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Can I Donate Plasma If I M A Diabetic?

Donating Blood & Platelets: Medical Conditions Affecting Donation | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Donating Blood & Platelets: Medical Conditions Affecting Donation | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Accept if treatment completed & feeling well. Defer for 90 days if untreated Aortic or cerebral, if surgically corrected and asymptomatic, defer for 6 months from date of surgery. If not surgically corrected, a letter of medical clearance is needed If donor had cardiac surgery or stent and angina is resolved, accept if one year after surgery, donor has resumed normal activities and has a letter of medical clearance. Defer if still symptomatic Accept unless donor has a history of respiratory difficulty Accept 6 months after procedure if donor is asymptomatic, has no limitations on activity and has a letter of medical clearance Defer for one year if exposed to any animals blood through a needle stick Defer until full course of treatment is completed Accept 6 months after surgical repair if donor is asymptomatic and has no limitations on activity A donor with a history of arrhythmia can be accepted if asymptomatic, has no history of other cardiac problems and has a letter of medical clearance Accept if surgically corrected and asymptomatic for 6 months from date of surgery. If not surgically corrected, a medical clearance is needed Accept (both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis) If causing permanent lung disease-permanent deferral, otherwise accept Accept if asymptomatic, has no history of other cardiac problems and has a letter of medical clearance Defer for 2 weeks after treatment with BCG Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic With High Blood Pressure Donate Blood? - Quora

Can A Diabetic With High Blood Pressure Donate Blood? - Quora

Can a diabetic with high blood pressure donate blood? Answered Jun 4, 2017 Author has 25k answers and 49.2m answer views Dutch transfusion services Sanquin says no to diabetics on insulin for their own protection, no problems otherwise if well controlled and not having worthwhile vascular and/or neurological complications from the diabetes. 252 Views View Upvoters Not for Reproduction Answer requested by Debo Kayode Ogunranti According to the American Red Cross Blood Donor Eligibility: Medications & Health page: High Blood Pressure - Acceptable as long as your blood pressure is below 180 systolic (first number) and below 100 diastolic (second number) at the time of donation. Medications for high blood pressure do not disqualify you from donating. Low Blood Pressure - Acceptable as long as you feel well when you come to donate, and your blood pressure is at least 90/50 (systolic/diastolic). Diabetics who are well controlled on insulin or oral medications are eligible to donate. Continue reading >>

Donate Blood, Platelets, Plasma?

Donate Blood, Platelets, Plasma?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. What do you know about diabetics donating blood, platelets, or plasma? What do you know about diabetics donating blood, platelets, or plasma? I only know that I've got an appointment at 9:30 tomorrow morning to donate a pint of whole blood. The blood center called me the day after I was eligible to donate again (last time was in July) and I wasn't going to say no. depends what country you are in. In the Uk people with diabetes controlled by anythign other than diet are not allowed to donate blood/blood products, or bone marrow. which sucks... i dont see why, it's not like anyone's gonna catch it!? I was told even people controlling it with a diet would be lucky to give blood. When i spoke to the advisors on the phone they said it was to protect people with diabetes, rather than protect people from us! I just visited the red cross (dot org) website and checked out their guidelines (BLOOD DONATION ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES) and I quote: To give blood for transfusion to another person, you must be healthy, be at least 17 years old or 16 years old if allowed by state law, weigh at least 110 pounds, and not have donated blood in the last 8 weeks (56 days). "Healthy" means that you feel well and can perform normal activities. If you have a chronic condition such as diabetes or high blood pressure, "healthy" also means that you are being treated and the condition is under control. " In almost all cases, medications will not disqualify you as a blood donor. Your eligibility will be based on the reason that the medication was prescribed. As long as the condition is under control and you are healthy, bloo Continue reading >>

Can I Still Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Still Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

