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Can I Get Tested For Diabetes At Urgent Care?

Diabetes Screen Blood Test, Loveland Urgent Care

Diabetes Screen Blood Test, Loveland Urgent Care

There is a blood test used to screen and diagnose diabetes and pre-diabetes. This test is called hemoglobin A1c. It gives your physician a good idea of the average amount of glucose in the blood over a few months. This information can help determine the treatment of diabetes and whether or not you have diabetes. If you feel your blood sugar level does not stay constant this would be a good test for you. Your physician can order this test and go over the test results with you. Also, remember your family physician is also a good resource for your non-life threatening urgent care needs. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Screening & Counseling

Diabetes Screening & Counseling

What is diabetes? Type 2 diabetes, also known as adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes. It is a health condition that affects how the body uses glucose, the main type of sugar in the blood. The glucose level in the blood rises after eating a meal and causes the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the blood stream. For patients with diabetes, the body either can't make or respond to insulin properly, causing glucose to build up in the blood instead of going into cells as it should. As a result, blood sugar levels in the blood are higher than normal and can lead to damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart. While the exact cause of diabetes is not known, obesity and lack of physical activity are two of the most common risk factors for the disease. People with type 2 diabetes often have no symptoms for many years. Early symptoms of diabetes may include blurred vision, erectile dysfunction, pain or numbness in the feet or hands, infections that are more frequent or heal slowly, fatigue, hunger, increased thirst and urination. Blood tests are needed to confirm the diagnosis. What is diabetes screening & counseling? Diabetes screening & counseling is a service designed to measure a patient's risk for diabetes. For most accurate results, it is recommended that you fast for 9-12 hours before testing. During this visit, we will record the patient's age, height, weight and waist circumference, as well as medical, family, and social history information. After this, a blood test will be performed by obtaining a small blood sample from the patient's finger to measure blood sugar levels. Based on the results of these screenings we will counsel the patient on their risk factors and recommend lifestyle changes to help the patient lead a healt Continue reading >>

Sahara West Urgent Care & Wellness

Sahara West Urgent Care & Wellness

Insulin is a hormone that the body needs to break down sugars and starches from foods and turn them into energy to help you function throughout the day. Diabetes mellitus is a disease in which the body doesn’t properly use or make insulin, therefore causing blood sugar levels to be high. High blood sugar levels in turn can cause extensive damage to many important organ systems in the body. We know that certain factors like genetics, obesity, and lack of exercise play a key role in the development of the disease. It is estimated that 7.8 % of the American population (23.6 million people) are diabetic. There are different types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is the primary type of diabetes in children and young adults. This type of diabetes is caused by a disorder of the body’s pancreas gland that affects its ability to make insulin. Type 1 diabetes must be closely managed by a health care professional through insulin replacement. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 5-10 % of all cases of this disease. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes and is mostly found in adults. Type 2 diabetes is related to insulin resistance that causes a relative insulin deficiency. Insulin resistance is a condition that results from the body’s failure to appropriately use the insulin that it makes and is closely related to being overweight. Most Americans diagnosed with the disease have Type 2 diabetes (95 %). Some important risk factors for the development of Type 2 diabetes include: Being overweight Leading a sedentary lifestyle Being over 30 years of age Being African American, Hispanic, or American Indian Giving birth to a baby that weighs over 9 pounds Having a family member who has diabetes Having blood pressure readings 130/90 or higher Having high cholesterol There is also a Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Test/diabetes Testing

