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Can I Eat White Bread With Diabetes?

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes is a serious medical condition that puts you at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is also very treatable, and if you have it, there is a good chance you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by making changes in your diet and increasing your level of physical activity. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body does not produce or use enough insulin to be able to turn glucose into energy. Glucose is the sugar and starch that comes from the food you eat, which fuels your body. Insulin is a hormone that carries glucose from your blood into your cells. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in your blood and can cause serious health problems. Pre-Diabetes Pre-diabetes is when your fasting blood glucose (blood sugar) level is above normal. To test for pre-diabetes, your doctor will take a sample of your blood after you have fasted overnight: Normal fasting glucose: 60 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) Pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose): 100 to 125 mg/dl Diabetes: 126 mg/dl or higher on 2 occasions Healthy Tips for Preventing Type 2 Diabetes If you have pre-diabetes, you should talk to your doctor about developing a lifestyle plan to reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends increased physical activity and, if you are overweight, losing 5-10 percent of your body weight. Your doctor may also want you to take medication if you have a family history of diabetes, you are obese, or have other cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, or a history of heart disease). Below are tips to help you keep pre-diabetes from progressing to Type 2 diabetes: Exercise Every Day Since muscles use glucose for energy, activities like walking, bicycling, and gardening Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Diabetes is a metabolic disease, meaning there is a glitch in the way the body converts food energy into usable energy. A healthy reaction to eating carbohydrate is a rise in blood sugar (glucose) followed by insulin being released as a response. The insulin acts as a key to open up cells within the brain and organs to let glucose in to be used as an immediate source of energy. Any unused energy is then stored in the liver, muscle, and fat tissues. Someone with diabetes has a rise in blood glucose but insulin is either not released or cells are resistant to the insulin. This is why diabetics have difficulty returning their high blood sugar levels back down to normal and thus need to control how much carbohydrate (glucose source) they put into their body throughout the day. Control carbohydrates. With a little effort and control diabetes can easily be managed. Diabetics should not condemn, but rather control carbohydrates. They should focus on allowing their body only the amount of carbohydrates it can handle at one time (this can be determined by a doctor or registered dietitian). Despite being diabetic, the body still needs and uses carbohydrates as its preferred source of energy. In fact, it is the only source of fuel for the brain! So it should never be eliminated, just merely controlled so your body can handle the glucose load. Stick to an eating plan. There is no single ideal eating plan for those with diabetes; the recommended plan is specific to a person’s weight, medication, blood sugars, cholesterol, and other medical conditions or concerns. Despite the varying eating plans, all diabetics should be consistent with their eating habits. Also, they need to eat about every 4-5 hours to prevent blood sugars from getting too low. Additionally, breakfast is an impor Continue reading >>

What Kinds Of Bread Can A Diabetic Eat?

What Kinds Of Bread Can A Diabetic Eat?

Diabetics should avoid white bread and anything else made with white flour because it can raise their blood sugar levels quickly. White flour and glucose, or pure sugar, are used to rank foods according to how fast they raise blood glucose. When a diabetic eats white bread, it is just like eating sugar. Whole Grains Are Best Finding the glycemic index of foods containing carbohydrates is a good way to control your diet and blood sugar level. Bread that is 100 percent stone-ground whole-wheat or pumpernickel is best because of its low glycemic level. Diabetics should be very careful to choose only bread that is 100 percent whole-wheat. If the label says, "Wheat Bread," the bread could contain a high content of white flour. It is best to avoid oat bread and other breads as well because they often contain white flour, which should always be treated like pure sugar when you have diabetes. Although some other breads and foods that are a lot like bread may look darker, this does not mean that they are whole-wheat products. Some bagels look like they are stone-ground whole-wheat, but they could actually be made with mostly white flour. Crackers may also look like they have wheat in them, and they might be partially made from whole wheat. This does not make them safe for diabetics to eat, however, because they will likely cause a spike in their glucose levels. Whole-wheat bread, rye, and pita breads that are not made from 100 percent stone-ground whole-wheat or pumpernickel are considered by the American Diabetes Association to be medium GI foods. Other Foods to Avoid There are many other bread products full of carbohydrates that cause spikes in blood sugar. They have a high glycemic index and include mashed potatoes, corn flakes, instant oatmeal, puffed rice, bran flakes, and Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Diabetics