20 Books People with Diabetes Should Read Your diabetes should be under controlled before you donate blood To donate blood with diabetes, your blood sugar needs to be in your target range . Your A1C should be less than 7%, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. If your blood sugars and diabetes are not well controlled, you shouldnt donate blood. Its up to you to let the Red Cross know. If you are unsure about the condition of your diabetes, discuss your concerns with your healthcare provider. They will be able to help you decide if giving blood is a good idea, or if you should wait until your diabetes is better managed. You should be in good overall health before you donate blood with diabetes Besides having your blood sugars in control, you should also have other conditions under control. For example, your blood pressure should be less than 180/100 mmHg to give blood, which is higher than 140/90 mmHg that is the recommended blood pressure for people with diabetes. Conversely, if your blood pressure is less than 90/50 mmHg, you wont be able to donate blood. Besides diabetes, they will also ask you about other conditions, and medications which you may be taking. Diabetes medications generally wont keep you from giving blood in the US, but there is a Red Cross list of other medications that shouldnt be taken if you are donating blood, including blood thinners. The Red Cross representative will screen you for conditions and medications which may affect your ability to donate blood with diabetes and related health conditions. Another thing to know is that if you plan to donate platelets, you should not take aspirin or blood thinners for several days prior to your donation. 1 If you have heart complications from your diabetes, there are some things that you ne Continue reading >>

Can Diabetic People Donate Blood?

Can Diabetic People Donate Blood?

In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration does not have any regulatory restrictions against diabetics donating blood other than if the individual has received bovine source insulin since 1980. The concern here is not the diabetes but rather the bovine spongiform encephalopathy. As bovine source insulins were not widely available in the US, the diabetic would have had to specifically import it from Europe. (Of note, the FDA regulations require that is the donor answers that they are not certain whether they received bovine source insulin, they are deferred. Many donors answer "I do not know" and are therefore deferred when in reality they have not been exposed as it was not available in the US.) Donors may mistake this deferral as being due to their having diabetes. Here is the FDA guidance (Each blood collection center in the US can have criteria more stringent that either the FDA and AABB so there is some variability among blood centers. At the collection center where I work, we allow donors with diabetes, whether controlled with diet, oral hypoglycemics, or insulin, to donate. The only instance where I can think where diabetes would have a negative affect on blood product and therefore an adverse effect on the patient would be in the rare instances where we collect granulocytes. If the donor had poor glucose control, this could impair neutrophil function. Since granulocyte donors are usually stimulated with corticosteroids, which would worsen glucose control, diabetics are deferred from granulocyte donation at my institution so this is not an issue. Continue reading >>

Donating Blood With Type 1 Diabetes

Donating Blood With Type 1 Diabetes

According to the American Red Cross, every two seconds someone needs blood. We all know that donating blood is a worthy thing to do. But the donation of blood assumes a cooperative body and a donation system that will accept the blood running through your veins. So what does that mean for those with T1D? Many are under the assumption that a diagnosis means they can’t donate. Wrong. For the most part, giving blood is an option, but it does depend on the following: Where you live Your blood sugar levels What type of insulin you are taking Consider your own safety T1D should not put you at any greater risk of feeling feint or nauseous while donating. Some T1D patients report their BGLs run slightly higher for 3-5 days after donating. Your immediate levels shouldn’t be influenced either way — you won’t suddenly spike or bottom out. Doctors do say your A1c or HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin, which measures one’s 3-month blood sugar level) may be falsely lowered, a temporary effect thought to be caused by blood loss and accelerated red blood cell turnover. If you want to donate, but are concerned about the health consequences, talk to your doctor first. After donating it’s crucial to closely monitor your blood sugar levels and re-nourish your body. Increase your fluid intake and consider eating more iron-rich foods for a few days. Be smart. Use common sense. Take care of yourself the same way you always would. US donor requirements to be in good overall health (the day they plan to donate) have a weight of 110 pounds or more be at least 17 years old (in most states) When you arrive to donate, a donation professional will take you through a screening process requiring you to disclose any health conditions, including T1D. You should be ready to provide additional informa Continue reading >>