Blood Sugar Test/diabetes Testing

Thirsty A Lot? Have To Pee Frequently? You Might Be Diabetic It might be wise to take a blood sugar test if you suspect you have high blood sugar. Having high blood sugar is a condition where a person’s blood sugar (glucose) levels remain high most of the time. This condition is called diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, around 86 million people have elevated blood sugar. This leads to the development of diabetes. Normal blood sugar level is less than 100mg while fasting and less than 140 two hours after eating. Diabetics’ blood sugar levels run higher than this on a regular basis. Low blood sugar is the opposite problem when blood sugar levels are consistently low. The good news is you can receive a blood sugar test in the convenience and comfort of your own home. Especially if you have mobility issues, it’s nice to have a medical practitioner come to you. We do a simple blood test to accurately measure your blood sugar levels. Then we determine if you have diabetes and prescribe treatment. We also visit your home for regular blood sugar tests if you have difficulty doing it yourself. It is very important to test regularly and manage your blood sugar levels if you are diabetic. Diabetes is a serious medical condition that should not go unchecked. Blood testing is one of several mobile urgent care services we offer patients. Best of all, we bring urgent care to you! … Overall, this saves you time and money. It’s also an ideal option for those who have trouble getting to the doctor’s office. Give us a call to schedule an appointment at a time and location that’s good for you … Call Anywhere UrgentCare™ Now: Keep reading to learn more about high blood sugar and diabetes … What Are Symptoms for Diabetes (High Blood Sugar)? Signs yo Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes, often called non-insulin dependent diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 90% – 95% of the 21 million people with diabetes. In this article, you’ll learn the basics about type 2 diabetes, including symptoms and causes, as well as type 2 diabetes in children. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 diabetes produce insulin; however, either their pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body cannot use the insulin adequately. This is called insulin resistance. When there isn’t enough insulin or the insulin is not used as it should be, glucose (sugar) can’t get into the body’s cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, the body’s cells are not able to function properly. Other problems associated with the buildup of glucose in the blood include: Dehydration. The buildup of sugar in the blood can cause an increase in urination. When the kidneys lose the glucose through the urine, a large amount of water is also lost, causing dehydration. Diabetic Coma (Hyperosmolar nonketotic diabetic coma) .When a person with type 2 diabetes becomes severely dehydrated and is not able to drink enough fluids to make up for the fluid losses, they may develop this life-threatening complication. Damage to the body. Over time, the high glucose levels in the blood may damage the nerves and small blood vessels of the eyes, kidneys, and heart and predispose a person to atherosclerosis (hardening) of the large arteries that can causeheart attack and stroke. Type 2 Diabetes in Children More and more children are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Find out about type 2 diabetes symptoms in children, the diagnosis, and the treatment in WebMD’s article on type 2 Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children: A Guide To Symptoms, Tests And Treatment

Diabetes In Children: A Guide To Symptoms, Tests And Treatment

How do you know if your child has diabetes? Experts offer a guide to symptoms, tests and treatment. Knowing the early signs and symptoms of diabetes not only helps you get the treatment your child needs, but it could save a life. There are two separate types of diabetes. Diabetes in children has increased in recent years and now affects more than 200,000 children in the United States. From 2000 to 2009, Type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents increased by 21 percent and Type 2 increased by 30 percent, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Read on to learn about the two types of diabetes and the differences between them. Definition and Symptoms Type 1 Diabetes Occurs when the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin, which is the hormone responsible for utilizing glucose in the body. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that generally develops during childhood. The cause remains unknown, although it may be linked to genetics and the environment, such as exposure to viruses. Type 2 Diabetes Develops at a slower pace at any age. Causes include weight gain and genetics, but generally diagnosis happens above age 10. Type 2 occurs when the body develops insulin resistance and the insulin produced no longer controls blood glucose levels. Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes have many overlapping symptoms. According to Dr. Tamar S. Hannon, who specializes in pediatric endocrinology at Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis, the two universal symptoms of diabetes are: Increased urination (polyuria). Increased thirst (polydipsia). "These symptoms always warrant screening for diabetes," says Dr. Hannon. Other symptoms include blurred vision, flu-like symptoms, fatigue and slow-healing cuts or bruises. If your child also loses weight and compl Continue reading >>