Dietary Recommendations For Diabetics

Whole rye breads are known for their health virtues, such as increment of satiety, assistance to the digestive system function, long term energy, vitamins, many minerals and reduction of the risk of colon and breast cancer. Furthermore, whole rye breads, especially bread from 100% whole rye flour, are extremely recommended for pre diabetic and diabetic patients, why? Written by: Hadas Yariv (M Sc, MBA), food technician and nutrition expert. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder, which causes a rise in the blood sugar levels and damages all of the body’s systems. Obesity and diabetes are the main epidemics of the current millennium. In Israel there are 500,000 diabetics and another 200,000 who don’t know they are diabetic and referred to as “pre diabetic patients”. The chance to get diabetes rises in older age up to 40%. Over 95% of diabetics suffer from type 2 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes the insulin discharged from the pancreas isn’t effective enough to insert the sugar into the body cells, or isn’t discharged in a sufficient way. The shortage of sugar evolves gradually, and might not appear for years at all, until it becomes a real life threatening situation. Dietary Recommendations for Diabetics International health organizations recommended for a diabetic/ pre diabetic patient to base their diet on whole grains, vegetables, fruit, legumes, low fat dairy products, chicken and fish (not fried); it is recommended to consume monounsaturated fat from olive oil, nuts, almonds and avocado. On the other hand they should reduce consumption of saturated fat, trans fat, salt and processed meat. We highly recommend on keeping a low calorie diet. Recommendations for Carbs and Whole Grains Consumption: Carbs are the main essential nutrient that affects the levels of blood Continue reading >>

Breads For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

Breads For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

Bread consumption can often hinder the control of blood glucose in diabetics. Many types of bread are laden with carbohydrates and sugar causing blood glucose to rise. However, for those that refuse to surrender their daily bread, there are a few low carbohydrate breads that can contribute to fiber content in the diet and will not drastically raise blood glucose levels. The American Diabetes Association recommends high fiber breads made from whole grains to keep blood glucose from spiking and to maintain optimal digestive health. As always, it is imperative to consult with a licensed dietitian familiar with diabetes before attempting to drastically alter any diet for a medical condition. Video of the Day Pumpernickel bread is a dark brown color that is low on the glycemic index. For 1 one ounce slice, pumpernickel scores a 51 with 1 g of fat and 15 g of carbohydrate. Pumpernickel traces its origins to Germany, and was traditionally made to feed the hungry. The German Food Guide describes pumpernickel as a whole grain bread made from rye flour and coarse rye meal that, in America, has the addition of molasses or sour mix for sourdough adding to its signature color, aroma and taste. Sourdough is a white bread that is low on the glycemic index. For a 1-oz. slice, sourdough scores a 52 with 1 g g of fat and 20 g of carbohydrate. Sourdough is a rather lean dough that obtains much of its robust flavor and texture from the sour mix that ferments over time adding leavening as well as flavor. While it is a white dough, the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics Center for Integrative Medicine's Glycemic Food Index ranks sourdough lower than most in scoring making it a favorable option for diabetics. Wholegrain vs. Stoneground Wheat Wholegrain wheat provides a considerable Continue reading >>

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

By Brandon May Bread is perhaps one of the most widely used types of food on the planet. It can also be a food that poses a health risk for people with diabetes. Despite the risk, bread can be one of the hardest foods to give up. Fortunately, there are breads on the market that don't raise blood sugar to extreme levels. Whole-grain breads with high-fiber ingredients, like oats and bran, may be the best option for people with diabetes. Making bread at home with specific, diabetes-friendly ingredients may also help reduce the impact bread has on blood sugar levels. The role of nutrition in controlling diabetes Diabetes has two main types: type 1 and type 2. People with type 1 diabetes have difficulty producing insulin, which is a hormone that "captures" blood sugar (or glucose) and transfers it into cells. Glucose is the preferred energy source for cells. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes is also the easier form to prevent and manage with lifestyle changes and medication. According to the World Health Organization, over 422 million people have type 2 diabetes worldwide. In the earlier phase of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, but cells have become insensitive to its effects. This is sometimes due to poor diet, genetics, and lifestyle habits. Because of this, cells can't access blood sugar following a meal. Nutrition plays a crucial role in diabetes control. It's only through putting proper dietary planning into practice that good blood sugar management can be accomplished. A good diet must also be combined with lifestyle changes and medication. A carbohydrate is one of the three major nutrients essential to human health. However, carbohydrates also raise blood sugar and can reduce effective diabetes control. This Continue reading >>

