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Can I Eat Corn As A Diabetic?

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Chips

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Chips

Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living W Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Patient Have Boiled Sweet Corn?

Can A Diabetic Patient Have Boiled Sweet Corn?

Q: I am a type 2 diabetic patient, aged 55 years and my sugar level is 5.6. I want to know whether I can consume 200 gms daily boiled sweet corn (maize) without any ingredients but with some salt? What are the vitamins in it? A:Maize, the American Indian word for corn, means literally that which sustains life. It is, after wheat and rice, the most important cereal grain in the world. Botanically, maize (Zea mays) belongs to the grass family (Gramineae). The major chemical component of the maize kernel is starch, which provides up to 72 to 73 percent of the kernel weight. Other carbohydrates are simple sugars present as glucose, sucrose and fructose in amounts that vary from 1 to 3 percent of the kernel. After starch, the next largest chemical component of the kernel is protein. Protein content varies in common varieties from about 8 to 11 percent of the kernel weight. The oil content of the maize kernel comes mainly from the germ. Oil content is genetically controlled, with values ranging from 3 to 18 percent. Maize and other cereal grains constitute important sources of carbohydrates, proteins, vitamin B, and minerals. In some regions, maize serves as the primary staple while in other regions, maize is combined with other cereal grains. Maize is an excellent source of carbohydrates and good quality oil. It is more complete in nutrients in comparison to other cereals. All cereals tend to be low in lysine, tryptophan, and in available calcium. Maize is particularly low in niacin. Continue reading >>

Are Cornflakes Good For Diabetes?

Are Cornflakes Good For Diabetes?

Are you a diabetic patient? If so, then, you must be very much careful about what you eat. Lately, a fad for eating packaged foods offering high nutrition and vitamins sans any calories is on the rise. And one of the most popular packaged breakfast options is cornflakes. But then, is cornflakes the right food for diabetics? Does it help in the treatment of diabetes? This post has the answers. Read on to know more! Are Cornflakes A Health Food? Breakfast is necessary for everyone as it provides the required amount of energy necessary to sail comfortably through the day. Mornings are tough and hectic, and hence, many households opt for instant fix breakfast. But using milk and cornflakes as a healthy breakfast cereal is a bad choice because cornflakes are not exactly a health food. Cornflakes are made up of corn, malt flavoring, sugar and high fructose corn syrup. Most of the cornflakes brands in the market have high Glycemic index (GI), which increases the risk of diabetes (1). Diabetes And Glycemic Index: To understand the negative effect of cornflakes on diabetics, it is very important to know about Glycemic index. The GI is used to measure how a carbohydrate rich food increases the level of glucose in the blood (2). It means, food with high GI raises the blood glucose levels more than a food having low or medium GI. Hence, diabetic patients need to choose foods that have medium or low GI and plan their meals accordingly (3). In case you are eating a high GI food in your meal in the morning, you must balance it by eating low GI food in the evening. Cornflakes, as mentioned earlier, are rich in carbohydrates. Hence, they have high GI, which means they are not good for diabetes patients. Low Protein Food – Cornflakes: Cornflakes are a low protein food, which although m Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet - Gestational

Diabetes Diet - Gestational

For a balanced diet, you need to eat a variety of healthy foods. Reading food labels can help you make healthy choices when you shop. If you are a vegetarian or on a special diet, talk with your health care provider to make sure you're getting a balanced diet. In general, you should eat: Plenty of whole fruits and vegetables Moderate amounts of lean proteins and healthy fats Moderate amounts of whole grains, such as bread, cereal, pasta, and rice, plus starchy vegetables, such as corn and peas Fewer foods that have a lot of sugar, such as soft drinks, fruit juices, and pastries You should eat three small- to moderate-sized meals and one or more snacks each day. Do not skip meals and snacks. Keep the amount and types of food (carbohydrates, fats, and proteins) the same from day to day. This can help you keep your blood sugar stable. CARBOHYDRATES Less than half the calories you eat should come from carbohydrates. Most carbohydrates are found in starchy or sugary foods. They include bread, rice, pasta, cereal, potatoes, peas, corn, fruit, fruit juice, milk, yogurt, cookies, candy, soda, and other sweets. High-fiber, whole-grain carbohydrates are healthy choices. Vegetables are good for your health and your blood sugar. Enjoy lots of them. Carbohydrates in food are measured in grams. You can learn to count the amount of carbohydrates in the foods that you eat. GRAINS, BEANS, AND STARCHY VEGETABLES Eat 6 or more servings a day. One serving equals: 1 slice bread 1 ounce (28 grams) ready-to-eat cereal 1/2 cup (105 grams) cooked rice or pasta 1 English muffin Choose foods loaded with vitamins, minerals, fiber, and healthy carbohydrates. They include: Whole-grain breads and crackers Whole grain cereals Whole grains, such as barley or oats Beans Brown or wild rice Whole-wheat pa Continue reading >>

Is Corn A Bad Food To Eat With Diabetes?

