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Can I Get Tested For Diabetes At Urgent Care?

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

My uncle, like all his family, was a bit of a cheapskate. He hated to spend money unless it was absolutely necessary. He was thin and active, having only recently given up a career as a singer and dancer performing weekly on a nationally televised variety show. So when he felt unwell one weekend night, he turned down his wife's suggestion that she drive him to the emergency room and told her he'd wait til Monday when he could see his family doctor. Why waste all that money on an ER visit that was probably unnecessary? As it turned out, he didn't need to see his doctor on Monday. He died that night. He was a few years younger than I am now and the fatal heart attack he experienced was the first symptom he had of our family's odd form of inherited diabetes. But this is why, even though I've inherited the family "cheap" gene, if there's any possibility something dangerous is going on, I head for the ER. Usually it is a waste of money. I was in a small car accident a few weeks ago that left me with nerve pain running up and down my arms and legs. I sat for four hours at our local ER, saw the doctor for five minutes, and was sent home. The diagnosis, whiplash. The treatment, wait and see if it gets worse. The bill? Over $900. I went to the ER because I'd called my family doctor's office and they told me to. Whiplash usually resolves on its own, but occasionally it can cause swelling in your neck that can kill you. I'm not equipped to judge what kind I had, and unlike my uncle, I wasn't about to gamble. So with this in mind, you can understand my reaction when a stranger contacted me recently, after reading my web page, and told me that his blood sugar, which had been normal until very recently, was testing in the 500s on his meter except when his meter wasn't able to give hi Continue reading >>

Er, Clinic Or Urgent Care – Which One Is Best?

Er, Clinic Or Urgent Care – Which One Is Best?

Recently, on a four-day weekend, we were lucky enough to head down to the Florida Keys for a little rest and relaxation. After arriving late at night we planned our next day’s events which included plenty of water activities and sunshine. Unfortunately, I woke up with left-sided facial swelling accompanied by severe pain and numbness. I often over analyze a medical situation since I am a registered nurse and many times I fear the worst; I also know facial numbness is a possible symptom of a stroke so I chose the emergency room for a proper diagnosis. For one thing, there were no urgent care or walk-in clinics on this particular key so that was really my only choice. Luckily it was only a parotid stone [a stone usually made of excess minerals in the salivary gland] which “just kind of happens to people like forming a kidney stone”. The treatment was fairly simple. Drink copious amounts of water, suck on sugar-free lemon drops and apply ice packs until it resolves. The physician also considered antibiotics since it could have also been a tooth abscess. I decided to hold onto the antibiotics until I visited my dentist who also felt it was a parotid stone. After 24 hours my face was back to normal so I guess I did pass the stone but I do wish I at least had the opportunity to visit an urgent care center. Between the wait time I experienced and the final whopping bill, I understand why there are so many urgent care centers popping up! Having diabetes, especially if uncontrolled, may present some unexpected medical issues directly related to diabetes or a completely unrelated medical problem. When diabetes is uncontrolled white blood cells do not function as they should which sets you up for a higher rate of infections. It could be a critical decision deciding where to Continue reading >>

Screening For Diabetes In An Outpatient Clinic Population

Screening For Diabetes In An Outpatient Clinic Population

Go to: Opportunistic disease screening is the routine, asymptomatic disease screening of patients at the time of a physician encounter for other reasons. While the prevalence of unrecognized diabetes in community populations is well known, the prevalence in clinical populations is unknown. To describe the prevalence, predictors, and clinical severity of unrecognized diabetes among outpatients at a major medical center. We screened patients for diabetes by using an initial random Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement, and then obtaining follow-up fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for all subjects with HbA1c ≥6.0%. A case of unrecognized diabetes was defined as either HbA1c ≥7.0% or FPG ≥7 mmol/L (126 mg/dL). Height and weight were obtained for all subjects. We also obtained resting blood pressure, fasting lipids, and urine protein in subjects with HbA1c ≥6.0%. RESULTS The prevalence of unrecognized diabetes was 4.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.4 to 5.7). Factors associated with unrecognized diabetes were the diagnosis of hypertension (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.5; P = .004), weight >120% of ideal (adjusted OR, 2.2; P = .02), and history of a parent or sibling with diabetes (adjusted OR, 1.7; P = .06). Having a primary care provider did not raise or lower the risk for unrecognized diabetes (P = .73). Based on the new diagnosis, most patients (61%) found to have diabetes required a change in treatment either of their blood sugar or comorbid hypertension or hyperlipidemia in order to achieve targets recommended in published treatment guidelines. Patients reporting a primary care provider were no less likely to require a change in treatment (P = .20). If diabetes screening is an effective intervention, opportunistic screening for diabetes may be the preferred method fo Continue reading >>