Gardenia: So Good You Can Even Eat It On Its Own

Gardenia: So Good You Can Even Eat It On Its Own

Read on to discover more about nutritional information and find out which Gardenia loaf Q: Will grain foods like bread, rice and noodles make me fat? Grain foods are great sources of carbohydrates. But they are low in fat. Carbohydrates provide just 4 kilocalories per gram, while fat provides 9 kilocalories per gram. So, carbohydrates foods do not make you fat. Whole grains such as wholemeal being rich in fibre fill you up, reducing the urge to overeat. To maintain a healthy weight, balance what you eat with exercise. Q: I have diabetes. How can I include bread in my diet and still control my blood sugar well? Bread can be included in a diabetic meal plan. The exact quantity of bread you can eat will depend on your body weight, activity and medication or insulin. Meet with a dietician to draw up a meal plan that best suits your needs. For better blood sugar control, pick a higher fibre bread such as wholemeal bread or high fibre white bread. Q: I have diabetes. My blood sugar is in good control. Can I eat fruit breads? If yes, how much can I eat? Fruit breads have more carbohydrates per slice than regular bread as it contains fruit too. So to include some fruit bread as part of your meal or snack, work out the serving size that is equivalent to one slice of regular bread and replace the appropriate amount in your meal plan. Q: I have a strong family history of colon cancer. Can eating whole grains help prevent colon cancer? There are many risk factors that trigger off the development of cancers such as genetics, diet and exposure to carcinogens. Some research studies have highlighted that a high fibre diet may be beneficial in preventing certain cancers. So enjoy a well balanced diet made up of a wide variety of many foods including whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Continue reading >>

White Bread Linked To Diabetes

White Bread Linked To Diabetes

Health : Diabetes --- White Bread with a diabetic syringe and heart rhythmn with a caduceus Eating white bread is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a new Australian study. After following the diets and health records of more than 36,000 men and women in Australia for four years, researchers say they found white bread and starchy foods were linked to diabetes. "White bread was the food most strongly related to diabetes incidence," they write in the November issue of the journal Diabetes Care. Results were based on food frequency questionnaires and diabetes diagnoses made during the study. Special attention was paid to the glycemic index (GI) of the foods eaten by participants. The glycemic index measures a food's impact on blood sugar. High-GI foods like white bread, cakes, and biscuits spike blood sugar dramatically, while lower-GI carbs including most vegetables and legumes have a smaller effect. Participants who ate the most white bread -- more than 17 slices per week -- had the highest risk of diabetes, say the researchers, who included Allison Hodge, MENVSC, of the Cancer Council in Victoria, Australia. Eating lots of high-GI foods like white breads and white potatoes can cause weight gain, raising the risk of diabetes, say the researchers. A high-GI diet could also lead to insulin resistance (decreased ability for the body to respond to the hormone insulin), which can lead to diabetes. On the other hand, participants who ate a lot of sugar, magnesium, and total carbohydrates had a lower risk of diabetes. That's not a green light to guzzle sugar. The surveys included naturally sweet fruit, which may affect the body differently than added sugars found in cakes, pastries, and sweets. All things considered, you may want to reach for whole Continue reading >>

Reasons To Skip White Bread For Good | Everyday Health

Reasons To Skip White Bread For Good | Everyday Health

Remember that sandwich bread is far from the only source of white bread in your diet: baguettes, bagels, and pizza all count, too. After eating refined carbohydrates like white bread, the surplus of sugar in your bloodstream tends to be stored as fat in the body . New research shows a link between the consumption of refined carbs and depression in post-menopausal women. Most people know that white bread is a diet dont: One of the easiest swaps you can make for a major health boost is ditching refined flour in favor of whole wheat. But its not just that loaf of Wonder Bread that you need to watch out for. The basket of rolls delivered to the table when dining out, the French baguette you grab on your way home to accompany dinner, your Saturday-morning bagel ritual, and Friday pizza night all come with a side of less-than-desirable health risks. Here are five unpleasant reasons to nix the bread basket: Little nutritional value. Yes, food is delicious, but at the end of the day we are eating for one reason: to nourish our bodies. And white bread made with refined flour fails to accomplish this goal. When a grain is refined, such as in the making of flour for white bread, the outermost and innermost layers of the grain are removed. This removes the fiber and some (25 percent) protein, leaving behind the starch, says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD , author of Belly Fat Diet For Dummies. You may see "enriched flour" on the label. While this flour has had some nutrients like B vitamins and iron added back in after the refining process, its still lower in fiber and protein than whole-wheat flour. Opting for whole-grain varieties carries with it a dose of healthy fiber and more protein, adding a nutritional boost to meals. Erratic blood-sugar levels. Since it's low in the fiber and pro Continue reading >>

