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Can I Eat Oatmeal If I Have Diabetes?

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal - Diabetes Q&a

Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal - Diabetes Q&a

Answer: Yes! Oats are a fantastic grain which offer a slew of health benefits. They contain a special type of fiber called beta-glucan. Beta glucan is a soluble fiber that's been shown to be beneficial in lowering one's blood cholesterol levels. (Remember those Cheerios commercial about lowering cholesterol? That's the beta glucan at work) This benefit is extremely helpful for those with diabetes since, as you may know, having diabetes increases one's risk of heart disease. And, lowering high cholesterol levels helps reduce one's risk of heart disease. Including oats as a regular part of your diet can help ward off one of the negative health risks associated with diabetes. A steaming bowl of oatmeal for breakfast can be a great way to start the day. But, steer clear of those flavored little packets; they contain a good deal of added sugar. Stick to the bulk stuff in the big canisters or, if you really need the convenience of the little packets, just stick to the plain ones. But, that doesn't mean you have to eat it plain. You can make your own flavored oatmeal easily. But, first things first, to boost the nutrition content of your meal even more, prepare your oatmeal with lowfat or skim milk instead of water. Use the same amount of milk as the label says to use for water, and if you don't have time for stove top cooking and stirring, pop the bowl in the microwave and cook on HIGH for 1 minute at a time, stirring after each minute until it reaches the consistency you like. Flavor, flavor, flavor. Oatmeal is so neutral, it can be embellished in a number of ways. You can add your favorite spices -- cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, or others. You can add a bit of vanilla too. Nuts also make a deliciously nutritious addition to oatmeal -- just stir in 1 to 2 tablespoons before or Continue reading >>

Eating Oatmeal When You Have Diabetes

Eating Oatmeal When You Have Diabetes

As a diabetes patient, what you eat can impact your condition. Eating foods high in nutrients and fiber, yet low in sugar and fat can help to maintain a healthy level of blood sugar in your body while also improving your overall health. One of the foods that are most recommended for those with diabetes is oatmeal. This food comes with a lot of health benefits and is often a go to food. However, oatmeal can sometimes be bad for diabetes.. Benefits of Oatmeal for those With Diabetes Including oatmeal into your diet can somehow help to manage your diabetes and this comes with benefits as well. For one, it helps to regulate your blood sugar level thanks to its low glycemic index and high fiber content. It is healthy for the heart and can help to lower your cholesterol. When oatmeal is cooked or soaked ahead, it can serve as a quick and easy meal. It is also high in fiber and will make you feel full longer. Hence it helps in weight management, which is important for those with diabetes. But other than the benefits, there might also be some drawbacks of including oatmeal to your diet. If you have diabetes, consuming just the right amount of oatmeal does not come with any disadvantages. However, oatmeal is also high in carbohydrates and should not be over consumed. It is also important to choose the right oatmeal product as some can be filled with sugar and artificial flavoring. The best type of oatmeal are raw rolled oats or steel cut oats. Avoid processed instant oatmeal. Oatmeal also has negative effects for people who have gastroparesis, a condition that refers to delayed gastric emptying. If you have gastroparesis and diabetes at the same time, consuming oatmeal maybe harmful for your body due to the high fiber content. When prepared the right way, oatmeal can have lots Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal? Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal? Our registered dietitian and CDE Amy Reeder weighs in on whether or not you should eat oatmeal. Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a masters degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. There are several foods that share a common theme among people with diabetes: they wreak havoc on your blood sugar. Pizza, pasta, and cereal are a few. Oatmeal is another. Most people report a spike in blood glucose after eating oatmeal compared to other breakfast foods. Surprisingly, for such a simple food, oatmeal can be found in many different formsinstant, slow-cooking, flavored, unflavored, plain, and chock-full of toppings. Some of the flavored oatmeals, like apple cinnamon and maple brown sugar, contain as much as four teaspoons of added sugar. Combine that added sugar with the fact that some people with diabetes are more insulin resistant in the morning time and you have a recipe for challenging blood sugar control! If you do enjoy oatmeal for breakfast (or anytime) and it does cause your blood sugars to surge, here are a few tips that might work to even things out: Cook plain, whole oats, or steel-cut oats on the stove top. These oats have not been processed as much as instant oats and take longer to digest and absorb as glucose in the bloodstream. Try the overnight oats recipe below if you only have time to heat in the morning as opposed to cook. Add your own sweetener. If you like your oatmeal a little sweet, add a touch of Splenda, agave, or honey. A little goes a long way. And theres a good chance you wont add nearly as much as the company making the flavored stuff. A few Continue reading >>

What's The Deal With Oatmeal?

What's The Deal With Oatmeal?