Original Research: Early Diabetes Screening In The Urgent Care, Part 1

Original Research: Early Diabetes Screening In The Urgent Care, Part 1

Urgent message: Undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus affects more than 9 million Americans. This first part of a two-part article focuses on evaluation of diabetes screening for the adult urgent care patient in whom diabetes has not been diagnosed, using effective early disease-detection strategies to reduce the long-term burden of diabetes. How this article helps you: by providing data to assist you in deciding about screening in your center. Introduction There are now more than 9000 urgent care centers across the United States, and they serve as the main entry point for the medical care of a large percentage of the population.1 Lack of access to primary-care services, medical workforce shortages, lack of health insurance, and lack of time for many Americans have steadily increased the use of urgent care centers for nonurgent problems.2 Historically, urgent care centers focused on providing episodic care for acute illness and injury. In response to recent health-care capacity strain, many urgent care centers have adjusted clinical procedures to provide both acute and chronic care. Chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes mellitus are occurring in epidemic proportions, creating a demand for urgent care practitioners to diagnose and manage more complex illnesses. With urgent care centers providing a significant portion of primary-care services, communication between the urgent care provider and the primary-care provider (PCP) is essential. Yet the literature demonstrates consistently impaired communication between urgent care providers and PCPs. [Editor’s note: See “‘Why Are You Calling Me?’ The Problem with Patient Transfers in Urgent Care,” at and ‘Why Are You Calling Me?’ How to Fix Relationships with Emergency Departments,” at Urgent care centers must ex Continue reading >>

Screening For Diabetes In An Outpatient Clinic Population

Screening For Diabetes In An Outpatient Clinic Population

Go to: Opportunistic disease screening is the routine, asymptomatic disease screening of patients at the time of a physician encounter for other reasons. While the prevalence of unrecognized diabetes in community populations is well known, the prevalence in clinical populations is unknown. To describe the prevalence, predictors, and clinical severity of unrecognized diabetes among outpatients at a major medical center. We screened patients for diabetes by using an initial random Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement, and then obtaining follow-up fasting plasma glucose (FPG) for all subjects with HbA1c ≥6.0%. A case of unrecognized diabetes was defined as either HbA1c ≥7.0% or FPG ≥7 mmol/L (126 mg/dL). Height and weight were obtained for all subjects. We also obtained resting blood pressure, fasting lipids, and urine protein in subjects with HbA1c ≥6.0%. RESULTS The prevalence of unrecognized diabetes was 4.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.4 to 5.7). Factors associated with unrecognized diabetes were the diagnosis of hypertension (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.5; P = .004), weight >120% of ideal (adjusted OR, 2.2; P = .02), and history of a parent or sibling with diabetes (adjusted OR, 1.7; P = .06). Having a primary care provider did not raise or lower the risk for unrecognized diabetes (P = .73). Based on the new diagnosis, most patients (61%) found to have diabetes required a change in treatment either of their blood sugar or comorbid hypertension or hyperlipidemia in order to achieve targets recommended in published treatment guidelines. Patients reporting a primary care provider were no less likely to require a change in treatment (P = .20). If diabetes screening is an effective intervention, opportunistic screening for diabetes may be the preferred method fo Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Signs That Indicate You May Be In Danger Of Diabetes

10 Diabetic Signs That Indicate You May Be In Danger Of Diabetes

There’s no way to sugarcoat the fact that diabetes is a major danger. This health condition occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin or is unable to process it properly. This causes blood sugar levels to spike and become much higher than normal. And having high blood sugar levels can lead to many serious health problems, such as heart disease, kidney damage, stroke, blindness, and others. Studies show that 24 million people in the U.S. suffer from diabetes, but nearly 6 million people have no idea that they have the condition. Yet there are many diabetic signs that can help you detect the disease. To help you be proactive and protect your family’s health, discover which diabetic symptoms may signal a possible problem. 3 Types of Diabetes There are different kinds of diabetes and it’s important to know their differences to understand your risk. They fall into the following types: Type 1 Diabetes: This is an autoimmune disease that was previously called juvenile diabetes because its diabetic symptoms are often detected in childhood. It occurs when the immune system destroys the cells that produce insulin, which leaves the body with too little or no insulin. Type 2 Diabetes: This is the most common type of diabetes and it typically develops in adulthood. It either occurs when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels or when the cells become unable to use insulin properly. Gestational Diabetes: This affects 5 to10 percent of women during or after pregnancy. 10 Diabetic Symptoms That May Indicate a Problem Millions of people are struggling with diabetes and don’t even know it because many of its symptoms are simply overlooked. But by detecting signs of a problem, you can manage the disease before it leads to other conditions. Continue reading >>

