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Can I Live A Normal Life With Diabetes

How To Live Normal Life With Diabetes

How To Live Normal Life With Diabetes

Maintaining diabetes is quite a mundane job. From controlling eating habits to regular medication, the total treatment procedure of this disease becomes harassment for the patients. However, some patience and guidance can surely help the diabetic patient to cope up with this disease and live a normal life like all the other healthy folks. Yes, you can live a normal life with Diabetes. In the beginning, you may feel heartbroken because in some way or other this disease will take away your freedom and change your lifestyle, but with time you will realize it’s very easy to live with diabetes. All you need is some information and some encouragement. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com What are the steps you need to follow to live a normal life with Diabetes? 1. Gather information about Diabetes Collecting information and learning more about your disease will help you cope up with the fear you have regarding it. Most of the patients remain stressed out since they don’t have any clue about handling their disease, especially in the times of emergency. Therefore, learning all about the disease will help you in several ways. Moreover, in this age of internet, learning about new things isn’t much hard work. You may easily sit in front of your computer and know all about diabetes within hours. Plus, it’s proven that one can learn more from internet than months of schooling! Or if you aren’t much computer friendly, then you may contact a ‘diabetes educator’ who will explain you all the things you need to know, briefly! What are the main things you need to know about diabetes? The first and foremost thing you need to know is what type of diabetes have you de Continue reading >>

Living Longer With Diabetes

Living Longer With Diabetes

Diabetes tends to shorten your expected life. The good news is that you can do a lot to get those years back, and most of those things feel good. Studies disagree on exactly how much damage diabetes does. A Princeton University study of about 20,000 adults found that diabetes cuts about 8.5 years off the life expectancy of an average 50 year old, compared to a 50 year old without diabetes. Most of this early death comes from complications such as heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure. People with diabetes are also less likely to be employed and more likely to be depressed and disabled, all of which can make life harder and potentially shorter, researchers found. However, a recent Dutch study published in the online journal PLOS One found much more encouraging results. People with Type 2 and an average age of 66 seem to have the same death rate as those without diabetes. Various factors influence death rates. According to the British site Diabetes.co.uk, “How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of complications, and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy.” What to do Most complications of diabetes come from high blood sugars and high blood pressure. Too much sugar damages blood vessels and nerves. Almost any organ can fail given poor circulation caused by diabetes. According to mainstream medicine, the best way to lengthen life with Type 2 is to keep sugars down. In a typical recommendation, Diabetes.co.uk writes, “Keeping blood sugar levels within the recommended ranges will [reduce] the likelihood of complications and increase life expectancy…Enjoy a healthy lifestyle, with a well balanced diet, and regular activity.” If that doesn’t work, take medications, they say. With about ten categories of pr Continue reading >>

Is It Possible For A Diabetic Patient To Live Normal And Long Term Life? - Quora

Is It Possible For A Diabetic Patient To Live Normal And Long Term Life? - Quora

Is it possible for a diabetic patient to live normal and long term life? Earn your informatics graduate degree online from UTHealth SBMI. Graduate courses available in health data science, machine learning, precision medicine, & informatics. He just need to keep his blood sugar levels under control. ( HbA1c <7). According to DCCT & UKPDS trials it has been proved that good sugar control (HbA1c <7) in first 5 years of diabetes diagnosis limits majority of long term diabetes complications like retinopathy, nephropathy etc. It is called as legacy effect or metabolic memory. For best sugar control good diet, regular exercise and timely medication is very important. This answer is not a substitute for professional medical advic... Read More Loading This answer is not a substitute for professional medical advice. This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Quora users who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Quora's Terms of Service ( ). Diabetes is a metabolic condition in which the amount of insulin produced by the body is insufficient to meet the requirements of the body ,resulting in an imbalance.If a person is able to balance this deficiency of insulin created in the body by taking insulin from outside, drugs and diet modification,one can definitely lead a normal and long term life. Since diabetes type 2 is mainly due to lifestyle changes creating a burden on the pancreas to produce more and more insulin,which finally exhausts resulting in deficiency Continue reading >>

How Do Others Live With Diabetes?

How Do Others Live With Diabetes?