As most of my readers know, I am a huge fan of eggs. But every so often, I like to mix it up and have some oatmeal. Oatmeal is interesting because, while it is a healthy food choice, it actually has a pretty high glycemic index, meaning it could cause a spike in blood sugar. However, how you eat oatmeal could determine how much of a spike it could cause. For instance, if you add a teaspoon of sugar or some honey to a bowl of oatmeal, the glycemic index will skyrocket and it will trigger an even greater spike in blood sugar levels. If, however, you add a tablespoon of butter and some cinnamon, it has less effect on blood sugar levels. Since most meals contain more than one item, it’s really best to monitor your blood sugar levels to get a handle on what’s actually happening with various type meals. Monitor How Oatmeal and Other Foods Affect You That’s why I suggest self-testing using a glucose monitor. It’s an easy and precise way to see how specific foods affect your blood sugar levels and then compare that to the way you feel (your mood, energy level, etc.). Ideally, I would suggest keeping your “postprandial” level (the level one hour after you eat) at 100 mg/dL or below. Check your blood sugar before you eat and then one hour afterward. If the postprandial level exceeds 100 mg/dL, that meal or food is a problem. It doesn’t matter if it’s something you know is sweet, such as a dessert, or something you think is healthy. If it spikes your postprandial blood sugar, it’s a problem for you. Once you identify the problem foods, you don’t need to keep checking them. For example, if you ate some oatmeal and your postprandial level was 125 mg/dL, then avoid oatmeal from there on out. Only check new meals to determine which ones don’t cause a spike in blo Continue reading >>

Is Oatmeal Good For People With Diabetes?

Is Oatmeal Good For People With Diabetes?

Oatmeal, also known as porridge, is a popular breakfast food made from oats. There are several different types of oatmeal including rolled oats (old-fashioned), instant, and steel-cut. All oatmeal starts with whole raw oats, which are harvested and cleaned. The outer shell, or hull, is removed, leaving the edible grain or "groat" behind. People can buy and consume oat groats, but they need to be cooked for 50-60 minutes to soften. Steel-cut oats are made when the groats are chopped with a metal blade. Steel-cut oats cook more quickly - about 20-30 minutes - because they are further broken down. Rolled oats or old-fashioned oatmeal is made by steaming and rolling the groats into flakes. This cuts cooking time down to 3-5 minutes. Instant oats or "quick oats" are made by further steaming and rolling the oats, bringing the cook time down to as little as 30-60 seconds. The texture of steel-cut, old-fashioned, and instant oats differs widely, and which one is best is a personal preference. People who have tried quick oats and not enjoyed their softer texture should try the hardier steel-cut oats. The nutritional profile of each cut of oats is the same when they are plain. However, many instant oats have added sugar and flavorings and are often high in sodium. Also, the higher the level of processing, the quicker the speed of digestion, and the higher the glycemic index, a measure of how quickly blood sugar rises when eating. How does oatmeal affect people with diabetes? Oatmeal is mainly a source of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates are converted to sugar when digested and increase sugar levels in the bloodstream. Carbohydrates that have fiber cause a slower release of sugar into the bloodstream, lowering the potential spike in blood sugar after a meal. A diet that is high in proc Continue reading >>

Is Oatmeal Good For A Diabetic Diet?

Is Oatmeal Good For A Diabetic Diet?

Question Originally asked by Community Member KEN C Is Oatmeal Good For A Diabetic Diet? Should I increase or eliminate oatmeal in my diabetic diet? And if I should increase, is there a specific kind I should be eating to help? Answer There are plenty of things you could be eating as a diabetic that aren’t good for your diabetes diet-like these seemingly healthy low-carb options. But oatmeal is not one of those seemingly bad options-it’s an actual good option! I am a diabetic and I eat oatmeal at least 2-3 times a week. I don’t and haven’t had any issues with it. I do try to eat the lower-sugar kind, which has about 26g of carbs. If you’re looking for other low-carb breakfast options you may consider barley cereal. There are other small changes you can make in your diet that will have a big effect, too! Like these six simple food and cooking technique swaps. If weight is a concern, consider following these 12 ways to lose weight and manage your diabetes. Bottom line is, keep enjoying your oatmeal unless your physician tells you otherwise! You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Cherise Nicole Continue reading >>

Quaker Oats For Breakfast, Diabetes For Lunch?

Quaker Oats For Breakfast, Diabetes For Lunch?