Bread Revealed: Eating This Surprising Type Could Be Better For You

Bread Revealed: Eating This Surprising Type Could Be Better For You

New research: People react differently to different foods These new findings go against the commonly-held belief that brown bread is always better than white. The researchers at Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel believe that the one size fits all diet concept is incorrect. These new findings go against the commonly-held belief that brown bread is always better than white. This is thanks to years of blanket advice suggesting its more nutritious. Indeed, for some people whole grains contain more fibre and nutrients. Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. People should be aware signs and symptoms of diabetes are not always obvious and the condition is often diagnosed during GP check ups. [Getty Images] Brown bread: It's long been thought to have more fibre and other nutrients A recent study found that eating gluten-free meant you missed out on these heart-loving properties in whole grains. But this new research suggests that it isnt so for everyone. In the study, 20 healthy participants ate bread regularly - it made up a quarter of their daily calorie intake. One half ate supermarket-bought white bread, while the other half consumed whole wheat sourdough. White bread: Participants ate it daily as a quarter of their calories At the end of the first week, the groups switched breads. The researchers measured glucose, fat and cholesterol levels, and discovered there were no clinically significant differences between the effects of the two types of bread. However, more interestingly, some of the group had a better blood sugar response after eating white bread. For others, they reacted better to brown - but there was no type of b Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Bread Is Best For Diabetics?

What Kind Of Bread Is Best For Diabetics?

Diabetes and bread… So many questions come up about good ‘ol bread. And not surprisingly because it's a staple food that we've all grown up on. Toast for breakfast, sandwiches for lunch, a side of bread for dinner, it's a pretty common practice right? But if you're diabetic, should bread get the cut? Is it okay to eat? Are there certain types of breads that are better than others? These are all great questions so let's dig in and go over this together now. If you have any questions, just leave them at the bottom of the post and we'll chat about it. JUMP TO MENU: What Kind of Bread Is Best? | Wheat & Rye Breads | Sourdough Bread | Does Cutting Bread Help? | Making Low Carb Breads At Home | Is Bread Better Than Cereal? | Low Carb Bread Options You Can Buy | Free Bread Baking Class What Kind Of Bread Is Best For A Diabetic? We've recently covered the types of flours that are best for diabetes, so before we dig in and talk about breads, let's briefly look at the flour cheat sheet. See how everything above coconut flour goes up from 30 g net carbs and above, which is really getting up there. In reality, the best breads for you to eat are ones made from flaxseed, almond, chickpea or coconut flour, which are a bit more difficult to come by. Of course, the simplest way to overcome this is to make your own. But, I understand that not everyone wants to make their own, and thankfully, there are quite a number of companies that supply great low carb bread options you can buy. Whole Wheat & Rye Bread and Diabetes It's often recommended that you eat whole grains instead of the white stuff and it's true, whole grains are a better choice because they are complex carbs, rather than simple carbs. But, when you take the whole grain and grind it into a flour, it changes the way your bo Continue reading >>

Best Bread For People With Diabetes

Best Bread For People With Diabetes

The smell of a freshly baked bread, or the sight of bread, is enough to send your senses reeling. Though people with diabetes should eat bread in moderation, sometimes it can be easy to get carried away. After all, bread is one of the most popular foods all over the globe. Just because you have diabetes, it doesn’t mean that you have to miss out on all the great bread that life has to offer. In order to be able to eat bread if you have diabetes, there are a few things that you will need to know. Sonya’s Story Sonya sat across from me. She looked defeated. She hung her head low. “I don’t know how I’ll ever give up bread,” she said. “It’s my favorite food. Now that I have Type 2 Diabetes, I know I can’t eat bread, rice, or pasta.” “You can have bread, rice, and pasta in small amounts. I can teach you which kind of breads are best for you, so that you can get some of your favorite food,” I said. “That would be great,” said Sonya. “Wow, I feel a lot better! When can I come to class and learn about this?” “You can come tomorrow,” I said. “I’ll find you some bread recipes that you can make at home with diabetes-friendly ingredients, so that the bread you do eat is healthier. It will also be lower in carbohydrates than some other breads, and the carbohydrates will be good carbohydrates.” Sonya came to class where she learnt valuable information about making diabetes-friendly breads. Now she makes them for herself, and a few other friends with diabetes that she happened to have met in her diabetes classes. Breads with high fibers Breads that are whole grain, and high in fiber, such as oats or bran, are the best type of bread for people with diabetes to eat. While you can have a serving or two of bread, you still need to stay within the Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