June- Men’s Health Month

June- Men’s Health Month

ZipPass® is a service of JUNE IS MEN’S HEALTH MONTH Suggested Checkups and Tests for Men This checklist is meant only as a general guideline. The tests and screenings you need depend on your individual risks, medical and genetic histories, and age. Talk with your doctor to know what you need to do to keep up your health. Your doctor can also tell you how often you should have these tests and screenings. Many doctors follow the guidelines put forth by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). The USPSTF is the nation’s leading source of recommendations and guidelines for screening tests. Doctors also follow other recommendations, like those made by the American Cancer Society or other professional organizations. Regular checkups. Regular checkups are a good way to keep track of your health. Your doctor can take your blood pressure, listen to your heart, weigh you and take other assessments. Sometimes, conditions that do not have noticeable symptoms, like high blood pressure, are found at a routine checkup. This is also a good time to get advice from your doctor about your diet, exercise and other steps to take. There is no consensus as to when or how often a man should go for a routine physical. Talk to your doctor about suggestions for what is right for you. Testicular exams. The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends a testicular exam as part of a routine cancer related office visit. But checking yourself for testicular cancer (testicular self-exams) has not been shown to help men live longer. The ACS does not recommend testicular self-exams for all men. They do advise men who have cancer risk factors to consider a monthly testicular self-exam and to discuss this with their doctors. The USPSTF does not advise screening teens or adult men for testicular c Continue reading >>

Sahara West Urgent Care & Wellness

Sahara West Urgent Care & Wellness

Insulin is a hormone that the body needs to break down sugars and starches from foods and turn them into energy to help you function throughout the day. Diabetes mellitus is a disease in which the body doesn’t properly use or make insulin, therefore causing blood sugar levels to be high. High blood sugar levels in turn can cause extensive damage to many important organ systems in the body. We know that certain factors like genetics, obesity, and lack of exercise play a key role in the development of the disease. It is estimated that 7.8 % of the American population (23.6 million people) are diabetic. There are different types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is the primary type of diabetes in children and young adults. This type of diabetes is caused by a disorder of the body’s pancreas gland that affects its ability to make insulin. Type 1 diabetes must be closely managed by a health care professional through insulin replacement. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 5-10 % of all cases of this disease. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes and is mostly found in adults. Type 2 diabetes is related to insulin resistance that causes a relative insulin deficiency. Insulin resistance is a condition that results from the body’s failure to appropriately use the insulin that it makes and is closely related to being overweight. Most Americans diagnosed with the disease have Type 2 diabetes (95 %). Some important risk factors for the development of Type 2 diabetes include: Being overweight Leading a sedentary lifestyle Being over 30 years of age Being African American, Hispanic, or American Indian Giving birth to a baby that weighs over 9 pounds Having a family member who has diabetes Having blood pressure readings 130/90 or higher Having high cholesterol There is also a Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms And Information