Sitting down to a bowl full of sugar every morning is a pretty surefire way to lead yourself to a whole host of metabolic derangements down the line, whether or not your waistline is showing it. Insulin dis-regulation not only leads to difficulty managing blood sugar, but also has a direct effect on the status of the other hormones in our bodies which are the way most of our body functions are managed. This is where the old saying, “you are what you eat” becomes a bit freaky when we're sitting down to a big bowl of cereal to start our days. I've already ranted about Kashi comparing it's GoLean Crunch Cereal to an egg, because that commercial was and is appalling. If you even took one minute to THINK about how those huge vats of grains and sweeteners arrive on a truck at a factory door before going through miles of machinery to be portioned out into bags and boxes of cereal, you might possibly pause to think about whether or not cereal is even FOOD. Or perhaps not. I know I didn't think much about it before maybe five or six years ago. I ate tons of cereal. With skim milk. Seriously. And I was hungry ALL the time. After seeing the latest commercial from Quaker where The Biggest Loser trainer Bob Harper pimps their Oatmeal Squares cereal as a “superfood,” I couldn't resist another little rant. I don't even have time to get into every last detail here about how sugar and grains (yes, even “whole grains”) negatively impact our blood sugar and our waist lines. If you aren't clear yet on how that all works, a tiny bit of research will turn up TONS of information on how a low-fat/high-carb USDA-recommended diet promotes dis-regulation of insulin secretions in your body leaving you hungry, craving more sugar, likely still fat (despite the caloric deficit you struggl Continue reading >>

Oatmeal For Diabetes

Oatmeal For Diabetes

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which the body is unable to adequately use consumed sugars or glucose. This occurs when body becomes less sensitive to insulin or is unable to produce sufficient amounts of this hormone. Diabetes is a chronic disease that can lead to heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, blindness and other conditions. Diet is an important factor in treating and controlling diabetes; fiber-rich foods such as oatmeal help to balance blood sugar levels and reduce diabetic complications. Video of the Day The glycemic index measures how quickly a food raises blood sugar levels and is an important factor in controlling diabetes. DiabetesNet.com advises that foods such as oats have a lower glycemic index and help to balance glucose levels for better diabetes control and prevention of related complications. Oatmeal has this effect because it increases the viscosity or thickness of the contents of the stomach, slowing digestion and prolonging the absorption of glucose into the bloodstream. This also gives the body a stable, long-term source of energy. Oatmeal Lowers Cholesterol People with diabetes also have an increased risk of high cholesterol. Oatmeal contains beta-glucan, a soluble fiber that lowers blood cholesterol. This occurs because soluble fiber from oats and other fiber-rich foods forms a gel-like substance in the small intestines, helping to catch unhealthy cholesterol from foods and preventing it from being absorbed by the body. However, high density lipid or HDL cholesterol, which is a healthy variety, is not trapped. Oatmeal is also a heart-healthy food, which is particularly important for diabetics who are more prone to heart disease than those without diabetes. In addition to its cholesterol-lowering properties, the American Diabetes Associati Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

Effects Of Oatmeal On Blood Glucose

Effects Of Oatmeal On Blood Glucose

Whether you've been diagnosed with type I or type II diabetes, chances are you're facing the same challenges: how to manage your blood glucose levels and reduce your weight. Fortunately, there are a number of easy, effective ways to manage both, and they don't require a lot of expense, time or energy. It all starts at the breakfast table. Video of the Day Blood Glucose and Hyperglycemia The challenge for most diabetics is how to manage their blood glucose levels. The normal range of blood sugar is 70 to 110 mg/dl. While glucose levels can fluctuate throughout the day, blood sugar levels that remain over 110 to 130 mg/dl can mean that you are pre-diabetic--a dangerous disease that affects the kidneys, heart, eyes and many other organs. Newly diagnosed diabetics learn that one of the most important ways to manage blood glucose is by eating complex carbohydrates--carbohydrates that break down slowly in the bloodstream, preventing blood glucose levels from spiking. The Glycemic Index One of the easiest ways to manage your blood glucose is to eat foods that rate low on the glycemic index. The glycemic index (GI) is a rating system that is assigned to all carbohydrates and defines how quickly they cause blood glucose levels to spike. Spiking glucose levels can cause a number of complications in diabetes like dizziness, nausea, muscle tremors and lack of consciousness. Using the glycemic index, diabetics can choose foods that keep their blood glucose levels stable and avoid serious complications. Foods rated lower than 54 on the GI are considered low. Foods rated between 55 and 70 are medium-GI foods. Foods rated over 70 are high GI foods. The goal is to eat low-GI foods, or combine high-GI foods with low-GI foods or fat and protein to limit blood glucose spiking. Traditional Continue reading >>