Is Corn A Bad Food To Eat With Diabetes?

If you are diabetic, well-meaning friends or family might have warned you away from corn as a starchy, carbohydrate-rich food you shouldn't eat. But corn offers plenty of nutritional benefits that make it worth the extra effort to include it as part of a balanced diabetic diet. The trick to including corn in your eating plan is to balance it with sources of protein and fat that can mitigate the effect of carbohydrate-rich foods on blood glucose levels. Video of the Day People with diabetes can't properly process glucose and use it for energy. Instead, their production or use of insulin, the hormone responsible for converting glucose to fuel, is hampered, leading to episodes of extremely high blood sugar levels. A diagnosis of diabetes typically requires a blood glucose level of 200 mg/dL or more during a random test or one over 126 mg/dL after an eight-hour fast. Over 23 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. Carbohydrates can cause blood sugar to rise, so diabetics typically have to pay close attention to the carbohydrates in their diet. This can be done through counting carbohydrates and limiting the specific amount allowed per meal, by using an exchange system to swap out specific carbohydrate-containing foods with others or by using the glycemic index, a measure of blood sugar response to specific carbohydrate-containing foods. Corn is high in starch, a type of carbohydrate that can quickly raise blood sugar levels. This doesn't mean that as a diabetic you need to completely forgo corn, however. Corn contains plenty of healthy nutrients, including iron, vitamins A and B-6, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese and selenium. It also provides a high level of fiber and is c Continue reading >>

Is Corn Good For Diabetics

Is Corn Good For Diabetics

Well-meaning family and friends may have advised you away from corns as a carb-rich, starchy food you can’t eat. And it is basically processed food. But for diabetics, corn is beneficial because of nutrients like Vitamin B5, C and B3 and it is also rich in antioxidants. It can help your body develop better blood sugar control. Anyway, with controlled blood sugar, only a little corn is allowed. The trick to including corns in your meal plan is to well balance it with sources of fat and proteins that will mitigate the effect of carb-rich foods on the blood sugar levels. Corn is categorized as starch, a type of carb, so it is only allowed in small portions for people with type 2 diabetes. It means that as a diabetic you don’t need to forgo corn completely. Corn is also high in fiber as well as is considered a greatly whole-grain food. It also has plenty of healthy nutrients, such as selenium, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, folate, niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, vitamins B-6 and A and iron. You can properly include it in your diabetic diet, just eat it along with foods including fat and protein and also cut down on the amount of foods you eat. Limit your consumption to one-half cut of the kernels or one ear of corn at any given meal. Anyway, you should not just eat corn and stop medication without checking with your doctor. The High Fructose Corn Syrup mainly use corn as its ingredient. HFCS is also added to lots of packaged and preserved food. Badly the syrup surely is responsible for big unnatural sugar spikes. With certain strategy, you can help prevent spikes in your blood sugar levels. HFC2 is on the list for lots of chronic conditions, like obesity, cardiovascular, diabetes and some other lifestyle related conditions. If you really enjoy eating corn, you should b Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Corn?

Can Diabetics Eat Corn?

If you have diabetes, your body’s ability to produce or use insulin is impaired. Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that clears the sugar you eat out of your blood and puts it into your cells so you can use it for energy. Starchy vegetables, including corn, contain carbohydrates that may raise your blood sugar, but they can be part of a healthy diet if you consume them in moderation. Video of the Day Fitting Corn into a Healthy Diet Even though you have diabetes, your meal plan should include small portions of carbohydrate foods, such as fruit, cereal, yogurt, beans and starchy vegetables. Corn is a source of energy, fiber, vitamins and minerals and is low in fat and sodium. Keep track of the carbohydrate grams you eat and set a limit for the day, advises the American Diabetes Association. A ½-cup serving of cooked corn or half of a large corn cob contains 15 grams of carbohydrate. Most people with diabetes should eat between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal. Continue reading >>