Living with any chronic disease can make you feel like you are living alone with it. It can be quite isolating to feel this way. Recurring thoughts like Nobody understands me, I am going through this alone!, My symptoms are worse than everyone elses! are very common amongst those populations. Diabetes, as we are all aware of, is not only draining on physical energies but also emotional energies. People who have diabetes are constantly working hard to keep their blood sugar levels on point, so that they do not experience low or high blood levels. They tend to get so consumed with the same daily routine that they forget that there are others who have the same routine as them. I would like to invite you to stop for a few minutes and read to see how others are living with their diabetes. If you constantly feel like you are alone in this journey, it is important to remind yourself that you are not. The National Diabetes Statistics Report (2017) estimated the following numbers: 3 million people have diabetes in the US (that is 9.4% of the entire population!) 1 million out of the 30.3 have been diagnosed with diabetes The remaining 7.2 million people are still undiagnosed! If you sit with those numbers long enough, you will realize that there are millions of people around you who are doing the same thing as you on a daily basis: keeping their blood sugar levels on target, prepping meals appropriate to their diet, ensuring all the while that they get enough physical activity. In this article, we will share stories from two such people who are not only living with diabetes, but they are kicking diabetes ass. They are an inspiration to all of us because they have not only come into terms with and have accepted their diabetes but are also encouraging others to do the same by thei Continue reading >>

Living With Type 1 Diabetes | Prevention

Living With Type 1 Diabetes | Prevention

You probably know someone with type 1 diabetes (there are 1.25 million American children and adults living with the autoimmune disease), but do you really know what they're going through each day? Here's a brief glimpse: They're constantly checking their glucose numbers, watching what they eat, and worrying about how stress and other factors will influence their blood sugar . To learn more about what it's like to manage the condition day in and day out, read on. (Take back control of your eatingand lose weight in the processwith our 21-Day Challenge !) You worry about every little thing you eat. Always. "You cannot be a diabetic without thinking about food and how it will affect you ," says Taylor, 25, from Salem, OR. "Each item of food that I put into my mouth has so much more to it than the taste. When you eat, you have questions running through your mind such as, 'How many carbs does this have?', 'Did I take enough insulin for this?', 'What if I am full but took too much insulin, do I still have to finish it?' Those are just some of the questions, and that is for every single item I eat." It used to be that people with type 1 diabetes had to check their blood glucose values at least three or four times a day. However, according to Gregory Dodell, MD, a board-certified endocrinologist at Central Park Endocrinology New York, keeping up can be lower maintenance, thanks to new technology called a continuous glucose monitor (CGM)which is a sensor that checks glucose values consistently throughout the day and is viewed via a separate device, including an iPhone app. You constantly have to explain to people the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes . "It is hard having a disease you feel you have to defend. Many people think I brought this on myself with a poor die Continue reading >>

Can Dogs Live A Normal Life With Diabetes?

Can Dogs Live A Normal Life With Diabetes?

Can Dogs Live a Normal Life with Diabetes? Can Dogs Live a Normal Life with Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that is found in both humans and dogs.The disease is very similar across both species. This chronic disease alsoaffects other animals as well, but it cant be cured in any species. Fortunately, dogs withdiabetes can live a normal life with the help of diet, exercise, and insulin. If your dog is diagnosed with diabetes, it is important thatyou work closely with your veterinarian to determine an appropriate course oftreatment that will keep your dog healthy and happy for the rest of theirlives. Following this course of treatment will give your dog a mostly normallife. Signs Dogs Can Live a Normal Life with Diabetes Most dogs can live a completely normal life despite beingdiagnosed with diabetes. With an appropriate diet and exercise regimen, as wellas daily insulin injections, dogs with diabetes can be both happy and healthy. Dogs with diabetes will often want to eat constantly anddrink excessively before treatment is started. After treatment, your dogs symptomsshould start to fade away. Once insulin injections, diet changes, and anexercise schedule are implemented, dogs with diabetes will be perfectlyhealthy. Unfortunately, these dogs do need extra care to stay this way. Insulin injections are needed every day, so owners of dogswith diabetes will need to learn how to give their dogs the injections.Typically, dogs with diabetes need to be fed the same food in the same amountat the same time every day, as well as the insulin injections. Other than that,your dogs life will be completely normal. Remember that if you go on vacation, you will need to leaveyour dog at a place that can follow their regular schedule. Dogs need the insulinto live, but that doesnt mean that t Continue reading >>

You Can Live A Normal Happy Life With Diabetes

You Can Live A Normal Happy Life With Diabetes

18-year-old Sophie looks back on life with Type 1 and her diagnosis when she was aged four. Hear about how she copes with diabetes as a teenager and why she thinks diabetes isn't all bad. My name is Sophie, I'm 18 years old. I go to college and study Art and Design. On 7th August 2001, I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of four. As I was quite young when it happened, I can't really remember being diagnosed or in the hospital, but one thing I do remember is constantly feeling thirsty and needing the toilet. A few weeks before I was diagnosed I was really thin and ill-looking. I was always running to the toilet and looking for a drink. I had a few ‘accidents’ when I was out playing with friends or during the night. My mum thought I was just drinking too much late at night, so after six o’clock I wasn't allowed any juice or water. But that didn't work, I was so thirsty I found a little toy cup and filled it up with tap water in the bathroom. When my mum found me doing this, she realised there might be something wrong. Sophie, left, with her younger sister Lucy."The way I look at is that doing injections isn't the best thing in the world, but there are much worst illnesses and diseases than diabetes." March of that year, my little sister Lucy was born.As a new baby in the house my mum and dad thought it was attention I was looking, until one night we were over at a family friends house and I was constantly asking for a drink and then two seconds asking for another one. Linda who happened to be a nurse was wiping the toilet seat after I had been. She told my mum that it was sticky and she thinks it could be diabetes and she should take me to the doctors. Being a young child I hated going to the doctors. So monday morning came and my mum took me to the doct Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: Ending Myths And Getting Started On Your Best Life Yet