Is bread an option for people with diabetes? Food may be one of life’s simple pleasures, but for people with diabetes, deciding what to eat can get complicated. Foods that contain a lot of carbohydrates can spike blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates are found in many different kinds of food, including desserts, grains, and bread. Giving up carbs completely isn’t realistic, healthy, or even necessary. What matters is that you’re aware of your carb intake and make nutritious food choices. Breads can often be high in carbs. Some are overly processed, high in sugar, and filled with empty calories. Healthier options can be part of a satisfying meal plan for people with diabetes. If you’re trying to figure out which breads work best for diabetes management, this information may help. When a person has diabetes, their body doesn’t make or use enough insulin to process food efficiently. Without enough insulin, blood sugar levels can spike. People with diabetes may also have high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. This means that it’s important to keep an eye on fat and sugar intake. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin injections daily and follow a specific type of eating plan. This eating plan is geared towards keeping blood sugar levels low. People with type 2 diabetes often follow an eating and exercise regimen geared towards reducing blood sugar. If diet and exercise aren’t enough to control blood sugar, insulin injections or oral medication may be a part of a daily regimen. Creating a food plan, making smart nutritional choices, and watching carbohydrate intake is recommended for people with both types of diabetes. Creating a meal plan can help people with diabetes control blood sugar and provide satisfying nutrition. There isn’t a one-size-fits-a Continue reading >>

Eating White Bread Ups Obesity Risk

Eating White Bread Ups Obesity Risk

Eating two or more daily servings of white bread can increase a persons risk for obesity by 40%, according to a preliminary study presented at the 2014 European Congress on Obesity in Bulgaria. More than one-third of adults in the United States are obese and roughly another third are overweight, putting them at increased risk for developing Type 2 diabetes . To evaluate the relationship between white bread consumption and obesity, researchers at the University of Navarra in Spain monitored the eating habits and weight of 9,267 Spanish university graduates over the course of five years. The data showed that people whose only bread consumption came in the form of white bread and who consumed two or more portions a day of the bread were 40% more likely to become overweight or obese than people who ate less than one portion of white bread a week, with fully one-fifth of people who ate six or more slices of white bread every day becoming overweight or obese. No link was found between eating only whole-grain bread or between eating a combination of both white and whole-grain bread and becoming overweight or obese perhaps because of the types of carbohydrate and the fiber content in whole-grain bread, the researchers suggest. When you use refined flour for making bread, you lose the bran and the germ, and you lose essential nutritious components for the diet, such as vitamins. [Fiber] slows the absorption of sugars, but refined bread is almost like a bomb of sugar, noted Martinez-Gonzalez . The problem is similar to what we see with soft drinks, their sugars are rapidly transformed into fat [in] an organism, he added . The researchers recommended switching from white to whole-grain bread, particularly for people who are trying to lose weight. Although the study showed an asso Continue reading >>

White Bread Vs Wheat Bread

White Bread Vs Wheat Bread

My husband has just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes so we are learning how to change our diet in order to control it without meds. In looking at carb information on bread, I noticed that the numbers are pretty similar but the doctor said not to eat white bread. If the carbs are basically the same, what is the reason for this? I think both wheat and white bread pose problems for diabetics. The carbs in the flour turns to sugar, fairly quickly raising blood sugars. Doctors want us eating more fiber but getting fiber from veggies is better. If your husband has to have bread check out some gluten free options or Low Carb breads or tortillas. In the beginning have your husband test his bg before he eats a new food and 2 hours after. Ideally he should be in the 120-140 range or lower. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Hi and welcome to DD sorry to say this is not what diabetics have found. We live this, we test daily and we know white or wheat or whole grain it makes no difference for the majority of us. I suggest that your husband get a meter, carbs turn to sugar, all carbs turn to sugar. What your husband can eat his meter will tell him by the readings he gets. This is the start, the learning begins when he eats, then 2 hrs later tests. Exercise also helps along with weight loss if needed. My husband has just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes so we are learning how to change our die Continue reading >>

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