Science, Sweet Corn And Diabetes – Research In The Making

Science, Sweet Corn And Diabetes – Research In The Making

Food scientists are constantly exploring how to make foods taste better, digest easier, grow with fewer fertilizers, etc. We recently learned that a team of scientists at Iowa State University is working with the starches in sweet corn to try to create a response in the body that modify the starch to digest more slowly… which creates a more moderate insulin response, and release of glucose into the blood stream. This is important to the U.S.’s diabetic population of more than 21 million individuals, since moderating insulin and glucose through diet and medication is a constant need. This research has been in the works for the last 15 years. Iowa State scientists have been looking at the genes, examining their make-up, splicing and moving things around, and developing corn seed with the modified starch. These seeds grow new corn and the starch from those kernels is then examined to determine how the starch breaks down with enzymes as well as with human test subjects. Their blood glucose levels are measured to determine how slowly the starch is digested. “We have an obesity epidemic… the number one disease that goes along with obesity is Type 2 Diabetes,” said Dr. Suzanne Hendrich. “Being able to help those folks maintain better control of their blood sugar is going to protect them from all those bad consequences that can happen if you have too high levels of blood glucose over time.” Check out this video about Sweet Corn Research in Iowa to see the progress being made. Continue reading >>

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Know What to Avoid Diabetes requires daily maintenance, including monitoring your blood sugar, eating a healthy diet, exercising, and of course staying on top of any complications with your heart, eyes, and other organs. Controlling your weight is another key aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. If you’re overweight, losing some weight — even just 10 to 15 pounds — can help improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, reduce triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, and lower your blood pressure. A healthy diet for diabetes will help you manage your weight and lead you toward foods that have a positive effect on your glucose levels, while guiding you away from those foods that are likely to cause dangerous spikes in your blood sugar. Learn which nine foods you should steer clear of if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Eat Popcorn?

Can People With Diabetes Eat Popcorn?

Popcorn can be a healthful snack for most people, depending on how it is prepared. With its fairly low calorie and high-fiber content, air popped popcorn is often a go-to snack for dieters. However, people with diabetes have more to worry about than their waistlines when snacking on popcorn. People with diabetes can eat popcorn but need to choose carefully the type of popcorn, how it is cooked, and how much they eat, due to popcorn's high carb content. Nutritional information Air-popped popcorn offers very few calories per cup. In addition, a cup of air-popped popcorn contains a little over 1 gram (g) in fiber. It also contains about 1 g of protein and about 6 g of carbohydrate. Additionally, popcorn contains zero cholesterol and is almost fat-free, far less than 0.5 g per cup. The total calories in a 5-cup serving are between 100-150. Popcorn qualifies as a whole-grain food. One serving can provide about 70 percent of the recommended daily intake of whole grain. Popcorn is full of vitamins and minerals. A single serving of popcorn contains a number of vitamins and minerals, including: vitamin A vitamin E vitamin B6 pantothenic acid thiamin niacin riboflavin A serving of popcorn also contains iron and trace amounts of manganese, calcium, phosphorus, copper, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. The popcorn's hull or shell is the source of much of its nutritional value. The shell contains beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin, which are important for maintaining eye health. The shell also contains polyphenols with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which may protect against cancer and cardiovascular disease. Researchers have stated that popcorn contains up to 300 milligrams of polyphenols per serving. This high amount of polyphenols is more than 60 percent of the am Continue reading >>

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

If you have type 2 diabetes — the most common form of diabetes — eating a healthy, well-balanced diet is critical to controlling your weight, blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol. By enriching your diet and creating a meal plan tailored to your personal preferences and lifestyle, you'll be able to enjoy the foods you love while minimizing complications and reducing further risk. Although there isn’t any research that directly supports individual dietary choices in the fight against type 2 diabetes, it doesn’t hurt to maintain a balanced diet. More often than not, the average diet is lacking in these key nutrients: calcium magnesium fiber potassium vitamins A, C, D, and E vitamin B-12 for those on metformin Adding foods rich in these nutrients is often a great first step in diabetes management. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the following are considered to be diabetes superfoods: Fat-free milk and yogurt are both a good source of vitamin D, which promotes strong bones and teeth. Whole grains containing germ and bran are often rich in magnesium, chromium, and folate. Regardless of the type, berries are an excellent source of antioxidants and fiber. Citrus fruits, such as oranges, lemons, and limes, are high in vitamin C. Not only are beans high in fiber, they’re a solid source of potassium and magnesium. Omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce your risk of heart disease, so don’t shy away from salmon dishes. In addition to providing magnesium and fiber, nuts can help with hunger management. Some nuts and seeds also contain omega-3s. Tomatoes contain crucial nutrients such as vitamins C and E. Swap regular potatoes for sweet potatoes, which are chock-full of potassium and vitamin A. Dark green leafy vegetables like collards and kale a Continue reading >>

Is Corn Flakes Good For Diabetics?

Is Corn Flakes Good For Diabetics?