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: Ending Myths And Getting Started On Your Best Life Yet

For far too long, diabetes has been associated with shorter-than-average life spans and a lower quality of life for those people with the condition. But as it turns out, when diabetes is managed well, this is often not the case. With the proper tools, attitude, and support system, anyone with diabetes can change the course of their health. Why Having Diabetes Doesn’t Necessarily Mean You’ll Die Sooner It’s true that, when you consider heart-related cardiovascular complications, men and women with diabetes tend to have higher rates of early death than their peers without the disease, according to research. But it’s also true that no two people with diabetes are the same, and how a person manages his or her blood sugar is key when considering how the disease might affect your life span. “Having diabetes won’t necessarily change someone's life expectancy — it's how diabetes progresses. For every individual, diabetes is going to progress differently,” says Joanne Rinker, RD, CDE, director of practice and content development at the American Association of Diabetes Educators. “If it progresses at an extremely slow rate, because diabetes is so individualized, it might be so slow that it does not impact their life expectancy whatsoever.” Instead of thinking only about how diabetes will impact your life span, experts suggest that people with the condition should take a broader look at their overall health. “Diabetes is not a singular disease that one should focus on. Focus on how you can improve the different risk factors that can impact the functioning of the heart and other organs,” says Medha Munshi, MD, director of geriatric diabetes programs at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. “It's important to think, ‘What are the factors that would impact Continue reading >>

My Life As A Spouse To A Person With Type 1 Diabetes

My Life As A Spouse To A Person With Type 1 Diabetes

My Life as a Spouse to a Person with Type 1 Diabetes Written by Mitchell Jacobs on January 23, 2017 Through my life, a lot of my memories have been unremarkable. I had a very normal childhood in a middle-class family. My life was never truly crazy until I met Brittany, a type 1 diabetic. Now I know that crazy sounds harsh, but thats what this disease is. It fights you tooth and nail, trying to break your spirit. You think you have it all under control, and within 5 minutes youre attempting to nurse someone back to consciousness. I guess I never imagined as a little kid, riding my bike throughout my neighborhood, that the woman I would fall in love with would have such a battle at hand. We met in 2009, when the only idea of diabetes I had was what Id seen on television. That with diet and exercise you stop taking insulin for diabetes. So meeting Brittany, I didnt think that this was such a bad disease. We dated for about four months, and then we moved in together. Thats when the reality of type 1 diabetes kicked me in the face. Diabetes changed my life. And it added so many complications for both of us that the two years we spent living together uninsured and kind of thrown from the nest are the most vivid memories of my life. Her disease is manageable, I can remember the endocrinologist telling us. With proper management and supplies, you can have a normal life. Really, the only issue they dont tell you is that manageable life has a large price tag. So thats where my life really became difficult. Not only did we need to make sure there was food on the table and the rent was paid, but we also now had to make sure we had enough insulin and testing supplies for the month. So needless to say, our two minimum wage jobs werent cutting it. I owned a pickup truck at the time, Continue reading >>

Long Live Living Long

Long Live Living Long

Diabetes Forecast is celebrating its 60th birthday by talking to people who have had diabetes for 60 years—or longer. Here are their stories. Continue reading >>

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

Diabetes is recognized as one of the leading causes of disability and death worldwide. There was a time when Type 2 diabetes was common in people in their late forties and fifties. However, thanks to the easy availability of processed foods, sedentary lifestyles, poor sleep and a host of other unfavorable factors, type 2 diabetes affects millions of young adults throughout the globe today. A report was commissioned in 2010 by the National Academy on an Aging Society. It showed that diabetes cut off an average of 8.5 years from the lifespan of a regular, diabetic 50-year-old as compared to a 50-year-old without the disease. This data was provided by the Health and Retirement Study, a survey of more than 20,000 Americans over the age of 50, done every two years by the University of Michigan. Characterized by high blood glucose levels, T2D can be the result of a combination of genes, obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle. If left untreated, diabetes can be life-threatening. Complications of this disease can take a serious toll on a patient’s health and well-being. So, how long do diabetics live, you ask? Does having diabetes shorten one’s life? Let’s address these questions, one by one. MORE: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) How Long Do Diabetics Live? Diabetes is a system-wide disorder which is categorized by elevated blood glucose levels. This blood travels throughout the human body and when it is laden with sugar, it damages multiple systems. When the condition is left unchecked or is managed poorly, the lifespan of diabetic patients is reduced due to constant damage. Early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes for preventing its long-term complications is the best coping strategy. So, don’t ignore your doctor’s advice if you’re pre-diabeti Continue reading >>

