieve, may switch to immediate-release product. Use: To improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an adjunct to diet and exercise. Usual Pediatric Dose for Diabetes Type 2 10 years or older: Immediate-release: Initial dose: 500 mg orally twice a day Dose titration: Increase in 500 mg weekly increments as tolerated Maintenance dose: 2000 mg daily Maximum dose: 2000 mg daily Comments: Take in divided doses 2 to 3 times a day with meals. Titrate slowly to minimize gastrointestinal side effects. Safety and effectiveness of metformin extended-release has not been established in pediatric patients less than 18 years of age. Use: To improve glycemic control in children with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an adjunct to diet and exercise. Le Continue reading >>

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Did you know that one of the main reasons you can't lose weight with PCOS is because of your hormones? It's true, and that's why many women (and physicians) turn to using Metformin to try and help with weight loss. But just because it works for some people doesn't mean it will necessarily work for YOU. Find out why metformin helps with weight loss, but more important what works better and how to finally lose weight if you have PCOS. ​ Insulin & PCOS: Why It's so Important One of the most common medications prescribed for PCOS is metformin. But, PCOS is a hormonal condition which results in weight gain, hair growth on the face, infertility, acne and estrogen/progesterone imbalances. So why is metformin, a medication used to lower blood sugar and treat insulin resistance, used to treat estrogen/progesterone imbalances in women? The logic is quite simple: Most of the symptoms of PCOS (all those listed above) stem from insulin resistanc e! In fact many physicians recommend that ALL women with PCOS should be treated for insulin resistance regardless of what their fasting insulin and fasting blood sugar levels are. This means that the root cause of PCOS (at least the majority of it) is insulin resistance, and this is why metformin is so commonly used to treat. Insulin resistance causes a block of glucose uptake in your skeletal muscles which results in a lower metabolism (and weight gain), insulin also directly acts on your ovaries and adrenals increasing androgens like testosterone and DHEA. It's also the action of insulin on your pituitary that results in increased LH production which over stimulates your ovaries resulting in the characteristic "cysts" of PCOS. ​ High levels of DHEA and testosterone lead to acne and hair growth (hirsutism). ​ But one simple question r Continue reading >>

Characteristics Of Trials In The Meta-analysis.

Characteristics Of Trials In The Meta-analysis.

NumberPopulationInterventionComparisonRelevant outcomes 22313 singleton pregnancies in women aged 18–45 years with PCOS (Rotterdam criteria). Metformin (850 mg twice daily or 1000 mg twice daily), n = 153. Age 29.5 ± 4.4, BMI 29.8 ± 7160 PCOS. Age 29.1 ± 4.3, BMI 28.6 ± 7.3.Second-trimester miscarriage, preterm delivery, preeclampsia, and gestational diabetes. 25360 nondiabetic PCOS patients (Egypt) (Rotterdam criteria) included were taking metformin for 3–6 months before they became pregnant.200 pregnant women continued on metformin at a dose of 1000–2000 mg daily throughout pregnancy. Age 30.8 ± 2.2, BMI 30.1 ± 1.5.160 women discontinued metformin use at the time of conception. Age 31.5 ± 2.4, BMI 29.6 ± 1.6.Gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and caesarean section rate. 26274 pregnancies were randomly assigned to either metformin or placebo treatment. Criteria were (1) PCOS diagnosed according to the Rotterdam criteria, (2) age 18–45 yr, (3) gestational age between 5 and 12 wk, and (4) a singleton viable fetus shown on ultrasonography.The metformin (2000 mg daily) treatment in pregnant PCOS women (n = 135). Age 29.6 ± 4.4, BMI 29.5 ± 7.0.Placebo in pregnant PCOS women (n = 138). Age 29.2 ± 4.4, BMI 28.5 ± 7.2.Preeclampsia, preterm delivery, GDM weight, blood pressure, heart rate, and mode and length of delivery. 27197 infertile obese Pakistani women with PCOS (Rotterdam 2003 consensus)119 (cases) were taking metformin 500 mg three times a day and continued throughout pregnancy. 70 conceived while on metformin only. 49 needed additional medications. Age 29 ± 4.1, BMI 32 ± 4.6. In 78 cases, metformin was stopped in first trimester or they conceived without metformin. 21 conceived without medication, 13 conceived on metformin, and 44 required induc Continue reading >>

What Is Your Current Lantus Dosage?

What Is Your Current Lantus Dosage?

