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Can I Eat Corn As A Diabetic?

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

6 Worst Diabetes Snacks You Should Cut From Your Diet

6 Worst Diabetes Snacks You Should Cut From Your Diet

1 / 7 What Not to Eat if You Have Type 2 Diabetes No one likes to be told no — especially if you have diabetes and are already struggling to meet the day-to-day dietary demands of the disease, which most people would admit is no easy task. Often, a diagnosis of prediabetes or full-blown type 2 diabetes means you have to give up or limit many of the foods you once loved, like white potatoes and red meat, and many others for which you may not yet have developed a taste, such as leafy greens and seafood. But making healthy choices when you have diabetes is one of your best bets for maintaining or achieving proper blood sugar control and helping to prevent certain diabetes complications, such as nerve damage, vision problems, heart disease, and stroke, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Adequate sleep and regular exercise should be part of that effort, but so should smart snacking. After all, a good diabetes snack can help you keep your blood sugar on an even keel, provide energy throughout a busy day, help improve your workout, and prevent you from overeating at mealtime. But when you choose which snacks to reach for when hunger strikes, are some options better than others? Unsurprisingly, yes, and when snacking, you should continue to count your carbohydrate intake, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) advises. According to an article published in February 2014 in the Journal of Education and Health Promotion, making sure your overall diabetes diet is rich in fruit, veggies (especially the nonstarchy kinds), lean protein, healthy fats, and whole grains can help you stay on track. And while most dietitians agree with the phrase “everything in moderation” when it comes to best managing your blood sugar, it’s actually true that when you have dia Continue reading >>

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Know What to Avoid Diabetes requires daily maintenance, including monitoring your blood sugar, eating a healthy diet, exercising, and of course staying on top of any complications with your heart, eyes, and other organs. Controlling your weight is another key aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. If you’re overweight, losing some weight — even just 10 to 15 pounds — can help improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, reduce triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, and lower your blood pressure. A healthy diet for diabetes will help you manage your weight and lead you toward foods that have a positive effect on your glucose levels, while guiding you away from those foods that are likely to cause dangerous spikes in your blood sugar. Learn which nine foods you should steer clear of if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Popcorn is one of life's little snacking pleasures -- after all, who could imagine going to see a flick without stopping by the snack counter for a small bucket? While people with diabetes should try to avoid the highly salted and buttery versions, popcorn can still be safely incorporated into the diabetic diet. Popcorn has high fiber and a low glycemic load compared to many other snack foods, so as long as it is consumed in moderation it makes a healthy addition to the diabetic diet. Nutritional Content of Popcorn Like any whole grain source of carbohydrate, air-popped and unprocessed popcorn is an excellent source of nutrients for individuals with diabetes. Most "light" popcorns contain 80 to 100 calories and 3 grams of fiber per serving. Because it is made from corn, which is a whole grain, popcorn does not impact blood sugar levels as dramatically as other sugary snack foods. In fact, one serving of popcorn has a glycemic load that is 2 to 4 times lower than other snack foods, such as raisins, graham crackers, or potato chips. The Diabetic Portion Size of Popcorn According to the American Diabetes Association, one diabetic portion size of popcorn equals 3 cups of popped popcorn, or approximately 15 grams of carbohydrates. Because individuals with diabetes can consume between 15 and 30 grams of carbohydrate for snacks, no more than two servings or 6 cups of popcorn should be consumed at one time. Most individual, 1 ounce bags of microwave popcorn bags contain approximately 21 grams of carbohydrate, making these portions perfect for individuals with diabetes. Choosing the Right Popcorn Individuals with diabetes must be mindful of the type of popcorn they consume because many versions have added fats, sugars and salts. When selecting popcorn at the grocery store, indiv Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetes Patient Eat Corn And Melon?

Can A Diabetes Patient Eat Corn And Melon?