High Blood Sugar Symptoms And Information

What is high blood sugar? High blood sugar means that the level of sugar in your blood is higher than normal. It is the main problem caused by diabetes. The medical term for high blood sugar is hyperglycemia. Blood sugar is also called glucose. How does it occur? Blood sugar that stays high is the main problem of diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes, high blood sugar happens because your body is not making insulin. Insulin moves sugar from the blood into your cells. It is normally made by the pancreas. If you have type 2 diabetes, high blood sugar usually happens because the cells have become unable to use the insulin your body is making. In both cases high levels of sugar build up in the blood. Sometimes people with diabetes can have high blood sugar even if they are taking diabetes medicine. This can happen for many reasons but it always means that your diabetes is not in good control. Some reasons why your sugar might go too high are: skipping your diabetes medicine or not taking the right amount of medicine if you are using insulin: a problem with your insulin (for example, the wrong type or damage to the insulin because it has not been stored properly) if you are using an insulin pump: a problem with the pump (for example, the pump is turned off or the catheter has come out) taking medicines that make your blood sugar medicines work less well (steroids, hormones or water pills) eating or drinking too much (that is, taking in too many calories) not getting enough physical activity emotional or physical stress illness, including colds and flu, especially if there is fever infections, such as an abscessed tooth or urinary tract infection Even if you don’t have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar for a brief time after you eat a food very high in sugar. For exam Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children: A Guide To Symptoms, Tests And Treatment

Diabetes In Children: A Guide To Symptoms, Tests And Treatment

How do you know if your child has diabetes? Experts offer a guide to symptoms, tests and treatment. Knowing the early signs and symptoms of diabetes not only helps you get the treatment your child needs, but it could save a life. There are two separate types of diabetes. Diabetes in children has increased in recent years and now affects more than 200,000 children in the United States. From 2000 to 2009, Type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents increased by 21 percent and Type 2 increased by 30 percent, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Read on to learn about the two types of diabetes and the differences between them. Definition and Symptoms Type 1 Diabetes Occurs when the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin, which is the hormone responsible for utilizing glucose in the body. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that generally develops during childhood. The cause remains unknown, although it may be linked to genetics and the environment, such as exposure to viruses. Type 2 Diabetes Develops at a slower pace at any age. Causes include weight gain and genetics, but generally diagnosis happens above age 10. Type 2 occurs when the body develops insulin resistance and the insulin produced no longer controls blood glucose levels. Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes have many overlapping symptoms. According to Dr. Tamar S. Hannon, who specializes in pediatric endocrinology at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, the two universal symptoms of diabetes are: Increased urination (polyuria). Increased thirst (polydipsia). "These symptoms always warrant screening for diabetes," says Dr. Hannon. Other symptoms include blurred vision, flu-like symptoms, fatigue and slow-healing cuts or bruises. If your child also loses weight and compl Continue reading >>

Diabetes Screen Blood Test, Loveland Urgent Care

Diabetes Screen Blood Test, Loveland Urgent Care

There is a blood test used to screen and diagnose diabetes and pre-diabetes. This test is called hemoglobin A1c. It gives your physician a good idea of the average amount of glucose in the blood over a few months. This information can help determine the treatment of diabetes and whether or not you have diabetes. If you feel your blood sugar level does not stay constant this would be a good test for you. Your physician can order this test and go over the test results with you. Also, remember your family physician is also a good resource for your non-life threatening urgent care needs. Continue reading >>

Original Research: Early Diabetes Screening In The Urgent Care, Part 1

Original Research: Early Diabetes Screening In The Urgent Care, Part 1

Urgent message: Undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus affects more than 9 million Americans. This first part of a two-part article focuses on evaluation of diabetes screening for the adult urgent care patient in whom diabetes has not been diagnosed, using effective early disease-detection strategies to reduce the long-term burden of diabetes. How this article helps you: by providing data to assist you in deciding about screening in your center. Introduction There are now more than 9000 urgent care centers across the United States, and they serve as the main entry point for the medical care of a large percentage of the population.1 Lack of access to primary-care services, medical workforce shortages, lack of health insurance, and lack of time for many Americans have steadily increased the use of urgent care centers for nonurgent problems.2 Historically, urgent care centers focused on providing episodic care for acute illness and injury. In response to recent health-care capacity strain, many urgent care centers have adjusted clinical procedures to provide both acute and chronic care. Chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes mellitus are occurring in epidemic proportions, creating a demand for urgent care practitioners to diagnose and manage more complex illnesses. With urgent care centers providing a significant portion of primary-care services, communication between the urgent care provider and the primary-care provider (PCP) is essential. Yet the literature demonstrates consistently impaired communication between urgent care providers and PCPs. [Editor’s note: See “‘Why Are You Calling Me?’ The Problem with Patient Transfers in Urgent Care,” at and ‘Why Are You Calling Me?’ How to Fix Relationships with Emergency Departments,” at Urgent care centers must ex Continue reading >>