Can I Donate

Can I Donate

Many potential blood donors believe that they cant donate blood due to medical or other reasons. But whether youve heard or read information about donation restrictions or been turned down in the past, please do not self defer. You may be able to say Yes I can! and share your power through blood donation.If you have questions about any of the subjects below, please contact us for more information. Anemia is a condition that, if caused by low iron body reserves, can be corrected with a change in diet. Eating many types of red meat, fortified cereal and leafy green vegetables may help. Find out more about low iron and foods high in iron here . While many medications may prevent you from giving blood, you may still be able to donate while taking medications in the treatment of non-infectious diseases such as arthritis, chronic pain, gout, etc. If your blood pressure is under control, you may still be able to donate blood while taking most medications for high blood pressure. If your diabetes is being treated and is under control, you are most likely able to donate blood. You should let your doctor know that you plan to donate. Most localized skin cancers are not a reason to stop you from donating blood. Because many different types of cancer exist, we will ask you a few questions regarding your diagnosis, and in some cases the blood center medical director may make the final determination on the deferral. Most often, people who are free of relapse a year after completion of treatment are able to donate blood. People who received a tattoo at a state-licensed and regulated facility are now eligible to donate once the area has healed. People who received a tattoo at a non-regulated facility must wait 12-months before they can donate. People who received any type of body pier Continue reading >>

Can I Give Blood, Even Though I Have Diabetes?

Can I Give Blood, Even Though I Have Diabetes?

I am 42 years old, and I have diabetes. Can I donate blood or become an organ donor? — Annette, New Jersey How wonderful it is that you are thinking about donating blood or an organ. It is a constant struggle for the blood banks and transplant centers to maintain an adequate supply. The answer to your question is not the same for both organ and blood donation, so I will first address blood donation. Yes, you can donate blood, if you meet the following criteria: Your sugar level is controlled. You are in good health. Your blood pressure is below 180/100. You are not anemic (low red blood cells). The blood banks usually check for donor eligibility through a series of other questions and tests, so keep in mind that you might still be disqualified. For example, if you have received bovine (beef) insulin since 1980, you may not be eligible to donate. That's because some bovine insulin was made from cattle in the United Kingdom and might carry Creutzfeldt-Jakob (or "mad cow") disease. If you are eligible to donate, make sure you have an adequate meal, drink extra fluids to replace the volume being removed, and stay away from caffeinated beverages on the day of your donation. Around that date, it's important to eat iron-rich foods (such as spinach, kale, and lean red meat). And as always, stay away from fatty foods, which might affect some of the tests done to determine eligibility. Regarding organ donation, let me give you some general information. There are various organs and tissues in the human body that can be transplanted to save lives or cure illnesses. The heart, lungs, kidneys, pancreas, liver, and intestines can be donated. Besides organs, we can donate tissues such as skin, cartilage, tendons, corneas, veins, and heart valves. The donation of an organ can be life Continue reading >>

Plasma Donation Faqs

Plasma Donation Faqs

Home / Donor Information / Plasma Donation FAQs Here are the answers to your most Frequently Asked Questions. Why does another plasma donation center give different prizes than my location? Each Octapharma Plasma donation center runs its own special promotions and programs and selects prizes for its donors. If you have ideas for prizes, share your suggestions with your local Octapharma Plasma donation center staff. Does Octapharma match the money other plasma centers pay? The amount of money you make for each successful plasma donation is based on the time it takes you to donate and other factors. Additionally, donor fees may vary month-to-month, by location, or even for special promotions throughout the year. Check with your local Octapharma Plasma donation center for more information. The amount of money you make for each successful plasma donation is based on the time it takes you to donate and other factors. Additionally, donor fees may vary month-to-month, by location, or even for special promotions throughout the year. For current promotions, please see our special donor promotions page: . **New Donors can make up to $250 for their first five plasma donations ($50 x 5), and many of our donation centers are running specialfrequency bonuses for your 6x/7x/8x donations (up to $60-75 extra). It all adds up! For more info, pleasecontact your local Octapharma Plasma donation center . What does weight have to do with how much money I make? The amount of plasma you can donate is based on your body weight (110 to 149 pounds, 150 to 174 pounds, 175 to 400 pounds). These guidelines are set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Generally, the more you weigh, the more plasma we can collect and the longer it takes to donate it. The amount of money new and returning d Continue reading >>