Corn iѕ high in starch, a type оf carbohydrate thаt саn quickly raise blood sugar levels. Thiѕ dоеѕn't mеаn thаt аѕ a diabetic уоu nееd tо completely forgo corn, however. Corn соntаinѕ plenty оf healthy nutrients, including iron, vitamins A аnd B-6, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese аnd selenium. It аlѕо рrоvidеѕ a high level оf fiber аnd iѕ considered a whole-grain food. Tо properly include corn in a diabetic diet, consume it аlоng with foods соntаining protein оr fat аnd limit уоur consumption tо оnе еаr оf corn оr one-half cup оf kernels аt аnу givеn meal. Melon iѕ a good fruit choice fоr people with diabetes, but mаnу people mistakenly think thаt it iѕ not. Thе rеаѕоn hаѕ tо dо with thе difference bеtwееn glycemic index аnd itѕ glycemic load. Thе Glycemic Index (GI) iѕ a measure оf thе effects оf carbohydrates оn blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates thаt break dоwn quickly during digestion, releasing glucose rapidly intо thе bloodstream (like thоѕе found in white bread), hаvе a “high GI” (70 оr higher); carbohydrates thаt break dоwn slowly, releasing glucose gradually intо thе bloodstream. I got diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes last year, and was put on Metformin. I followed the ADA diet 100% for a few weeks but it was ineffective at getting my blood sugar below 140. My Doctor was pretty ineffective as far as treatment options went (Metformin until Insulin...). Then I found this blog - Control Your Blood Sugar Level to help you figure out how to beat diabetes naturally, without being dependent on medications. Since following that protocol I've lost over 30 pounds and shaved 7 inches off my waist. I have more energy than ever, and ca Continue reading >>

Corn For Diabetes

Corn For Diabetes

Healthy Diet Plans >> Diabetic Diet >> Corn Corn For Diabetes Available throughout the year, but relished more when freshly harvested during the summer, corn is a versatile crop that can be eaten both raw and cooked. Roast it, boil it, steam it, this crop can be included in multiple dishes and crèmes, enhancing the overall flavor of the dish. Until recently, corn was not considered an important part of our diet and food. Today corn is gaining popularity because of its many health benefits. Nutrients In Corn Corn is not only rich in dietary fiber, but in other mineral and vitamins too. google_ad_client="ca-pub-5089409400548728";google_ad_slot="8293302746";google_adsbygoogle_status="done";google_ad_width=300;google_ad_height=250;google_available_width=593;google_ad_modifications={"plle":true,"eids":["368226201","38893302","21061122","191880502"],"loeids":["368226211","38893312"]};google_loader_used="aa";google_reactive_tag_first=true;google_ad_format="300x250";google_ad_unit_key="2597211695";google_ad_dom_fingerprint="2879382821";google_sailm=false;google_unique_id=4;google_async_iframe_id="aswift_4";google_start_time=1515273119367;google_pub_vars="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 Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Corn?

Can Diabetics Eat Corn?

If you have diabetes, your body’s ability to produce or use insulin is impaired. Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that clears the sugar you eat out of your blood and puts it into your cells so you can use it for energy. Starchy vegetables, including corn, contain carbohydrates that may raise your blood sugar, but they can be part of a healthy diet if you consume them in moderation. Video of the Day Fitting Corn into a Healthy Diet Even though you have diabetes, your meal plan should include small portions of carbohydrate foods, such as fruit, cereal, yogurt, beans and starchy vegetables. Corn is a source of energy, fiber, vitamins and minerals and is low in fat and sodium. Keep track of the carbohydrate grams you eat and set a limit for the day, advises the American Diabetes Association. A ½-cup serving of cooked corn or half of a large corn cob contains 15 grams of carbohydrate. Most people with diabetes should eat between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal. Continue reading >>

Is Corn Good For Diabetics

Is Corn Good For Diabetics

Well-meaning family and friends may have advised you away from corns as a carb-rich, starchy food you can’t eat. And it is basically processed food. But for diabetics, corn is beneficial because of nutrients like Vitamin B5, C and B3 and it is also rich in antioxidants. It can help your body develop better blood sugar control. Anyway, with controlled blood sugar, only a little corn is allowed. The trick to including corns in your meal plan is to well balance it with sources of fat and proteins that will mitigate the effect of carb-rich foods on the blood sugar levels. Corn is categorized as starch, a type of carb, so it is only allowed in small portions for people with type 2 diabetes. It means that as a diabetic you don’t need to forgo corn completely. Corn is also high in fiber as well as is considered a greatly whole-grain food. It also has plenty of healthy nutrients, such as selenium, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, folate, niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, vitamins B-6 and A and iron. You can properly include it in your diabetic diet, just eat it along with foods including fat and protein and also cut down on the amount of foods you eat. Limit your consumption to one-half cut of the kernels or one ear of corn at any given meal. Anyway, you should not just eat corn and stop medication without checking with your doctor. The High Fructose Corn Syrup mainly use corn as its ingredient. HFCS is also added to lots of packaged and preserved food. Badly the syrup surely is responsible for big unnatural sugar spikes. With certain strategy, you can help prevent spikes in your blood sugar levels. HFC2 is on the list for lots of chronic conditions, like obesity, cardiovascular, diabetes and some other lifestyle related conditions. If you really enjoy eating corn, you should b Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Chips