Tests And Screenings

Tests And Screenings

If you have diabetes, you face a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, and other complications such as eye, kidney, and nerve disease. Regular screenings and tests can help you and your doctor develop the best treatment plan for your health. Be an active partner in your care Ask your doctor how often you should schedule your visits, and go to all of your appointments. You may also work with specialists, nurses, nutritionists, a diabetes educator, or a care manager. Control your blood sugar. This is the most important way to manage your diabetes. Get tips on testing your blood sugar from a diabetes educator. If you have hypertension, measure your blood pressure at home, and take steps to control it. Keeping your blood pressure in the range you and your doctor have discussed will help reduce your risk for heart attack, stroke, and premature death. You will also need to have your blood pressure and blood lipid levels (including cholesterol) checked as recommended by your doctor. Get your blood tested for hemoglobin A1c (also called A1c, HbA1c, or glycohemoglobin) as often as your doctor recommends. This test will help your doctor understand if your diabetes is being controlled or if you need to adjust your treatment plan. Have an eye exam every 2 years. (If you already have diabetes-related eye disease, have an eye exam as often as your doctor recommends.) Remove your shoes at every appointment so your doctor can easily check your feet. Remember to ask questions about your test results and what they mean for your health. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Test - Blood

Blood Sugar Test - Blood

Random blood sugar; Blood sugar level; Fasting blood sugar; Glucose test; Diabetic screening - blood sugar test; Diabetes - blood sugar test A blood glucose test measures the amount of a sugar called glucose in a sample of your blood. Glucose is a major source of energy for most cells of the body, including brain cells. Carbohydrates are found in fruit, cereal, bread, pasta, and rice. They are quickly turned into glucose in your body. This raises your blood glucose level. Hormones made in the body help control blood glucose level. How to Prepare for the Test The test may be done in the following ways: After you have not eaten anything for at least 8 hours (fasting) At any time of the day (random) Two hours after you drink a certain amount of glucose (oral glucose tolerance test) How the Test will Feel When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or slight bruising. This soon goes away. Why the Test is Performed Your doctor may order this test if you have signs of diabetes. More than likely, the doctor will order a fasting blood sugar test. The blood glucose test is also used to monitor people who already have diabetes. The test may also be done if you have: An increase in how often you need to urinate Recently gained a lot of weight Blurred vision Confusion or a change in the way you normally talk or behave Fainting spells Seizures (for the first time) SCREENING FOR DIABETES This test may also be used to screen a person for diabetes. High blood sugar and diabetes may not cause symptoms in the early stages. A fasting blood sugar test is almost always done to screen for diabetes. If you are over age 45, you should be tested every 3 years. If you're overweight (body m Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes, often called non-insulin dependent diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 90% – 95% of the 21 million people with diabetes. In this article, you’ll learn the basics about type 2 diabetes, including symptoms and causes, as well as type 2 diabetes in children. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 diabetes produce insulin; however, either their pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body cannot use the insulin adequately. This is called insulin resistance. When there isn’t enough insulin or the insulin is not used as it should be, glucose (sugar) can’t get into the body’s cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, the body’s cells are not able to function properly. Other problems associated with the buildup of glucose in the blood include: Dehydration. The buildup of sugar in the blood can cause an increase in urination. When the kidneys lose the glucose through the urine, a large amount of water is also lost, causing dehydration. Diabetic Coma (Hyperosmolar nonketotic diabetic coma) .When a person with type 2 diabetes becomes severely dehydrated and is not able to drink enough fluids to make up for the fluid losses, they may develop this life-threatening complication. Damage to the body. Over time, the high glucose levels in the blood may damage the nerves and small blood vessels of the eyes, kidneys, and heart and predispose a person to atherosclerosis (hardening) of the large arteries that can causeheart attack and stroke. Type 2 Diabetes in Children More and more children are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Find out about type 2 diabetes symptoms in children, the diagnosis, and the treatment in WebMD’s article on type 2 Continue reading >>