Plasma Donateing | Diabetic Connect

Plasma Donateing | Diabetic Connect

I am wandering if I can donation plasma still if i am a pre diabetic now ?? or what can Diabetics who are well controlled on insulin or oral medications are eligible to donate. Be at least 17 years old in most states, or 16 years old with parental consent if allowed by state law Just an FYI you have to have a medical clearance from your doctor to give blood, it has to state if you are on insulin and that you never have insulin from an animal, it can only be rDNA insulin"artificial". I had given three time and when I went to give again and they told me I had to get clearance from the doctor. That was copied from the red cross site, I thought it sounded a bit vague. I saw for women that they have to be 5'5" or taller, what the heck? I an 5'2" and my blood is still red. LOL yes we all bleed red. I think you have to be 5.5 to give a double batch of blood. I am only 5.2 too and they took my blood until they discovered I needed an okay from my doctor. So I have not given scince. My blood type is O neg. so they need my blood. Oh well I haven't made it to the doctors to get it yet. The mother of my sons was 5' 2" and when we were in College (before our marriage) she tried to give but once they got the needle in her she fainted. Her veins were also pretty tiny and hard for the phlebotomists to find. Perhaps that was from a lot of experience with women like my ex. I had given over 20 gallons over about 30 or 40 years. And it is not QUITE that simple. When I started having a lot of medical challenges I had to let them know what medications I was taking. There were certain medications that I was taking which deferred me from giving. That being said, I have given whole blood, plasma, and platelets after I was Dx'd. So if your BP is not elevated, ( I was deferred several times for H Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Give Blood?

Can People With Diabetes Give Blood?

Tweet When it comes to giving blood, there are a number of conditions that can make you ineligible. Unfortunately, people with diabetes won't, in most cases, be eligible to give blood. At least, not in the UK. This is because NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) maintain a policy of refusing blood donations from anybody who may be placed at risk by giving blood. In many cases, this includes people with diabetes. Prediabetes and giving blood People who have been diagnosed with prediabetes are eligible to give blood, as long as they haven't had any heart problems. Insulin and blood donation People who take insulin are not allowed to give blood, which excludes both people with type 1 diabetes and people with type 2 diabetes who are insulin-dependent. The affect of blood donations on insulin levels is considered a risk to the donor's health. Because of this, people who are dependent on insulin are not permitted to give blood. This applies to both regular insulin injections and insulin pump therapy. Diabetes medication and giving blood People who take diabetes medication can give blood, as long as their medication hasn't changed in the last four weeks. Medication changes include changes in dosage, as well as the type of medication taken. If your medication has changed recently, the effect on your blood glucose means that your health would be at risk should you give blood. Diabetes, the heart, and giving blood People with diabetes who have experienced heart problems are, in most cases, ineligible to give blood. This includes people who have: Experienced faintness or giddiness as a result of heart problems Experienced heart failure Had surgery for blocked or narrowed arteries (including amputation) Conditions for giving blood There are a number of conditions that may prevent you f Continue reading >>

Kendsie Hunter: Can Diabetics Donate Blood, Organs Or Plasma?

Kendsie Hunter: Can Diabetics Donate Blood, Organs Or Plasma?

Kendsie Hunter: Can Diabetics Donate Blood, Organs or Plasma? Being the people person that I am, I am always looking for a way to help others. However, when my friends recently went off to donate blood for a volunteer hour, I second-guessed my ability to help others. I know that I can volunteer in different ways, but it got me thinking: Ive just always assumed that because I have diabetes I am not able to donate blood, organs or plasma, but is there any truth to this way of thinking? I asked a Certified Diabetes Educator (CED, at my doctors office recently, and she told me that it depends on the situation. Yes, diabetics can donate blood. For organs, there are specific and individual guidelines. And yes, diabetics can donate plasma. The main reason behind not being able to donate blood is due to the scare of low blood sugar. There is nothing wrong with diabetic blood that renders it useless, but there are other factors that go into the decisions made by blood donation organizations. For those non-diabetic readers: the nurses always give you cookies and juice after you donate blood. Do you know why? It is to keep your blood sugar stable after such a large amount of blood loss. The organizations have enough issues dealing with non-diabetics who may faint or feel woozy after giving blood, so having a diabetic there with a low blood sugar is a liability. So, if you want to donate blood, there are certain criteria that you may have to meet (check with the blood bank to which you are planning to donate). (However, it is a different story for organs. Diabetics cannot donate organs while living. One of the reasons is the fact that as diabetics live longer, the disease in one way or another affects their organs. For example, kidney and heart disease are common among diabetics, Continue reading >>