Oatmeal For People With Diabetes

Oatmeal For People With Diabetes

The American Diabetes Association recommends whole grains, like oatmeal, as a good way to increase soluble fiber in the diet. Soluble fiber can help improve blood glucose control by slowing the absorption of sugar from the digestive system. Oatmeal can lower low density lipoprotein, or "bad" cholesterol, when it's consumed daily. People with diabetes have at least double the risk for heart disease, according to the American Heart Association, and lowering cholesterol is one way to help reduce the risk for heart disease. Video of the Day Benefits of Oatmeal A December 2013 article in "Forschende Komplementärmedizin/Research in Complementary Medicine" reported that eating oatmeal may help improve sensitivity to the blood-sugar-regulating hormone insulin in obese people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Another study in the August 2012 issue of "Nutrition Journal" found that people who consumed oatmeal daily for 6 weeks, as part of a low-fat diet based on nutritious whole foods, decreased waist size by 1/2 inch and reduced LDL cholesterol by 15 mg/dL. The control group in this study ate wheat noodles instead of oatmeal and experienced a 1/3-inch gain in waist size. LDL cholesterol dropped by 7 mg/dL in the control group. Steel cut oats are the least processed and cook in about 45 minutes. Rolled oats are slightly processed to reduce cooking time, but they still contain the whole grain and cook in about 10 minutes. Quick-cooking oats cook in even less time. Instant oatmeal contains less fiber and often contains added sugar, although plain instant oatmeal without added sugar is available. One cup of cooked oatmeal contains about 27 g of carbohydrates. Healthy toppings include a sprinkle of chopped nuts, cinnamon, berries or other fruit and low-fat milk. Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Oatmeal And Milk Blood Sugar Spike

Oatmeal And Milk Blood Sugar Spike

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community As you all know the doctor recommends to eat oatmeal with milk for breakfast, actually my doctor said to add some dried fruits so I did that and boom my blood sugar was 189 mg/dl after two hours. I don't understand how a doctor can prescribe something like this to a diabetic is crazy, what's the deal with this diets, they want to kill as faster? Also how much do you spike after such a meal? I would spike through the roof. Far too many carbs in oatmeal, and we also have to be careful with milk because it contains a lot of natural sugar. Dried fruits need to be avoided. Doctors need educating about what raises blood sugars! I would spike through the roof. Far too many carbs in oatmeal, and we also have to be careful with milk because it contains a lot of natural sugar. Dried fruits need to be avoided. Doctors need educating about what raises blood sugars! I used to really like a big stodgy bowl of porridge oats and I had this unsweetened with only water added. Before I started my more severe diet I reduced the quantity of oats and bought the version with added wheat and oat bran. Oatmeal is a moderate GI food so on paper it should be OK as part of a controlled diet. There is 27g of carbs in a 50g (dry) serving of the oats with oatbran and wheat bran that I have in the cupboard. That serving also has 6g of fibre and 6g of protein. If you made that as a 35g serving the carb load would only be 19g. I think it's all down to quantities and your own personal carb limits. I hope I can go back to enjoying a (small) portion of oats for breakfast in the future! Everyone is different and oats cause problems for some and not for others. However, dried fruit is prob Continue reading >>

12 Breakfast Rules For Diabetes

12 Breakfast Rules For Diabetes

First, eat it iStock/EasyBuy4u Even if your blood sugar is high in the morning, don't skip breakfast. Research shows that forgoing a morning meal increases the risk for obesity and insulin resistance. And studies confirm that breakfast eaters are better able to resist fatty and high-calorie foods later in the day. Aim to eat your breakfast at the same time every day, since keeping your blood sugar levels even throughout the day means eating consistently from day to day. Try to incorporate these healthy carbs for diabetes into your breakfast. iStock/ShotShare You can't (and shouldn't) avoid restaurants altogether, but there's one meal you should almost always eat at home: breakfast. Look at the alternatives: Diner-style breakfasts can include 1,000 calories or more with astronomical amounts of carbohydrates and fats. A healthy-sounding whole-wheat bagel with light cream cheese from a bagel shop may contain up to 67 grams of carbs, 450 calories, and 9 grams of fat. A sausage muffin may pack 29 grams of carbs, 370 calories, and 22 grams of fat. Compare those to a bowl of oatmeal (half a cup) with a half cup of fat-free milk, which contains a mere 12 grams of carbs, 195 calories, and 3 grams of fat. iStock/MarkGillow We assume you're already starting out with a cereal that contains at least 5 grams of fiber per serving. (Studies have found that people who regularly eat whole-grain cereal gain less weight than people who don't.) Make it even more diabetes-friendly by adding half a cup (one serving) of fresh fruit, such as strawberries or blueberries. Here's why fruit is healthy for diabetes (not forbidden!). Sprinkle 1 or 2 tablespoons of ground flaxseed on hot and cold cereal and yogurt iStock/Sasha Radosavljevic Rich in protein and fiber, these tiny seeds are a godsend to Continue reading >>

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