I am taking 11 units of Lantus at 10:00PM for daily bolus. I am a carb counter and take Novalog on a sliding scale for meals: at breakfast, one unit for every 3 grams of carb; at lunch one unit for every 6 grams of carb and at dinner one unit for every 10 grams of carb. I currently take 65 units in the am and 55 in the pm, down from 75 units twice a day. Just started Victoza and hopefully it will allow me to go lower on my Lantus. 24 units @ 8:00 pm. Sometimes I split the dose 12 hrs apart. Taking 2500 mg metformin also. Like many here I get hungry at night. Get two walks in daily,but need to include a bike ride. Different muscles and more cardio. Mornings are extremely light with some light Greek yogurt and maybe 1/2 piece of ww toast,peanut butter and sugarfree jelly. I took CoQ10 for quite awhile with no improvement. Im taking 5 unit at night. Just came back from my heart drs. They told me dont let it get over 150 BG . 26 units at night. Consistently under 120 in the morning. 2500mg Metformin in three increments throughout the day. Zero lows and I'm able to exercise the spikes off pretty quickly. Lantus has been a lifesaver to me. started at 10 units and after two months still at ten and the doctor is happy, I inject Lantus Solarstar at 9.30 in the morning and has bought my levels down from 14 - 16's to 6 - 7s which makes life a lot easier I am new to Lantus, switching from Levemir . I take 10 am-11pm. I am trying to lower my A1c from 7.3-6.8. Nancy I'm using 28 units @ 8:00 pm along with 2500 mg Metformin spread over a 12 hr. period. A1C is 7.1. After 13 yrs of T2 I am developing a cloudiness in my left eye and some minor abnormalities in my eye blood vessels. A1C has nearly always been under 7.0. Gotta work harder. Hello. I'm new to TuDiabetes & read your posting Continue reading >>

The Low Down On Metformin And Vitamin B12 Deficiency

The Low Down On Metformin And Vitamin B12 Deficiency

So many women with PCOS are prescribed Metformin (an insulin-sensitizing drug) to manage their Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. And for good reason too. Metformin has been shown to improve many aspects of PCOS, including weight loss, fertility and improved testosterone levels (1). But, it also leads to Vitamin B12 deficiency if used at high doses or for long periods of time. So, here’s what you need to know about Metformin and Vitamin B12 deficiency with PCOS. What is Metformin? As I have already mentioned, Metformin is an insulin sensitizing drug that is often prescribed for women withPCOS. It works by decreasing absorption of glucose through the intestines, lowering the amount of glucose produced by the liver and making the body more sensitive to the insulin that is being produced. The overall effect of Metformin use for PCOS is lowered testosterone levels, improved ovulation and fertility as well as a more regular menstrual cycle. This is all sounding good, right? Well, it is good although there are some nasty side effects. A full discussion on Metformin is not going to be dealt with now, though. I really want to hone in on Metformin’s effect of Vitamin B12 levels as this could be affecting you right now. A free 6 lesson course that has helped women with PCOS around the world learn how to see lasting changes in their PCOS symptoms. Ready to join? Vitamin B12 Vitamin B12 is a vitamin that is vital for the body’s functioning. It is important for red blood cell formation, neurological function and DNA formation. If you are deficient in this important vitamin, it could lead to anaemia and neurological problems. (including memory loss – something that I have seen cropping up more often in PCOS communities). (2) Metformin and Vitamin B12 Right, so this is where it gets Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Metformin Wonder Drug

Metformin Wonder Drug

A while back I wrote about why metformin is the number one treatment for Type 2 diabetes. Now new research finds metformin prevents cancer and heart disease and may actually slow aging! Where can I get this stuff? A study from Scotland found that people on metformin had only roughly half the cancer rate of people with diabetes who weren’t on the drug. This is important, because diabetes is associated with higher risks of liver, pancreas, endometrial, colon and rectum, breast, and bladder cancer. Nobody could explain how metformin helped, but then Canadian researchers showed that metformin reduces cell mutations and DNA damage. Since mutations and DNA damage promote both cancer and aging, this is striking news. No one thought we could limit mutations before, but perhaps metformin can do it. A study on mice exposed to cigarette smoke showed that those given metformin had 70% less tumor growth. A small study of humans in Japan showed similar improvements in colorectal cancer outcomes. Metformin is now being studied in clinical trials for breast cancer. The researchers write, “Women with early-stage breast cancer taking metformin for diabetes have higher response rates to [presurgical cancer therapies] than diabetic patients not taking metformin.” They also had better results than people without diabetes. How Does It Work? According to Michael Pollak, MD, professor in McGill’s Medicine and Oncology Departments, metformin is a powerful antioxidant. It slows DNA damage by reducing levels of “reactive oxygen species” (ROS). ROS are produced as byproducts when cells burn glucose. Just as oxygen helps fires burn or metals rust, ROS will oxidize (“burn” or “rust”) the nuclei or other parts of cells. ROS are what the antioxidant vitamins are supposed to block. Continue reading >>

Metformin Overview

Metformin Overview

Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides, which work by helping your body respond better to the insulin it makes naturally, decreasing the amount of sugar your liver makes, and decreasing the amount of sugar your intestines absorb. This medication comes in tablet, extended-release tablet, and liquid forms. It is taken up to 3 times daily, depending on which form you are taking. Swallow extended-release tablets whole. Common side effects of metformin include diarrhea, nausea, and upset stomach. Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Metformin may be found in some form under the following brand names: Serious side effects have been reported including: Lactic Acidosis. In rare cases, metformin can cause a serious side effect called lactic acidosis. This is caused by a buildup of lactic acid in your blood. This build-up can cause serious damage. Lactic acidosis caused by metformin is rare and has occurred mostly in people whose kidneys were not working normally. Lactic acidosis has been reported in about one in 33,000 patients taking metformin over the course of a year. Although rare, if lactic acidosis does occur, it can be fatal in up to half the people who develop it. It is also important for your liver to be working normally when you take metformin. Your liver helps remove lactic acid from your blood. Make sure you tell your doctor before you use metformin if you have kidney or liver problems. You should also stop using metformin and call your doctor right away if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treate Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

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