How To Tell If You Have Diabetes

How To Tell If You Have Diabetes

Expert Reviewed If you believe that you may have diabetes, consult a medical professional immediately. Type 1 diabetes is when the islet cells of your pancreas can no longer produce insulin; it is a type of autoimmune disease that makes them no longer functional. Type 2 diabetes is more lifestyle-related (relating to lack of exercise and consuming too much sugar). It is important to know the signs and symptoms of diabetes, as well as to understand how it is diagnosed, in order to be treated as soon as possible if you do have the condition. 1 Be aware of the following signs and symptoms. If you have two or more on the list below, it is best to see your doctor for further evaluation. Common signs and symptoms of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes include:[1] Excessive thirst Excessive hunger Blurry vision Frequent urination (you wake 3 or more times in the night to urinate) Fatigue (particularly after eating) Feeling irritable Wounds that don't heal or heal slowly 2 Take note of your lifestyle choices. People who live a sedentary life (with little to no exercise) are at a heightened risk of Type 2 diabetes. People who are overweight or obese, or who eat more sweets and refined carbohydrates than is ideal are also at significantly higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.[2] Note that Type 2 diabetes is acquired in one's life, most often related to poor lifestyle choices, versus Type 1 diabetes which is a condition one is born with that most often presents in childhood. 3 See your doctor.[3] The only way to truly confirm whether or not you have diabetes is to see your doctor for diagnostic testing (in the form of blood tests). The numbers that come back on your blood tests will help to classify you as "normal," "pre-diabetic" (meaning you are at very high risk of soon develo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lab Testing

Diabetes Lab Testing

Photo credit www.gosalute.it Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood glucose, commonly called blood sugar. Glucose is vital to your health because it’s an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It’s also your brain’s main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the reasons may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Symptoms? Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there’s not enough insulin) Fatigue Blurred vision Slow-healing sores High blood pressure Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal or bladder infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age and is often preventable. When to see your doctor or Westbank Urgent Care If y Continue reading >>

Sugar Diabetes Test

Sugar Diabetes Test

Sugar Diabetes Test Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects millions of Americans. A sugar diabetes test is the best method of early intervention and can also catch other blood sugar abnormalities, such as hypoglycemia. At FastMed Urgent Care, your local walk-in clinic, we help patients manage chronic conditions like diabetes, hypertension, and back pain. We also treat common conditions like strep throat, stitch up cuts, and x-ray an arm or leg to see if there is a break. Our on-site labs will process the results of your sugar diabetes test right away, so we can quickly decide on a course of treatment. FastMed Urgent Care is not the same as emergency care. Diabetes can be a dangerous disease, so if you are experiencing severe symptoms, dial 9-1-1 and get to an emergency room right away. if you are doing a sugar test for diabetes at home using a monitor and test strips and you find your levels are significantly above average, you need medical attention. Severe symptoms require that you pay close attention in order to effectively manage the situation. Alert: High Levels Sugar Diabetes Test There are dangerous complications that can occur from diabetes. That’s why it’s very important to manage contact with your medical team at FastMed in addition to monitoring your blood-sugar levels at home. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA): DKA is a very serious and potentially life-threatening condition. It is a chemical (electrolyte) imbalance that develops in diabetics when the cells do not get the sugar they need for energy.The body will break down fat in lieu of sugar and release ketones into your bloodstream. When your ketone levels are high, it is a warning sign. If your blood sugar levels are also high, you may want to see seek medical attention. You can monitor your ketone l Continue reading >>

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