Diabetes is a lifestyle disease in which the blood sugar level increases uncontrollably. So, if you are diabetic, you would want to start off your day with a bowl of corn flakes thinking it as a good diet plan for diabetes. But, can diabetics eat corn flakes? Well, it won’t be inappropriate to say that corn flakes are not a healthy option for diabetic patients as it aggravates the risk of not only diabetes but many other lifestyle diseases also. We all know that a healthy breakfast should contain food that are low in calories, sugar and fat, but should have high nutritional values and fibre content. Choosing your diet is one of the crucial factors in keeping the blood sugar level at a normal range, particularly if you are diabetic. So, how about a bowl of corn flakes and milk? 20 Foods That Diabetics Should Avoid Of course, corn is the main ingredient in corn flakes, but the other ingredients are sugar, malt flavouring and corn syrup with a high fructose level. All these ingredients have a high content of glycemic index. Therefore, the consumption of corn flakes can actually increase the blood glucose level and pose a greater risk of aggravating diabetes. So they are not good for diabetics. Corn flakes can be a choice only if they are taken in moderation. Before reaching on a conclusion on are corn flakes good for diabetes, let us have a look at the effect of corn flakes in diabetic patients. High Glycemic Index (GI) It is a method to measure how carbohydrate-rich foods can raise the blood sugar levels pretty quickly. As corn flakes have a GI value of 83, it creates a sudden increase in the blood glucose level So, how is corn flakes good for diabetes? Just think about it! Low Protein Content Corn flakes have a very low protein content in it. So even after having a cup Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Popcorn is one of life's little snacking pleasures -- after all, who could imagine going to see a flick without stopping by the snack counter for a small bucket? While people with diabetes should try to avoid the highly salted and buttery versions, popcorn can still be safely incorporated into the diabetic diet. Popcorn has high fiber and a low glycemic load compared to many other snack foods, so as long as it is consumed in moderation it makes a healthy addition to the diabetic diet. Nutritional Content of Popcorn Like any whole grain source of carbohydrate, air-popped and unprocessed popcorn is an excellent source of nutrients for individuals with diabetes. Most "light" popcorns contain 80 to 100 calories and 3 grams of fiber per serving. Because it is made from corn, which is a whole grain, popcorn does not impact blood sugar levels as dramatically as other sugary snack foods. In fact, one serving of popcorn has a glycemic load that is 2 to 4 times lower than other snack foods, such as raisins, graham crackers, or potato chips. The Diabetic Portion Size of Popcorn According to the American Diabetes Association, one diabetic portion size of popcorn equals 3 cups of popped popcorn, or approximately 15 grams of carbohydrates. Because individuals with diabetes can consume between 15 and 30 grams of carbohydrate for snacks, no more than two servings or 6 cups of popcorn should be consumed at one time. Most individual, 1 ounce bags of microwave popcorn bags contain approximately 21 grams of carbohydrate, making these portions perfect for individuals with diabetes. Choosing the Right Popcorn Individuals with diabetes must be mindful of the type of popcorn they consume because many versions have added fats, sugars and salts. When selecting popcorn at the grocery store, indiv Continue reading >>

High-fructose Corn Syrup And Your Type 2 Diabetes Management Plan

High-fructose Corn Syrup And Your Type 2 Diabetes Management Plan

If you have type 2 diabetes, you know you need to watch your weight, your carbohydrates, and specifically your sugar intake. That means limiting sugar-laden sodas, desserts, candies, and more. Included in the array of sugars to beware of is high-fructose corn syrup, or HFCS, a processed type of sugar that's found in a huge number of packaged foods. "HFCS is corn syrup that has undergone processing to convert its glucose into fructose," says Erin Palinski, RD, a registered dietitian in private practice in northern New Jersey. That processing gives HFCS a longer shelf life, making it a common sweetener you’ll see on ingredient labels. You’ll typically find it in sodas, processed foods, snack foods with fruit flavoring, and candy. Once eaten, high-fructose corn syrup is converted into glucose, just as regular table sugar (sucrose) is. "Any food or ingredient that can be converted into glucose in the body will raise blood sugar levels," says Palinski. And like sugar, high-fructose corn syrup is very high on the glycemic index. "The glycemic index (GI) is a ranking system that helps to categorize the effect a carbohydrate will have on blood sugar levels," explains Palinski. “The higher the GI of a food, the more impact it will have on our blood sugar levels." The glycemic index of both sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup is nearly identical, which means that they will have a nearly identical impact on blood sugar. "Since both HFCS and sucrose have high GI levels, it is important for those with diabetes to consume foods containing these ingredients in moderation to prevent spikes in blood sugar levels," Palinski recommends. The Sour Side of HFCS High-fructose corn syrup shouldn't be viewed as any better than sucrose when it comes to watching your sugar intake. In fact, Continue reading >>

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