Can I Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

Donating blood is a selfless way to help others. Blood donations help people who need transfusions for many types of medical conditions, and you may decide to donate blood for a variety of reasons. A pint of donated blood may help up to three people. Although you’re allowed donate blood if you have diabetes, there are a few requirements that you’ll need to meet. If you have diabetes and want to donate blood, it’s generally safe for you to do so. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are eligible to give blood donations. You should have your condition under control and be in otherwise good health before you donate blood. Having your diabetes under control means that you maintain healthy blood sugar levels. This requires you to be vigilant about your diabetes on a daily basis. You need to be aware of your blood sugar levels throughout each day and make sure you eat a proper diet and exercise sufficiently. Living a healthy lifestyle will contribute to keeping your blood sugar levels in a healthy range. Your doctor may also prescribe certain medications to help manage your diabetes. These medications shouldn’t impact your ability to donate blood. If you want to donate blood but are concerned about your diabetes, talk to your doctor before your donation. They can answer any questions you may have and help you determine whether this is the best option for you. Health screening Blood donation centers have a screening process that requires you to disclose any preexisting health conditions. It’s also a time where a certified Red Cross professional will evaluate you and measure your basic vital statistics, such as your temperature, pulse, and blood pressure. They will take a small blood sample (likely from a finger prick) to determine your hemoglobin levels as well. If Continue reading >>

Myths And Facts: Stop Diabetes American Diabetes Association

Myths And Facts: Stop Diabetes American Diabetes Association

Diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Having diabetes nearly doubles your chance of having a heart attack. The good news is that good diabetes control can reduce your risks for diabetes complications. Diabetes is caused by eating too much sugar. Type 1 diabetes is caused by genetics and unknown factors that trigger its onset; type 2 is caused by genetics and lifestyle factors. Being overweight increases your risk for developing type 2, and a diet high in calories from any source contributes to weight gain. Research has shown that sugary drinks are linked to type 2 diabetes. Learn more . People with diabetes are more likely to get colds and other illnesses. You are no more likely to get sick if you have diabetes. However, an illness can make your diabetes more difficult to control. Learn more . People with type 1 diabetes can't participate in sports or exercise. They can be tennis players, mountain climbers, weight lifters, basketball stars, snowboarders the sky's the limit! Women with diabetes shouldn't get pregnant. Women who manage their diabetes well can have a normal pregnancy and give birth to a healthy baby. Learn more . People with diabetes can feel when their blood glucose level goes too low. Not always. Some people cannot feel or recognize the symptoms of low blood glucose, or hypoglycemia, which can be dangerous. Learn more . It's possible to have "just a touch" or "a little" diabetes. There is no such thing. Everyone who has diabetes runs the risk of serious complications. Learn more . You have to lose a lot of weight for your diabetes to improve. Losing just 7% of your body weight can offer significant health benefitsabout 15 pounds if you weigh 200. Learn more . Diabetes doesn't run in my family, so I'm safe. Family histo Continue reading >>

Common Myths About Blood Donations...

Common Myths About Blood Donations...

What's holding you back from giving life to your community? Each day, hundreds of people roll up their sleeve to give their incredible and lifesaving gift to area hospital patients. One of the things that keeps many from donating blood is a misunderstanding about their eligibility. In truth, there are very few things that may prevent an otherwise healthy person from donating blood. Here are some of the common myths and truths about blood donation. Myth 1 I can't give blood because I have seasonal allergies. Allergies, even those that need to be controlled by medication, will not prevent you from donating blood. Myth 2 I can't give blood because I have high blood pressure. As long as your blood pressure is below 180 systolic (first number) and 100 diastolic (second number) at the time of your donation, you may give blood. Furthermore, medications that you may be taking for high blood pressure do not disqualify you from donating. Myth 3 I can't give blood because I have high cholesterol. A high cholesterol level does not disqualify you from donating, even if medication is used to control it. Myth 4 I can't give blood because I had cancer. While some types of cancer may disqualify you from donating, there are many circumstances under which you may give blood after an appropriate waiting period. Myth 5 I can't give blood because I'm diabetic. Diabetics may give blood as long as the other medical requirements are met. However, the use of bovine-derived insulin will result in deferral from blood donation. Myth 6 I can't give blood because I have epilepsy or seizures. Epilepsy or seizures do not disqualify you from giving as long as you have had no seizures for one year. Myth 7 I can't donate because I'm anemic. Your hemoglobin (iron) level will be checked prior to donating bl Continue reading >>

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