How We Live A Normal Life With Diabetes

How We Live A Normal Life With Diabetes

Just let the diagnosis be part of the fabric of your lives, not the focus. – Themighty.com At first, I thought it was just another one of those futile memes being shared – another quote meant to inspire that actually does nothing but remind you that you’re wasting time on Facebook. But this one – for a change – struck me. It spoke to me so much I even shared it with a one-syllable retort: “How?” How does one actually pull that off when you have a disease that requires constant monitoring and care? With diabetes, it’s easy for the diagnosis to become all you are. And yet, as my daughter, family, and I lap our way into our 18th year with Type 1 diabetes in our lives (Lauren was diagnosed in the fall of 1997, a tiny little kindergartener), I feel like we’ve somehow managed, for the most part, to figure out that “how.” Some of our success came from our amazing medical teams over the years, some came from other families I met, and some came from what just seemed to make sense. Most of it, though, came from my determination (which was quite honestly fueled by my daughter’s determination) NOT to let diabetes win all the time. Could we stabilize blood sugars for good? Nope. Could we remove the need for constant oversight and intervention? No again. But what we could do was embrace a rich, exciting and somewhat “normal” life, one where diabetes doesn’t always have the final say. My first goal in adjusting to life as the parent of a child with diabetes was to always put diabetes second and life’s moments first. We always have been—and always will be – an active family. We travel. We ski,swim, and play in long, hot tennis tournaments. Our kids played out in our yard with other kids for hours. They climbed trees and rode bikes. And I did not want Continue reading >>

How To Live A Healthy Life As A Diabetic

How To Live A Healthy Life As A Diabetic

Edit Article If you have diabetes, you'll be looking into improving and maintaining your health for the long run. You control your diabetes successfully, by eating well, exercising and keeping informed about developments for better treatment. Your quality of life is also about finding ways to be happy, share with others and have fun in your life. While you've got a condition which will affect you medically, it is possible to start each day afresh and take control of your health rather than let it dictate your routine. 1 Make an appointment to discuss your overall health with your trusted health team. This is important, both so that you understand what will help you and you don't feel alone dealing with this disease. In particular: Always seek medical advice for any questions or concerns you may have. Do not let small things go unnoticed––even little changes can mean something significant and the sooner you bring it to the attention of your doctor, the better. If you have not been following your recommended diet, or taking your medications as directed, you need to see your doctor. 2 Follow your recommended diet with care. Your doctor or dietitian should have given you a diet to follow; diet is key to maintaining wellness when you have diabetes. Every diabetic individual has differing needs, so it's likely that your doctor has tailored the diet suggestion to your specific needs. If you haven't been given a recommended diet, ask for one. Ask questions about what special needs you have and where you can source healthful options from if they're hard to obtain in your area. Remember to drink carefully too––many commercial and homemade drinks contain sugar and other additions that may spoil a carefully followed diet if not accounted for. A food diary can be helpful if Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

My Life With Diabetes: 69 Years And Counting

My Life With Diabetes: 69 Years And Counting

I do not know of many diabetics who developed the illness around the time I did, in 1946, who are still alive. I know of none who do not suffer from active complications. The reality is, had I not taken charge of my diabetes, it’s very unlikely that I’d be alive and active today. Many myths surround diet and diabetes, and much of what is still considered by the average physician to be sensible nutritional advice for diabetics can, over the long run, be fatal. I know, because conventional “wisdom” about diabetes almost killed me. I developed diabetes in 1946 at the age of twelve, and for more than two decades I was an “ordinary” diabetic, dutifully following doctor’s orders and leading the most normal life I could, given the limitations of my disease. Over the years, the complications from my diabetes became worse and worse, and like many diabetics in similar circumstances, I faced a very early death. I was still alive, but the quality of my life wasn’t particularly good. I have what is known as type 1, or insulin-dependent, diabetes, which usually begins in childhood (it’s also called juvenileonset diabetes). Type 1 diabetics must take daily insulin injections just to stay alive. Back in the 1940s, which were very much still the “dark ages” of diabetes treatment, I had to sterilize my needles and glass syringes by boiling them every day, and sharpen my needles with an abrasive stone. I used a test tube and an alcohol lamp (flame) to test my urine for sugar. Many of the tools the diabetic can take for granted today were scarcely dreamed of back then — there was no such thing as a rapid, finger-stick blood sugar–measuring device, nor disposable insulin syringes. Still, even today, parents of type 1 diabetics have to live with the same fear my par Continue reading >>

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