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Chips

Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better snack chip? Try one of our 18 winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated pretzels, flavored chips, cheesy chips, plain potato chips, BBQ chips, and corn chips our Diabetic Living W Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Eating Corn & Being Diabetic

The Effects Of Eating Corn & Being Diabetic

While corn is a staple vegetable for many people, some may worry about the effects of eating corn and being diabetic. Fortunately for people with diabetes, corn is a nutrient-rich food classified as a starch on the Diabetes Food Pyramid, along with grains, potatoes, peas and beans. With a glycemic index (GI) of 42, corn is also classified as a low-GI food, meaning that corn raises blood sugar by a relatively small amount. The healthy effects of eating corn may be negated, however, by consuming the wrong type of corn products. Improved Metabolism One of the most important links between corn and diabetes is the high level of pantothenic acid found in corn. A B vitamin used in processing carbohydrates and protein, pantothenic acid is important for helping people with diabetes maintain a healthy weight through improved metabolic function and for managing blood sugar levels. Improved Heart Health Another one of the major healthy effects of eating corn is a decreased risk of heart disease, heart attack and stroke associated with folate, another nutrient found in corn. A cup of corn contains 19 percent of the recommended daily value for folate intake. Improved Digestive Health Fiber in corn and other starches is an important part of nutrition and overall digestive health for people with diabetes. The high levels of folate found in corn that make corn a heart-healthy food also contribute to digestive health as well, with folate offering a lower risk of colon cancer as one of the benefits of eating corn. High Levels of Sodium and Fat Eating canned corn with salt added, or adding table salt and butter to fresh corn, can cause people with diabetes to unconsciously consume unhealthy amounts of sodium and fat when eating corn with a meal. Butter and other fats should be eaten sparin Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

Is Corn A Bad Food To Eat With Diabetes?

Is Corn A Bad Food To Eat With Diabetes?

If you are diabetic, well-meaning friends or family might have warned you away from corn as a starchy, carbohydrate-rich food you shouldn't eat. But corn offers plenty of nutritional benefits that make it worth the extra effort to include it as part of a balanced diabetic diet. The trick to including corn in your eating plan is to balance it with sources of protein and fat that can mitigate the effect of carbohydrate-rich foods on blood glucose levels. Video of the Day People with diabetes can't properly process glucose and use it for energy. Instead, their production or use of insulin, the hormone responsible for converting glucose to fuel, is hampered, leading to episodes of extremely high blood sugar levels. A diagnosis of diabetes typically requires a blood glucose level of 200 mg/dL or more during a random test or one over 126 mg/dL after an eight-hour fast. Over 23 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. Carbohydrates can cause blood sugar to rise, so diabetics typically have to pay close attention to the carbohydrates in their diet. This can be done through counting carbohydrates and limiting the specific amount allowed per meal, by using an exchange system to swap out specific carbohydrate-containing foods with others or by using the glycemic index, a measure of blood sugar response to specific carbohydrate-containing foods. Corn is high in starch, a type of carbohydrate that can quickly raise blood sugar levels. This doesn't mean that as a diabetic you need to completely forgo corn, however. Corn contains plenty of healthy nutrients, including iron, vitamins A and B-6, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese and selenium. It also provides a high level of fiber and is c Continue reading >>