In-house Lab Testing And Digital X-rays Located In Iselin, Nj

In-house Lab Testing And Digital X-rays Located In Iselin, Nj

Excel Urgent Care of Iselin offers in-house lab testing for all our patients. There is no reason to go to another facility for testing, we offer all of the following tests at our urgent care. Some of the lab test need to be sent out to laboratories for further processing, but be assured that we will get back to you with your accurate reports in a timely manner. Digital, low-dose X-Rays Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Blood Glucose Complete Blood Count (CBC) Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP) Electrolytes Fecal Blood Occult Flu Mono (Mononucleosis) Strep Throat (Rapid Strep) Trichomonas Urinalysis Cholesterol (Lipid) Tests Glucose Testing for Diabetics (HA1C: Hemoglobin A1C) Pregnancy Test HIV Testing STD (Sexually Transmitted Disease) Testing Please note we are not a freestanding clinic for laboratory testing. Continue reading >>

Lab Tests

Lab Tests

The following tests are available at all lab locations including: CBC—Complete blood count is a blood test used to evaluate your overall health and to detect a wide range of disorders. Urinalysis—This test evaluates a sample of your urine. It is used as a screening and/or diagnostic tool because it can help detect substances or cellular material in the urine associated with different disorders. HCG—This test measures the amount of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) in blood. It is used to screen for pregnancy, and evaluate and manage problems during pregnancy. This test may also be used to evaluate and manage certain cancers. ESR—Erythrocyte sedimentation rate is a test that measures inflammation in the body. It is used to detect and monitor autoimmune disorders, bone infections, certain forms of arthritis and inflammatory diseases that cause vague symptoms. Rapid Strep—This test can detect strep bacteria in minutes by looking for substances (antigens) in the throat. Rapid Influenza—This test is used to detect influenza (the flu). It can differentiate influenza from other viral and bacterial infections with similar symptoms that may be serious and must be treated differently. Rapid flu tests are best used within the first 48 hours of the onset of symptoms to help diagnose influenza and determine whether or not antiviral drugs are a treatment option. EKG—An EKG (electrocardiogram) is done to check the electrical impulses that the heart produces. Among other uses, it can be used to determine the cause of chest pain or symptoms of heart disease, such as shortness of breath, dizziness, fainting or rapid, irregular heartbeat. RSV—Respiratory syncytial virus testing is usually used during the RSV season to help diagnose the infection in people who have moderat Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body. After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach. When people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body in the urine. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose. What are the types of diabetes? The three main types of diabetes are: type 1 diabetes type 2 diabetes gestational diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease results when the body’s system for fighting infection—the immune system—turns against a part of the body. In diabetes, the immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. The pancreas then produces little or no insulin. A person who has type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily to live. At present, scientists do not know exactly what causes the body’s immune system to attack the beta cells, but they believe that autoimmune, genetic, and environmental factors, possibly viruses, are involved. Type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5 to 10 percent of diagnosed diabetes in the Continue reading >>

Tests And Screenings

Tests And Screenings

If you have diabetes, you face a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, and other complications such as eye, kidney, and nerve disease. Regular screenings and tests can help you and your doctor develop the best treatment plan for your health. Be an active partner in your care Ask your doctor how often you should schedule your visits, and go to all of your appointments. You may also work with specialists, nurses, nutritionists, a diabetes educator, or a care manager. Control your blood sugar. This is the most important way to manage your diabetes. Get tips on testing your blood sugar from a diabetes educator. If you have hypertension, measure your blood pressure at home, and take steps to control it. Keeping your blood pressure in the range you and your doctor have discussed will help reduce your risk for heart attack, stroke, and premature death. You will also need to have your blood pressure and blood lipid levels (including cholesterol) checked as recommended by your doctor. Get your blood tested for hemoglobin A1c (also called A1c, HbA1c, or glycohemoglobin) as often as your doctor recommends. This test will help your doctor understand if your diabetes is being controlled or if you need to adjust your treatment plan. Have an eye exam every 2 years. (If you already have diabetes-related eye disease, have an eye exam as often as your doctor recommends.) Remove your shoes at every appointment so your doctor can easily check your feet. Remember to ask questions about your test results and what they mean for your health. Continue reading >>

Sugar Diabetes Test

Sugar Diabetes Test

Sugar Diabetes Test Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects millions of Americans. A sugar diabetes test is the best method of early intervention and can also catch other blood sugar abnormalities, such as hypoglycemia. At FastMed Urgent Care, your local walk-in clinic, we help patients manage chronic conditions like diabetes, hypertension, and back pain. We also treat common conditions like strep throat, stitch up cuts, and x-ray an arm or leg to see if there is a break. Our on-site labs will process the results of your sugar diabetes test right away, so we can quickly decide on a course of treatment. FastMed Urgent Care is not the same as emergency care. Diabetes can be a dangerous disease, so if you are experiencing severe symptoms, dial 9-1-1 and get to an emergency room right away. if you are doing a sugar test for diabetes at home using a monitor and test strips and you find your levels are significantly above average, you need medical attention. Severe symptoms require that you pay close attention in order to effectively manage the situation. Alert: High Levels Sugar Diabetes Test There are dangerous complications that can occur from diabetes. That’s why it’s very important to manage contact with your medical team at FastMed in addition to monitoring your blood-sugar levels at home. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA): DKA is a very serious and potentially life-threatening condition. It is a chemical (electrolyte) imbalance that develops in diabetics when the cells do not get the sugar they need for energy.The body will break down fat in lieu of sugar and release ketones into your bloodstream. When your ketone levels are high, it is a warning sign. If your blood sugar levels are also high, you may want to see seek medical attention. You can monitor your ketone l Continue reading >>

How Does The A1c Test Work?

How Does The A1c Test Work?

An A1C (glucose) test is a blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past three months. The A1C test is sometimes called the hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c or glycohemoglobin test. The results of the A1C test can tell you how well you are controlling your diabetes. The test can also be used to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes. Find a CareNow® clinic near you Sugar attaches to hemoglobin in red blood cells, which carry oxygen to different parts of the body. Red blood cells typically live about three months. An abnormal A1C result means that you have had high blood sugar over a period of weeks to three months. How are A1C test results reported? Results are reported as a percentage. Here’s what A1C levels usually mean: Normal blood sugar levels (no diabetes): Less than 5.7 percent Prediabetes: 5.7 percent to 6.4 percent Diabetes: 6.5 percent or higher Your healthcare provider may report your results as eAG, or estimated average glucose. This number is reported in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl), which is the same number you would see on a blood glucose monitor. If you have anemia, kidney disease or certain blood disorders, your A1C test might give invalid results. Certain medicines can also make the results false. Before taking the test, talk to your healthcare provider about your health conditions and medications. What should you expect with an A1C test? The A1C test is a simple blood test. Blood can be drawn from a vein or the test can be done with a finger stick. You don’t need to do anything to prepare for the test. Fasting is not required. Most healthcare providers recommend people with diabetes get their A1C tested twice a year. If you are at increased risk for diabetes, ask a healthcare provider if you need an A1C test. Contact the nearest Care Continue reading >>

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