High-fructose Corn Syrup And Your Type 2 Diabetes Management Plan

High-fructose Corn Syrup And Your Type 2 Diabetes Management Plan

If you have type 2 diabetes, you know you need to watch your weight, your carbohydrates, and specifically your sugar intake. That means limiting sugar-laden sodas, desserts, candies, and more. Included in the array of sugars to beware of is high-fructose corn syrup, or HFCS, a processed type of sugar that's found in a huge number of packaged foods. "HFCS is corn syrup that has undergone processing to convert its glucose into fructose," says Erin Palinski, RD, a registered dietitian in private practice in northern New Jersey. That processing gives HFCS a longer shelf life, making it a common sweetener you’ll see on ingredient labels. You’ll typically find it in sodas, processed foods, snack foods with fruit flavoring, and candy. Once eaten, high-fructose corn syrup is converted into glucose, just as regular table sugar (sucrose) is. "Any food or ingredient that can be converted into glucose in the body will raise blood sugar levels," says Palinski. And like sugar, high-fructose corn syrup is very high on the glycemic index. "The glycemic index (GI) is a ranking system that helps to categorize the effect a carbohydrate will have on blood sugar levels," explains Palinski. “The higher the GI of a food, the more impact it will have on our blood sugar levels." The glycemic index of both sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup is nearly identical, which means that they will have a nearly identical impact on blood sugar. "Since both HFCS and sucrose have high GI levels, it is important for those with diabetes to consume foods containing these ingredients in moderation to prevent spikes in blood sugar levels," Palinski recommends. The Sour Side of HFCS High-fructose corn syrup shouldn't be viewed as any better than sucrose when it comes to watching your sugar intake. In fact, Continue reading >>

Science, Sweet Corn And Diabetes – Research In The Making

Science, Sweet Corn And Diabetes – Research In The Making

Food scientists are constantly exploring how to make foods taste better, digest easier, grow with fewer fertilizers, etc. We recently learned that a team of scientists at Iowa State University is working with the starches in sweet corn to try to create a response in the body that modify the starch to digest more slowly… which creates a more moderate insulin response, and release of glucose into the blood stream. This is important to the U.S.’s diabetic population of more than 21 million individuals, since moderating insulin and glucose through diet and medication is a constant need. This research has been in the works for the last 15 years. Iowa State scientists have been looking at the genes, examining their make-up, splicing and moving things around, and developing corn seed with the modified starch. These seeds grow new corn and the starch from those kernels is then examined to determine how the starch breaks down with enzymes as well as with human test subjects. Their blood glucose levels are measured to determine how slowly the starch is digested. “We have an obesity epidemic… the number one disease that goes along with obesity is Type 2 Diabetes,” said Dr. Suzanne Hendrich. “Being able to help those folks maintain better control of their blood sugar is going to protect them from all those bad consequences that can happen if you have too high levels of blood glucose over time.” Check out this video about Sweet Corn Research in Iowa to see the progress being made. Continue reading >>

Is Corn Flakes Good For Diabetics?

Is Corn Flakes Good For Diabetics?

Diabetes is a lifestyle disease in which the blood sugar level increases uncontrollably. So, if you are diabetic, you would want to start off your day with a bowl of corn flakes thinking it as a good diet plan for diabetes. But, can diabetics eat corn flakes? Well, it won’t be inappropriate to say that corn flakes are not a healthy option for diabetic patients as it aggravates the risk of not only diabetes but many other lifestyle diseases also. We all know that a healthy breakfast should contain food that are low in calories, sugar and fat, but should have high nutritional values and fibre content. Choosing your diet is one of the crucial factors in keeping the blood sugar level at a normal range, particularly if you are diabetic. So, how about a bowl of corn flakes and milk? 20 Foods That Diabetics Should Avoid Of course, corn is the main ingredient in corn flakes, but the other ingredients are sugar, malt flavouring and corn syrup with a high fructose level. All these ingredients have a high content of glycemic index. Therefore, the consumption of corn flakes can actually increase the blood glucose level and pose a greater risk of aggravating diabetes. So they are not good for diabetics. Corn flakes can be a choice only if they are taken in moderation. Before reaching on a conclusion on are corn flakes good for diabetes, let us have a look at the effect of corn flakes in diabetic patients. High Glycemic Index (GI) It is a method to measure how carbohydrate-rich foods can raise the blood sugar levels pretty quickly. As corn flakes have a GI value of 83, it creates a sudden increase in the blood glucose level So, how is corn flakes good for diabetes? Just think about it! Low Protein Content Corn flakes have a very low protein content in it. So even after having a cup Continue reading >>

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